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1

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

Tauxe, J.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Model For Syn-Eruptive Groundwater Flow During The Phreatoplinian Phase  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Model For Syn-Eruptive Groundwater Flow During The Phreatoplinian Phase Of The 28-29 March 1875 Askja Volcano Eruption, Iceland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Model For Syn-Eruptive Groundwater Flow During The Phreatoplinian Phase Of The 28-29 March 1875 Askja Volcano Eruption, Iceland Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a groundwater flow model that integrates geological observations, field data, effective permeabilities for fractured lava flows, and historical eyewitness records to explain the change from wet to

4

Groundwater flow model for the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina. Assessment of groundwater flow rates and directions, potential contaminant transport times, and concentration of potential contaminants is required to determine current and future environmental effects resulting from releases by these facilities. Proposed closure actions and/or remedial alternatives also need to be evaluated. Numerical groundwater flow and solute transport models are a means of assessing the environmental effects on the groundwater system. They provide a logical method of integrating all available data into a consistent framework for quantitative analysis. The results of groundwater models can be used directly for input to management decisions and design/construct issues or can provide input into risk assessment models for site evaluations. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by the Environmental Restoration Department of WSRC to develop a groundwater model of the entire General Separations Area (GSA). Of particular interest is the area surrounding the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) as shown in Figure 1.2. The model developed in this phase of the study will be used to assess groundwater flow issues for the entire GSA. The second phase of the study will address contaminant transport issues specific to the area surrounding the MWMF.

Not Available

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogeological and Groundwater Flow Model for C, K, L, and P Reactor Areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi{sup 2} surrounding the C, K. L. and P reactor areas has been developed. The Reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department.

Flach, G.P.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R. [GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States); Stephenson, D.E. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Development and applications of two finite element groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: FEWA and FEMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the construction, verification, and application of two groundwater flow and contaminant transport models: A Finite Element Model of Water Flow through Aquifers (FEWA) and A Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The construction is based on the finite element approximation of partial differential equations of groundwater flow (FEWA) and of solute movement (FEMA). The particular features of FEWA and FEMA are their versatility and flexibility for dealing with nearly all vertically integrated two-dimensional problems. The models were verified against both analytical solutions and widely used US Geological Survey finite difference approximations. They were then applied for calibration and validation, using data obtained in experiments at the Engineering Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results indicated that the models are valid for this specific site. To demonstrate the versatility anf flexibility of the models, they were applied to two hypothetical, but realistic, complex problems and three field sites across the United States. In these applications the models yielded good agreement with the field data for all three sites. Finally, the predictive capabilities of the models were demonstrated using data obtained at the Hialeah Preston site in Florida. This case illustrates the capability of FEWA and FEMA as predictive tools and their usefulness in the management of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. 25 refs.

Yeh, G.T.; Wong, K.V.; Craig, P.M.; Davis, E.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

Flach, G.P.

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Uncertainty Analysis Framework - Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) embarked on a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of the predictions being made with a site-wide groundwater flow and transport model at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. In FY 2000, the focus of the initiative was on the characterization of major uncertainties in the current conceptual model that would affect model predictions. The long-term goals of the initiative are the development and implementation of an uncertainty estimation methodology in future assessments and analyses using the site-wide model. This report focuses on the development and implementation of an uncertainty analysis framework.

Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Rogers, Phillip M.

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ground-water flow modeling of the Culebra dolomite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The study has produced an estimation of the transmissivity and Darcy-velocity distributions in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The results of this study are intended to support Sandia National Laboratories performance-assessment calculations. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT II was employed for the numerical modeling, using a variable-fluid-density and single-porosity formulation. The spatial scale of the model, 21.3 km by 30.6 km, was chosen to allow simulation of regional-scale pumping tests conducted at the H-3 and H-11 hydropads and the WIPP-13 borehole, which are located south, southeast, and northwest, respectively, of the center of the WIPP site. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the controlled area defined by the WIPP-site boundaries. The work performed in this study consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra in two stages: steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution (i.e., of the hydraulic conditions before excavation of the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981) and superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic response to excavation of the four WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 144 refs., 98 figs., 23 tabs.

LaVenue, A.M.; Cauffman, T.L.; Pickens, J.F. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Development of a regional groundwater flow model for the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a study conducted to develop a regional groundwater flow model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was developed to support Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-04 groundwater flow and transport studies. The products of this study are this report and a set of computational tools designed to numerically model the regional groundwater flow in the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The objective of developing the current model was to create a tool for defining the regional groundwater flow at the INEL. The model was developed to (a) support future transport modeling for WAG 10-04 by providing the regional groundwater flow information needed for the WAG 10-04 risk assessment, (b) define the regional groundwater flow setting for modeling groundwater contaminant transport at the scale of the individual WAGs, (c) provide a tool for improving the understanding of the groundwater flow system below the INEL, and (d) consolidate the existing regional groundwater modeling information into one usable model. The current model is appropriate for defining the regional flow setting for flow submodels as well as hypothesis testing to better understand the regional groundwater flow in the area of the INEL. The scale of the submodels must be chosen based on accuracy required for the study.

McCarthy, J.M.; Arnett, R.C.; Neupauer, R.M. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Numerical modeling of deep groundwater flow and heat transport in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical modeling approach has been used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluid flow on contemporary heat flow in an intracratonic basin. The authors have selected the Williston basin for this hydrodynamic study because of the opportunity it presents to assess the relation of deep groundwater flow to basin geothermics and the associated features of diagenesis and petroleum accumulation. The finite element method is used to solve the coupled equations of fluid flow and heat transport in two-dimensional sections of the basin. Both the fluid- and heat-flow regime are assumed to be at steady state, and the fluid flow is driven primarily by the water-table relief which is taken to be a subdued replica of land-surface topography. Buoyancy forces may also affect flow through fluid density gradients created by temperature and salinity effects. Three southwest-northwest oriented sections across the basin were modeled using available and estimated parameter data. The predicted flow patterns are most strongly affected by the topography, but the Devonian salt unit and Cretaceous shale unit exert some control. Cross-formational flow is especially important near the downdip, solution edge of the salt beds. Flow rates rarely exceed 0.5 m/year in the deep-central part of the basin, yet there does exist a marked effect on heat flow, albeit subdued by the blanket effect of the low-permeability Cretaceous shales. The regional effect of the topography-driven flow system is reflected in present-day salinity patterns and heat-flow data.

Garven, G.; Vigrass, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

Drici, Warda

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

Drici, Warda

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of groundwater flow and transport in the General Separations Areas, Savannah River Plant: Flow model refinement and particle-tracking analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the necessary NEPA documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to address the waste disposal activities for groundwater protection at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). For purposes of this EIA, the areas within the plant have been separated into 26 functional groups based primarily on hydrogeologic setting and types of disposed waste materials. The overall objective is to provide an appropriate quantitative assessment of the environmental impacts from past and future operations within each functional group. The analysis from each functional group will be integrated to assess the impacts of plant-wide operations. A flexible approach to quantifying the impacts using several methods of quantitative analysis is being employed. Numerical flow and transport modeling is one method being applied to several functional groups. The scope of work can be divided into four broad categories: (1) Data Review and Conceptual Model Development, (2) Groundwater Flow Model Construction and Refinement, (3) Solute Transport Model Construction, and (4) Remedial Alternative Simulations. The major topics covered in this report are: (1) summary of the hydrogeologic conditions of the area, (2) observed flow velocities at the study site, (3) a summary of results from the preliminary flow modeling effort, (4) flow model refinement and results, and (5) particle tracking analyses based on the refined flow model.

Duffield, G.M.; Buss, D.R.; Root, R.W. Jr.; Hughes, S.S.; Mercer, J.W. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Validation, Proof-of-Concept, and Postaudit of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Project Shoal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model characterizing the Shoal underground nuclear test has been accepted by the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. According to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between DOE and the State of Nevada, the next steps in the closure process for the site are then model validation (or postaudit), the proof-of-concept, and the long-term monitoring stage. This report addresses the development of the validation strategy for the Shoal model, needed for preparing the subsurface Corrective Action Decision Document-Corrective Action Plan and the development of the proof-of-concept tools needed during the five-year monitoring/validation period. The approach builds on a previous model, but is adapted and modified to the site-specific conditions and challenges of the Shoal site.

Ahmed Hassan

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ground-water flow and transport modeling of the NRC-licensed waste disposal facility, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a simulation study of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from disposal at the NRC licensed waste disposal facility in West Valley, New York. A transient, precipitation driven, flow model of the near-surface fractured till layer and underlying unweathered till was developed and calibrated against observed inflow data into a recently constructed interceptor trench for the period March--May 1990. The results suggest that lateral flow through the upper, fractured till layer may be more significant than indicated by previous, steady state flow modeling studies. A conclusive assessment of the actual magnitude of lateral flow through the fractured till could however not be made. A primary factor contributing to this uncertainty is the unknown contribution of vertical infiltration through the interceptor trench cap to the total trench inflow. The second part of the investigation involved simulation of the migration of Sr-90, Cs-137 and Pu-239 from the one of the fuel hull disposal pits. A first-order radionuclide leach rate with rate coefficient of 10{sup {minus}6}/day was assumed to describe radionuclide release into the disposal pit. The simulations indicated that for wastes buried below the fractured till zone, no significant migration would occur. However, under the assumed conditions, significant lateral migration could occur for radionuclides present in the upper, fractured till zone. 23 refs., 68 figs., 12 tabs.

Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

Farid Marandi, Sayena

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

22

Integrated hydrogeological model of the general separations area. Volume 2: groundwater flow model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report models the Gordon aquifer, the Gordon confining unit, and the `lower` aquifer zone, `tan clay` confining zone, and `upper` aquifer zone of the Water Table aquifer. The report presents structure-contour and isopach maps of each unit.

Flach, G.P.; Harris, M.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized masses to avoid presenting classified information. As only linear processes are modeled, the results can be readily scaled by the true classified masses for use in the risk assessment. The modeling timeframe for the risk assessment was set at 1,000 years, though some calculations are extended to 2,000 years. This first section of the report endeavors to orient the reader with the environment of Amchitka and the specifics of the underground nuclear tests. Of prime importance are the geologic and hydrologic conditions of the subsurface. A conceptual model for groundwater flow beneath the island is then developed and paired with an appropriate numerical modeling approach in section 2. The parameters needed for the model, supporting data for them, and data uncertainties are discussed at length. The calibration of the three flow models (one for each test) is then presented. At this point the conceptual radionuclide transport model is introduced and its numerical approach described in section 3. Again, the transport parameters and their supporting data and uncertainties are the focus. With all of the processes and parameters in place, the first major modeling phase can be discussed in section 4. In this phase, a parametric uncertainty analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of the transport modeling results to the uncertainties present in the parameters. This analysis is motivated by the recognition of substantial uncertainty in the subsurface conditions on the island and the need to incorporate that uncertainty into the modeling. The conclusion of the first phase determines the parameters to hold as uncertain through the main flow and transport modeling. This second, main phase of modeling is presented in section 5, with the contaminant breakthrough behavior of each test site addressed. This is followed by a sensitivity analysis in section 6, regarding the importance of additional processes that could not be supported in the main modeling effort due to lack of data. Finally, the results for the individual sites are compared, the sensitivities discussed,

Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford… (more)

Adamski, Mark Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Influence of flooding on groundwater flow in central Cambodia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cambodia is affected by flooding from the Mekong, Tonle Sap and Bassac ... paper is to highlight the effects of river flooding on groundwater flow using numerical simulation. A two-dimensional groundwater flow mo...

Raksmey May; Kenji Jinno; Atsushi Tsutsumi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the author’s vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Summary of groundwater flow direction and velocity in the general separations area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GeoTrans data from the model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the central portion of the Savannah River Plant (General Separations Area) was used to compute groundwater flow direction and velocities. This report describes the modeling area, shows method of computations, and illustrates the results in figure form. 1 ref., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Scott, M.T.

1986-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wallula Gap Row Sand Hallow Flows Sliver Fans Flo Ginkgo Flows Palause Falls Flow Vantage Intarbad Undifferent a e 0 s Rocky Coulee Flow Levering Flow Cohaeeet Row Unnamed Flow Birkett Flow Undifferentiated Flows McCoy Canyon Flow Unnamed... penetrate and have provided water samples for the flow systems in the Frenchman Springs and Rocky Coulee flows are: Ford, McGee, Enyeart, DB-11, RRL-2, DC-16, DC-19, DC-2, DB-15, DC-7, and DC-15. Based on the hydraulic data obtained from these wells...

Adamski, Mark Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

Brown, T.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Groundwater abstraction impacts on spring flow and base flow in the Hillsborough River Basin, Florida, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater abstraction has resulted in spring flow and groundwater base-flow declines in the Hillsborough River system of central Florida, USA. These declines have resulted in reduction of inflows to the Tamp...

Kenneth A. Weber; Robert G. Perry

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Hydrostratigraphic System for Modeling Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration at the Corrective Action Unit Scale, Nevada Test Site and Surrounding Areas, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground Test Area (UGTA) corrective action unit (CAU) groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity are built upon hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) that utilize the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) as the fundamental modeling component. The delineation and three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of HSUs within the highly complex geologic terrain that is the NTS requires a hydrostratigraphic system that is internally consistent, yet flexible enough to account for overlapping model areas, varied geologic terrain, and the development of multiple alternative HFMs. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system builds on more than 50 years of geologic and hydrologic work in the NTS region. It includes 76 HSUs developed from nearly 300 stratigraphic units that span more than 570 million years of geologic time, and includes rock units as diverse as marine carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, granitic intrusives, rhyolitic lavas and ash-flow tuffs, and alluvial valley-fill deposits. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system uses a geology-based approach and two-level classification scheme. The first, or lowest, level of the hydrostratigraphic system is the hydrogeologic unit (HGU). Rocks in a model area are first classified as one of ten HGUs based on the rock’s ability to transmit groundwater (i.e., nature of their porosity and permeability), which at the NTS is mainly a function of the rock’s primary lithology, type and degree of postdepositional alteration, and propensity to fracture. The second, or highest, level within the UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system is the HSU, which is the fundamental mapping/modeling unit within UGTA CAU-scale HFMs. HSUs are 3-D bodies that are represented in the finite element mesh for the UGTA groundwater modeling process. HSUs are defined systematically by stratigraphically organizing HGUs of similar character into larger HSUs designations. The careful integration of stratigraphic information in the development of HSUs is important to assure individual HSUs are internally consistent, correlatable, and mappable throughout all the model areas.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack Jr., Jennifer Mercadante

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Flow and Storage in Groundwater Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...Herrera, Eds., Seawater Intrusion in Coastal...conductivity, specific storage, and thickness...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...

William M. Alley; Richard W. Healy; James W. LaBaugh; Thomas E. Reilly

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

An artificial neural network based groundwater flow and transport simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Artificial neural networks are investigated as a tool for the simulation of contaminant loss and recovery in three-dimensional heterogeneous groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling. These methods have useful applications in expert system development, knowledge base development and optimization of groundwater pollution remediation. The numerical model runs used to develop the artificial neural networks can be re-used to develop artificial neural networks to address alternative optimization problems or changed formulations of the constraints and or objective function under optimization. Artificial neural networks have been analyzed with the goal of estimating objectives which normally require the use of traditional flow and transport codes: such as contaminant recovery, contaminant loss (unrecovered) and remediation failure. The inputs to the artificial neutral networks are variable pumping withdrawal rates at fairly unconstrained 3-D locations. A forward-feed backwards error propagation artificial neural network architecture is used. The significance of the size of the training set, network architecture, and network weight optimization algorithm with respect to the estimation accuracy and objective are shown to be important. Finally, the quality of the weight optimization is studied via cross-validation techniques. This is demonstrated to be a useful method for judging training performance for strongly under-described systems.

Krom, T.D.; Rosbjerg, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda R.E. Ewing, y , M.S. Pilant, y J.G. Wade, z and A.T. Watson x Abstract The petroleum industry has well­established partial differential equation models for multi­phase fluid flow through porous media, but the use of control

Ewing, Richard E.

38

Groundwater flow near the Shoal Site, Sand Springs Range, Nevada: Impact of density-driven flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature of flow from a highland recharge area in a mountain range in north-central Nevada to discharge areas on either side of the range is evaluated to refine a conceptual model of contaminant transport from an underground nuclear test conducted beneath the range. The test, known as the Shoal event, was conducted in 1963 in granitic rocks of the Sand Springs Range. Sparse hydraulic head measurements from the early 1960s suggest flow from the shot location to the east to Fairview Valley, while hydrochemistry supports flow to salt pans in Fourmile Flat to the west. Chemical and isotopic data collected from water samples and during well-logging arc best explained by a reflux brine system on the west side of the Sand Springs Range, rather than a typical local flow system where all flow occurs from recharge areas in the highlands to a central discharge area in a playa. Instead, dense saline water from the playa is apparently being driven toward the range by density contrasts. The data collected between the range and Fourmile Flat suggest the groundwater is a mixture of younger, fresher recharge water with older brine. Chemical contrasts between groundwater in the east and west valleys reflect the absence of re-flux water in Fairview Valley because the regional discharge area is distant and thus there is no accumulation of salts. The refluxing hydraulic system probably developed after the end of the last pluvial period and differences between the location of the groundwater divide based on hydraulic and chemical indicators could reflect movement of the divide as the groundwater system adjusts to the new reflux condition.

Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; McKay, A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., R-2, Ent. Block, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.L. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

Ewing, Richard E.

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-affected groundwater areas Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flow and contaminant transport in this area. The groundwater flow model... -SCALE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOWA-DANUBE - PART A: THE GROUNDWATER MODEL...

43

FTWORK: A three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three-dimensional, finite-difference model, FTWORK, may be used to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport processes in fully saturated porous media. The model solves the flow and transport equations separately. Transport mechanisms considered include: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, adsorption, and radioactive decay. This version of FTWORK also provides for parameter estimation of the steady-state flow applications. Also included in this version is a subroutine that allows linkage with a particle tracking program, GEOTRACK. 20 refs., 51 figs., 31 tabs.

Faust, C.R.; Sims, P.N.; Spalding, C.P.; Andersen, P.F. (GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon, VA (USA)); Stephenson, D.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A grid refinement approach to flow and transport modeling of a proposed groundwater corrective action at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regional scale model, calibrated by an automatic least-squares procedure, resulted in a set of hydraulic parameter values consistent with other methods. The automatic procedure facilitated the calibration of the model in which ten hydraulic parameters were treated as unknowns. Ground water flow velocities were used to perform particle-tracking analyses. Local scale transport models were developed for the F and H Area seepage basins. The grid refinement technique in conjunction with the parameter estimation method was very effective in the analysis of regional and local flow and transport phenomena. The estimated hydraulic parameters, determined objectively by the automatic procedure, showed excellent agreement with results from other methods. The local scale transport modeling required significant mesh refinements to meet the objectives of the study. Thus, it was necessary to reduce the area of the model domain to maintain cost and computational efficiency. Regional flow phenomena were preserved in the reduced scale models by extracting hydraulic boundaries and parameters from the regional flow model.

Duffield, G.M.; Buss, D.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Mercer, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

46

Modeling and assessment of flow and transport in the Hueco Bolson, a transboundary groundwater system: the El Paso / Cuidad Juarez case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Additionally, historical, current, and future stresses on the Hueco Bolson alluvial aquifer in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area due to excessive groundwater withdrawal can affect contaminant migration in the area. In the current study, an updated and improved...

Nwaneshiudu, Okechukwu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Experimental study of turbulent unconfined groundwater flow in a single fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental study of turbulent unconfined groundwater flow in a single fracture Jiazhong Qiana groundwater flow in a single fracture under the conditions of different surface roughness and apertures. We found that the gradient of the Reynolds number versus the average velocity in a single fracture

Zhan, Hongbin

48

A Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Clark, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, revised three-dimensional (3-D) hydrostratigraphic framework model for Frenchman Flat was completed in 2004. The area of interest includes Frenchman Flat, a former nuclear testing area at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. Internal and external reviews of an earlier (Phase I) Frenchman Flat model recommended additional data collection to address uncertainties. Subsequently, additional data were collected for this Phase II initiative, including five new drill holes and a 3-D seismic survey.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Three-dimensional simulation of groundwater flow and transport of chemical and low-level radioactive constituents within two production areas of the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling of transport in the environmental media was performed. Predicting the future performance of any waste site or facility and postulated actions in terms of migration of potential hazardous materials requires mathematical models capable of simulating flow and transport in the groundwater. Three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the groundwater movement and contaminant transport in the Raw Materials Fabrication Area and the Separations Area. The overall objective of the analysis was to develop groundwater flow models that quantifies the rate and direction of the groundwater movement from the waste sites to points of discharge. The USGS Modular 3D model uses the strongly implicit procedure to solve sets of simultaneous finite-difference equations that represent the groundwater flow process. The transport functions, which are the concentration or mass flux at time t due to continuous injection starting at time t', were obtained by solving the three-dimensional advection-dispersion equations using the Sandia Waste Isolation Flow and Transport (SWIFT) model. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Stephenson, D.E.; Looney, B.B.; Andrews, C.B.; Buss, D.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Groundwater modeling of the proposed new production reactor site, Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses groundwater modeling performed to support the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that is being prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE). The EIS pertains to construction and operation of a new production reactor (NPR) that is under consideration for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Three primary issues are addressed by the modeling analysis: (1) groundwater availability, (2) changes in vertical hydraulic gradients as a result of groundwater pumpage, and (3) migration of potential contaminants from the NPR site. The modeling indicates that the maximum pumpage to be used, 1000 gpm, will induce only minor drawdown across SRS. Pumpage of this magnitude will have a limited effect on the upward gradient from the Cretaceous into the Tertiary near Upper Three Runs Creek. Potentiometric surface maps generated from modeled results indicate that horizontal flow in the water table is either towards Four Mile Creek to the north or to Pen Branch on the south. Particle tracking analysis indicates that the primary flow paths are vertical into the Lower Tertiary Zone, with very little lateral migration. Total travel times from the NPR site to the edge of the model (approximately 3 miles) is on the order of 50 years. The flow direction of water in the Lower Tertiary Zone is relatively well defined due to the regional extent of the flow system. The Pen Branch Fault does not influence contaminant migration for this particular site because it is in the opposite direction of Lower Tertiary Zone groundwater flow. 20 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Andersen, P.F.; Spalding, C.P.; Davis, D.H.

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Community College Highlights Paducah Site Groundwater Model | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community College Highlights Paducah Site Groundwater Model Community College Highlights Paducah Site Groundwater Model Community College Highlights Paducah Site Groundwater Model May 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Steve Hampson of the University of Kentucky, left to right, West Kentucky Community & Technical College President Dr. Barbara Veazey, Paducah Junior College Board of Trustees member Ken Wheeler and Buz Smith of the DOE Paducah Site Office examine a DOE Paducah Site groundwater model exhibit at the West Kentucky Community & Technical College Emerging Technology Center. Steve Hampson of the University of Kentucky, left to right, West Kentucky Community & Technical College President Dr. Barbara Veazey, Paducah Junior College Board of Trustees member Ken Wheeler and Buz Smith of the DOE Paducah Site Office examine a DOE Paducah Site groundwater model exhibit at

52

RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

Chilakapati, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

mjsingleton@lbl.gov

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

B.W. ARNOLD

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

58

Uranium Elemental and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Beneath the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nopal I uranium deposit in Chihuahua, Mexico, is an excellent analogue for evaluating the fate of spent fuel, associated actinides, and fission products over long time scales for the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository. In 2003, three groundwater wells were drilled directly adjacent to (PB-1) and 50 m on either side of the uranium deposit (PB-2 and PB-3) in order to evaluate uranium-series transport in three dimensions. After drilling, uranium concentrations were elevated in all of the three wells (0.1-18 ppm) due to drilling activities and subsequently decreased to {approx}5-20% of initial values over the next several months. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were similar for PB-1 and PB-2 (1.005 to 1.079) but distinct for PB-3 (1.36 to 1.83) over this time period, suggesting limited mixing between groundwater from these wells over these short time and length scales. Regional groundwater wells located up to several km from the deposit also have distinct uranium isotopic characteristics and constrain mixing over larger length and time scales. We model the decreasing uranium concentrations in the newly drilled wells with a simple one-dimensional advection-dispersion model, assuming uranium is introduced as a slug to each of the wells and transported as a conservative tracer. Using this model for our data, the relative uranium concentrations are dependent on both the longitudinal dispersion as well as the mean groundwater flow velocity. These parameters have been found to be correlated in both laboratory and field studies of groundwater velocity and dispersion (Klotz et al., 1980). Using typical relationships between velocity and dispersion for field and laboratory studies along with the relationship observed from our uranium data, both velocity (1-10 n/yr) and dispersion coefficient (1E-5 to 1E-2 cm{sup 2}/s) can be derived from the modeling. As discussed above, these relatively small flow velocities and dispersivities agree with mixing considerations derived from the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U data. While these results and the limited productivity of these wells consistently suggest limited groundwater flow and mixing, we anticipate additional work with artificial tracers to better establish groundwater flow velocities and gradient at this site.

S.J. Goldstein; M.T. Murrell; A.M. Simmons

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

Reed, David Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Regional groundwater flow paths in Trans-Pecos, Texas inferred from oxygen,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydrogen, oxygen, and strontium isotopes. dD and d18 O values fall close to the global meteoric water lineRegional groundwater flow paths in Trans-Pecos, Texas inferred from oxygen, hydrogen, and strontium isotopes, and major ion chemistry are used to con- strain flow paths in a fracture-controlled regional

Banner, Jay L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Incorporation of groundwater losses and well level data in rainfall-runoff models illustrated using the PDM Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 2538 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater storage under the influence of pumped abstractions, spring flows and underflows. This model the PDM 25 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(1), 25­38 (2002) © EGS Incorporation of groundwater there are pumped abstractions to water supply. Many rainfall-runoff models are not formulated so as to represent

Boyer, Edmond

62

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Deterministic Smart Market Model for Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient management of water requires balancing environmental needs, externality considerations, and economic efficiency. Toward that end, this paper presents a deterministic linear program that could be used to operate a smart spot market for groundwater. ... Keywords: bidding/auctions, environment, games/group decisions, natural resources, water resources

John F. Raffensperger; Mark W. Milke; E. Grant Read

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being carried out in the model report, ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model, described herein, independent of the transport processes, and are then used as inputs to the transport model. Justification for this abstraction is presented in the model report, ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021 (BSC 2003 [164870]).

G. Zyvoloski

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science Team develops physics-based simulation models to conduct applied scientific research. - Development of new theory - Extensive on-site and collaborative V&V efforts and testing - Engages in technology transfer - Applies the models to industrial scale problems. 3 Why is Multiphase Flow Science Needed? * Industry is increasingly relying on multiphase technologies to produce clean and affordable energy with carbon capture. * Unfortunately, the presence of a solid phase reduces the operating capacity of a typical energy device from its original design on average by 40% [1].

68

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling

Fay, Noah

69

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Groundwater pollution from agrochemicals — A dynamic model of externalities and policy options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic model of groundwater pollution from intensive agrochemical use is developed in this paper to capture the possible externalities and analyze various policy options in protecting groundwater resources. Fo...

Suresh Chandra Babu; B. Thirumalai Nivas; B. Rajasekaran

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Characterization of groundwater flow and transport in the General Separations Area, Savannah River Plant: Effect of groundwater withdrawals on the Tuscaloosa-Congaree aquifer head reversal in H Area. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Plant (SRP) has maintained a number of sites used for land disposal of various waste materials. The General Separations Area at SRP, located between the Upper Three Runs and Four Mile Creeks, has served as an active area for waste storage for about thirty years. The Tuscaloosa aquifer, which lies beneath the General Separations Area, is a water source for SRP and the surrounding area. The isolation of the Tuscaloosa aquifer has been maintained by an upward hydraulic gradient from the Tuscaloosa aquifer to the overlying Congaree aquifer. This upward gradient is referred to as a hydraulic head reversal in the General Separations Area, i.e., hydraulic heads in the upper Tuscaloosa are higher than hydraulic heads in the Congaree. This head reversal has declined in recent years due to increased groundwater pumping in the upper and lower Tuscaloosa formations. The objective of this investigation is to assess the effects of pumping within the General Separations Area on the Congaree/upper Tuscaloosa head reversal. Methods of maintaining future Tuscaloosa aquifer isolation through the optimization of groundwater withdrawal location and rate were studied. Steady-state and transient groundwater flow models were used to characterize past and potential future groundwater conditions. Future groundwater conditions were simulated for a variety of pumping scenarios.

Spalding, C.P.; Duffield, G.M.; Shaw, S.T. [GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Characterization of groundwater flow and transport in the General Separations Area, Savannah River Plant: Effect of groundwater withdrawals on the Tuscaloosa-Congaree aquifer head reversal in H Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Plant (SRP) has maintained a number of sites used for land disposal of various waste materials. The General Separations Area at SRP, located between the Upper Three Runs and Four Mile Creeks, has served as an active area for waste storage for about thirty years. The Tuscaloosa aquifer, which lies beneath the General Separations Area, is a water source for SRP and the surrounding area. The isolation of the Tuscaloosa aquifer has been maintained by an upward hydraulic gradient from the Tuscaloosa aquifer to the overlying Congaree aquifer. This upward gradient is referred to as a hydraulic head reversal in the General Separations Area, i.e., hydraulic heads in the upper Tuscaloosa are higher than hydraulic heads in the Congaree. This head reversal has declined in recent years due to increased groundwater pumping in the upper and lower Tuscaloosa formations. The objective of this investigation is to assess the effects of pumping within the General Separations Area on the Congaree/upper Tuscaloosa head reversal. Methods of maintaining future Tuscaloosa aquifer isolation through the optimization of groundwater withdrawal location and rate were studied. Steady-state and transient groundwater flow models were used to characterize past and potential future groundwater conditions. Future groundwater conditions were simulated for a variety of pumping scenarios.

Spalding, C.P.; Duffield, G.M.; Shaw, S.T. (GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mapping subsurface radionuclide migration and groundwater flow with organic tracers. [Shallow-land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Pacific Northwest Laboratory we have had the opportunity to study the subsurface migration of radionuclides at the Maxey Flats burial site. We constructed an experimental study area adjacent to one of the waste-filled trenches at the site. In this report we describe some preliminary results of organic research currently underway at Maxey Flats. This research is aimed at: (1) elucidating the role of organic species in the subsurface migration of radionuclides; and (2) testing the usefulness of artificial and in situ organic groundwater tracers for mapping radionuclide migration and groundwater flow. We also describe two analytical procedures developed for this research. First, as part of a survey study of organics in Maxey Flats groundwater we have developed a procedure for the isolation and characterization of trace levels of organics in radioactive groundwaters. Second, for a detailed chemical speciation study we developed a procedure based on steric exclusion chromatography for testing whether or not organics are chelated to radionuclides. 1 figure, 1 table.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.; Myers, R.B.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Groundwater Model Validation for the Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stoller has examined newly collected water level data in multiple wells at the Shoal site. On the basis of these data and information presented in the report, we are currently unable to confirm that the model is successfully validated. Most of our concerns regarding the model stem from two findings: (1) measured water level data do not provide clear evidence of a prevailing lateral flow direction; and (2) the groundwater flow system has been and continues to be in a transient state, which contrasts with assumed steady-state conditions in the model. The results of DRI's model validation efforts and observations made regarding water level behavior are discussed in the following sections. A summary of our conclusions and recommendations for a path forward are also provided in this letter report.

None

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Identification of potential groundwater flow paths using geological and geophysical data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project represents the first phase in the development of a methodology for generating three-dimensional equiprobable maps of hydraulic conductivity for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In this study, potential groundwater flow paths were investigated for subsurface tuffs at Yucca Flat by studying how these units are connected. The virtual absence of site-specific hydraulic conductivity data dictates that as a first step a surrogate attribute (geophysical logs) be utilized. In this first phase, the connectivity patterns of densely welded ash-flow tuffs were studied because these tuffs are the most likely to form zones of high hydraulic conductivity. Densely welded tuffs were identified based on the response shown on resistivity logs and this information was transformed into binary indicator values. The spatial correlation of the indicator data was estimated through geostatistical methods. Equiprobable three-dimensional maps of the distribution of the densely-welded and nonwelded tuffs (i.e., subsurface heterogeneity) were then produced using a multiple indicator simulation formalism. The simulations demonstrate that resistivity logs are effective as soft data for indicating densely welded tuffs. The simulated welded tuffs reproduce the stratigraphic relationships of the welded tuffs observed in hydrogeologic cross sections, while incorporating the heterogeneity and anisotropy that is expected in this subsurface setting. Three-dimensional connectivity of the densely welded tuffs suggests potential groundwater flow paths with lengths easily over 1 km. The next phase of this investigation should incorporate other geophysical logs (e.g., gamma-gamma logs) and then calibrate the resulting soft data maps with available hard hydraulic conductivity data. The soft data maps can then augment the hard data to produce the final maps of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity that can be used as input for numerical solution of groundwater flow and transport.

Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling Turbulent Flow  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turbulent Turbulent Flow with Implicit LES L.G. Margolin 1 Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Five Laboratory Conference on Computational Mathematics/Physics 19-23 June, 2005 Vienna, Austria 1 Applied Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, len@lanl.gov 1 Abstract Implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) is a methodology for modeling high Reynolds' num- ber flows that combines computational efficiency and ease of implementation with predictive calculations and flexible application. Although ILES has been used for more than fifteen years, it is only recently that significant effort has gone into providing a physical rationale that speaks to its capabilities and its limitations. In this talk, we will present new theoret- ical results aimed toward building a justification and discuss some remaining gaps in our understanding and our practical

79

A residence-time-based transport approach for the groundwater pathway in performance assessment models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical implementation of a new modeling approach for representing the groundwater pathway in risk assessment or performance assessment model of a contaminant transport system. The model developed ... Keywords: Groundwater pathway, Mixing model, Performance assessment, Residence time distribution

Bruce A. Robinson; Shaoping Chu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

URANIUM-SERIES CONSTRAINTS ON RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND GROUNDWATER FLOW AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the vicinity of the Nopal I uranium ore deposit are used to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes at this site, and also, by analogy, at Yucca Mountain. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 suggest that groundwater flow rates are low (< 10 m/yr). Field tests, well productivity, and uranium isotopic constraints also suggest that groundwater flow and mixing is limited at this site. The uranium isotopic systematics for water collected in the mine adit are consistent with longer rock-water interaction times and higher uranium dissolution rates at the front of the adit where the deposit is located. Short-lived nuclide data for groundwater wells are used to calculate retardation factors that are on the order of 1,000 for radium and 10,000 to 10,000,000 for lead and polonium. Radium has enhanced mobility in adit water and fractures near the deposit.

S. J. Goldstein, S. Luo, T. L. Ku, and M. T. Murrell

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Accumulation of a light non-aqueous phase liquid on a flat barrier baffling a descending groundwater flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which flows past this solid-gas protruding as a static cap...encumbrances with respect to a natural or induced groundwater flow...barriers, in a sense similar to cascades of aerofoils or other barriers...Al-Maamari-et al. 2011) or to rely on natural attenuation (i.e. to leave...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

UZ Flow Models and Submodels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

Y. Wu

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

DOEINVIl0845-51 DC-703 GROUNDWATER FLOW NEAR THE SHOAL SITE,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEINVIl0845-51 DOEINVIl0845-51 DC-703 GROUNDWATER FLOW NEAR THE SHOAL SITE, SAND SPRINGS RANGE, NEVADA: IMPACT OF DENSITY-DRIVEN FLOW Prepared by Jenny Chapman, Todd Mihevc, and Alan McKay Submitted to Nevada Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 1994 Publication #45130 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, mark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily

85

Review and selection of unsaturated flow models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer ground-water flow models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. In the area of scientific modeling, the M&O CRWMS has the following responsibilities: To provide overall management and integration of modeling activities. To provide a framework for focusing modeling and model development. To identify areas that require increased or decreased emphasis. To ensure that the tools necessary to conduct performance assessment are available. These responsibilities are being initiated through a three-step process. It consists of a thorough review of existing models, testing of models which best fit the established requirements, and making recommendations for future development that should be conducted. Future model enhancement will then focus on the models selected during this activity. Furthermore, in order to manage future model development, particularly in those areas requiring substantial enhancement, the three-step process will be updated and reported periodically in the future.

NONE

1993-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

UZ Flow Models and Submodels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

P. Dixon

2004-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

Remote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is lower than 200 mm and the population density does not exceed 0.05 inhabitants per km2 . PreviousRemote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa Marc.springerlink.com #12;2 Remote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa Marc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit.

Andersen, P.F.; Shupe, M.G.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (US)

1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Application of groundwater modeling in remedial action development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development and implementation of a remedial program usually is a costly process. Available scientific and engineering data should be used to optimize the investigation program which will lead to the development of a cost-effective remedial action. As part of the scope of the Remedial Investigation (RI), the data needs and significance of the key parameters as related to the final remedial design should be assessed and determined to obtain necessary data in a timely and cost-effective manner. Properly verified groundwater computer models are powerful tools for both identifying data gaps which must be filled before an appropriate design can be prepared and for assessing the significance of site features on the problem and solution. These models can be used effectively during both the RI and Feasibility Study (FS) phases. In the RI phase, the models can be used for optimization of field and laboratory testing programs and in data analysis to assess adequateness of the field investigation and provide basic data for

Sirous H. Djafari; David E. Troxell

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Multiscale modeling in granular flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Granular materials are common in everyday experience, but have long-resisted a complete theoretical description. Here, we consider the regime of slow, dense granular flow, for which there is no general model, representing ...

Rycroft, Christopher Harley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A multiple-tracer approach to understanding regional groundwater flow in the Snake Valley area of the eastern Great Basin, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Groundwater in Snake Valley and surrounding basins in the eastern Great Basin province of the western United States is being targeted for large-scale groundwater extraction and export. Concern about declining groundwater levels and spring flows in western Utah as a result of the proposed groundwater withdrawals has led to efforts that have improved the understanding of this regional groundwater flow system. In this study, environmental tracers (?2H, ?18O, 3H, 14C, 3He, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe) and major ions from 142 sites were evaluated to investigate groundwater recharge and flow-path characteristics. With few exceptions, ?2H and ?18O show that most valley groundwater has similar ratios to mountain springs, indicating recharge is dominated by relatively high-altitude precipitation. The spatial distribution of 3H, terrigenic helium (4Heterr), and 3H/3He ages shows that modern groundwater (temperatures (NGTs) are generally 1–11 °C in Snake and southern Spring Valleys and >11 °C to the east of Snake Valley and indicate a hydraulic discontinuity between Snake and Tule Valleys across the northern Confusion Range. The combination of \\{NGTs\\} and 4Heterr shows that the majority of Snake Valley groundwater discharges as springs, evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals within Snake Valley rather than continuing northeastward to discharge at either Fish Springs or the Great Salt Lake Playa. The refined understanding of groundwater recharge and flow paths acquired from this multi-tracer investigation has broad implications for interbasin subsurface flow estimates and future groundwater development.

Philip M. Gardner; Victor M. Heilweil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

94

Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits ... Simultaneously, raw groundwater from the same households and additional 31 tubewells was sampled to investigate arsenic coprecipitation with hydrous ferric iron from solution, i.e., without contact to sand surfaces. ... Concentra tions of total Fe, Mn, Na, K, Mg, and Ca were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (Shimadzu AA-6800, Kyoto, Japan). ...

Michael Berg; Samuel Luzi; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Walter Giger; Doris Stüben

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Integration of Groundwater Transport Models with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~nigo Urteaga2 , Qi Han2 , Anura Jayasumana3 , Tissa Illangasekare1 1 Division of Environmental Sciences dynamic hydrological and environmental processes. As the wireless nodes are resource constrained, mass be conceptualized in the WSN context. INTRODUCTION As groundwater contamination is an established problem with many

Han, Qi "Chee"

98

Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The influence of fracture properties on ground-water flow at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill Mine in northern Idaho is a large underground lead-zinc mine located in Precambrian metaquartzite rocks with virtually no primary porosity. Ground-water flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as joints, faults and relict bedding planes. Ground water that flows into the mine via the fractures is contaminated by heavy metals and by the production of acid water, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the ground-water flow system is a prerequisite to the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The data obtained include: (a) fracture type, (b) orientation, (c) trace length, (d) the number of visible terminations, (e) roughness (small-scale asperities), (f) waviness (larger-scale undulations), (g) infilling material, and (h) a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture.

Lachmar, T.E. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A PARALLEL MULTIGRID PRECONDITIONED CONJUGATE GRADIENT ALGORITHM FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several environmental applications, including ground- water remediation studies and groundwater resource in popu- larity as sites become larger and more complex. Computational environmental remediation is particularly attractive for the design, evaluation, and management of engineered remediation procedures 23

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary...

102

Flow and transport model of the Savannah River Site Old Burial Grounds using Data Fusion modeling (DFM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Data Fusion Modeling (DFM) approach has been used to develop a groundwater flow and transport model of the Old Burial Grounds (OBG) at the US Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). The resulting DFM model was compared to an existing model that was calibrated via the typical trial-and-error method. The OBG was chosen because a substantial amount of hydrogeologic information is available, a FACT (derivative of VAM3DCG) flow and transport model of the site exists, and the calibration and numerics were challenging with standard approaches. The DFM flow model developed here is similar to the flow model by Flach et al. This allows comparison of the two flow models and validates the utility of DFM. The contaminant of interest for this study is tritium, because it is a geochemically conservative tracer that has been monitored along the seepline near the F-Area effluent and Fourmile Branch for several years.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: • Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. • Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. • Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters.

John McCord

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: groundwater contaminant transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes briefly the work of the Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the University of Texas at Austin (and Rice University prior to September 1995) on the Partnership in Computational Sciences Consortium (PICS) project entitled Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport.

Todd Arbogast; Steve Bryant; Clint N. Dawson; Mary F. Wheeler

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

GIS DRASTIC model for groundwater vulnerability estimation of Astaneh-Kouchesfahan Plain, Northern Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the groundwater vulnerability to pollution was evaluated for Astaneh-Kouchesfahan Plain, Northern Iran using GIS DRASTIC model. Based upon available data, six thematic maps were generated and intrinsic vulnerability map was developed based upon calculations from various mapped layers and DRASTIC index. The results show that low, moderate, high and very high groundwater vulnerability risk zones cover around 12, 52, 28 and 8% of the area, respectively. Finally, in order to verify the model, the categorised DRASTIC map was compared with a categorized TDS map and the results shows that the areas including enhanced values of TDS correspond with those with higher DRASTIC ratings.

Masoud Saatsaz; Wan Nor Azmin Sulaiman; Saeid Eslamian; Kourosh Mohammadi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fluid flow and solute transport modeling with lattice Boltzmann models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid flow and solute transport modeling with lattice Boltzmann models Ph.D. Proposal: Shadab Anwar with solute transport and fluid flow modeling in porous media using lattice Boltzmann model (LBM). LBM

Sukop, Mike

108

Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

rock, flow is primarily in relatively sparse networks of fractures. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured rock that...

109

Groundwater flow in a volcanic–sedimentary coastal aquifer: Telde area, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater conditions in a 75- km2...coastal area around the town of Telde in eastern Gran Canaria island have been studied. Pliocene to Recent...2 day?1; 5 and 0.5 m day?1, respectively). These two formations a...

M. C. Cabrera; E. Custodio

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The importance of conservation 7 What is Groundwater? The Hydrologic Cycle 8 Groundwater flow patterns 9 Saturated and unsaturated zones 9 Aquifers 10 Sole source aquifers 10 Water wells 12 Groundwater Quality Contamination and pollution, measuring... The High Plains Aquifer 22 Population served by groundwater 23 Competing uses for a limited resource 23 Groundwater declines 24 Contamination and Health Issues Water Testing 26 Regulatory Standards, Treatment Options 27 Table of Contents 3 Public...

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

Kinetic Model of Gas Bubble Dissolution in Groundwater and Its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that rely on the actual dissolved gas content of gases such as oxygen or nitrogen. To describe the bubble of this excess gas is controlled by the solubility and the molecular diffusivity of the gases considered to water in the pore space. In the case of noble gases in a through-flow system, solubility differences

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

113

News Release: DOE to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton UMTRCA Site News Release: DOE to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton UMTRCA Site July 30, 2012 - 11:08am Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Tests will indicate progress of current groundwater remediation strategy The U.S. Department of Energy will conduct additional characterization work at the Riverton, WY, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Site this summer, including extensive groundwater and soil sampling. The Department will use the sampling results to update the site conceptual model and to develop a revised groundwater flow and transport model to more accurately simulate natural flushing processes.

114

Groundwater velocities at the Nevada Test Site: {sup 14}Carbon-based estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data can be used to constrain and validate groundwater flow models. This study examines probable groundwater flowpaths at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and estimates groundwater velocities for these flowpaths using water chemistry and carbon isotopes. These velocities are provided for comparison to velocities calculated by a numerical flow model developed by GeoTrans, Inc. Similar to numerical flow models, models of chemical and isotopic evolution are not unique; any number of combinations of reactions can simulate evolution from one water to another, but are no guarantee that the simulation is correct. Knowledge of the hydrology, mineralogy, and chemistry must be combined to produce feasible evolutionary paths.

Chapman, J.B.; Hershey, R.L.; Lyles, B.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial groundwater recharge Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the groundwater is usually called recharge. Recharge causes the local... groundwater level to rise which creates a gradient that causes groundwater to flow away from the...

116

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

P. Tucci

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lattice Boltzmann model for traffic flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoscopic models for traffic flows are usually difficult to be employed because of the appearance of integro-differential terms in the models. In this work, a lattice Boltzmann model for traffic flow is introduced on the basis of the existing kinetics models by using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-type approximation interaction term in the Boltzmann equation and discretizing it in time and phase space. The so-obtained model is simple while the relevant parameters are physically meaningful. Together with its discrete feature, the model can be easily used to investigate numerically the behavior of traffic flows. In consequence, the macroscopic dynamics of the model is derived using the Taylor and Chapman-Enskog expansions. For validating the model, numerical simulations are conducted under the periodic boundary conditions. It is found that the model could reasonably reproduce the fundamental diagram. Moreover, certain interesting physical phenomena can be captured by the model, such as the metastability and stop-and-go phenomena.

Jianping Meng; Yuehong Qian; Xingli Li; Shiqiang Dai

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study fluid flow in fractures using numerical simulation and address the challenging issue of hydraulic property characterization in fractures. The methodology is based on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ...

Sarkar, Sudipta

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible axisymmetric flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible axisymmetric flow is proposed in this paper. Unlike previous axisymmetric lattice Boltzmann models, which were based on “primitive-variables” Navier-Stokes equations, the target macroscopic equations of the present model are vorticity-stream-function formulations. Due to the intrinsic features of vorticity-stream-function formulations, the present model is more efficient, more stable, and much simpler than the existing models. The advantages of the present model are validated by numerical experiments.

Sheng Chen; Jonas Tölke; Sebastian Geller; Manfred Krafczyk

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

General single phase wellbore flow model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

1997-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microgravity Flow Regime Transition Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparatus have been used in past flow regime mapping experiments such as Venturi, perforated pipe, annular, and t-junction mixers. The mixing apparatus used in a particular experiment determines the bubble size distribution at the inlet... pressure of 80 kPa was reported, however, the temperature was not. The orientation and location of the test section with respect to the aircraft are unknown. The mixing apparatus used in the experiment was a Venturi mixer. This data set does...

Shephard, Adam M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geothermal electric cash flow model (GCFM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Cash Flow Model (GCFM) is a user-interactive computer model that estimates the costs and cash flow patterns of geothermal electric development projects. It was developed as a financial analysis tool for the US Department of Energy Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program. It contains a power-plant sizing and costing routine that is useful for preliminary feasibility studies of geothermal projects. The model can be operated using either a few preliminary estimates of geothermal resource characteristics or detailed estimates from reservoir engineering and power plant engineering studies. GCFM is available for public distribution.

Entingh, D.J.; Keimig, M.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: FLOW Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FLOW Model FLOW Model Project Summary Full Title: Chemical Engineering Process Simulation Platform - FLOW Project ID: 131 Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Brief Description: FLOW is a steady-state chemical process simulator. Modules have been developed for supply chain calculations, micro-economic calculations, and other calculations. Purpose Simulate steady-state chemical processes to support hydrogen infrastructure and transition analysis. Performer Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Address: Bethel Valley 1, Bldg 5700, N217 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 Telephone: 865-574-4998 Email: ferradajj@ornl.gov Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE Hydrogen Program Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov

125

On Water Flow in Hot Fractured Rock -- A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travelunsaturated model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal ofinto drifts at Yucca Mountain, Journal of Contaminant

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhang, Yingqi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A model for transonic plasma flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

Guazzotto, Luca, E-mail: luca.guazzotto@rochester.edu [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hameiri, Eliezer, E-mail: hameiri@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)] [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content on the lifespan and maximum length of benzene plumes Diego E. Gomez1 and Pedro 10 March 2009. [1] A numerical model was used to evaluate how the concentration of ethanol

Alvarez, Pedro J.

128

Accumulation of a light non-aqueous phase liquid on a flat barrier baffling a descending groundwater flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Riesenkampf's scheme revisited. Water Resour. Res. 47, 11521...the characteristics of ground water movement. Final Report...Dane 1999 Movement and remediation of trichloroethylene...1962-1977 Theory of ground-water movement. Princeton...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

Moujaes, S.F.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Lattice Boltzmann models for nonequilibrium gas flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to its computational efficiency, the kinetic-based lattice Boltzmann method has recently been used to model nonequilibrium gas dynamics. With appropriate boundary conditions, lattice Boltzmann models have been able to capture both velocity slip and temperature jump at a solid surface. To enable these models to simulate flows in the transition regime, both high-order and modified lattice Boltzmann models have been proposed. In this paper, we demonstrate the advantages of the standard lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model in predicting high-order rarefaction phenomenon. In addition, we show that current high-order lattice Boltzmann models are not yet able to capture the nonlinear constitutive relation for the stress in the Knudsen layer, despite the improved predictions of the wall slip-velocity, especially for Poiseuille flow. By considering how the wall affects the gas mean free path, we present a simplified high-order lattice Boltzmann model that can predict flow in the transition regime and is also able to capture the essential characteristics of the Knudsen layer.

Gui-Hua Tang; Yong-Hao Zhang; David R. Emerson

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

133

Micro level study on groundwater contaminant transport modeling of industrial pollution and hydro remediation;.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water pollution is a serious problem world over, as a growing percentage of surface water resources and groundwater reserves are being contaminated due to uncontrolled… (more)

Hemamalini C G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Buying, Selling and Exporting Groundwater: Implications for Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Sales/ Lease Agreement, by Sandra Burns. Regulation of Exportation of Underground Water, by Doug Caroom. Roberts County Transportation Permits, by C.E. Williams. Export Fees: A Groundwater District Limits and Uses, by Jace Houston. The report also... in Texas, by Ronald Kaiser. Groundwater Transactions: Buyers Perspective, by Russell Johnson. Purchasing Groundwater for Export: The Kinney County Proposal, by Lynn Sherman. Model Lease of Groundwater Rights, by Ned Meister. Protecting Your Land and Water...

Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce A.; Silvey, Valeen

135

A bulk-flow model of angled injection Lomakin bearings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bulk-flow model for determination of the leakage and dynamic force characteristics of angled injection Lomakin bearings is presented. Zeroth- and first-order equations describe the equilibrium flow for a centered bearing and the perturbed flow...

Soulas, Thomas Antoine Theo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Groundwater Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Database Groundwater Database Groundwater Database DOE has one of the largest ground water contamination problems and subsequent cleanup responsibilities for a single entity in the world, in terms of the sheer volume of affected groundwater, number of plumes, range of hydrogeologic settings, and diversity of contaminant types. The Groundwater Database was developed to provide a centralized location for information relating to groundwater flow, contamination, and remedial approaches across the DOE complex. The database provides DOE management and other interested parties with an easily accessible, high level understanding of the type of contamination, magnitude of contamination, and dynamics of groundwater systems at DOE sites. It also identifies remedial approaches, exit strategies, long-term stewardship requirements, regulatory

138

Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

Jin Sun

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advances of Modeling Water Flow in Variably Saturated Soils with SWAP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agriculture should be sustainable, implying less groundwater...fields surrounding an estate called Wildenborch...the fields near the estate. This regional flow...valuable, in many real-world applications...and scenarios for sustainable management of European...

Jos C. van Dam; Piet Groenendijk; Rob F.A. Hendriks; Joop G. Kroes

140

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems C. Ringhofer Abstract We emphasis is given to the implementation of service rules for complex systems, involving multiple product flow type models for complex production systems. Traffic flow models represent, in some sense

Ringhofer, Christian

144

Optimized groundwater containment using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to contain contaminant plumes. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield is to use a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when the objectives of the potential pumping scheme and the site hydrogeology are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. Calculations were conducted by using ModMan to link a calibrated MODFLOW flow model with LINDO, a linear programming package. Past activities at the site under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input water budget as groundwater discharge from the disposal area. The objective function of the optimization was to minimize the rate of groundwater extraction while preventing discharge to the marsh across a user-specified boundary. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates to produce a groundwater divide along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Durham, L.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Flow characteristics in an irregular spillway model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Authority. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS V1 LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION REVIEW OF LITERATURE Open Channel Flow Spillways Physical Modeling METHODS AND PROCEDURES 5 5 10 16 20 RESULTS... Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ? PMF Test 27 27 29 29 32 35 38 43 43 49 49 52 56 63 63 65 65 DISCUSSION S...

Scott, Mary Charlene

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Network flow model for multi-energy systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel approach to model networks with multiple energy carrier. The proposed nodal matrix establishes a link between an optimization of enclosed areas and their interconnections via networks. In the envisioned network flow model ... Keywords: energy conversion, energy hubs, grids, line losses, network flow, optimal power flow

Matthias Schulze; Goran Gašparovi?

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines Shane Cline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines by Shane Cline B.Sc., University of Toledo, 2003 M means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines by Shane potential flow methods are a promising alternative to mainstream wind turbine aerodynamics tools

Victoria, University of

149

EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of… (more)

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stochastic and deterministic models for dense granular flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Granular materials such as sand or gravel surround us everyday and yet remain poorly understood. In this thesis, two models are developed for dense granular flow, each capable of predicting flows with accuracy in multiple ...

Kamrin, Kenneth Norman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lattice Boltzmann model for ultrarelativistic flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a relativistic lattice Boltzmann model capable of describing relativistic fluid dynamics at ultra-high velocities, with Lorentz factors up to ??10. To this purpose, we first build a new lattice kinetic scheme by expanding the Maxwell-Jüttner distribution function in an orthogonal basis of polynomials and applying an appropriate quadrature, providing the discrete versions of the relativistic Boltzmann equation and the equilibrium distribution. To achieve ultra-high velocities, we include a flux limiter scheme, and introduce the bulk viscosity by a suitable extension of the discrete relativistic Boltzmann equation. The model is validated by performing simulations of shock waves in viscous quark-gluon plasmas and comparing with existing models, finding very good agreement. To the best of our knowledge, we for the first time successfully simulate viscous shock waves in the highly relativistic regime. Moreover, we show that our model can also be used for near-inviscid flows even at very high velocities. Finally, as an astrophysical application, we simulate a relativistic shock wave, generated by, say, a supernova explosion, colliding with a massive interstellar cloud, e.g., molecular gas.

F. Mohseni; M. Mendoza; S. Succi; H. J. Herrmann

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

154

Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Flow in Computer Hacking: A Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study hackers’ motivation is investigated, using the flow paradigm. It was hypothesized that flow increases with the increase of hackers’ competence in the IT use. An on-line research was administered wit...

Alexander E. Voiskounsky; Olga V. Smyslova

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

157

Modeling gas flow through microchannels and nanopores Subrata Roya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling gas flow through microchannels and nanopores Subrata Roya) and Reni Raju Computational. A two-dimensional finite-element based microscale flow model is developed to efficiently predict is modeled using either the continuum or the molecular approach.1­4 The con- tinuum approach solves

Roy, Subrata

158

Stochastic flow shop scheduling model for the Panama Canal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Panama Canal can be modeled as a stochastic flexible flow shop for the purpose of scheduling. A metaheuristic stochastic optimization method (Nested Partition) was… (more)

de Castillo, Zoila Yadira Guerra

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Detection and Characterization of Natural...

160

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PagesgroundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode97 1) We assumed that "conduit flow" includes fracture flow. The average groundwater flow velocity was calculated based on data from wells...

163

Nonlinear elasto-plastic model for dense granular flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work proposes a model for granular deformation that predicts the stress and velocity profiles in well-developed dense granular flows. Recent models for granular elasticity (Jiang and Liu 2003) and rate-sensitive plastic flow (Jop et al. 2006) are reformulated and combined into one universal granular continuum law, capable of predicting flowing regions and stagnant zones simultaneously in any arbitrary 3D flow geometry. The unification is performed by justifying and implementing a Kroner-Lee elasto-plastic decomposition, with care taken to ensure certain continuum physical principles are necessarily upheld. The model is then numerically implemented in multiple geometries and results are compared to experiments and discrete simulations.

Ken Kamrin

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Lattice Boltzmann models for non-Newtonian flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Issue: Modelling the mesoscale Lattice Boltzmann models for non-Newtonian flows...road, Chester CH1 4BJ, UK The lattice Boltzmann method has been established...the case of inelastic fluids. lattice Boltzmann methods|non-Newtonian fluids......

T. N. Phillips; G. W. Roberts

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

REYNOLDS STRESS MODEL IMPLEMENTATION FOR HYPERSONIC FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REYNOLDS STRESS MODEL IMPLEMENTATION FOR HYPERSONIC FLOW SIMULATIONS Arianna Bosco, PhD student, 52056 Aachen, Germany Abstract The simulation of hypersonic flows presents some difficulties due of the model is analyzed. 1 Introduction The aerodynamic design of hypersonic inlets is a criti- cal issue

166

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation Alexandra G. Konings,1: Konings, A. G., G. G. Katul, and S. E. Thompson (2012), A phenomenological model for the flow resistance [2002]. In this paper, a phenomenological approach is used to describe the momentum transfer

Katul, Gabriel

167

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Feedback Model for Radio Sources Fueled by Cooling Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many clusters of galaxies, radiative cooling in the central regions appears to drive an accretion flow. Many of these "cooling-flow clusters" possess strong radio sources in the central regions, which suggests a causal relation between the cooling flow and the radio source. We consider a general model in which a cooling flow produces and interacts with relativistic electrons in the core of the cluster. These electrons heat the inflowing gas, generating negative feedback that reduces the accretion rate. For sufficiently strong feedback, the accretion flow shows an oscillatory behavior on a timescale of several hundred million years.

Wallace Tucker; Laurence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale? Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale? Print Thursday, 03 January 2013 00:00 Over 20 trillion cubic meters of natural gas are trapped in shale, but many shale oil and gas producers still use models of underground fluid flow that date back to the heyday of easy-to-tap gas and liquid crude. The source of shale oil and gas is kerogen, an organic material in the shale, but until now kerogen hasn't been incorporated in mathematical models of shale gas reservoirs. Paulo Monteiro, Chris Rycroft, and Grigory Isaakovich Barenblatt, with the Computational Research Division and the Advanced Light Source, recently modeled how pressure gradients in the boundary layer between kerogen inclusions and shale matrices affect productivity and can model reservoir longevity.

170

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Coupled multiphase flow and poromechanics: A computational model of pore pressure effects on fault slip and earthquake triggering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coupling between subsurface flow and geomechanical deformation is critical in the assessment of the environmental impacts of groundwater use, underground liquid waste disposal, geologic storage of carbon dioxide, and ...

Jha, Birendra

172

Solyndra Facts vs. Fiction: Cash Flow Modeling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Solyndra Facts vs. Fiction: Cash Flow Modeling Solyndra Facts vs. Fiction: Cash Flow Modeling September 23, 2011 - 5:25pm Addthis Questions have been raised about a quote selectively pulled from an Aug. 20, 2009 email to make it look like Solyndra would run out of cash by Sept. 2011. To be clear, the analysis addressed in that email did not refer to Solyndra's corporate cash flow, but rather the cash flow for a subsidiary of Solyndra - the "Fab 2 Project Company." The cash flow models never said that Solyndra (the parent company) would run short of cash in September 2011. The email noted that the subsidiary was projected to have relatively low levels of cash in one particular month, and that the parent company would need to make up any potential shortfall.

173

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Flow Battery Modeling - Mario Martinez, SNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Photos placed in horizontal position with even amount of white space between photos and header Photos placed in horizontal position with even amount of white space between photos and header Flow Battery Modeling Energy Storage Systems Peer Review September 26-28, 2012 MJ Martinez (PI), J Clausen, SM Davison, HK Moffat Flow Battery Modeling Schematic of a Flow Battery PURPOSE: The flow battery modeling task seeks to improve fundamental understanding and enable high-performing, low-cost designs of flow batteries through

174

SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF THE AIR FLOW ABOVE WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF THE AIR FLOW ABOVE WAVES V.N. Kudryavtsev Marine Hydrophysical Institute influenced by the air flow dynamics over the water waves. The exchange of momentum, heat, moisture and gases between the atmosphere and the ocean is determined to a large extent by the wind-wave interaction

Haak, Hein

175

Modelling macroeconomic flows related to large ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including, say, oil prices, interest rates, etc; dynamics of shares markets are governed by information are illustrated by flows of a liquid between interconnected reservoirs, where the heights of different reservoirs is changing with time, and movement of the liquid between the reservoirs is governed by gravity, see Figure 1

Schellekens, Michel P.

176

A turbulence model for buoyant flows based on vorticity generation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A turbulence model for buoyant flows has been developed in the context of a k-{var_epsilon} turbulence modeling approach. A production term is added to the turbulent kinetic energy equation based on dimensional reasoning using an appropriate time scale for buoyancy-induced turbulence taken from the vorticity conservation equation. The resulting turbulence model is calibrated against far field helium-air spread rate data, and validated with near source, strongly buoyant helium plume data sets. This model is more numerically stable and gives better predictions over a much broader range of mesh densities than the standard k-{var_epsilon} model for these strongly buoyant flows.

Domino, Stefan Paul; Nicolette, Vernon F.; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tieszen, Sheldon R.; Black, Amalia Rebecca

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combustion, and Emission Modeling Using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Sibendu Som, Douglas E. Longman Engine and Emissions Group (Energy Systems Division)...

178

The Flow of Information in Information Retrieval: its modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Flow of Information in Information Retrieval: its modelling Mounia Lalmas Department of Computing Science University of Glasgow Situation Theory for Information Retrieval Information is and intuitively acceptable definition of information; until now, none of these have succeeded. Authors

Lalmas, Mounia

179

Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Groundwater vulnerability to agrochemicals: a GIS-based DRASTIC model analysis of Carroll, Chariton, and Saline counties, Missouri USA .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This investigation presents an analysis of groundwater vulnerability in three mid-Missouri counties that represent an agricultural production region that is physiographically and hydrogeologically complex. The… (more)

Soper, Rodney Craig

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling of Time Varying Slag Flow in Coal Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest within government agencies and the energy industries across the globe to further advance the clean and economical conversion of coal into liquid fuels to reduce our dependency on imported oil. To date, advances in these areas have been largely based on experimental work. Although there are some detailed systems level performance models, little work has been done on numerical modeling of the component level processes. If accurate models are developed, then significant R&D time might be saved, new insights into the process might be gained, and some good predictions of process or performance can be made. One such area is the characterization of slag deposition and flow on the gasifier walls. Understanding slag rheology and slag-refractory interactions is critical to design and operation of gasifiers with extended refractory lifetimes and also to better control of operating parameters so that the overall gasifier performance with extended service life can be optimized. In the present work, the literature on slag flow modeling was reviewed and a model similar to Seggiani’s was developed to simulate the time varying slag accumulation and flow on the walls of a Prenflo coal gasifier. This model was further extended and modified to simulate a refractory wall gasifier including heat transfer through the refractory wall with flowing slag in contact with the refractory. The model was used to simulate temperature dependent slag flow using rheology data from our experimental slag testing program. These modeling results as well as experimental validation are presented.

Pilli, Siva Prasad; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Williford, Ralph E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Korolev, Vladimir N.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - air flow models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Modeling of Doorway Flow Summary: software. The problem that was modeled is that of a flow from an air curtain mounted...

183

A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater using a Multi-Objective Parallel Evolutionary Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horizontal flow treatment wells (HFTWs) with in situ biodegradation is an innovative approach with the potential to remediate perchlorate- contaminated groundwater. A model has been developed that combines in the natural environment. The perchlorate problem is exacerbated because remediation of perchlorate

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

185

Potential flow models of thunderstorm-environment interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the kinematics of the environment around an isolated, growing thunderstozm. Motions employed in the models include storm movement, environmental wind velocity, horizontal mass inflow or outflow (sink or source), and flow around a solid cylinder. The models... are solved using measured data. Streamlines and wind velocities resulting from the models are verified with aircraft data collected near thunderstorms in previous st. udies. Model results show that the ma)or thunderstorm-environment inter- actions...

Gerhard, Myron L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

A distributed converging overland flow model: 1. Mathematical solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL The kinematic wave equations of continuity and momentum for a converging section are [Singh, 1974] 889 890 SHERMAN AND SINGH: FLOW MODELING, 1 X Fig. 1. Geometry of converging overland flow model. Oh O(uh) uh Ot q- Ox - q(x, t) q- L -- x (3...)' Q = uh = a(x,t)h n (4) where L is the length of the converging section (Figure 1). For a specified rainfall duration T, q(x, t) = 0 when t > T. We assume that n > 1. Eliminating u in (3) and (4), .we get Oh q_ na(x t)h \\"- Oh Ot ' Ox a(x, t...

Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

187

Phenomenological model for ordered onions under shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a phenomenological model for the multi-lamellar vesicles (onions) formation induced by shear flow. In a nonionic surfactant (C$_{12}$E$_4$) system, onion phases under a fixed shear flow within a certain range show the order-disorder transition accompanied with a size jump by changing temperature. Our model can simulate ordered and disordered onion phases with different onion sizes. We show numerical results of the onion formation simulated by the model and also discuss what factors in this system are critical to cause the transition between these two different onion phases.

Kenta Odagiri; Kazue Kudo

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clay and granitic units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel. The report addresses the representation and characterization of flow in these two media within...

190

An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study, heat flow simulations use a 3-D thermal model grid (model grid, which is used for gas flow and ambient heat-flowgrid showing a smaller model domain, used for modeling gas and heat

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

An efficient parallel-computing method for modeling nonisothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent transport in porous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numerical model simulating flow of moisture in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; the second

Elmroth, Erik

192

Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Quantitative modelling of granular suspension flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...up of particles, can be an important process even though it has not been explicitly...lead to a self-accelerating current, a process often called autosuspension, was first...Proc. 18th NATO-CCMS. Int. Tech. Mtg on Air Pollution Modelling and its Applications...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geothermal loan guaranty cash flow model: description and users' manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the users guide for the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Cash Flow Model (GCFM). GCFM is a Fortran code which designs and costs geothermal fields and electric power plants. It contains a financial analysis module which performs life cycle costing analysis taking into account various types of taxes, costs and financial structures. The financial module includes a discounted cash flow feature which calculates a levelized breakeven price for each run. The user's guide contains descriptions of the data requirements and instructions for using the model.

Keimig, M.A.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A unified model for slug flow in upward inclined pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of pipe inclination on upward two-phase slug flow characteristics has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Experimental data were acquired for the entire range of inclination angles, from horizontal to vertical. New correlations were developed for slug length and liquid holdup in the slug body as a function of inclination angle. A unified model has been developed for the prediction of slug flow behavior in upward inclined pipes. Reasonable agreement is observed between the pressure drop predicted by the model and the experimental data.

Felizola, H.; Shoham, O. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Global nuclear material flow/control model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of Collector Well Configurations to Model Hydrodynamics in Riverbank Filtration and Groundwater Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to better visualize and understand the findings generated by the model. The original model created in section 4.1 was designed by Dugat [2009]. Modifications to the original model are expanded upon in section 4.2. Figures 3-4 show the basic set-up... to better visualize and understand the findings generated by the model. The original model created in section 4.1 was designed by Dugat [2009]. Modifications to the original model are expanded upon in section 4.2. Figures 3-4 show the basic set-up...

De Leon, Tiffany Lucinda

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

From material flow analysis to material flow management Part I: social sciences modeling approaches coupled to MFA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents social sciences modeling approaches (SSMA) that have been coupled to material flow analyses in order to support management of material flows. The presented literature review revealed that the large share of these approaches stem from economics, as these models have similar data and modeling structure than the material flow models. The discussed modeling approaches support a better system understanding and allow for estimating the potential effects of economic policies on material flows. However, it has been shown that these approaches lack important aspects of human decision-making and, thus, the designed economic measures might not always lead to the expected improvements of the material system.

Claudia R. Binder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant advantages over other biomass processing methods with respect to separations. These 'green' alternatives employ a hybrid medium that, when operated supercritically, offers the prospect of tunable physicochemical properties. Solubility can be rapidly altered and phases partitioned selectively to precipitate or dissolve certain components by altering temperature or pressure in the near-critical region. The ability to tune the solvation properties of water in the highly compressible near-critical region facilitates partitioning of products or by-products into separate phases to separate and purify products. Since most challenges related to lipid extraction are associated with the industrial scale-up of integrated extraction systems, the new modeling capability offers the prospect of addressing previously untenable scaling issues.

D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M.N.; Szekely, F. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Toward a new paradigm for reactive flow modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional reactive flow modeling provides a computational representation of shock initiation of energetic materials. Most reactive flow models require ad hoc assumptions to obtain robust simulations, assumptions that result from partitioning energy and volume change between constituents in a reactive mixture. For example, most models assume pressure and/or temperature equilibrium for the mixture. Many mechanical insults to energetic materials violate these approximations. Careful analysis is required to ensure that the model assumptions and limitations are not exceeded. One limitation is that the shock to detonation transition is replicated only for strong planar shocks. Many models require different parameters to match data from thin pulse, ramp wave, or multidimensional loading, an approach that fails for complex loading. To accurately simulate reaction under non-planar shock impact scenarios a new formalism is required. The continuum mixture theory developed by Baer and Nunziato is used to eliminate ad hoc assumptions and limitations of current reactive flow models. This modeling paradigm represents the multiphase nature of reacting condensed/gas mixtures. Comparisons between simulations and data are presented.

Schmitt, Robert Gerard

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Low Mach Number Model for Moist Atmospheric Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a low Mach number model for moist atmospheric flows that accurately incorporates reversible moist processes in flows whose features of interest occur on advective rather than acoustic time scales. Total water is used as a prognostic variable, so that water vapor and liquid water are diagnostically recovered as needed from an exact Clausius--Clapeyron formula for moist thermodynamics. Unlike the pseudo--incompressible formulation, this model allows a general equation of state. Low Mach number models can be computationally more efficient than a fully compressible model, but the low Mach number formulation introduces additional mathematical and computational complexity because of the divergence constraint imposed on the velocity field. Here, latent heat release is accounted for in the source term of the constraint by estimating the rate of phase change based on the time variation of saturated water vapor subject to the thermodynamic equilibrium constraint. We numerically assess the validity of the l...

Duarte, Max; Bell, John B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Portniaguine and Solomon 1998), and ground water temperature (Doussan et al. 1994). Compared to calibration depended on calibration methodology; models calibrated with multiple targets simulated q more accurately of Calibration Methodology on Ground Water Flow Predictions by James E. Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H

Saiers, James

205

Lattice Boltzmann aero-acoustics modelling of flow around obstacles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Boltzmann aero-acoustics modelling of flow around obstacles H. Machroukia , D. Ricotb and O using LaBS software which is based on Lattice Boltzmann method. Within the framework of a consortium including industrial companies and academics institutes, LaBS was created around Lattice Boltzmann method

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CONCRETE FLOW: STATE OF THE ART  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concretes such as Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) tools for prediction of the form filling of SCC are neededCOMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CONCRETE FLOW: STATE OF THE ART Nicolas Roussel Laboratoire Central des Lars N. Thrane Concrete Centre, Danish Technological Institute Peter Szabo Department of Chemical

Boyer, Edmond

207

Constraints on mantle convection from seismic tomography and flow modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I combine high resolution seismic tomography and realistic flow modeling to constrain mantle convection. The bulk of the data used in the tomographic imaging are millions of P, pP and pwP travel time residuals, ...

Kárason, Hrafnkell, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Computational methods for several models of ice stream flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on any grid Shallow ice approximation produces oscillatory solutions Nonlinear and linear solvers haveComputational methods for several models of ice stream flow Jed Brown Laboratory of Hydrology transition at ice stream margins Bed slope is discontinuous and of order 1. Taylor expansions no longer valid

Brown, Jed

209

A multiple temperature kinetic model and its application to micro-scale gas flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multiple temperature kinetic model and its application to micro-scale gas flow simulations model, micro-scale flows. 1. Introduction Gas flows can be classified according to the flow regimes_pku@yahoo.com.cn Abstract This paper presents a numerical approach to solve the multiple temperature kinetic model (MTKM

Xu, Kun

210

Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs.

LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Checking Threat Modeling Data Flow Diagrams for Implementation Conformance and Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Checking Threat Modeling Data Flow Diagrams for Implementation Conformance and Security Marwan Abi Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Center for Software Excellence Abstract Threat Foundation. #12;Keywords: Threat modeling, data flow diagrams, reflexion models, architecture-level security

Abi-Antoun, Marwan

212

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat flow simulations use the 3-D thermal model grid (Figuremodel grid, which is used for gas flow and ambient heat flowgrid showing a smaller model domain, used for modeling gas and heat

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources'' was initiated by E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Cosby, B.J. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Driscoll, C.T. (Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Hemond, H.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Charles, D.F.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Improve image resolution for microseismicimaging and time-lapse active seismic imaging; Enhance the prediction of fluid flow and temperature distributions and stress changes by coupling fracture flow simulations with reservoir flow simulations; and integrating imaging into modeling.

215

A nuclear data acquisition system flow control model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general Petri Net representation of a nuclear data acquisition system model is presented. This model provides for the unique requirements of a nuclear data acquisition system including the capabilities of concurrently acquiring asynchronous and synchronous data, of providing multiple priority levels of flow control arbitration, and of permitting multiple input sources to reside at the same priority without the problem of channel lockout caused by a high rate data source. Finally, a previously implemented gamma camera/physiological signal data acquisition system is described using the models presented.

Hack, S.N.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow. For the non-equilibrium flow computations, i.e., the nozzle flow and hypersonic rarefied flow over flat plate-kinetic method; Hypersonic and rarefied flows 1. Introduction The development of aerospace technology has

Xu, Kun

217

An optimized groundwater extraction system for the toxic burning pits area of J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing and disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals at the J-Field area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) have resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater. The discharge of contaminated groundwater to on-site marshes and adjacent estuaries poses a potential risk to ecological receptors. The Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area is of special concern because of its disposal history. This report describes a groundwater modeling study conducted at J-Field that focused on the TBP area. The goal of this modeling effort was optimization of the groundwater extraction system at the TBP area by applying linear programming techniques. Initially, the flow field in the J-Field vicinity was characterized with a three-dimensional model that uses existing data and several numerical techniques. A user-specified border was set near the marsh and used as a constraint boundary in two modeled remediation scenarios: containment of the groundwater and containment of groundwater with an impermeable cap installed over the TBP area. In both cases, the objective was to extract the minimum amount of water necessary while satisfying the constraints. The smallest number of wells necessary was then determined for each case. This optimization approach provided two benefits: cost savings, in that the water to be treated and the well installation costs were minimized, and minimization of remediation impacts on the ecology of the marsh.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reynolds-stress model prediction of 3-D duct flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper examines the impact of different modelling choices in second-moment closures by assessing model performance in predicting 3-D duct flows. The test-cases (developing flow in a square duct [Gessner F.B., Emery A.F.: {\\em ASME J. Fluids Eng.} {\\bf 103} (1981) 445--455], circular-to-rectangular transition-duct [Davis D.O., Gessner F.B.: {\\em AIAA J.} {\\bf 30} (1992) 367--375], and \\tsn{S}-duct with large separation [Wellborn S.R., Reichert B.A., Okiishi T.H.: {\\em J. Prop. Power} {\\bf 10} (1994) 668--675]) include progressively more complex strains. Comparison of experimental data with selected 7-equation models (6 Reynolds-stress-transport and 1 scale-determining equations), which differ in the closure of the velocity/pressure-gradient tensor $\\Pi_{ij}$, suggests that rapid redistribution controls separation and secondary-flow prediction, whereas, inclusion of pressure-diffusion modelling improves reattachment and relaxation behaviour.

Gerolymos, G A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Numerical heat conduction in hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamical models of colliding hypersonic flows are presented which explore the dependence of the resulting dynamics and the characteristics of the derived X-ray emission on numerical conduction and viscosity. For the purpose of our investigation we present models of colliding flow with plane-parallel and cylindrical divergence. Numerical conduction causes erroneous heating of gas across the contact discontinuity which has implications for the rate at which the gas cools. We find that the dynamics of the shocked gas and the resulting X-ray emission are strongly dependent on the contrast in the density and temperature either side of the contact discontinuity, these effects being strongest where the postshock gas of one flow behaves quasi-adiabatically while the postshock gas of the other flow is strongly radiative. Introducing additional numerical viscosity into the simulations has the effect of damping the growth of instabilities, which in some cases act to increase the volume of shocked gas and can re-he...

Parkin, E R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media By Daniel E.A. van with the formulation and numerical solution of equations for modelling multicomponent, two-phase, thermal fluid flow typical flow behaviour that occurs during fluid injection into a reservoir. Keywords: porous media flow

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221

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advances of Modeling Water Flow in Variably Saturated Soils with SWAP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...any user-specified grid density to allow local...that the ecosystem would benefit from higher groundwater...might be bridged with smart one-dimensional models...2007). These studies benefit greatly from reliable...G. Lachaud. 1995. Estimating sparse forest rainfall...

Jos C. van Dam; Piet Groenendijk; Rob F.A. Hendriks; Joop G. Kroes

224

In Situ Stabilization of Metal-Contaminated Groundwater by Hydrous Ferric Oxide:? An Experimental and Modeling Investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A potential method is investigated for remediation of metal-contaminated groundwater by in-situ emplacement of an adsorptive coating on the aquifer matrix. ... The conceptual remedial method presented in this investigation involves injecting a series of soluble components into the aquifer, where they react and precipitate as they mix in situ, coating the aquifer with an insoluble, nontoxic substrate that has a high affinity for trace-metal contaminants. ... (5)?Evaluation of Groundwater Extraction Remedies:? Phase II; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Emergency and Remedial Response:? Washington, DC, 1992b. ...

Todd A. Martin; J. Houston Kempton

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for Coupling Air Flow Models to Load/Energy Models and Implications for Envelope Component Testing and Modeling Speaker(s): Brent Griffith Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dariush Arasteh Air models allow accounting for air temperature variations within a thermal zone or along the surface of an envelope component. A recently completed ASHRAE research project (RP-1222) produced a source code toolkit focused on coupling airflow models to load routines typical of whole building energy simulation. The two modeling domains are computed separately (and iteratively) with relevant temperature boundary conditions passed back and forth. One of the air models in the toolkit is a new contribution to crude/fast airflow modeling that is based on solving the Euler equation

226

Conceptualization of a fresh groundwater lens influenced by climate change: A modeling study of an arid-region island in the Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Understanding the fresh groundwater lens (FGL) behavior and potential threat of climatic-induced seawater intrusion (SWI) are significant for the future water resources management of many small islands. In this paper, the FGL of Kish Island, an arid-region case in the Persian Gulf, Iran, is modeled using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations. These simulations are based on the application of SUTRA, a density-dependent groundwater numerical model. Also, the numerical model parameters are calibrated using PEST, an automated parameter estimation code. Firstly a detailed conceptualization of the FGL model is completed to understand the sensitivity of the FGL to some particular aspects of the model prior to analysis of climate change simulations. For these investigations, the FGL system is defined based on Kish Island system to accomplish the integrated comparison of features of a conceptual model that are representative of real-world systems. This is the first study which adopts such an approach. The comparison of cross-sectional simulations suggests that the two-layer properties of the Kish Island aquifer have a significant influence on the FGL while the impacts of lateral-boundary irregularities are negligible. The impacts of sea-level rise (SLR), associated land-surface inundation (LSI), and variations in recharge rate on the FGL salinization of Kish Island are investigated numerically. Variations of SLR value (1–4 m) and net recharge rate (17–24 mm/year) are considered to cover a possible range of climatic scenarios in this arid-region island. The 2D and 3D simulation results demonstrate that LSI caused by SLR and recharge rate variation impacts are more important factors in the FGL in comparison to estimated SLR impacts without LSI. It is also shown that climate change impacts on the FGL are long-term to reach a new FGL equilibrium in the case of Kish Island’s aquifer system. The comparative analysis of 2D and 3D results shows that three-dimensionality is a significant factor, especially in large-scale 3D systems of small islands. The results of this study are expected to have implications for the understanding and management of the fresh groundwater resources of Kish Island and are also expected to be relevant to the study of the impact of climate change on groundwater resources on islands worldwide.

Davood Mahmoodzadeh; Hamed Ketabchi; Behzad Ataie-Ashtiani; Craig T. Simmons

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Why Do Continuum Gas-Solids Flow Models Predict Core-Annulus Flow?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core-annulus flow is an experimentally well established, industrially significant flow pattern of circulating fluidized beds. Several studies reported in the literature have shown that continuum gas-solids flow models are able to predict that flow pattern. But the crucial features of the model that give rise to the core-annulus flow structure have not been identified. To determine those features, we conduct transient simulations and analyze the results. Furthermore we time-average the results and investigate the formulation of time-averaged equations. We use transient, highly resolved, 1-D, grid-independent numerical solutions of a continuum model in this study. We show that the results could be even qualitatively incorrect (high solids concentration at the center of the channel) unless grid-independence is established. This explains why in certain coarse grid computations reported in the literature it was necessary to remove a dissipation term or to increase the particle size. Our simulations verify that the core-annulus structure arises in a time-averaged sense from unsteady gas-solids flow, as observed in experiments. We show that the key term that makes the flow unsteady is the dissipation term in the granular energy equation. Without that term the simulation yields a steady-state solution. The intuition based on steady-state solutions may not be valid. Unlike steady-state solutions, the transient solutions are not unduly sensitive to the restitution coefficient. The effect of restitution coefficient in transient simulations is remarkably different: a smaller restitution coefficient gives a higher average granular temperature. Both the micro-scale (clusters resolved) and meso-scale (clusters time-averaged) phenomena are important, unlike turbulent single-phase flows where the meso-scale (turbulent) stresses dominate. The prediction of core-annulus flow is strongly affected by the parameters used in the (micro-scale) wall boundary conditions; it is essential that the parameters are such that no granular energy is produced at the wall. The normal stress based on kinetic theory (Ps, micro) is an order of magnitude larger than normal stress arising from fluctuations (Ps, meso). Therefore, the granular temperature and solids fraction are approximately inversely correlated, just as shown by a steady-state analysis. However, the gradient of Ps, micro is of the same order of magnitude as the gradient of Ps, meso; those gradients adjust to ensure that the time averaged total Ps gradient in the radial direction is zero. The meso-scale shear stress is larger than the micro-scale shear stress. The meso-scale granular energy production term dominates the corresponding micro-scale term and must be included in time-averaged equations. That term is responsible for the maximum at the center in the granular temperature profile. The micro-scale granular energy production term is identically zero at the center because it is proportional to the gradient of solids velocity, which is zero at the center. The instantaneous gradient of solids velocity at the center, however, is not zero because of the down flow of clusters near the walls; it takes positive and negative values making the time-averaged velocity gradient exactly zero at the center. Therefore, the time-averaged square of the velocity gradient is non-zero at the center, which results in a production term in the time-averaged equations that is non-zero at the center. We find that the predictions are insensitive to the currently available k-å type turbulence models. The traditional k-å type models, based on the experience with single phase flow calculations, may not be adequate because meso-scale terms do not necessarily dominate the micro-scale terms. And certain parameters could behave counter to our intuition based on single phase flows: we compute and confirm with physical arguments that the gas-phase turbulent (meso-scale) viscosity could become negative.

Benyahia, S.; Syamlal, M.; O'Brien, T.J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Network Flow Modeling Via Lattice-Boltzmann Based Channel Conductance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) computations of single phase, pore-to-pore conductance are compared to models in which such conductances are computed via standard pore body-channel-pore body series resistance (SR), with the conductance of each individual element (pore body, channel) based on geometric shape factor measurements. The LB computations, based upon actual channel geometry derived from X-ray computed tomographic imagery, reveal that the variation in conductance for channels having similar shape factor is much larger than is adequately captured by the geometric models. Fits to the dependence of median value of conductance versus shape factor from the LB-based computations show a power law dependence of higher power than that predicted by the geometric models. We introduce two network flow models based upon the LB conductance computations: one model is based upon LB computations for each pore-to-pore connection; the second is based upon a power law fit to the relationship between computed conductance and throat shape factor. Bulk absolute permeabilities for Fontainebleau sandstone images are computed using the SR-based network models and the two LB-based models. Both LB-based network models produce bulk absolute permeability values that fit published data more accurately than the SR-based models.

Sholokhova, Y.; Kim, D; Lindquist, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling Metal Stocks and Flows: A Review of Dynamic Material Flow Analysis Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remote sensing methods are used by Takahashi et al.,(86) who analyze in-use copper stocks using satellite nighttime light observation data. ... McMillan et al.(54) quantify the sensitivity of the lifetime distribution, recycling rate, and metallic recovery by using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method, which provides a measure of input sensitivity defined as the fraction of total model variance. ... Yano, J.; Hirai, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Sakai, S.Dynamic flow analysis of current and future end-of-life vehicles generation and lead content in automobile shredder residue J. Mater. ...

Esther Müller; Lorenz M. Hilty; Rolf Widmer; Mathias Schluep; Martin Faulstich

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Heat flow and geothermal studies in the Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In continental heat flow studies, sedimentary basins are usually avoided because of difficulties in obtaining thermal conductivity measurements and because temperature gradients may contain advective signals caused by moving groundwater. These problems are superimposed in the Denver, Kennedy and Williston Basins where complex geothermal gradients derive both from large contrasts among thermal conductivities of strata and from regional groundwater flow. The occurrence and magnitude of advective heat flow within the Denver, Kennedy and Williston Basins is conceptually consistent with simple models that relate groundwater flow to the piezometric surface and to subsurface structures, i.e., folds and faults. An advective heat flow of +25 mW/m/sup 2/ has been determined for an area in the eastern margin of the Denver Basin, and quantities of +35 mW/m/sup 2/ and +10 MW/m/sup 2/ have been determined respectively for parts of the southeastern and northeastern parts of the Williston Basin. A detailed analysis of bottom hole temperatures obtained from drill holes in the area of the Billings Anticline in the Williston Basin indicates that information on subsurface structures and groundwater flow may be obtained from heat flow studies. Additional information that may be derived from these heat flow studies includes: the occurrence and nature of geothermal resources, oil source rock maturation and secondary migration of petroleum, formation and deposition of strata-bound ores. 43 references.

Gosnold, W.D.; Fischer, D.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Model Free Closed-Loop Flow Control ERCAN ATAM, LIONEL MATHELIN, LAURENT CORDIER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Free Closed-Loop Flow Control ERCAN ATAM, LIONEL MATHELIN, LAURENT CORDIER *CNRS- Mathelin-Cordier (LIMSI-CNRS,IP') Model Free Closed-Loop Flow Control ECCOMAS'12 1 / 21 #12;Outline 1 and some future work Atam- Mathelin-Cordier (LIMSI-CNRS,IP') Model Free Closed-Loop Flow Control ECCOMAS'12

Mathelin, Lionel

233

Accurate Subgrid Models for Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a strong influence on flow and transport in oil reservoirs. In this work, a new modelAccurate Subgrid Models for Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Yalchin R. Efendiev, SPE for the representation of subgrid terms is introduced and applied to two-phase reservoir flows. The model entails

Efendiev, Yalchin

234

Preferential flow: first results of a full-scale flow model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......520 min during the irrigation process. Moreover, the whole surface...distribution and water transport processes in soils, Mitt Deutschen Bodenkundlichen...Extended Abstracts, 2nd Ann. Mtg, Environ. Eng. Geophys...drained field plot, in Ann. Mtg on Groundwater Contamination......

S. A. al Hagrey; T. Schubert-Klempnauer; D. Wachsmuth; J. Michaelsen; R. Meissner

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Hanford Story: Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

236

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann modeling of flowing soft systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mesoscopic multi-component lattice Boltzmann model with short-range repulsion between different species and short/mid-ranged attractive/repulsive interactions between like-molecules is introduced. The interplay between these composite interactions gives rise to a rich configurational dynamics of the density field, exhibiting many features of disordered liquid dispersions (micro-emulsions) and soft-glassy materials, such as long-time relaxation due to caging effects, anomalous enhanced viscosity, ageing effects under moderate shear and flow above a critical shear rate.

Roberto Benzi; Sergio Chibbaro; Sauro Succi

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling multiphase flow for high viscosity liquids: a study of vertical/inclined zero net liquid flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

° for higher viscosities. The trend suggests that the flow distribution coefficient, C[], varies with fluid viscosity and inclination angle, therefore affecting the liquid holdup in the pipe. A new model is proposed to take into account these factors and its...

Rodriguez, Jose Ramon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Subgrid-scale model for the temperature fluctuations in reacting hypersonic turbulent flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subgrid-scale model for the temperature fluctuations in reacting hypersonic turbulent flows M. Pino fluctuations for use in large-eddy simulations of turbulent, reacting hypersonic flows. The proposed model uses, a greater understand- ing of turbulent hypersonic flows is needed. Direct numerical simulations DNS

Martín, Pino

244

MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE Jeffrey Glandt, Sirivatch University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 vanzee@engr.sc.edu Key words: PEM fuel cell, flow field or printed in its publications. #12;2 MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE

Van Zee, John W.

245

Analysis of models for induced gas flow in the unsaturated zone Kehua You,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of models for induced gas flow in the unsaturated zone Kehua You,1 Hongbin Zhan,1 term are frequently employed in modeling the induced gas flow in an unsaturated zone underlying a leaky 2011. [1] Accurate description of induced gas flow in an unsaturated zone is indispensable

Zhan, Hongbin

246

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

247

A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

Zhang, Fan [ORNL; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Pace, Molly [ORNL; Kim, Young Jin [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NUMERICAL MODEL OF TRANSIENT TWO-PHASE FLOW IN A WELLBORE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wellbore storage in geothermal wells: presented at 1979two-phase flow in a geothermal well has been modelled with asteam water flow in geothermal wells: Journal of Petroleum

Miller, Constance W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gyrokinetic and Gyrofluid Models for Zonal Flow Dynamics in Ion and Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collisionless time evolution of zonal flows in ion and electron temperature gradient turbulence in toroidal plasmas is investigated. The responses of the zonal-flow potential to the initial perturbation and to the turbulence source are determined from the gyrokinetic equations combined with the Poisson equation, A novel gyrofluid model is presented, which properly describes the zonal-flow time evolution and reproduces the same residual zonal-flow levels as predicted by the gyrokinetic model.

Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Ferrando i Margalet, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sanitary landfill local-scale flow and transport modeling in support of alternative concentrations limit demonstrations, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina which is currently operated and managed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Sanitary Landfill (Sanitary Landfill) at the SRS is located approximately 2,000 feet Northwest of Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) on an approximately 70 acre site located south of Road C between the SRS B-Area and UTRC. The Sanitary Landfill has been receiving wastes since 1974 and operates as an unlined trench and fill operation. The original landfill site was 32 acres. This area reached its capacity around 1987 and a Northern Expansion of 16 acres and a Southern Expansion of 22 acres were added in 1987. The Northern Expansion has not been used for waste disposal to date and the Southern Expansion is expected to reach capacity in 1992 or 1993. The waste received at the Sanitary Landfill is predominantly paper, plastics, rubber, wood, metal, cardboard, rags saturated with degreasing solvents, pesticide bags, empty cans, and asbestos in bags. The landfill is not supposed to receive any radioactive wastes. However, tritium has been detected in the groundwater at the site. Gross alpha and gross beta are also evaluated at the landfill. The objectives of this modeling study are twofold: (1) to create a local scale Sanitary Landfill flow model to study hydraulic effects resulting from capping the Sanitary Landfill; and (2) to create a Sanitary Landfill local scale transport model to support ACL Demonstrations for a RCRA Part B Permit Renewal.

Kelly, V.A.; Beach, J.A.; Statham, W.H.; Pickens, J.F. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

An Expert Elicitation Process in Support of Groundwater Model Evaluation for Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is implementing corrective actions at facilities where nuclear-related operations were conducted in Nevada. Among the most significant sites being addressed are the locations of underground nuclear tests on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The process for implementing corrective actions for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) locations is defined in Appendix VI of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996, as amended). In broad terms, Appendix VI describes a Corrective Action Investigation followed by a Corrective Action Decision, and implementation of a Corrective Action Plan prior to closure. The Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) is farthest along in the UGTA corrective action process. It includes ten underground tests within the Frenchman Flat topographic basin, in the southeastern portion of the NNSS. Data have been collected from drilling exploration, hydrologic testing, and field and laboratory studies. Modeling has been completed at a variety of scales and focusing on a variety of flow and transport aspects ranging from regional boundary conditions to process dynamics within a single nuclear cavity. The culmination of the investigations is a transport model for the Frenchman Flat CAU (Stoller Navarro Joint Venture, 2009) that has undergone rigorous peer review and been accepted by the State of Nevada, setting the stage for the Corrective Action Decision and progression from the investigation phase to the corrective action phase of the project.

Chapman Jenny,Pohlmann Karl

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. In early April, five peer...

253

A simple model of gas flow in a porous powder compact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a simple model for ideal gas flow from a vessel through a bed of porous material into another vessel. It assumes constant temperature and uniform porosity. Transport is treated as a combination of viscous and molecular flow, with no inertial contribution (low Reynolds number). This model can be used to fit data to obtain permeability values, determine flow rates, understand the relative contributions of viscous and molecular flow, and verify volume calibrations. It draws upon the Dusty Gas Model and other detailed studies of gas flow through porous media.

Shugard, Andrew D.; Robinson, David B.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

255

MSET modeling of Crystal River-3 venturi flow meters.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of archived Crystal River-3 feedwater flow data reveals a slow and steady degradation of the flow meter measurements during the 1992/1993 operating cycle. MSET can reliably estimate the true flow rate and quantify the degree of departure between the indicated signal and the true flow rate with high accuracy. The MSET computed flow rate could, in principle, be used to provide an improved estimate of the reactor power and hence avoid the revenue loss associated with derating the reactor based on a faulty feedwater flow rate indication.

Bockhorst, F. K.; Gross, K. C.; Herzog, J. P.; Wegerich, S. W.

1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling of gas-solid flow in a CFB riser based on computational particle fluid dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional model for gas-solid flow in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was developed based on computational particle ... experimental data validated the CPFD model for the CFB riser. The model pr...

Yinghui Zhang; Xingying Lan; Jinsen Gao

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Hidden Markov Model Perspective on Regimes and Metastability in Atmospheric Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, data from three atmospheric models are analyzed to investigate the existence of atmospheric flow regimes despite nearly Gaussian statistics of the planetary waves in these models. A hierarchy of models is used, which describes the ...

Christian Franzke; Daan Crommelin; Alexander Fischer; Andrew J. Majda

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

Cooper, Clay A [DRI] [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI] [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI] [DRI; Lyles, Brad F [DRI] [DRI

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Wasserstein geometry of non-linear sigma models and the Hamilton-Perelman Ricci flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non linear sigma models are quantum field theories describing, in the large deviations sense, random fluctuations of harmonic maps between a Riemann surface and a Riemannian manifold. Via their formal renormalization group analysis, they provide a framework for possible generalizations of the Hamilton-Perelman Ricci flow. By exploiting the heat kernel embedding introduced by N. Gigli and C. Mantegazza, we show that the Wasserstein geometry of the space of probability measures over Riemannian metric measure spaces provides a natural setting for discussing the relation between non-linear sigma models and Ricci flow theory. This approach provides a rigorous model for the embedding of Ricci flow into the renormalization group flow for non linear sigma models, and characterizes a non-trivial generalization of the Hamilton-Perelman version of the Ricci flow. We discuss in detail the monotonicity and gradient flow properties of this extended flow.

Mauro Carfora

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - artifical groundwater recharge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models. The conclusions summarize... : groundwater recharge and baseflow (or ground- water ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 4...

262

A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

Raustad, Richard A. [Florida Solar Energy Center

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Information Flow in Ising Models on Brain Sebastiano Stramaglia1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Flow in Ising Models on Brain Networks Sebastiano Stramaglia1,2,3 , Jesus M. Cortes2-9000 Ghent, Belgium Abstract. We analyze the information flow in the Ising model on two real networks the Ising model is implemented on the two-dimensional regular grid. At criticality the system shows

Cortes, Jesus

264

Numerical modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a narrow Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a narrow Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille system S [1, 2] widely validated in various rotor-stator cavities with throughflow [3­5] and heat transfer [6: RANS modeling, Reynolds Stress Model, Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow, turbulence, heat transfer. hal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

265

Simple Models of Zero-Net Mass-Flux Jets for Flow Control Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple Models of Zero-Net Mass-Flux Jets for Flow Control Simulations Reni Raju Dynaflow Inc for modeling the dynamics of zero- net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators, the computational costs associated-flow model. 1. INTRODUCTION Zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators or "synthetic jets" have potential

Mittal, Rajat

266

Checking Threat Modeling Data Flow Diagrams for Implementation Conformance and Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Checking Threat Modeling Data Flow Diagrams for Implementation Conformance and Security Marwan Abi Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 # Center for Software Excellence Abstract Threat Foundation. #12; Keywords: Threat modeling, data flow diagrams, reflexion models, architecture­level security

267

The McCormack model for gas mixtures: Plane Couette flow R. D. M. Garcia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The McCormack model for gas mixtures: Plane Couette flow R. D. M. Garcia HSH Scientific Computing flow for a binary gas mixture described by the McCormack kinetic model. The solution yields, defined for binary gas mixtures in terms of the McCormack model, for semi-infinite media14 Kramers

Siewert, Charles E.

268

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows C. Manes,1 L impermeable rough boundaries. A novel phenomenological model that describes such anomalous behavior), A phenomenological model to describe tur- bulent friction in permeable-wall flows, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L14403

Katul, Gabriel

269

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

271

Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations J 2004) An ad hoc thermostating procedure that couples a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

Brenner, Donald W.

272

Uncertainty in Climate Modelling; Projected climate changes and low flow discharge in Elverdams Å.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This project uses the Danish stream Elversdam Å as a case study to analyse uncertainty in climate modelling, with particular focus on the low flow… (more)

Dam, Peter Rosendahl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High order lattice Boltzmann models for gas flow on a wide range of Knudsen number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High order lattice Boltzmann models for gas flow on a wide range of Knudsen number L´eonard de, 2011) The lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) have successfully been applied to micro-scale flows], which are micro-metric system flows driven by macroscopic pumps. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

274

FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package: Volume 2, User's guide to the EFLOW groundwater flow code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a two-dimensional finite element code, EFLOW, developed to simulate water flow in fully or variably saturated porous media. This code is one component in the FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. For variably saturated flow problems, nonlinearities caused by unsaturated soil properties, atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage faces), and water uptake by plant roots are treated using Picard or Newton-Raphson methods. For fully saturated unconfined flow problems, the governing equations are formulated in an areal plane, and nonlinear water-table boundary conditions are treated using the Picard method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. 24 refs., 39 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Multiscale Preferential Flow - 8/05-8/10 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research agenda of this project are: (1) Modeling of preferential transport from mesoscale to macroscale; (2) Modeling of fast flow in narrow fractures in porous media; (3) Pseudo-parabolic Models of Dynamic Capillary Pressure; (4) Adaptive computational upscaling of flow with inertia from porescale to mesoscale; (5) Adaptive modeling of nonlinear coupled systems; and (6) Adaptive modeling and a-posteriori estimators for coupled systems with heterogeneous data.

Ralph Showalter; Malgorzata Peszynska

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hydraulisk och termisk grundvattenmodellering av ett geoenergilager i Stockholmsåsen; Hydraulic and thermal groundwater modelling of a geothermal energy system in the Stockholmesker.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Geothermal energy can be extracted from an aquifer, where the groundwater is used as heat exchange medium while heat and cold are stored in… (more)

Landström, Carolin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modelling two-phase flow in porous media at the pore scale using the volume-of-fluid method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a stable numerical scheme for modelling multiphase flow in porous media, where the characteristic size of the flow domain is of the order of microns to millimetres. The numerical method is developed for efficient modelling of multiphase flow ... Keywords: Pore-scale modelling, Porous media, Two-phase flow, Volume of fluid

Ali Q. Raeini; Martin J. Blunt; Branko Bijeljic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Experiences and Challenges Scaling PFLOTRAN, a PETSc-based Code for Subsurface Reactive Flow Simulations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, groundwater, solvers 1 Introduction Over the past several decades, subsurface (ground- water) flow these simplified ground- water models are still in wide use, advances in subsurface science have enabled and the efficacy of proposed remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. For years, traditional models

Mills, Richard

280

A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model has been developed to simulate flow and distribution of moisture, gas and heat at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. The model takes into account the simultaneous flow dynamics of liquid water, vapor, air and heat in the highly heterogeneous, fractured porous rock in the unsaturated zone (UZ). This model is intended for use in the prediction of the current and future conditions in the UZ so

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Comparisons of purely topological model, betweenness based model and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper selects three frequently used power grid models including a purely topological model (PTM) a betweennness based model (BBM) and a direct current power flow model (DCPFM) to describe three different dynamical processes on a power grid under both single and multiple component failures. Each of the dynamical processes is then characterized by both a topology-based and a flow-based vulnerability metrics to compare the three models with each other from the vulnerability perspective. Taking as an example the IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to a tolerance parameter tp the results show non-linear phenomenon: under single node failures there exists a critical value of tp?=?1.36 above which the three models all produce identical topology-based vulnerability results and more than 85% nodes have identical flow-based vulnerability from any two models; under multiple node failures that each node fails with an identical failure probability fp there exists a critical fp?=?0.56 above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results at any tp???1 but producing identical flow-based vulnerability results only occurs at fp?=?1. In addition the topology-based vulnerability results can provide a good approximation for the flow-based vulnerability under large fp and the priority of PTM and BBM to better approach the DCPFM for vulnerability analysis mainly depends on the value of fp. Similar results are also found for other failure types other system operation parameters and other power grids.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reduced order modeling of transient two-phase flows and its application to upward two-phase flows in the under-balanced drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, reduced order modeling (ROM) of transient two-phase flow equations is performed based on the four-equation two-fluid model, using an equation-free/Galerkin-free proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method. The AUSMDV^* method is used ... Keywords: Proper orthogonal decomposition, Reduced order modeling, Two-fluid model, Two-phase flow, Under balanced drilling

Younes Shekari, Ebrahim Hajidavalloo, Morteza Behbahani-Nejad

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Model of ventilation flows during large tunnel fires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to describe the reduction in the longitudinal airflow velocity due to the fire and hot gases resistances in a large tunnel fire, a theoretical model, taking into consideration the pressure losses over the fire source and obstructions, the thermal stack effects, and the hydraulic resistance induced by the tunnel walls, fire protection boards and a HGV trailer mock-up, is developed and validated using the large-scale tests data from the fire tests performed in the Runehamar tunnel with longitudinal ventilation in Norway 2003. Two large mobile fan units were used to create a longitudinal flow within the tunnel and prevent smoke backlayering upstream of the fire. One fan was located outside the entrance of the tunnel and the other inside the tunnel. The fire load consisted of a mock-up simulating a heavy goods vehicle (HGV) trailer creating a maximum heat release rates in the range of 66–202 MW. Two methods of calculating the mean temperature related to the thermal expansion and stack effect are proposed and compared.

Haukur Ingason; Anders Lönnermark; Ying Zhen Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mathematical Model for Heavy Oil–Water–Gas Stratified Flow in Horizontal Pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, isothermal, transient model for the stratified flow of heavy oil, water and gas, in horizontal pipelines, is presented. The two-fluid mathematical model consists of mass, momentum and energy...

C. Centeno-Reyes; O. Cazarez-Candia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine Tomás Polóni. Based on an augmented observable Mean Value En- gine Model (MVEM) of a turbocharged Diesel engine in the intake duct. Keywords: Diesel engine, Mass flow estimation, Bias estimation, Kalman filtering, Mean value

Johansen, Tor Arne

286

Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller Bachelors of Engineering, University in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is a critical issue in ensuring high cell performance. The water production

Victoria, University of

287

COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

Vierow, Karen

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Phase I Flow and Transport Model Document for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1 with ROTC 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, in the northeast part of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) requires environmental corrective action activities to assess contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing. These activities are necessary to comply with the UGTA corrective action strategy (referred to as the UGTA strategy). The corrective action investigation phase of the UGTA strategy requires the development of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models whose purpose is to identify the lateral and vertical extent of contaminant migration over the next 1,000 years. In particular, the goal is to calculate the contaminant boundary, which is defined as a probabilistic model-forecast perimeter and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary that delineate the possible extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing. Because of structural uncertainty in the contaminant boundary, a range of potential contaminant boundaries was forecast, resulting in an ensemble of contaminant boundaries. The contaminant boundary extent is determined by the volume of groundwater that has at least a 5 percent chance of exceeding the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (CFR, 2012).

Andrews, Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of a CFD-model for simulation of simplified flow conditioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perforated plate flow conditioners are used to generate a fully developed turbulent flow profile upstream of an orifice meter. It is very time-consuming to measure the effect of a flow conditioner for different upstream flow profiles. Therefore a project is initiated to evaluate the performance of a computational fluid computer code for this purpose. If the code correctly predicts the flow characteristics downstream of more complex flow conditioners. In this study a k-{var_epsilon} CFD-model was used to predict the flow downstream of obstruction plates having one large or nine small holes. Both mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, {var_epsilon}, were calculated and compared against measured data. The results indicate that it is possible to predict the mean velocity well and that the accuracy of the predicted k and {var_epsilon} depends on the complexity of the flow.

Erdal, A. [Statoil/K-LAB, Haugesund (Norway); Torbergsen, L.E.; Rimestad, S.; Krogstad, P.A. [Norwegian Inst. of Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

MODELING FLOW AND TRANSPORT PATHWAYS TO THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl are used in conjunction with geologic interpretation and numerical modeling to evaluate flow and transport pathways, processes, and model parameters in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. By synthesizing geochemical and geologic data, the numerical model results provide insight into the validity of alternative hydrologic parameter sets, flow and transport processes in and away from fault zones, and the applicability of {sup 36}Cl/Cl. ratios for evaluating alternative conceptual models.

A.V. WOLFSBERG, G.J.C. ROEMER, J.T. FABRYKA-MARTIN, B.A. ROBINSON

1998-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

292

Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75°C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25°C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling the influence of optic flow on grid cell firing in the absence of other cues1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the influence of optic flow on grid cell firing in the absence of other cues1 Florian affect the firing of grid cells recorded in entorhinal cortex of rats. Optic flow provides information and superimposed with noise in order to model the optic flow that would be available to the rat. This optic flow

Hasselmo, Michael

294

Joint three-dimensional inversion of coupled groundwater flow and heat transfer based on automatic differentiation: sensitivity calculation, verification, and synthetic examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gradient of the objective function very efficiently at a cost of a few forward models, independent of the number...H., Tavana M., 1981. A technical data book for geothermal energy utilization, Tech. Rep. DE81-029868, NTIS. Poeter......

V. Rath; A. Wolf; H. M. Bücker

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mathematical Modelling of Sap Flow Graham Moore, Dr. John Stockie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., the crown, stem, ect.) � Water content W (kg) and charge Q (c). � Flow rate f(pool) (kg/s) and current I (A equations for tree water flow are then given by analogies to RC laws: (1) f(pool) = dW dt I = dQ dt (2) f(pool/s) be the transpiration rate. Using the basic equations (1), (2) and conservation of water mass, we obtain: (4) Fcrown

Stockie, John

296

Instrumentation development for multi-dimensional two-phase flow modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted instrumentation approach is described which has played a significant role in obtaining fundamental data for two-phase flow model development. This experimental work supports the development of a three-dimensional, two-fluid, four field computational analysis capability. The goal of this development is to utilize mechanistic models and fundamental understanding rather than rely on empirical correlations to describe the interactions in two-phase flows. The four fields (two dispersed and two continuous) provide a means for predicting the flow topology and the local variables over the full range of flow regimes. The fidelity of the model development can be verified by comparisons of the three-dimensional predictions with local measurements of the flow variables. Both invasive and non-invasive instrumentation techniques and their strengths and limitations are discussed. A critical aspect of this instrumentation development has been the use of a low pressure/temperature modeling fluid (R-134a) in a vertical duct which permits full optical access to visualize the flow fields in all two-phase flow regimes. The modeling fluid accurately simulates boiling steam-water systems. Particular attention is focused on the use of a gamma densitometer to obtain line-averaged and cross-sectional averaged void fractions. Hot-film anemometer probes provide data on local void fraction, interfacial frequency, bubble and droplet size, as well as information on the behavior of the liquid-vapor interface in annular flows. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure the velocity of liquid-vapor interfaces in bubbly, slug and annular flows. Flow visualization techniques are also used to obtain a qualitative understanding of the two-phase flow structure, and to obtain supporting quantitative data on bubble size. Examples of data obtained with these various measurement methods are shown.

Kirouac, G.J.; Trabold, T.A.; Vassallo, P.F.; Moore, W.E.; Kumar, R. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Model For The Transient Temperature Effects Of Horizontal Fluid Flow In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transient Temperature Effects Of Horizontal Fluid Flow In Transient Temperature Effects Of Horizontal Fluid Flow In Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Model For The Transient Temperature Effects Of Horizontal Fluid Flow In Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A characteristic temperature versus depth (T-D) profile is observed in various geothermal environments. Particular features of the T-D profile can be explained in terms of a simple time-dependent two-dimensional (x, z) hydrothermal model. In this model a hot fluid is constrained to flow along a thin aquifer buried at a depth l from the surface with conductive heat transfer into the rocks both above and below the aquifer. In many geothermal systems transient changes in the flow

298

Comparing Large-Scale Hydrological Model Predictions with Observed Streamflow in the Pacific Northwest: Effects of Climate and Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing uncertainties in hydrologic models can improve accuracy in predicting future streamflow. Here, simulated streamflows using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at coarse (°) and fine (°) spatial resolutions were evaluated ...

Mohammad Safeeq; Guillaume S. Mauger; Gordon E. Grant; Ivan Arismendi; Alan F. Hamlet; Se-Yeun Lee

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater.

300

Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Resampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the simulation of extreme river flows. This is important to assess the impact of climate change on river flooding biases in the RCM data, the simulated extreme flood quantiles correspond quite well with those obtainedResampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows Robert

Haak, Hein

302

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

303

A simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/deposition processes when a layer of particles is flowing over a static layer or near the destabilization and arrestA simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield, 75005 Paris, France, 4 ANGE team, INRIA, CETMEF, Lab. J.-L. Lions, Paris, France Abstract We introduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

ESTIMATION OF FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR HYDROLOGICAL MODELLING Petter Pilesj  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.hkbu.edu.hk Lars Harrie Department of Surveying. University of Lund. Box 118, ht 54. S ­ 221 00 Lund, Sweden. E-mail: Lars.Harrie@lantm.lth.se Abstract: This paper discusses a new approach to estimate flow direction. Holmgren (1994) summarises some of the algorithms as, #12;( ) ( )= = 8 1 tan tan j x j x i

Harrie, Lars

305

Macroscopic transport models for rarefied gas flows: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......which has a non-negative production. For space reasons...considered to describe the gas on the macroscopic level...description of rarefied gas flows with Knudsen numbers...fraction of the numerical cost of microscopic solvers...available only for monatomic gases. Since most gases of......

Henning Struchtrup; Peyman Taheri

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Treatment of model inland brackish groundwater reverse osmosis concentrate with electrodialysis—Part I: sensitivity to superficial velocity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of electrodialysis performance to variations in hydraulic flow when treating brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) concentrate waste. A synthetic BWRO concentrate from Arizona of 7890 mg/L total dissolved solids was prepared with poly-phosphonate antiscalants, and desalinated with a laboratory-scale electrodialyzer with 10 cell-pairs and a transfer area of 64 cm2 per membrane. Flow, pressure, conductivity, temperature, and pH were measured continuously, and periodic process samples were analyzed by ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry for anion and cation concentrations, respectively. The BWRO concentrate was successfully treated with a stack voltage application of 1.0 V/cell-pair and current densities less than 280 A/m2 for salinity removal ratios up to 99% (without precipitation). The superficial velocities were controlled in a range of 1.2 to 4.8 cm/s, which corresponded to Reynolds numbers of 10 to 40. This paper shows the polarization parameter (ranging from 2.0 to 3.6 A/m2 per meq/L) as a function of Reynolds number and removal ratio, and, at maximum sensitivity, the polarization parameter was proportional to Reynolds number raised to the 0.132 power.

W. Shane Walker; Younggy Kim; Desmond F. Lawler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

REACTIVE FLOW IN VUGGY CARBONATES: METHODS AND MODELS APPLIED TO MATRIX ACIDIZING OF CARBONATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonates invariably have small (micron) to large (centimeter) scale heterogeneities in flow properties that may cause the effects of injected acids to differ greatly from what is predicted by a model based on a homogenous formation. To the best...

Izgec, Omer

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling and Detection of Content and Packet Flow Anomalies at Enterprise Network Gateway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation investigates modeling techniques and computing algorithms for detection of anomalous contents and traffic flows of ingress Internet traffic at an enterprise network gateway. Anomalous contents refer to a large volume of ingress...

Lin, Sheng-Ya

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Green Water Flow Kinematics and Impact Pressure on a Three Dimensional Model Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow kinematics of green water due to plunging breaking waves interacting with a simplified, three-dimensional model structure was investigated in laboratory. Two breaking wave conditions were tested: one with waves impinging and breaking...

Ariyarathne, Hanchapola Appuhamilage Kusalika Suranjani

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES the guidance and direction provided by my advisors: Dr. Mandell, Dr. Cairns and Dr. Larsen. I would also like

311

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

312

Dynamic electro-thermal modeling of all-vanadium redox flow battery with forced cooling strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study focuses on the dynamic electro-thermal modeling for the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) with forced cooling strategies. The Foster network is adopted to dynamically model the heat dissipation of VRB with heat exchangers. The parameters of Foster network are extracted by fitting the step response of it to the results of linearized CFD model. Then a complete electro-thermal model is proposed by coupling the heat generation model, Foster network and electrical model. Results show that the established model has nearly the same accuracy with the nonlinear CFD model in electrolyte temperature prediction but drastically improves the computational efficiency. The modeled terminal voltage is also benchmarked with the experimental data under different current densities. The electrolyte temperature is found to be significantly influenced by the flow rate of coolant. As compared, although the electrolyte flow rate has unremarkable impact on electrolyte temperature, its effect on system pressure drop and battery efficiency is significant. Increasing the electrolyte flow rate improves the coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency and energy efficiency simultaneously but at the expense of higher pump power demanded. An optimal flow rate exists for each operating condition to maximize the system efficiency.

Zhongbao Wei; Jiyun Zhao; Binyu Xiong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Simulation of heavy oil reservoir performance using a non-Newtonian flow model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AILM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Approved as to style and content by: lng . U an of Committee) R. . Morse...

Narahara, Gene Masao

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The backflow cell model of steady state flow reactors with axial dispersion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE BACKFLOW CELL MODEL OF STEADY STATE FLOW REACTORS WITH AXIAL DISPERSION A Thesis By John Thomas Baldwin Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1966 Major Subject;. Chemical Engineering THE BACKFLOW CELL MODEL OF STEADY STATE FLOW REACTORS WITH AXIAL DISPERSION A Thesis By John Thomas Baldwin Approved as to style and content by: C airman o ommittee ea o epartment (Member...

Baldwin, John Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can ...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Persistent energy flow for a stochastic wave equation model in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a one-dimensional partial differential equation system modeling heat flow around a ring. The system includes a Klein-Gordon wave equation for a field satisfying spatial periodic boundary conditions, as well as Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic differential equations with finite rank dissipation and stochastic driving terms modeling heat baths. There is an energy flow around the ring. In the case of a linear field with different (fixed) bath temperatures, the energy flow can persist even when the interaction with the baths is turned off. A simple example is given.

Lawrence E. Thomas

2012-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Integration of an Aggregate Flow Model with a Traffic Flow Simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation Tool (FACET). Using delay predictions, system metrics, and a visualization of the aggregated) solutions for weather disturbances. I. Introduction A. The Need for System Modeling. TFM initiatives

318

Hydrogeologic properties and ground-water chemistry of the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80 (DB-14) Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offsite migration studies were conducted to characterize the hydraulic properties and groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems within the Hanford Site. These studies support the recommendations in ERDA-1538 to provide input for hydrologic modeling of groundwater flow within the Hanford Site, to afford information concerning possible contamination of underlying confined aquifer systems and to make the results available to the public. This report presents analytical results and aquifer test procedures used in characterizing the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80. The overall close association in groundwater chemistries and presence of elevated nitrate levels suggest that the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed may be locally in communication with the overlying unconfined aquifer system. Other physical evidence which indicates a potential local communication with the unconfined aquifer system includes: favorable stratigraphic position; absence of the confining Elephant Mountain basalt in surrounding areas; and intersection of a recharge boundary during aquifer tests of well 699-25-80.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Howland, M.D.; Strait, S.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

320

NETL: Releases & Briefs - MFIX: Particle-fluid flow modeling, fast and free  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MFIX: Particle-fluid Flow Modeling, Fast and Free MFIX: Particle-fluid Flow Modeling, Fast and Free Until recently, full solution of the complex set of equations that describe gas-particle flows was nearly impossible. But an open-source code developed by researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and designed to run on inexpensive PC (Beowulf) clusters, makes it relatively simple. Called MFIX (Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange), the code incorporates special numerical techniques that provide an efficient solution to the coupled equations, exceeding the capabilities of commercial software. Originally developed at NETL to model fixed, fluidized and bubbling coal gasification technologies, its power has been used in research ranging from catalytic cracking in oil refineries to volcanology. A free, fully-functional version is available at www.mfix.org

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, Colombia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras Volcano, Colombia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a two-dimensional model for dilute pyroclastic flow dynamics that uses the compressible Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the Diffusion-Convection equation to take into account sedimentation. The model is applied to one of the slopes of Galeras Volcano to show: (1) the temperature evolution with the time; (2) dynamic pressure change; and (3) particle concentration along the computer domain from the eruption to the impact with a topographic barrier located more than 16 km

322

Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Conceptual models of the thermal structure of the Oregon Cascade Range propose either (1) a narrow zone of magmatic heat sources, flanked by shallow heat-flow anomalies caused by lateral ground-water flow; or (2) a wide zone of magmatic heat sources, with localized, generally negligible ground-water effects. The proposed narrow heat source coincides with the Quaternary volcanic arc, whereas the wider heat source would extend 10-30 km west of the arc. To test the models, four new heat-flow holes were sited

323

Treatment of model inland brackish groundwater reverse osmosis concentrate with electrodialysis — Part III: Sensitivity to composition and hydraulic recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of electrodialysis performance to variations in voltage application and membrane type when treating brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) concentrate waste, which typically exceeds multiple salt solubility limits. Synthetic BWRO concentrates from Arizona, Texas, and Florida of 7890–18,600 mg/L total dissolved solids were prepared with 6–10 mg/L of poly-phosphonate antiscalants. Experimentation was performed using a laboratory-scale electrodialyzer a nominal transfer area of 64 cm2 per membrane. Flow, pressure, conductivity, temperature, and pH were measured continuously, and periodic process samples were analyzed for anion and cation concentrations. The three BWRO concentrates were successfully treated with stack voltage applications of 1.0–1.5 V/cell-pair with initial current densities of 200–600 A/m2 and final salinity removal ratios up to 98%. This paper shows consistent specific energy consumption (approximately 0.03 kWh/m3 per Volt/cell-pair applied per meq/L separated) for electrodialysis treatment for several concentrates across a range of salinity and composition. Successive electrodialysis treatment recovered more than 78% of BWRO concentrate without precipitation, corresponding to calcite and dolomite saturation ratios of 15. These results demonstrate that electrodialysis processes can effectively minimize concentrate waste from BWRO processes, with simulated system recoveries up to 95%.

W. Shane Walker; Younggy Kim; Desmond F. Lawler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Treatment of model inland brackish groundwater reverse osmosis concentrate with electrodialysis — Part II: Sensitivity to voltage application and membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of electrodialysis performance to variations in voltage application and membranes when treating brackish water reverse osmosis concentrate waste. Synthetic BWRO concentrates from Arizona and Texas of 7890–14,800 mg/L total dissolved solids were prepared with poly-phosphonate antiscalants. Experimentation was performed using a laboratory-scale electrodialyzer with two sets of membranes (AMV-CMV and PCSA-PCSK) with a nominal transfer area of 64 cm2 per membrane. Flow, pressure, conductivity, temperature, and pH were measured continuously, and periodic samples were analyzed for specific anion and cation concentrations. The BWRO concentrates were successfully treated with stack voltage applications of 0.5–1.5 V/cell-pair for salinity removal ratios up to 99% with current density less than 500 A/m2. This paper highlights that (1) the specific energy consumption was proportional to the applied voltage and equivalent concentration separated (i.e., approximately 0.03 kW h/m3 per Volt/cell-pair applied per meq/L separated); (2) lower voltage applications decreased the relative separation rate of sulfate compared to chloride; and (3) water transport by electro-osmosis was independent of voltage application or resulting current densities, while it is affected by the ion exchange membranes.

W. Shane Walker; Younggy Kim; Desmond F. Lawler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Comparisons of complex network based models and direct current power flow model to analyze power grid vulnerability under intentional attacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many scholars have applied complex network based models to investigate power grid vulnerability, but how effective are these models to capture the real performance is an interesting topic. This paper selects two typical complex network based models, including a purely topological model (PTM) and a betweenness based model (BBM), as well as a direct current power flow model (DCPFM), to simulate the topology-based and flow-based vulnerability of power grid under degree, betweenness, maximum traffic and importance based intentional attacks. The relationships of vulnerability results from different models are analyzed and discussed for model comparisons. Taking IEEE 300 power grid with line capacity set proportional to tolerant parameter tp as example, the results show that there exists a critical node attack intensity A I = 0.147 , above which the three models produce almost identical topology-based vulnerability results under each attack strategy at any t p ? 1 , while producing identical flow-based vulnerability results from PTM and DCPFM occurs at A I > 0.147 , and A I > 0.73 for BBM and DCPFM, which indicates that the PTM can better approach the DCPFM for flow-based vulnerability analysis under intentional attacks. Similar results are also found for intentional edge attacks and other power grids.

Min Ouyang; Lijing Zhao; Zhezhe Pan; Liu Hong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Switching moving boundary models for two-phase flow evaporators and condensers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The moving boundary method is an appealing approach for the design, testing and validation of advanced control schemes for evaporators and condensers. When it comes to advanced control strategies, not only accurate but fast dynamic models are required. Moving boundary models are fast low-order dynamic models, and they can describe the dynamic behavior with high accuracy. This paper presents a mathematical formulation based on physical principles for two-phase flow moving boundary evaporator and condenser models which support dynamic switching between all possible flow configurations. The models were implemented in a library using the equation-based object-oriented Modelica language. Several integrity tests in steady-state and transient predictions together with stability tests verified the models. Experimental data from a direct steam generation parabolic-trough solar thermal power plant is used to validate and compare the developed moving boundary models against finite volume models.

Javier Bonilla; Sebastián Dormido; François E. Cellier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Also includes relevant well information * Developed sub-grid scale model of fracture permeability as a function of normal and shear displacements - Installed in the fully...

328

Modeling flow in coral communities with and without waves: A ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These approaches are very similar, albeit with some key differences in how canopy resistance forces are parameterized. Canopy models provide a means of

329

An Inertial Cell Model for the Drag Force in Multi-phase Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new model for the drag coefficient of a sphere in a concentrated system is described. It is based upon a cell-averaged model for the Stokes regime combined with a physically motivated extrapolation to arbitrary Reynolds number. It can be used as an alternative to the isolated particle drag coefficient in Euler-Lagrange modelling of solid-liquid multi-phase flow.The corresponding drag force also provides a dynamic bed equation for use in Euler-Euler modelling.

Tupper, Gary; Mainza, Aubrey

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flow and Storage in Groundwater Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a static reservoir. Even specialists...measure of permeability, can range...conductivity, and porosity of the system...Fractured-rock systems in...regional low-permeability unit. The...conductivity, and porosity of the system...Fractured-rock systems in...regional low-permeability unit, the...law by a porosity (n) of...11. Rock Fractures...

William M. Alley; Richard W. Healy; James W. LaBaugh; Thomas E. Reilly

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)] [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Cosby, B.J. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences] [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Hemond, H.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Charles, D.F. [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research] [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research; Norton, S.A. [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Modeling of Multiphase Flow with a Multiphysics Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

differ locally. ­ Here: Remediation scenario 2p2c Conditions 1p2c Conditions Multi-Physics #12 Summary Concept of Multi-Physics Multi-Physics 2p2c Conditions 1p2c Conditions #12;10 Department differ locally ­ Divide into sub-domains. ­ Apply different models locally. Numerical model 1p2c

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

333

An individual-based instream flow model for coexisting populations of brown and rainbow trout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an individual-based model for sympatric populations of brown and rainbow trout in a stream habitat. Hatchery rainbow trout are included as a third species. The model provides a tool for predicting flow effects on trout populations by linking the hydraulic component of the Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM) methodology and an individual-based population modeling approach. PHABSIM simulates the spatial distribution of depth and velocity at different flows. The individual-based model simulates the reproduction, foraging, consumption, energetic costs, growth, habitat utilization, movement, and mortality of individual fish, and enables population attributes to be determined from relevant attributes of individual fish. The spatially explicit nature of the model permits evaluation of behavioral responses used by fish to mitigate temporary setbacks in habitat quality. This linked mechanistic modeling approach readily lends itself to the iterative process of making predictions, testing against field data, improving the model, and making more predictions. The model has been applied to a stream segment in the Tule River, California. Physical and biological data from this site are used as input to the model. Calibrating the model to abundance data was relatively easy because values for mortality parameters were not strongly constrained by empirical data. Calibrating the model to observed growth rates and habitat use was more challenging. The primary reason for developing this model has been to provide a new and complementary tool to PHABSIM that can be used in instream-flow assessments.

Van Winkle, W.; Jager, H.I.; Holcomb, B.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A mathematical model for unsteady mixed flows in closed water pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the derivation of a new unidirectionnal model for unsteady mixed flows in non uniform closed domains. We introduce a local reference frame to take into account the local perturbation caused by the changes of section and slope. Then an asymptotic analysis is performed to obtain a model for the free surface flow and another for the pressurised flow. By coupling these models through the transition points by the use of a common set of variables and a suitable pressure law, we obtain a simple formulation called PFS-model close to the shallow water equations with source terms. It takes into account the changes of section and the slope variation in a continuous way through transition points.

Bourdarias, Christian; Gerbi, Stéphane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Transient groundwater dynamics in a coastal aquifer: The effects of tides, the lunar cycle, and the beach profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed field measurements are combined with a numerical modeling to characterize the groundwater dynamics beneath the discharge zone at Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. Groundwater salinity values revealed a saline circulation ...

Abarca, Elena

336

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

Torgersen, Christian

337

Adaptive h-finite element modeling of wind flow around bridges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design of suspension bridge span is known to be very challenging, particularly considering its stability against wind flow. Traditionally, analysis of bridge section is done using wind tunnel and is very time consuming, with normal experimentation and modeling works requiring minimum 6–8 weeks. To reduce cost and time requirements of wind tunnel experiments, as an alternate approach, wind flow around bridges are investigated by application of computer modeling. One challenging aspect of computational approach is to solve the Navier–Stokes (NS) equations accurately. In the present work, automatic mesh generation technique is used to transfer the continuous fluid flow into discrete numerical data, followed by use of h-adaptive technique. The adaptive simulation is carried out using two posteriori error estimations, which are based on the velocity gradient and vorticity. The current study uses the wind flow over the Great Belt East Bridge (GBEB) as a case study.

Sanjaya K. Patro; R. Panneer Selvam; Harold Bosch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A distributed converging overland flow model: 2. Effect of infiltration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area; f is dependent on the depth of flow h in the following sense: f(x, t) >0 if h(x, t) >0 f(x, t) = 0 if h(x, t) = 0 We will assume further that q(x, t) > f(x, t) O< t < T 0 < x < L(1 - r) where q is the lateral inflow per unit area..., T is the duration of q, L is the length of the converging section, r is the degree of convergence, and x and t are space and time coordinates. Then the continuity and momentum equations are Oh O(uh) uh q- -- q(x, t) -- ](x, t) q- (1) Ot Ox L -- x Q = uh = a...

Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

339

Modeling of D/C motor driven synthetic jet acutators for flow separation control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to validate the jet exit velocities predicted by the theoretical model. The optimal jet exit velocity required to achieve maximum flow reattachment at reasonable blowing momentum coefficients is predicted. A dynamic electro-acoustic model of the D/C motor...

Balasubramanian, Ashwin Kumar

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Numerical Early Warning Model Research of Landfill Gas Permeation and Diffusion Considering Flow-Temperature Coupling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on seepage mechanics in porous medium gas and heat transfer theory, numerical early warning model is established, which is on quantitative description of migration and release of landfill gas and penetration and diffusion of energy, and dynamic ... Keywords: component, landfill gas, flow-temperature coupling, gas pressure and temperature distribution, numerical early warning model

Xue Qiang; Feng Xia-ting; Ma Shi-jin; Zhou Xiao-jun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Irreversible Thermodynamics Approach and Modeling of Shear-Banding Flow of Wormlike Micelles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

44430, Mexico ... The flow in a pipe of wormlike micellar solutions is examined using a simple model that consists of the codeformational Maxwell constitutive equation and a kinetic equation that accounts for the breaking and reformation of micelles. ... The stress plateau is set in our model by the criterion of equal extended Gibbs free energy of the bands. ...

F. Bautista; J. F. A. Soltero; E. R. Macías; J. E. Puig; O. Manero

2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Flow Model of a Vortex Street Near a Fish-like Body Joshua Brulé, University of Maryland to inviscid, irrotational solutions of Navier-Stokes · Vortex potential: "A model of the lateral line of fish for vortex sensing." Ren Z, Mohseni K. 2012 #12;Vortex near a (circular) fish · (Insert your own spherical

Anlage, Steven

343

Radial flow has little effect on clusterization at intermediate energies in the framework of the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lattice Gas Model was extended to incorporate the effect of radial flow. Contrary to popular belief, radial flow has little effect on the clusterization process in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions except adding an ordered motion to the particles in the fragmentation source. We compared the results from the lattice gas model with and without radial flow to experimental data. We found that charge yields from central collisions are not significantly affected by inclusion of any reasonable radial flow.

C. B. Das; L. Shi; S. Das Gupta

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mathematical circulation model for the blood-flow-heat-loss relationship in the rat tail  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model for the heat-loss-blood-flow relationship is developed for the rat tail. When supplied with experimental values of heat loss and blood flow, the model allows one to compute the distribution of flow in deep and cutaneous vessels as a function of body core and tail temperature and to determine the savings in heat loss that result from alterations in the pattern of circulation and from counter-current heat transfer. Blood flow in the cutaneous and deep lying veins of the tail is controlled by both central and local temperatures and increases fairly linearly with deep body temperature. However, the distribution of blood flow in the tail is controlled only by local tail temperature and is independent of deep body temperature. The change in venous distribution of flow has a great impact on the conservation of heat and can reduce the heat loss from the circulating blood by more than 50% when venous return is directed to deep lying veins. On the other hand, counter-current heat transfer is of only minor importance in the control of heat loss from the tail, resulting at most in a 10% saving of heat loss, and that only at the smallest rate of blood flow.

E R Raman; V J Vanhuyse; M F Roberts

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of a cell-based stream flow routing model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. (1994) developed a 2.00x2.50 resolution river routing model for a number of World Rivers, coupled with an atmospheric-ocean model. The GCM of NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) (Hansen et al., 1983) was used to calculate the runoff... resolution of 2.00 X 2.50 using the coarse river network developed by Miller et al. (1994). Input to each of the grid cell was derived from the improved GISS GCM (Hansen et al., 1983), which improved the model prediction of discharge. Costa and Foley (1997...

Raina, Rajeev

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

347

Multiscale, Multiphysics Network Modeling of Shale Matrix Gas Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a pore network model to determine the permeability of shale gas matrix. Contrary to the conventional reservoirs, ... morphology of the pores, the permeability in shale depends on pressure as well. In a...

Ayaz Mehmani; Maša Prodanovi?; Farzam Javadpour

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

349

Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

Joel Sminchak

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Comparison of analytical models for zonal flow generation in ion-temperature-gradient mode turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past years the understanding of the multi scale interaction problems have increased significantly. However, at present there exists a flora of different analytical models for investigating multi scale interactions and hardly any specific comparisons have been performed among these models. In this work two different models for the generation of zonal flows from ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) background turbulence are discussed and compared. The methods used are the coherent mode coupling model and the wave kinetic equation model (WKE). It is shown that the two models give qualitatively the same results even though the assumption on the spectral difference is used in the (WKE) approach.

Anderson, J.; Miki, K.; Uzawa, K.; Li, J.; Kishimoto, Y. [Dept. Fundamental Energy Science, School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

An algebraic model for a zinc/bromine flow cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF LITERATURE III. MODEL DEVELOPMENT IV. MODEL SOLUTION a. Steady-State b. Unsteady-State . c. Psuedo Steady-State V. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS . a. Steady-State b. Unsteady-State . c. Psuedo Steady-State VI. CONCLUSIONS VII. FUTURE WORK . LIST... adjacent to anode Early time response of potential adjacent to cathode Early time response of Zn+z adjacent to cathode Early time response of Brz adjacent to cathode Early time response of Brs adjacent to cathode Early time response of Br adjacent...

Simpson, Gary Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Two-phase power-law modeling of pipe flows displaying shear-thinning phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes work in modeling concentrated liquid-solids flows in pipes. COMMIX-M, a three-dimensional transient and steady-state computer program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, was used to compute velocities and concentrations. Based on the authors` previous analyses, some concentrated liquid-solids suspension flows display shear-thinning rather than Newtonian phenomena. Therefore, they developed a two-phase non-Newtonian power-law model that includes the effect of solids concentration on solids viscosity. With this new two-phase power-law solids-viscosity model, and with constitutive relationships for interfacial drag, virtual mass effect, shear lift force, and solids partial-slip boundary condition at the pipe walls, COMMIX-M is capable of analyzing concentrated three-dimensional liquid-solids flows.

Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Sha, W.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porosity (range: 5% to 45%) and reservoir permeability (range: 1e-11 m2 to 1e-14 m2 ). Lower reservoir pressure profiles throughout the reservoir during constant production. As the initial reservoir porosity for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

354

Modeling daily flow patterns individuals to characterize disease spread  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of an individual's travels throughout a day on the spread of disease is examined using a deterministic SIR model. We determine which spatial and demographic characteristics most contribute to the disease spread and whether the progression of the disease can be slowed by appropriate vaccination of people belonging to a specific location-type.

Smallwood, J. (Jeanine); Hyman, J. M. (James M.); Mirchandani, Pitu B.

2002-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Current trends in modelling research for turbulent aerodynamic flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...standpoint in RANS model development, the task is to characterize...motivation behind the development of turbulent closure...wing-body junctions or turbine blades where separation...c v) and R is the gas constant. The presence...equations. 3. Closure strategies for RANS The closure...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Computational analysis of flow field around Ahmed car model passing underneath a flyover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A flow structure around a ground vehicle has been studied by many researchers using numerous methods either computational or experimental. However no analysis of flow field generated by a car passing under a flyover has been carried out. One of the famous simplified models of a car is the Ahmed body that has been established to investigate the influence of the flow structure on the drag. In this paper we investigate a flow field around Ahmed body of a single cruising condition as the vehicle passes under a flyover using a computational method with RANS equation. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the turbulence kinetic energy and velocity magnitude developed within the wall boundary created by the flyover to the air flow field that is generated by the Ahmed reference car. It was observed that the simulated airflow passes the vehicle was bounded by the wall of the flyover and consequently changes the pattern of the flow field. Understanding the characteristic of this flow field under a flyover is essential if one wants to maximize the recovery of the dissipated energy which for example can be used to power a small vertical-axis wind turbine to produce and store electrical energy for lighting under the flyover.

Md Nor Musa; Kahar Osman; Ab Malik A. Hamat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

CURRENT - A Computer Code for Modeling Two-Dimensional, Chemically Reaccting, Low Mach Number Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents CURRENT, a computer code for modeling two- dimensional, chemically reacting, low Mach number flows including the effects of surface chemistry. CURRENT is a finite volume code based on the SIMPLER algorithm. Additional convergence acceleration for low Peclet number flows is provided using improved boundary condition coupling and preconditioned gradient methods. Gas-phase and surface chemistry is modeled using the CHEMKIN software libraries. The CURRENT user-interface has been designed to be compatible with the Sandia-developed mesh generator and post processor ANTIPASTO and the post processor TECPLOT. This report describes the theory behind the code and also serves as a user`s manual.

Winters, W.S.; Evans, G.H.; Moen, C.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of One- and Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Hypersonic Transitional Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many Navier-Stokes codes require that the governing equations be written in conservation form with a source term. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model was originally developed in substantial derivative form and when rewritten in conservation form, a density gradient term appears in the source term. This density gradient term causes numerical problems and has a small influence on the numerical predictions. Further work has been performed to understand and to justify the neglect of this term. The transition trip term has been included in the one-equation eddy viscosity model of Spalart-Allmaras. Several problems with this model have been discovered when applied to high-speed flows. For the Mach 8 flat plate boundary layer flow with the standard transition method, the Baldwin-Barth and both k-{omega} models gave transition at the specified location. The Spalart-Allmaras and low Reynolds number k-{var_epsilon} models required an increase in the freestream turbulence levels in order to give transition at the desired location. All models predicted the correct skin friction levels in both the laminar and turbulent flow regions. For Mach 8 flat plate case, the transition location could not be controlled with the trip terms as given in the Spalart-Allmaras model. Several other approaches have been investigated to allow the specification of the transition location. The approach that appears most appropriate is to vary the coefficient that multiplies the turbulent production term in the governing partial differential equation for the eddy viscosity (Method 2). When this coefficient is zero, the flow remains laminar. The coefficient is increased to its normal value over a specified distance to crudely model the transition region and obtain fully turbulent flow. While this approach provides a reasonable interim solution, a separate effort should be initiated to address the proper transition procedure associated with the turbulent production term. Also, the transition process might be better modeled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model with modification of the damping function f{sub v1}. The damping function could be set to zero in the laminar flow region and then turned on through the transition flow region.

ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

A two-phase flow model of sediment transport: transition from bedload to suspended load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport of dense particles by a turbulent flow depends on two dimensionless numbers. Depending on the ratio of the shear velocity of the flow to the settling velocity of the particles (or the Rouse number), sediment transport takes place in a thin layer localized at the surface of the sediment bed (bedload) or over the whole water depth (suspended load). Moreover, depending on the sedimentation Reynolds number, the bedload layer is embedded in the viscous sublayer or is larger. We propose here a two-phase flow model able to describe both viscous and turbulent shear flows. Particle migration is described as resulting from normal stresses, but is limited by turbulent mixing and shear-induced diffusion of particles. Using this framework, we theoretically investigate the transition between bedload and suspended load.

Filippo Chiodi; Philippe Claudin; Bruno Andreotti

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

Biological stability of groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional (e.g., coagulation, flocculation, and filtration) or membrane filtration treatment trains were used to remove organic compounds from groundwater. For the conventional train with sand-anthracite columns, the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) of the groundwater was reduced from 349 {+-} 127 {micro}g/L C to 54 {+-} 51 {micro}g/L C. For the membrane filtration train, there was no statistical difference between the AOC of the raw water influent (388 {+-} 126 {micro}g C) and that of the membrane permeate (334 {+-} 156 {micro}g/L C), suggesting that this treatment produced biologically unstable water. Similar results were obtained using the heterotrophic growth response (HGR) method. Comparison of the biostability methods showed that HGR was positively correlated with AOC (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001; n = 156), indicating that AOC only partially explains the ability of heterotrophic bacteria to grow in water samples.

Noble, P.A. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology; Clark, D.L. [Irvine Ranch Water District, CA (United States); Olson, B.H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). School of Social Ecology, Environmental Analysis, and Design

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

364

Case study of groundwater impact caused by underground mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigative methodology is presented to assist mining and regulatory personnel in determining the effect underground mining can have on local aquifers in the Appalachian coal region. The impact of underground mining on groundwater may be more extensive than first realized by the mining industry and regulatory agencies. The primary reason for this possible under-assessment of deep mining's influence on groundwater is the methods used to calculate groundwater movement. Since groundwater calculations are based on primary hydraulic conductivity, i.e. the conductivity through solid rock measured from rock core samples, erroneous results may be expected. In many cases, groundwater flow times and the corresponding areas of influence are much greater than those assumed since water is rapidly moved through fractured zones that commonly occur throughout Appalachia. A case study illustrating this phenomenon is drawn from underground mining operations in Pike County. A survey of 144 wells was conducted to determine if any loss of water supply and/or quality was found. This was correlated to the extent and time progression of underground mining operations. Other parameters qualified are water level fluctuations, groundwater quality, precipitation, seasonal effects, geology, and mine dewatering. The analysis includes a comprehensive compilation of a well inventory of domestic water supplies. The case study draws conclusions regarding cause and effect relationships.

Sloan, P.; Warner, R.C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

CFD modeling of commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to model the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical processes involved, the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented in this paper include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate and a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and the heating rate effect on volatile yield. The global gas phase reaction kinetics is also carefully selected. To predict a reasonable peak temperature of the coal/O{sub 2} flame inside an entrained-flow gasifier, the reserve reaction of H{sub 2} oxidation is included in the gas phase reaction model. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical commercial-scale oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for system-wide design and optimization.

Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Lattice Boltzmann Fictitious Domain Method for Modeling Red Blood Cell Deformation and Multiple-Cell Hydrodynamic Interactions in Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To model red blood cell (RBC) deformation in flow, the recently developed LBM-DLM/FD method ([Shi and Lim, 2007)29], derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain methodthe fictitious domain method, is extended to employ the mesoscopic network model for simulations of red blood cell deformation. The flow is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method with an external force, while the network model is used for modeling red blood cell deformation and the fluid-RBC interaction is enforced by the Lagrange multiplier. To validate parameters of the RBC network model, sThe stretching numerical tests on both coarse and fine meshes are performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data to validate the parameters of the RBC network model. In addition, RBC deformation in pipe flow and in shear flow is simulated, revealing the capacity of the current method for modeling RBC deformation in various flows.

Shi, Xing; Lin, Guang; Zou, Jianfeng; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

An elastic-perfectly plastic flow model for finite element analysis of perforated materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the formulation of an elastic-perfectly plastic flow theory applicable to equivalent solid [EQS] modeling of perforated materials. An equilateral triangular array of circular penetrations is considered. The usual assumptions regarding geometry and loading conditions applicable to the development of elastic constants for EQS modeling of perforated plates are considered to apply here. An elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] EQS model is developed for a collapse surface that includes fourth-order stress terms. The fourth order yield function has been shown to be appropriate for plates with a triangular array of circular holes. A complete flow model is formulated using the consistent tangent modulus approach based on the fourth order yield function.

Jones, D.P.; Gordon, J.L.; Hutula, D.N.; Banas, D.; Newman, J.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Detailed numerical modeling of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium in hypersonic flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in hypersonic flows has created a large demand for physicochemical models for air flow computations around reentry bodies. Detailed physicochemical models for air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium are needed for a realistic prediction of hypersonic flowfields. In this paper we develop a model, based on elementary physicochemical processes, for a detailed description of chemical nonequilibrium together with the excitation of internal DOFs. This model is implemented in a 2D Navier-Stokes code in order to show the strong influence of thermal nonequilibrium on the flowfields. The algorithm presented here is based on a fully conservative discretization of the inviscid fluxes in the conservation equations and uses the chain rule conservation law form for the viscous fluxes. The large system of ordinary differential and algebraic equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved by a time-accurate semiimplicit extrapolation method. 34 refs.

Riedel, U.; Maas, U.; Warnatz, J. (Stuttgart Univ. (Germany))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stationary, isothermal, three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery is developed, which is based on the comprehensive conservation laws, such as charge, mass and momentum, together with a kinetic model for reaction involving vanadium species. The model is validated against the results calculated by the available two-dimensional model. With the given geometry of the negative half cell, the distributions of velocity, concentration, overpotential and transfer current density in the sections that are perpendicular and parallel to the applied current are studied. It is shown that the distribution of the electrolyte velocity in the electrode has significant impact on the distribution of concentration, overpotential and transfer current density. The lower velocity in the electrode will cause the higher overpotential, further result in the side reaction and corrosion of key materials locally. The development of the design of the vanadium redox flow battery is discussed, and the further research is proposed.

Xiangkun Ma; Huamin Zhang; Feng Xing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling and Feedback Control for Air Flow Regulation in Deep Pits Emmanuel WITRANT and Nicolas the air). It is clear that investigating automatic control solutions and minimizing the amount of pumped to the ground turbine control and distributed sensors within the shaft; 2. air quality regulation

Boyer, Edmond

373

The Lattice Boltzmann Method as a General Framework for Blood Flow Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 The Lattice Boltzmann Method as a General Framework for Blood Flow Modelling with the Lattice Boltzmann method and the underlying Cartesian mesh. The methodology allows to accommodate red, the Lattice Boltzmann framework has become a reality for studying sections of the human circulatory system

Pontrelli, Giuseppe

374

Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

Lund, Jay R.

375

Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow S in a rotor-stator cavity subjected to a superimposed throughflow with heat transfer. Nu- merical predictions field from the heat transfer process. The turbulent flux is approximated by a gradient hypothesis

Boyer, Edmond

376

Multiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

individual scale, as an ensemble of porous media, with well defined properties (porosity and permeabilityMultiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs Peter Popov1, vuggy, porus media is a challenging problem which occurs frequently in reservoir engineering

Popov, Peter

377

A PARALLEL ADAPTIVE 3D MHD SCHEME FOR MODELING CORONAL AND SOLAR WIND PLASMA FLOWS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARALLEL ADAPTIVE 3D MHD SCHEME FOR MODELING CORONAL AND SOLAR WIND PLASMA FLOWS C. P. T. GROTH, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109­2143, USA K. G. POWELL Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109­2118, USA Abstract. A parallel adaptive

De Zeeuw, Darren L.

378

Transient fluid and heat flow modeling in coupled wellbore/reservoir systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

showing cleanup period.......................................................... 68 Figure 5.21 Geothermal gradient and sea water temperature profile............................. 68 Figure 5.22 Mimicking oil production rate input... into this category. 5 Miller (1980) developed one of the earliest transient wellbore simulators, which accounts for changes in geothermal-fluid energy while flowing up the wellbore. In this model, mass and momentum equations are combined...

Izgec, Bulent

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste long-lived radioactive wastes must be managed in a safe way for human health and for the environment. That is the raison why the French agency for the management of radioactive waste (ANDRA) is engaged to study

Boyer, Edmond

380

A non-continuum approach to obtain a macroscopic model for the flow of traffic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by continuum models for the flow of traffic. The number of vehicles in a typical section of a freeway does not justify traffic being treated as a continuum. It is also important to recognize that the basic premises of kinetic theory are not appropriate...

Tyagi, Vipin

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Turbulent models of ice giant internal dynamics: Dynamos, heat transfer, and zonal flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulent models of ice giant internal dynamics: Dynamos, heat transfer, and zonal flows K Magnetic fields a b s t r a c t The ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, have magnetic fields to yield small-scale and disorganized turbulence. In agreement with ice giant observations, both

382

CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M2 CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke Department- oped on top of the MCIRQ simulator with the aim to produce an automated FMEA for aircraft fuel systems similar to pre- viously developed automated electrical FMEA. Introduction This paper describes a circuit

Snooke, Neal

383

Statistical Analysis of Microgravity Two-Phase Slug Flow via the Drift Flux Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The result was a statistically consistent microgravity slug flow data base consisting of 220 data points from 8 different experiments and the associated values for the concentration parameter, Co, and drift velocity, u_(gj). A key component for this model...

Larsen, Benjamin A

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications A Abstract Fusion power plant studies have found helium to be an attractive coolant based on its safety tend to provide modest heat transfer performance due to their inherently low heat capacity and heat

Raffray, A. René

385

A New Model of Centrality Measure based on Bidirectional Power Flow for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power flow based model to evaluate the criticality in smart grid environment. Change in direction of smart grid includes various generation options, primarily in the distribution side ­ near consumers. Engagement of customers with the energy management systems is the most lucrative part of smart grid from

Pota, Himanshu Roy

386

A Novel Hyperbolization Procedure for The Two-Phase Six-Equation Flow Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a novel approach for the hyperbolization of the well-known two-phase six equation flow model. The six-equation model has been frequently used in many two-phase flow applications such as bubbly fluid flows in nuclear reactors. One major drawback of this model is that it can be arbitrarily non-hyperbolic resulting in difficulties such as numerical instability issues. Non-hyperbolic behavior can be associated with complex eigenvalues that correspond to characteristic matrix of the system. Complex eigenvalues are often due to certain flow parameter choices such as the definition of inter-facial pressure terms. In our method, we prevent the characteristic matrix receiving complex eigenvalues by fine tuning the inter-facial pressure terms with an iterative procedure. In this way, the characteristic matrix possesses all real eigenvalues meaning that the characteristic wave speeds are all real therefore the overall two-phase flowmodel becomes hyperbolic. The main advantage of this is that one can apply less diffusive highly accurate high resolution numerical schemes that often rely on explicit calculations of real eigenvalues. We note that existing non-hyperbolic models are discretized mainly based on low order highly dissipative numerical techniques in order to avoid stability issues.

Samet Y. Kadioglu; Robert Nourgaliev; Nam Dinh

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modeling evaporation from porous medium influenced by turbulent free flow Thomas Fetzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toolbox freeflow (1p2c) direct numerical simulation Reynolds-averaged- Navier-Stokes (RANS) Stokes flow medium (2p2c) direct numerical simulation pore network modeling representative elementary volume (REV as a one-phase, two-component system (1p2c), the porous medium as a two-phase, two-component system (2p2c

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

388

PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER QUALITY MODEL (RZWQM) AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER into the waste, earthen landfill covers are constructed once a landfill reaches its capacity. Formation earthen landfill covers during service. Most commonly used water balance models that are used

389

Application of the ``Ke'' model to open channel flows in a magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,* , Mohamed Abdou a , Neil Morley a , Alice Ying a , Tomoaki Kunugi b a Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering-133 Engineering IV, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597, USA b Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Japan-conductivity fluids such as molten salts. In the present study, the ``K­e'' model equations for turbulent flows

Abdou, Mohamed

390

groundwater | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany Contact NETL Key Staff Mission and Overview History Organization Awards & Recognition Education Site Enviromental Quality Visiting NETL Ground...

391

Stress-induced patterns in ion-irradiated Silicon: a model based on anisotropic plastic flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the effect of stress on thin amorphous films that develop atop ion-irradiated silicon, based on the mechanism of ion-induced anisotropic plastic flow. Using only parameters directly measured or known to high accuracy, the model exhibits remarkably good agreement with the wavelengths of experimentally-observed patterns, and agrees qualitatively with limited data on ripple propagation speed. The predictions of the model are discussed in the context of other mechanisms recently theorized to explain the wavelengths, including extensive comparison with an alternate model of stress.

Scott A. Norris

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Investigation of swirling flow mixing for application in an MHD pulverized coal combustor using isothermal modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate combustor reactant mixing with swirling oxidizer flow. The combustor configuration that was considered was designed to simulate a 4 lbm/sec mas flow pulverized coal combustor being tested in The University of Tennessee Space Institute MHD Facility. A one-fourth dimensionally scaled combustor model was developed for isothermal flow testing. A comparison was made of cold flow tests using 3 swirler designs with a base case oxidizer injector design of perforated plated which demonstrated acceptable performance in the 4 lbm/sec MHD combustor. The three swirlers that were evaluated were designed to allow a wide range of swirl intensity to be investigated. The design criterion of the swirler was the swirl number which has been related to swirler geometry. The results of the study showed that the swirlers that were tested fell short of the mixing characteristics displayed with the perforated plate base case oxidizer injector. Test data obtained with the cold flow model established that the actual swirl numbers of two of the swirlers were much lower than the design swirl numbers. Recirculation zones were defined for all configurations that were tested, and a comparison of velocity profiles was made for the configurations.

Power, W. H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) are being created in many parts of Texas to allow local citizens to manage and protect their groundwater. This publication answers frequently asked questions about groundwater and GCDs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

iTOUGH2-IFC: An Integrated Flow Code in Support of Nagra's Probabilistic Safety Assessment:--User's Guide and Model Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the development and use of the Integrated Flow Code (IFC), a numerical code and related model to be used for the simulation of time-dependent, two-phase flow in the near field and geosphere of a gas-generating nuclear waste repository system located in an initially fully water-saturated claystone (Opalinus Clay) in Switzerland. The development of the code and model was supported by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen, Switzerland. Gas generation (mainly H{sub 2}, but also CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) may affect repository performance by (1) compromising the engineered barriers through excessive pressure build-up, (2) displacing potentially contaminated pore water, (3) releasing radioactive gases (e.g., those containing {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H), (4) changing hydrogeologic properties of the engineered barrier system and the host rock, and (5) altering the groundwater flow field and thus radionuclide migration paths. The IFC aims at providing water and gas flow fields as the basis for the subsequent radionuclide transport simulations, which are performed by the radionuclide transport code (RTC). The IFC, RTC and a waste-dissolution and near-field transport model (STMAN) are part of the Integrated Radionuclide Release Code (IRRC), which integrates all safety-relevant features, events, and processes (FEPs). The IRRC is embedded into a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) computational tool that (1) evaluates alternative conceptual models, scenarios, and disruptive events, and (2) performs Monte-Carlo sampling to account for parametric uncertainties. The preliminary probabilistic safety assessment concept and the role of the IFC are visualized in Figure 1. The IFC was developed based on Nagra's PSA concept. Specifically, as many phenomena as possible are to be directly simulated using a (simplified) process model, which is at the core of the IRRC model. Uncertainty evaluation (scenario uncertainty, conceptualization uncertainty, parametric uncertainty) is handled by the outer shell of the PSA model; it is not further discussed in this report. Moreover, justifications for the inclusion or exclusion of FEPs as well as for certain simplifying assumptions are available or can be obtained using detailed process models and other supporting information. The IFC is both a numerical code and a model of a repository system. The numerical code is a modification of the multiphase, multicomponent simulator TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999), as implemented within the iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 2007abc) framework. The code modifications are mainly concerned with the implementation of relevant FEPs as outlined in Nagra (2007a, AN 07-115), as well as removal of processes and features that are not needed within the IFC; the modifications are summarized in Appendix A1. In addition, the IFC includes a model, i.e., a simplified representation of the repository system. Specifically, a computational grid was generated, which includes the emplacement tunnels for spent fuel, high-level wastes, as well as long-lived intermediate-level wastes. Moreover, the model represents engineered barriers (backfill, seals, plugs, etc.), various tunnels and other underground facilities, and includes a simplified representation of the geological structure, i.e., the host rock (including the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the underground openings), confining units, local aquifers, and a highly transmissive zone. The IFC model was designed in close collaboration with Nagra. This report describes all functional requirements of the IFC and how they are implemented in the IFC. The input formats needed to invoke added modeling capabilities are documented. Finally, the IFC model grid is described, and results from a test simulation are presented.

Finsterle, Stefan A.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Results of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in April 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), suggesting possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE were the following: Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; Air sparging (AS) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes (LDBs); and Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to development of a possible CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a). (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006b), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property. (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume. (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,b) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006c), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for the main body of the groundwater plume, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006); the KDHE later noted, however (KDHE 2007a), that this and other technologies might represent viable remedial options in the event of further downgradient migration of the plume toward the intermittent creek. In February 2007, the CCC/USDA presented preliminary analyses of (1) the AS-SVE remedial alternative, incorporating the use of LDBs, and (2) the risks to human health and the environment posed by the observed carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater (Argonne 2007a). The results of these analyses demonstrated the following: (1) Neither groundwater extraction nor AS-SVE in LDBs represents a practical approach for effective remediation of the groundwater contamination at Everest (near the Nigh property). (2) Periodic sampling and analyses for VOCs conducted by the CCC/USDA documented that the areal extent and range of carbon tetrachloride concentrations detected in the groundwater plume at Everest had changed relatively little from 2000 to 2006. (3) Estimates of groundwater flow and contaminant migration times, based on the hydrogeologic properties of the groundwater flow system identified at Everest (Argonne 2003, 2006b,c), indicated that, at minimum, approximately 4 years would be required for the carbon tetrachloride plume (in the subsurface) to reach the vicinity of the intermittent creek directly west of the Nigh property, and more than 20 years would be required for the contamination to reach the identified groundwater discharge area southwest of the Nigh property. (4) The existing (January-March 2006) plume posed no immediate danger of contamination to the surface waters of the intermittent creek. In lig

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Effects of Fluid Flow On Shear Localization and Frictional Strength From Dynamic Models Of Fault Gouge During Earthquakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the effects of fluid flow on shear localization and frictional strength of fault gouge through the use of a coupled 2-phase (pore fluid-grain) Finite Difference-Discrete Element Numerical model. The model simulates slip...

Bianco, Ronald

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges and furrows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges Abstract We introduce a new Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow with furrow conservation (decreases soil thickness by erosion and causes nutrient loss), infrastruc- tures (flooding

d'Orléans, Université

398

A pilot plant to treat chromium-contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater at a site in California is contaminated with hexavalent chromium. Different treatment options were tested. The options tested included: carbon adsorption, ion exchange, chemical treatment, reverse osmosis, and in-place fixation. Electrochemical treatment was the treatment of choice. Treatment operations were designed with turn down flexibility to allow operation at variable flow rates. Metal reduction is the first treatment step after collection of the groundwater and lowering of the pH to 3 in an on-line acid tank. Soluble ferrous ions are produced in an off-line electrochemical cell using sacrificial electrodes.

El-Shoubary, Y.; Speizer, N.; Seth, S.; Savoia, H. [Merck Mfg. Div., Somerset, NJ (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Groundwater Discharge Permit and Registration (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Discharge Permitting and Registration Program seeks to protect groundwater quality by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for wastewater discharges. The program...

400

Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater containing legacy contaminants (pollutants that remain after their sources have been controlled) moves through aquifers in response to the hydraulic gradient. As the groundwater moves,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of the forcing term in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of thermal flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is a popular model in the LB community for simulating multiphase flows. Recently, several thermal LB models, which are based on the pseudopotential LB model and constructed within the framework of the double-distribution-function LB method, were proposed to simulate thermal multiphase flows [G. H\\'azi and A. M\\'arkus, Phys. Rev. E 77, 026305 (2008); L. Biferale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 104502 (2012); S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012)]. The objective of the present paper is to show that the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation must be eliminated in the pseudopotential LB modeling of thermal flows. First, the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation is shown via the Chapman-Enskog analysis. For comparison, alternative treatments that are free from the forcing-term effect are provided. Subsequently, numerical investigations are performed for two benchmark tests. The numerical results clearly show ...

Li, Q

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Facilities, testing program and modeling needs for studying liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in fusion blankets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since many years, liquid metal flows for applications in fusion blankets have been investigated worldwide. A review is given about modeling requirements and existing experimental facilities for investigations of liquid metal related issues in blankets with the focus on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Most of the performed theoretical and experimental works were dedicated to fundamental aspects of MHD flows under very strong magnetic fields as they may occur in generic elements of fusion blankets like pipes, ducts, bends, expansions and contractions. Those experiments are required to progressively validate numerical tools with the purpose of obtaining codes capable to predict MHD flows at fusion relevant parameters in complex blanket geometries, taking into account electrical and thermal coupling between fluid and structural materials. Scaled mock-up experiments support the theoretical activities and help deriving engineering correlations for cases which cannot be calculated with required accuracy up to now.

L. Bühler; C. Mistrangelo; J. Konys; R. Bhattacharyay; Q. Huang; D. Obukhov; S. Smolentsev; M. Utili

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Flow modeling of flat oval ductwork elbows using computational fluid dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incompressible turbulent flow fields in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) elbows were computed using an incompressible, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver implementing a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Two different geometries were investigated, including 90-degree five-gore hard-bend and easy-bend flat oval elbows. The geometries represent a subset of many configurations analyzed in ASHRAE RP-854, Determination of Duct Fitting Resistance by Numerical Analysis. For each configuration, the zero-length pressure loss coefficient was calculated. The flow was described through contours of velocity and plots of static pressure. The Reynolds number for these flows was held constant at 100,000 based on duct diameter and mean fluid velocity.

Mahank, T.A.; Mumma, S.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Development of an entrained flow gasifier model for process optimization study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a versatile process to convert a solid fuel in syngas, which can be further converted and separated in hydrogen, which is a valuable and environmentally acceptable energy carrier. Different technologies (fixed beds, fluidized beds, entrained flow reactors) are used, operating under different conditions of temperature, pressure, and residence time. Process studies should be performed for defining the best plant configurations and operating conditions. Although 'gasification models' can be found in the literature simulating equilibrium reactors, a more detailed approach is required for process analysis and optimization procedures. In this work, a gasifier model is developed by using AspenPlus as a tool to be implemented in a comprehensive process model for the production of hydrogen via coal gasification. It is developed as a multizonal model by interconnecting each step of gasification (preheating, devolatilization, combustion, gasification, quench) according to the reactor configuration, that is in entrained flow reactor. The model removes the hypothesis of equilibrium by introducing the kinetics of all steps and solves the heat balance by relating the gasification temperature to the operating conditions. The model allows to predict the syngas composition as well as quantity the heat recovery (for calculating the plant efficiency), 'byproducts', and residual char. Finally, in view of future works, the development of a 'gasifier model' instead of a 'gasification model' will allow different reactor configurations to be compared.

Biagini, E.; Bardi, A.; Pannocchia, G.; Tognotti, L. [Consorzio Pisa Ric, Pisa (Italy). Div Energia Ambiente

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Inviscid Limits for a Stochastically Forced Shell Model of Turbulent Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish the anomalous mean dissipation rate of energy in the inviscid limit for a stochastic shell model of turbulent fluid flow. The proof relies on viscosity independent bounds for stationary solutions and on establishing ergodic and mixing properties for the viscous model. The shell model is subject to a degenerate stochastic forcing in the sense that noise acts directly only through one wavenumber. We show that it is hypo-elliptic (in the sense of Hormander) and use this property to prove a gradient bound on the Markov semigroup.

Susan Friedlander; Nathan Glatt-Holtz; Vlad Vicol

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Groundwater Protection, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Groundwater placeholder DOE, BNL, elected officials, and community leaders mark the opening of the first off-site groundwater treatment system. From the outset, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered the protection of human health to be the most important goal of the cleanup program. Because exposure to groundwater contamination had the greatest potential to impact human health, the focus was to ensure that local drinking water supplies were clean and safe. Early efforts concentrated on determining the locations of the contamination, installing treatment systems to clean up the groundwater, and remediating sources of contamination like landfills and underground tanks. DOE and the Lab are committed to protecting Long Island's sole-source aquifer, a vital natural resource.

407

Improved low-order model for shear flow driven by Rayleigh-Benard convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the low-order model for two-dimensional fluid flow with shear proposed by Drake [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Fluids B 4, 488 (1992)] is undertaken. Their two-term model for the shear is an extension of the model put forth by Howard and Krisnamurti [J. Fluid Mech. 170, 385 (1986)], and is shown to be an improved model in the sense that it respects certain conditions for vorticity conservation arising directly from the Boussinesq equations. In so doing, it provides a more realistic model of the physics involved. An important consequence of the improved model is the appearance of cutoff values for the shear instability that are dependent upon the aspect ratio of the interacting Rayleigh-Taylor cell. Numerical results are presented as confirmation of this prediction.

Hermiz, K.B. (Department of Mathematics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)); Guzdar, P.N.; Finn, J.M. (Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

RAPID applied to the SIM-France model1 Cdric H. David1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RAPID applied to the SIM-France model1 2 Cédric H. David1,2,3 (cedric/river/groundwater modeling25 system that simulates the water cycle throughout metropolitan France. The work26 presented called RAPID to enhance the capacity to relate28 simulated flows to river gages and to take advantage

Boyer, Edmond

409

Transient Heat and Material Flow Modeling of Friction Stir Processing of Magnesium Alloy using Threaded Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to investigate the material flow and heat transfer during friction stir processing (FSP) in an AZ31B magnesium alloy. The material was assumed to be a non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluid, and the Zener-Hollomon parameter was used to describe the dependence of material viscosity on temperature and strain rate. The material constants used in the constitutive equation were determined experimentally from compression tests of the AZ31B Mg alloy under a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. A dynamic mesh method, combining both Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, was used to capture the material flow induced by the movement of the threaded tool pin. Massless inert particles were embedded in the simulation domain to track the detailed history of material flow. The actual FSP was also carried out on a wrought Mg plate where temperature profiles were recorded by embedding thermocouples. The predicted transient temperature history was found to be consistent with that measured during FSP. Finally, the influence of the thread on the simulated results of thermal history and material flow was studied by comparing two models: one with threaded pin and the other with smooth pin surface.

Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Choo, Hahn [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major campaign to quantify the magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters around Mammoth Mountain volcano in eastern California was carried out from 1996 to 1999. The total water flow from all sampled cold springs was >=1.8_107 m3/yr draining an area that receives an estimated

412

Beyond-the-Standard-Model matrix elements with the gradient flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) we have started a long-term program that aims to determine beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) matrix elements using the gradient flow, and to understand the impact of BSM physics in nucleon and nuclear observables. Using the gradient flow, we propose to calculate the QCD component of key beyond the Standard Model (BSM) matrix elements related to quark and strong theta CP violation and the strange content within the nucleon. The former set of matrix elements impacts our understanding of Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs) of nucleons and nuclei (a key signature of BSM physics), while the latter contributes to elastic recoil of Dark Matter particles off nucleons and nuclei. If successful, these results will lay the foundation for extraction of BSM observables from future low-energy, high-intensity and high-accuracy experimental measurements.

A. Shindler; J. de Vries; T. Luu

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

Beyond-the-Standard-Model matrix elements with the gradient flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) we have started a long-term program that aims to determine beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) matrix elements using the gradient flow, and to understand the impact of BSM physics in nucleon and nuclear observables. Using the gradient flow, we propose to calculate the QCD component of key beyond the Standard Model (BSM) matrix elements related to quark and strong theta CP violation and the strange content within the nucleon. The former set of matrix elements impacts our understanding of Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs) of nucleons and nuclei (a key signature of BSM physics), while the latter contributes to elastic recoil of Dark Matter particles off nucleons and nuclei. If successful, these results will lay the foundation for extraction of BSM observables from future low-energy, high-intensity and high-accuracy experimental measurements.

Shindler, A; Luu, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Algebraic stress model for axial flow in a bare rod-bundle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of predicting transport properties for momentum and heat across the boundaries of interconnected channels has been the subject of many investigations. In the particular case of axial flow through rod-bundles, transport coefficients for channel faces aligned with rod centers are known to be considerably higher than those calculated by simple isotropic theories. And yet, it was been found that secondary flows play only a minor role in this overall transport, being turbulence highly enhanced across that hypothetical surface. In order to numerically predict the correct amount of the quantity being transported, the approach taken by many investigators was then to artificially increase the diffusion coefficient obtained via a simple isopropic theory (usually the standard k-epsilon model) and numerically match the correct experimentally observed mixing rates. The present paper reports an attempt to describe the turbulent stresses by means of an Algebraic Stress Model for turbulence. Relative turbulent kinetic energy distribution in all three directions are presented and compared with experiments in a square lattice. The strong directional dependence of transport terms are then obtained via a model for the Reynolds stresses. The results identify a need for a better representation of the mean-flow field part of the pressure-strain correlation term.

de Lemos, M.J.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The modeling and calculation of sound radiation from facilities with gas flowed pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer modeling of industrial facilities like chemical plants refineries or other production areas is the first and most important step in the calculation of sound exposure in the environment. The pipework with gas flows is often contributing relevant to the sound radiation of the complete facility. This radiation can be determined applying the methods described in technical papers like VDI 3733 and ISO 15664. On the basis of these descriptions a software tool was developed that allows to create pipework in 3D models with line sources and to calculate the sound propagation with methods like ISO 9613-2. The line sources are linked with the technical parameters like pipe cross section flow rate pressure density and temperature of the gas and material parameters of the pipe wall. The sound power emission from the pipe to the environment and the internal flow of sound power—linked to the next section of piping—is calculated on the basis of these parameters. The same technique is used to calculate the sound emission of cooling towers electric and fuel driven motors gears pumps and other devices. This powerful technique allows creating sustainable models that can be adapted to different operation conditions with minimum time and effort.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The modeling and calculation of sound radiation from facilities with gas flowed pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer modeling of industrial facilities like chemical plants refineries or other production areas is the first and most important step in the calculation of sound exposure in the environment. The pipework with gas flows is often contributing relevant to the sound radiation of the complete facility. This radiation can be determined applying the methods described in technical papers like VDI3733 and ISO15664. On the basis of these descriptions a software tool was developed that allows to create pipework in 3D models with line sources and to calculate the sound propagation with methods like ISO9613-2. The line sources are linked with the technical parameters like pipe cross section flow rate pressure density and temperature of the gas and material parameters of the pipe wall. The sound power emission from the pipe to the environment and the internal flow of sound power - linked to the next section of piping - is calculated on the basis of these parameters. The same technique is used to calculate the sound emission of cooling towers electric and fuel driven motors gears pumps and other devices. This powerful technique allows creating sustainable models that can be adapted to different operation conditions with minimum time and effort.

Fabian Probst

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Nonlocal Peridynamic Plasticity Model for the Dynamic Flow and Fracture of Concrete.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlocal, ordinary peridynamic constitutive model is formulated to numerically simulate the pressure-dependent flow and fracture of heterogeneous, quasi-brittle ma- terials, such as concrete. Classical mechanics and traditional computational modeling methods do not accurately model the distributed fracture observed within this family of materials. The peridynamic horizon, or range of influence, provides a characteristic length to the continuum and limits localization of fracture. Scaling laws are derived to relate the parameters of peridynamic constitutive model to the parameters of the classical Drucker-Prager plasticity model. Thermodynamic analysis of associated and non-associated plastic flow is performed. An implicit integration algorithm is formu- lated to calculate the accumulated plastic bond extension and force state. The gov- erning equations are linearized and the simulation of the quasi-static compression of a cylinder is compared to the classical theory. A dissipation-based peridynamic bond failure criteria is implemented to model fracture and the splitting of a concrete cylinder is numerically simulated. Finally, calculation of the impact and spallation of a con- crete structure is performed to assess the suitability of the material and failure models for simulating concrete during dynamic loadings. The peridynamic model is found to accurately simulate the inelastic deformation and fracture behavior of concrete during compression, splitting, and dynamically induced spall. The work expands the types of materials that can be modeled using peridynamics. A multi-scale methodology for simulating concrete to be used in conjunction with the plasticity model is presented. The work was funded by LDRD 158806.

Vogler, Tracy; Lammi, Christopher James

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Int. Symp. on Shallow Flows, Iowa City, USA, June 4 -6, 2012 A Hamiltonian Boussinesq model with horizontally sheared currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3rd Int. Symp. on Shallow Flows, Iowa City, USA, June 4 - 6, 2012 A Hamiltonian Boussinesq model, and these waves tend to break too early in comparison with the real phenomena. Boussinesq models include internal to be prevented in these models. The variational Boussinesq model proposed by Klopman et al. (2010) may

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

420

Development of a neural network model for the prediction of liquid holdup in two-phase horizontal flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edward Shippen, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Stuart Scott Accurate prediction of liquid holdup associated with multiphase flow is a critical element in the design and operation of modern production systems... Intermittent Annular 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Dispersed bubble Figure 1: Horizontal flow patterns A number of empirical correlations and mechanistic models have been applied to estimate frictional pressure losses associated with multiphase flow in pipes...

Shippen, Mack Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Coupled flow and heat transfer in viscoelastic fluid with Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This letter presents a research for coupled flow and heat transfer of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid above a stretching plate with velocity slip boundary. Unlike most classical works, the new heat flux model, which is recently proposed by Christov, is employed. Analytical solutions are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The effects of elasticity number, slip coefficient, the relaxation time of the heat flux and the Prandtl number on velocity and temperature fields are analyzed. A comparison of Fourier’s Law and the Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model is also presented.

Shihao Han; Liancun Zheng; Chunrui Li; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

426

Managing Texas Groundwater Resources through Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication gives an overview of Texas water law and the regulations governing groundwater conservation districts. The powers and responsibilities of districts are summarized. Color maps show the coverage of existing conservation and special...

Fipps, Guy

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

Sam Marutzky

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A coupled model for ring dynamics, gas flow, and oil flow through the ring grooves in IC engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil flows through ring/groove interface play a critical role in oil transport among different regions the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. This thesis work is intended to improve the understanding and ...

Jia, Ke, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)?1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min?1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that there is no particular advantage between quantitative estimation methods nor to performing dose reduction via tube current reduction compared to temporal sampling reduction. These data are important for optimizing implementation of cardiac dynamic CT in clinical practice and in prospective CT MBF trials.

Michael Bindschadler; Dimple Modgil; Kelley R Branch; Patrick J La Riviere; Adam M Alessio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

Buscheck, Timothy Eric

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Dynamic modeling of a single-stage downward firing, entrained flow gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gasifier is the heart of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), a technology that has emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional coal-fired power plant technology due to its higher efficiency and cleaner environmental performance especially with the option of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Understanding the optimal performance of the gasifier is therefore paramount for the efficient operation of IGCC power plants. Numerous gasifier models of varying complexity have been developed to study the various aspects of gasifier performance. These range from simple one-dimensional (1D) process-type models to rigorous higher order 2-3D models based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Whereas high-fidelity CFD models can accurately predict most key aspects of gasifier performance, they are computationally expensive and typically take hours to days to execute on high-performance computers. Therefore, faster 1D partial differential equation (PDE)-based models are required for use in dynamic simulation studies, control system analysis, and training applications. A number of 1D gasifier models can be found in the literature, but most are steady-state models that have limited application in the practical operation of the gasifier. As a result, 1D PDE-based dynamic models are needed to further study and predict gasifier performance under a wide variety of process conditions and disturbances. In the current study, a 1D transient model of a single-stage downward-fired GE/Texaco-type entrained-flow gasifier has been developed. The model comprises mass, momentum and energy balances for the gas and solid phases. The model considers the initial gasification processes of water evaporation and coal devolatilization. In addition, the key heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions have been modeled. The resulting time-dependent PDE model is solved using the well-known method of lines approach in Aspen Custom Modeler®, whereby the PDEs in the spatial domain are discretized and the resulting differential algebraic equations (DAEs) are then integrated over time using a dynamic integrator. The dynamic response results of the gasifier performance parameters to certain disturbances commonly encountered during practical operation are presented. These disturbances include ramp and step changes to input variables such as coal flow rate, oxygen-to-coal ratio and water-to-coal ratio among others. Comparison of model predictions to available dynamic data will also be discussed.

Kasule, J., Turton, R., Bhattacharyya, D., Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

GROUNDWATER/LEAK DETECTION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and LDS pipes drain to valve houses where the leachate and LDS fluid are collected in tanks, flow rates and volumes are monitored, and samples are collected. Fluid that collects...

434

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

435

Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand for water is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected. The Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas are carrying out a number of successful programs in the areas of education and public awareness, technical assistance...

Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

 Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of...

437

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring continued at the Savannah River Plant. During second quarter 1993, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), dichloromethane (methylene chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in the Frenchman Flat CAU Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal pathway for radionuclide migration from underground tests in Frenchman Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, to the accessible environment is groundwater flow. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport via groundwater have been identified from hydrologic data: (1) radionuclide transport downward from the alluvial and volcanic aquifers into the underlying carbonate aquifer; and (2) radionuclide transport laterally to the carbonate aquifer surrounding Frenchman Flat. This report presents an evaluation of geochemical and environmental isotopic data to test these potential pathways and to identify other groundwater flowpaths in, and out of, Frenchman Flat.

R. Hershey; J. Thomas; T. Rose; J. Paces; I. Farnham; C. Benedict, Jr.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Study of Multi-Scale Plant-Groundwater Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and their implications at a range of scales. At the plant scale (~1 m^(2)), a physically-based model was developed to explore the hydraulic mechanisms of plant groundwater use. New functions of root water uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) in the model were driven...

Gou, Si

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Model for Density Waves in Gravity-Driven Granular Flow in Narrow Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity-driven flow of grains through a narrow pipe in vacuum is studied by means of a one-dimensional model with two coefficients of restitution. Numerical simulations show clearly how density waves form when a strikingly simple criterion is fulfilled: that dissipation due to collisions between the grains and the walls of the pipe is greater per collision than that which stems from collisions between particles. Counterintuitively, the highest flow rate is observed when the number of grains per density wave grows large. We find strong indication that the number of grains per density wave always approaches a constant as the particle number tends to infinity, and that collapse to a single wave, which was often observed also in previous simulations, occurs because the number of grains is insufficient for multiple wave formation.

Ellingsen, Simen Å; Grøva, Morten; Hansen, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater flow model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Model for Density Waves in Gravity-Driven Granular Flow in Narrow Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gravity-driven flow of grains through a narrow pipe in vacuum is studied by means of a one-dimensional model with two coefficients of restitution. Numerical simulations show clearly how density waves form when a strikingly simple criterion is fulfilled: that dissipation due to collisions between the grains and the walls of the pipe is greater per collision than that which stems from collisions between particles. Counterintuitively, the highest flow rate is observed when the number of grains per density wave grows large. We find strong indication that the number of grains per density wave always approaches a constant as the particle number tends to infinity, and that collapse to a single wave, which was often observed also in previous simulations, occurs because the number of grains is insufficient for multiple wave formation.

Simen Å. Ellingsen; Knut S. Gjerden; Morten Grøva; Alex Hansen

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

The heating of the cooling flow (The feedback effervescent heating model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard cooling flow model has predicted a large amount of cool gas in the clusters of galaxies. The failure of the Chandra and XXM-Newton telescopes to detect cooling gas (below 1-2 keV) in clusters of galaxies has suggested that some heating process must work to suppress the cooling. The most likely heating source is the heating by AGNs. There are many heating mechanisms, but we will adopt the effervescent heating model which is a result of the interaction of the bubbles inflated by AGN with the intra-cluster medium(ICM). Using the FLASH code, we have carried out time dependent simulations to investigate the effect of the heating on the suppression of the cooling in cooling flow clusters. We have found that the effervescent heating model can not balance the radiative cooling and it is an artificial model. Furthermore, the effervescent heating is a function of the ICM pressure gradient but the cooling is proportional to the gas density square and square root of the gas temperature.

Nasser Mohamed Ahmed

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Macroscopic traffic flow modelling and ramp metering control using Matlab/Simulink  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer programs to simulate traffic flow offer an opportunity to evaluate new strategies for reducing delays, congestion, fuel consumption and pollution. This paper describes a Statistical Traffic Model or STM, which is based on accepted macro-modelling concepts, such as the conservation of vehicles and the fundamental traffic diagram. In this case, the model is constructed using the well known Matlab/Simulink™ software package, so providing an integrated approach for data processing, graphical presentation of data, control system design and macroscopic simulation in one straightforward to use, widely available environment. To illustrate the methodology, the STM is applied to a section of the M3/M27 Ramp Metering Pilot Scheme in the UK. This Highways Agency sponsored project, based in the Southampton area, utilises traffic lights at the on-ramp entrances to regulate access to the main carriageway of the motorway, in an attempt to maintain flow close to the capacity. The paper utilises the model to help design a locally-coordinated ramp metering algorithm, based on proportional-integral-plus (PIP) control methods. In this manner, the STM proves particularly valuable for the application of multi-objective optimisation techniques in the design of new traffic management systems.

C James Taylor; Paul G McKenna; Peter C Young; Arun Chotai; Mike Mackinnon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mathematical modeling of thixotropic drilling mud and crude oil flow in wells and pipelines—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many drilling muds and crude oils are known to be thixotropic. Under a wide range of pressures, temperatures and flow regimes, they display unusual complex flow properties when flowing through wells (crude oils and drilling muds) and during storage and pipeline transportation (crude oils). Understanding and modeling the deviation from Newtonian behavior of drilling muds and crude oils are essential in accurately and optimally designing the flow systems associated with these fluids. Despite an impressive amount of experimental and rheological modeling studies concerning the non-Newtonian drilling mud and crude oil behavior, mathematical modeling studies taking into account their thixotropic properties are rare. In addition, there was no literature review of the knowledge gained to date. Thus, a review paper on studies addressing the mathematical modeling of thixotropic drilling mud and crude oil flow in wells and pipelines will pinpoint the challenges and limitations encountered in such studies. This will hopefully trigger further development and new research topics. This review paper focuses mainly on mathematical modeling studies concerning the well and pipeline flow of thixotropic drilling muds and crude oils. After describing how thixotropy is understood today inside and outside of the petroleum industry community, several mathematical models available in the literature are examined. Finally, challenges, limitations, and potential areas for the development of these models are presented.

S. Livescu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mixed Waste Management Facility FSS Well Data Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1994, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. No constituent exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z