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1

Surfactants for ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground water contamination is a most intractable form of pollution. Spilled solvent or fuel liquids are trapped below the water table by colloidal forces. Surfactants may be used to dramatically improve contaminated aquifer remediation rates. Principal remediation mechanisms include micellar solubilization and mobilization of the trapped liquids by lowering of the oil/water interfacial tension. Surfactant selection is a key to the successful design of a remediation effort, and involves consideration of factors including Krafft Point, surfactant adsorption onto the aquifer solids, and the phase behavior of the oil/water/surfactant system. Successful field demonstrations have occurred in recent months and the technology is moving rapidly toward commercialization. Critical research issues remain including acceptable clean-up levels, surfactant/contaminant in situ biodegradation rates, and surfactant decontamination and reuse.

Jeffrey H. Harwell; David A. Sabatini; R.C. Knox

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Limiting factors in ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If one is charged with restoring a contaminated aquifer today, the procedure of pumping contaminated water to the surface for treatment and discharge is most often the state-of-practice technology. The perceived success of pump-and-treat technology can be misleading if the hydrology and contaminant characteristics at the site are not adequately understood. A failure to understand the processes controlling contaminant transport can result in extremely long pumping periods and, consequently, costly and inefficient remediation. Effects of tailing, sorption, and residual immiscible fluids on time required for pump-and-treat remediation of ground water are discussed.

Clinton W. Hall; Jeffrey A. Johnson

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

4

Remedial Costs for MTBE in Soil and Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of MTBE in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediating MTBE/BTEX releases compared to remediating sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluat...

Barbara H. Wilson; John T. Wilson Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Verification of Active and Passive Ground-Water Contamination Remediation Efforts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The verification of ground-water contamination remediation efforts requires thorough documentation of subsurface conditions ... comprehensive approach to the design and operation of remediation efforts with an em...

M. J. Barcelona

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Remediation of a uranium-contamination in ground water  

SciTech Connect

The former production site of NUKEM where nuclear fuel-elements were developed and handled from 1958 to 1988 was situated in the centre of an industrial park for various activities of the chemical and metallurgical industry. The size of the industrially used part is about 300.000 m{sup 2}. Regulatory routine controls showed elevated CHC (Chlorinated Hydro-Carbons) values of the ground water at the beginning of the 1990's in an area which represented about 80.000 m{sup 2} down-gradient of locations where CHC compounds were stored and handled. Further investigations until 1998 proved that former activities on the NUKEM site, like the UF{sub 6} conversion process, were of certain relevance. The fact that several measured values were above the threshold values made the remediation of the ground water mandatory. This was addressed in the permission given by the Ministry for Nuclear Installations and Environment of Hesse according to chap. 7 of the German atomic law in October 2000. Ground water samples taken in an area of about 5.000 m{sup 2} showed elevated values of total Uranium activity up to between 50 and 75 Bq/l in 2002. Furthermore in an area of another 20.000 m{sup 2} the samples were above threshold value. In this paper results of the remediation are presented. The actual alpha-activities of the ground waters of the remediation wells show values of 3 to 9 Bq/l which are dominated by 80 to 90 % U-234 activity. The mass-share of total Uranium for this nuclide amounts to 0,05% on average. The authority responsible for conventional water utilisation defined target values for remediation: 20 {mu}g/l for dissolved Uranium and 10 {mu}g/l for CHC. Both values have not yet been reached for an area of about 10.000 m{sup 2}. The remediation process by extracting water from four remediation wells has proved its efficiency by reduction of the starting concentrations by a factor of 3 to 6. Further pumping will be necessary especially in that area of the site where the contaminations were found later during soil remediation activities. Only two wells have been in operation since July 2002 when the remediation technique was installed and an apparatus for direct gamma-spectroscopic measurement of the accumulated activities on the adsorbers was qualified. Two further remediation wells have been in operation since August 2006, when the installed remediation technique was about to be doubled from a throughput of 5 m{sup 3}/h to 10 m{sup 3}/h. About 20.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted since from these two wells and the decrease of their Uranium concentrations behaves similar to that of the two other wells being extracted since the beginning of remediation. Both, total Uranium-concentrations and the weight-share of the nuclides U-234, U-235 and U-238 are measured by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry) besides measurements of Uranium-Alpha-Activities in addition to the measurement of CHC components of which PCE (Per-chlor-Ethene) is dominant in the contaminated area. CHC compounds are measured by GC (Gas Chromatography). Down-gradient naturally attenuated products are detected in various compositions. Overall 183.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted. Using a pump and treat method 11 kg Uranium have been collected on an ion-exchange material based on cellulose, containing almost 100 MBq U-235 activity, and almost 15 kg of CHC, essentially PCE, were collected on GAC (Granules of Activated Carbon). Less than 3% of the extracted Uranium have passed the adsorber-system of the remediation plant and were adsorbed by the sewage sludge of the industrial site's waste water treatment. The monthly monitoring of 19 monitoring wells shows that an efficient artificial barrier was built up by the water extraction. The Uranium contamination of two ground water plumes has drastically been reduced by the used technique dependent on the amounts of extracted water. The concentration of the CHC contamination has changed depending on the location of temporal pumping. Thereby maximum availability of this contaminan

Woerner, Joerg; Margraf, Sonja; Hackel, Walter [RD Hanau GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-water samples collected from existing hand-dug wells at Eagle Island, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Different masses of the absorbent (i.e., activated carbon) were then added to the samples of ground water. The so treated water samples were left to equilibrate for 7 days, after which the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contents of the samples were measured. Adsorption isotherms were derived for the two forms of activated carbon used, namely granular activated-carbon (GAC) and powdered activated-carbon (PAC). Results of the TPH analyses showed that activated carbon is an excellent means for the stripping-off of the contaminant: there were decreases in contaminant concentration from an initial concentration of 9304.70mg/l to average final concentrations of 361.00 and 12.37mg/l, that is, 96% and 99.9% resulting from the same amounts of GAC and PAC applications respectively. The results of this study revealed that the powdered form of AC would be very effective in the remediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated ground water and its use is therefore recommended.

M.J. Ayotamuno; R.B. Kogbara; S.O.T. Ogaji; S.D. Probert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

70 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 4/ Fall 2011/pages 7076 NGWA.org 2011, The Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

70 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 4/ Fall 2011/pages 70­76 NGWA.org © 2011, The Author(s) Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. doi: 10.1111/j 93% to 117% for both spiked laboratory reagent water and natural ground- water matrices, the later

Alvarez, Pedro J.

9

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 00, no. 0/ xxxx 0000/pages 0000 1 2012, The Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 00, no. 0/ xxxx 0000/pages 00­00 1 © 2012, The Author(s) Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2012, National Ground Water Association. doi: 10.1111/j). Bioaugmentation remediation methods that employ Dehalococcoides sp. (DHC) have been widely tested for treating

Clement, Prabhakar

10

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 3/ Summer 2011/pages 4754 47 2011, The Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 3/ Summer 2011/pages 47­54 47 © 2011, The Author(s) Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. doi: 10.1111/j underground stor- age. Thus, it is important to investigate the potential ground- water quality impacts

Alvarez, Pedro J.

11

Public and Private Initiatives to Develop Ground Water Remediation Technologies in the U.S  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground water at most hazardous waste sites in the ... most often the limiting factor for complete site remediation. Until recently, contaminants in surface soils ... were viewed as the only significant source of

Walter W. Kovalick Jr.; Rich Steimle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Natural Remediation Potential of Arsenic-Contaminated Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Migration of leachate from a municipal landfill in Saco, Maine has resulted in arsenic concentrations in ground water as high as 647 ?g/L.... Laboratory experimental data indicate the primary source of arsenic to...

Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; John A. Colman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Analysis of Ground-Water Remediation During a Pesticide Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pesticides are widely used in the pest management. More than one hundred pesticides and their degradation products have been identified as potential ground-water contaminants (Miles, 1992) and many of these pe...

Richard Tykva

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 3/ Summer 2011/pages 111118 111 2011, The Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 3/ Summer 2011/pages 111­118 111 © 2011, The Author(s) Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. doi: 10.1111/j under- ground storage tank containing biofuel blends. Benzene is of particular concern due to its

Alvarez, Pedro J.

15

Consideration of Reliability in System Design for Ground Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remedial action design system is described that may be used to evaluate candidate remediation systems and select the preferred alternative under conditions of uncertainty. The remedial action design method i...

W. Woldt; I. Bogardi; L. Duckstein

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Basics of pump-and-treat ground-water remediation technology. Special report  

SciTech Connect

The pump-and-treat process, whereby contaminated ground water is pumped to the surface for treatment, is one of the most common ground-water remediation technologies used at hazardous waste sites. However, recent research has identified complex chemical and physical interactions between contaminants and the subsurface media which may impose limitations on the extraction part of the process. The report was developed to summarize the basic considerations necessary to determine when, where, and how pump-and-treat technology can be used effectively to remediate ground-water contamination.

Mercer, J.W.; Skipp, D.C.; Giffin, D.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Treatment and remediation methods for arsenic removal from the ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, ground water is contaminating by arsenic continously, which needs economic treatment and remediation technologies. Physical, chemical and biological treatment methods have been developed, that include different kinds of filters, bucket type units, fill and draw, kalshi etc. The remediation methods discussed are air oxidation, reactive barriers, utilisation of deeper aquifers and sanitary protected dug wells. To the best of our knowledge no technology is available capable to remove arsenic from water at efficient, economic and commercial levels. Therefore, fast, efficient and economic arsenic removal technologies are required. Attempts have been made to suggest the future technologies of arsenic removal.

Imran Ali; Tabrez A. Khan; Iqbal Hussain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites  

SciTech Connect

This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New route for degradation of chlorinated ethylenes in exhaust gases from ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of an approximate finite-size description, a UV photoreactor was devised and constructed for studying the photooxidation of the chlorinated ethylenes perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylenes (DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and several saturated chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC). In the cases of PCE and TCE, the efficiency of the photooxidation using irradiation by a 222nm excimer lamp and subsequent photolysis for the initiation of the process was found to be sufficiently high so that a scaling up to an industrial purification plant of exhaust gases from ground water remediation can be hopefully envisaged. Thanks to consecutive reactions with the chain-sustaining chlorine atoms, this degradation route proves capable of decomposing the other chlorinated ethylenes which are not amenable to photolysis in a direct way. For saturated CHC the utilisability of this approach is limited.

Lutz Prager; Eberhard Hartmann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ground water remediation at the Moab, Utah, USA, former uranium-ore processing site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seepage from the Moab, Utah, USA, former uranium-ore processing site resulted in ammonia and uranium contamination of naturally occurring saline ground water in alluvium adjacent to the Colorado River. An interim...

Donald R. Metzler; Joseph D. Ritchey; Kent A. Bostick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Worldwide Occurrences of Arsenic in Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decision-making process of water managers, remediation specialists, and...The geologic and ground-water conditions that promote...water managers, remediation specialists, and...The geologic and ground-water conditions that promote...

D. Kirk Nordstrom

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

23

Lessons from practice in the assessment and remediation of contaminated ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The famous American humorist Mark Twain once wrote dont let school interfere with your education. This paper builds on this theme by examining important lessons that come from work on practical problems of ground

Franklin W. Schwartz; Eung Seok Lee; Yongje Kim

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

In-situ remediation of nitrate-contaminated ground water by electrokinetics/iron wall processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of using electrokinetics coupled with a zero valent iron (Fe0) treatment wall to abiotically remediate nitrate-contaminated soils was investigated. Upon completion of each test run, the contaminated soil specimen was sliced into five parts and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen. Nitrogen mass balance was used to determine the major transformation products. In control experiments where only electrokinetics was used at various constant voltages, 25 to 37% of the nitrate-nitrogen was transformed. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed improved when a Fe0 wall (20 g or about 810% by weight) was placed near the anode. For test runs at various constant voltages, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed ranged from 54 to 87%. By switching to constant currents, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed was about 84 to 88%. The major transformation products were ammonia-nitrogen and nitrogen gases. Nitrite-nitrogen was less than 1% in all experimental runs. Two localized pH conditions exist in the system, a low pH region near the anode and a high pH region near the cathode. Placing of an iron wall near the anode increases the pH in that area as time increases. Movement of the acid front did not flush across the cathode. This research has demonstrated that the electrokinetics/iron wall process can be used to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

Chin F. Chew; Tian C. Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Remediation of ground water containing chlorinated and brominated hydrocarbons, benzene and chromate by sequential treatment using ZVI and GAC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment with two sequenced columns was performed as a preliminary study for the installation of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at a site where a mixed ground water contamination exists. The...

Volkmar Plagentz; Markus Ebert; Andreas Dahmke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Application of encapsulation (pH-sensitive polymer and phosphate buffer macrocapsules): A novel approach to remediation of acidic ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Macrocapsules, composed of a pH-sensitive polymer and phosphate buffer, offer a novel remediation alternative for acidic ground waters. To test their potential effectiveness, laboratory experiments were carried out followed by a field trial within a coal pile runoff (CPR) acidic contaminant plume. Results of traditional limestone and macrocapsule treatments were compared in both laboratory and field experiments. Macrocapsules were more effective than limestone as a passive treatment for raising pH in well water from 2.5 to 6 in both laboratory and field experiments. The limestone treatments had limited impact on pH, only increasing pH as high as 3.3, and armoring by iron was evident in the field trial. Aluminum, iron and sulfate concentrations remained relatively constant throughout the experiments, but phosphate increased (0.1532mg/L), indicating macrocapsule release. This research confirmed that macrocapsules may be an effective alternative to limestone to treat highly acidic ground water.

C. Marjorie Aelion; Harley T. Davis; Joseph R.V. Flora; Brian C. Kirtland; Mark B. Amidon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ground water and energy  

SciTech Connect

This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The prediction of the effectiveness of interceptor trenches in the remediation of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. LIST OF FIGURES. . LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION. . Objectives. Previous Works Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SITE DESCRIPTIONS . . Site A. Site B. Site C . . . FIELD STUDIES. . . Site A. . Site B. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 15... . . 68 . 71 --. . 73 -- 77 Figure LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. General layout of Site A showing ground-flow in the vicinity of the interceptor trench 2. Schematic cross-sectional view of the interceptor trench at Site A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10...

Mast, Mary Katherine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Lab 10: Contaminated water and remediation Water on and in the Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab 10: Contaminated water and remediation Water on and in the Earth Where is Earth's water located that the vast majority of the fresh water available for our uses is stored in the ground (the large grey slice in ice and glaciers. Another 30 percent of freshwater is in the ground. Thus, surface-water sources (such

Li, X. Rong

31

Novel hybrid materials in the remediation of ground waters contaminated with As(III) and As(V)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural mica type of clay mineral sericite was modified to obtain the materials viz., Al-HDTMA-sericite (AH) and Al-AMBA-sericite (AA) which was characterized by the FT-IR and XRD data and morphologically analyzed by the SEM images. Further, the simulated batch reactor data indicated that increase in sorptive concentration enhanced the uptake of these pollutants and the 1000 times increase in ionic strength i.e., background electrolyte concentration (NaNO3) caused an insignificant decrease in As(V) removal, which inferred that As(V) was adsorbed specifically onto the solid surface. However, it was affected greatly with As(III) pointed that As(III) was sorbed mainly through electrostatic or even with van der Waals attraction. pH dependence data showed that arsenic removal was greatly affected with change in solution pH. Simultaneous presence of phenol in the removal of As(III) or As(V) showed insignificant change in arsenic removal by these materials pointed that different sorption sites available for these two different contaminants. Results obtained under dynamic conditions inferred that materials were reasonably useful in the speciation/attenuation of these two metal ions from water bodies. The breakthrough data was fitted well to the Thomas equation and hence, the maximum amount of the As(III) or As(V) to be loaded was found to be 0.338 and 0.433mg/g respectively for AA and AH for As(III) and 0.541 and 0.852mg/g respectively for AA and AH for As(V) under the specified column reactor conditions. Comparing these two materials AH possessed with higher removal capacity than AA, at least, for these two contaminants.

Diwakar Tiwari; Seung Mok Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ground Water Recovery and Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Until the environmental revolution, the only ground water that was routinely treated to remove contamination was the impacted ground water that was extracted for beneficial use. With ... the recognition that cont...

Tie Li Ph.D.; Raaj U. Patel P.G.; David K. Ramsden Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

35

Copyright 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation 2009 National Ground Water Association.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 29, no. 3/ Summer 2009/pages 93­104 93 Pore Water CharacteristicsCopyright © 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association. NGWA area). The concentrations of ethanol in ground water for both the bench- and pilot-scale experiments

Alvarez, Pedro J.

36

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

37

Remediation Experiences in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses remediation practices for addressing gasoline-impacted soil and ground water at several hundred Neste Marketing Limited (Neste ... in Finland. The first systematic investigation and remediation

Martti R. Suominen; Nancy E. Milkey P.G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of the distribution of 226Ra in ground water near the uranium industry of Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......levels of 226Ra observed in the ground water. Being a mineralised area, variation...226Ra activity concentration in ground water that is used for drinking purpose...Cretescu I. Characterisation and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium......

R. M. Tripathi; V. N. Jha; S. K. Sahoo; N. K. Sethy; A. K. Shukla; V. D. Puranik; H. S. Kushwaha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the authors vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterization of complex mineral assemblages: Implications for contaminant transport and environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...W P ( 1996 ) Ground Water 34 : 778 783...environmental remediation. | Surface...and biological remediation strategies...environmental effects ground water humic acids humic...pollutants pollution remediation risk assessment...

Paul M. Bertsch; John C. Seaman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

43

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

45

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Multiscale Investigation of Ground Water Flow at Clear Lake, Iowa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

targets. The model produced ground water inflow and outflow rates of 14,300 and 9200 m3/d, respectively­related problems in the lake and its water- shed, their likely causes, and potential remedial measuresA Multiscale Investigation of Ground Water Flow at Clear Lake, Iowa by William W. Simpkins Abstract

Simpkins, William W.

47

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The three most frequently used remediation technologies are discussed: (1) NAPL removal, (2) Pump-and-Treat, (3) Soil Vapor Extraction.

Oostrom, Mart; Falta, Ron W.; Mayer, Alex S.; Javandel, I.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ground water contamination in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...volume of ground water in storage exceeds the vol-ume...geo-thermal water; intruded seawater; water affected by evapotranspiration...pressure and the volume in storage may fluctuate according...Estimates of ground water in storage in the United States...communities have over-pumped their freshwater aquifers...

VI Pye; R Patrick

1983-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

51

A method for desalination and water remediation by hydrodynamic cavitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity with population growth demanding more and more amounts of this limited resource. Increased efforts are directed toward recycling and remediation as well as desalination of the large quantities of seawater available. Dr. Bertwin Langenecker was a pioneer in utilizing hydrodynamic cavitation in a variety of applications that would remove dissolved solids from water and other liquids. His combination of intense cavitation using a rotor-stator combination as well as simultaneously adding an adsorbent demonstrated impressive results in desalination and waste water remediation. In this presentation a description will be given of Dr. Langeneckers technology as well as a sampling of some of his most impressive results. Speculations as to why this approach works as well as it does will be presented.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A method for desalination and water remediation by hydrodynamic cavitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity with population growth demanding more and more amounts of this limited resource. Increased efforts are directed toward recycling and remediation as well as desalination of the large quantities of seawater available. Dr. Bertwin Langenecker was a pioneer in utilizing hydrodynamic cavitation in a variety of applications that would remove dissolved solids from water and other liquids. His combination of intense cavitation using a rotor-stator combination as well as simultaneously adding an adsorbent demonstrated impressive results in desalination and waste water remediation. In this presentation a description will be given of Dr. Langenecker's technology as well as a sampling of some of his most impressive results. Speculations as to why this approach works as well as it does will be presented.

Lawrence A. Crum; Michael Skinner; Scott Zeilinger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for Ground Water Volumes I & II (October 1996) Optical character recognition has been applied to these files, but full search capabilities...

55

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management & Protection Act by J of the Nebraska Ground Water Management & Protection Act (GMPA) 2. the special GMPA integrated water management a correlative rights framework, and 5. what additional water management tools are needed to effectively deal

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

57

Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001  

SciTech Connect

A problematic waste form encountered during remediation of the Hanford Site 618-10 burial ground consists of bottled aqueous waste potentially contaminated with regulated metals. The liquid waste requires stabilization prior to landfill disposal. Prior remediation activities at other Hanford burial grounds resulted in a standard process for sampling and analyzing liquid waste using manual methods. Due to the highly dispersible characteristics of alpha contamination, and the potential for shock sensitive chemicals, a different method for bottle processing was needed for the 618-10 burial ground. Discussions with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to development of a modified approach. The modified approach involves treatment of liquid waste in bottles, up to one gallon per bottle, in a tray or box within the excavation of the remediation site. Bottles are placed in the box, covered with soil and fixative, crushed, and mixed with a Portland cement grout. The potential hazards of the liquid waste preclude sampling prior to treatment. Post treatment verification sampling is performed to demonstrate compliance with land disposal restrictions and disposal facility acceptance criteria. (authors)

Faulk, Darrin E.; Pearson, Chris M.; Vedder, Barry L.; Martin, David W. [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill 5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill Tailings Site by using the selected alternative stated in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 1, 1997 EA-1155: Final Environmental Assessment Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site,

60

An accelerated remedial strategy developed for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

For an installation with many disposal sites and multiple contaminant sources, successful remediation at minimum cost can be complicated by insufficient geologic and hydrogeologic information, incomplete records of historical disposal activities, and uncertainty about the effectiveness of different investigative methods. To reduce these uncertainties and to increase the probability of successful remediation at minimum cost, a ``Phased and pilot`` accelerated remedial strategy has been developed for the J-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The strategy includes four phases. First, the most contaminated site is selected as a pilot for detailed investigation. Second, the most contaminated areas within the pilot site are chosen as a pilot source area for interim action study, and a remedial action is developed to remove the primary contaminant sources. The subsequent sitewide investigation uses the effective tools developed in the first phase. Third, a cleanup operation is initiated in the pilot source area, while a sitewide feasibility study is developed by taking advantage of lessons learned in the interim action. Fourth, a sitewide cleanup operation proceeds.

Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wrobel, J. [US Army Directorate of Safety, Health, and Environment, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

63

Avoiding Destructive Remediation at DOE Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pollutants, Radioactive 0 Water Pollutants, Radioactive...States Government Agencies Water Pollutants, Radioactive...management government agencies ground water policy pollutants pollution...pumping radioactive waste remediation risk assessment soils...

F. W. Whicker; T. G. Hinton; M. M. MacDonell; J. E. Pinder III; L. J. Habegger

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

65

EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control Program) webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Ground Water...

66

Residential radon remediation: performance over 17 years  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......covering about 1000 m2. Water drains into the basin...sub-slab ventilation remediation system installed, i...sub-slab ventilation remediation (Bq mSE). Measured...concentration with height above ground level. For example...had a sub-slab radon remediation system installed that......

Naomi H. Harley; Passaporn Chittaporn; Anthony Marsicano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

68

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

69

618-10 Burial Ground Trench Remediation and 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground Nonintrusive Characterization of Vertical Pipe Units Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

A lessons learned is a noteworthy practice or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or an adverse work practice/experience that is captured and shared to avoid reoccurrence. This document provides the lessons learned identified by the 618-10 Burial Ground trench remediation and the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground nonintrusive characterization of the vertical pipe units (VPUs).

Darby, J. W.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

SITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...............................................................................................................5 5.2 Ground and Surface Water MonitoringSITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION June 29, 2004 Prepared by: Colorado School of Mines .................................................................................................4 5.0 SITE AIR AND WATER MONITORING

72

Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Stream Discharge Measurements, Ground Water Level Data, and Ground Water Well Hydrographs This page intentionally left blank Contents Section .................................................................................. Surface Water Time-Concentration Plots D1.O ............................................................................................... Stream Discharge Measurements D2.0 ............................................................. Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots for Uranium D3.0 .......................................................................................................... Ground Water Level Data D4.0 ..............................................................................................

73

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water (Indiana) Ground Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting

76

Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQualitySurfaceandGround&oldid612197" Category: NEPA Resources...

77

Arsenic Epidemiology and Drinking Water Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurrences of arsenic in ground water." Dictionaries and...History, Study and Remediation is an Arsenic Project...also provided. The Ground Water and Drinking Water Division...resource page on arsenic in ground water of the United States...

Allan H. Smith; Peggy A. Lopipero; Michael N. Bates; Craig M. Steinmaus

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba...

79

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

80

U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWMON 1.12-1 GWMON 1.12-1 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan for the Land Farm Pilot Test Monument Valley, Arizona August 2000 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Ofice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-5 1 1-001 5-21-000 Document Number U0106701 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0106701 Contents Contents 1.0 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Pilot-Test Extraction Wellfield 2 4.0 Water Elevation Measurements and Monitoring ............... 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites AGENCY: U.S. DEP.4RTMENT OF ENERGY ACTIOK: FL&-DING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP-ACT (FONSI) SU$IM$RY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement ground lvater compliance strategies for two Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTR.4) Project sites near Slick Rock. Colorado. The purpose of the strategies is to comply with U.S. En\.ironmental Protection .Qency (EP.Aj ground n'ater standards defined in Title 40 Codr ~fF~d~w/ iieplutio?r.s (CFR) Part 192. and in so doing. protect human health and the en\.ironment. Ground water at the Slick Rock sites is contaminated with residual radioactive materials from hisTorica acti\,ities, associated with the processin of uranium ore, The planned action (~formeri>,.

82

Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Geologic Map of Site Area ........................................................................................................ E1.O Stream Flow Measurements ...................................................................................................... E2.0 Estimates of Ground Water Flow .............................................................................................. E3.0 .......................................... MODFLOW Flow Budget Analysis for OU 1 1 1 Model Subregions E4.0 ............................................................................ Burro Canyon Aquifer Ground Water Model E5.0 This page intentionally left blank

83

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called

84

Table EA-1. Stream-water dissolved Mn at basin outflow of perennial stream at Inspiration Dam illustrating decreases in dissolved Mn in response to remediation efforts. Dissolved Mn in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Jul-98 2.8E-04 24-Nov-98 3.6E-04 11-Feb-99 1.2E-05 Remedial ground-water pumping begins 24-Mar-99 8.9E) and ground-water (GW) chemistry data for streambed sediment sampling sites. Dissolved concentrations in moleTable EA-1. Stream-water dissolved Mn at basin outflow of perennial stream at Inspiration Dam

85

Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of an RI/FS is to characterize the nature and extent of the risks posed by contaminants present at a site and to develop and evaluate options for remedial actions. The overall objective of the RI is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of site conditions, types and quantities of contaminants present, release mechanisms and migration pathways, target populations, and risks to human health and the environment. The information developed during the RI provides the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions during the FS. The purpose of this RI Work Plan is to define the tasks that will direct the remedial investigation of the J-Field site at APG.

Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Haffenden, R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

89

Hanford Site environmental data for calendar year 1990 -- Ground water  

SciTech Connect

This report tabulates ground-water radiological and chemical data for calendar year 1990 by the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, reported Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Monitoring, and Operational Monitoring. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Projects are conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. This document supplements the reports Hanford Site Ground-Water Monitoring for 1990 (Evans et al. 1992) and mental Report for Calendar Year 1990 (Woodruff and Hanf 1991). The data listings provided here were generated from the Hanford Environmental Information System database.

Dresel, P.E.; Bates, D.J.; Merz, J.K.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ground Water Management District Rules | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District Rules Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Ground Water Management District Rules Abstract This webpage provides information...

91

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

95

Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Creek. Each boundary is described under the following headings. U.S. Department of Energy st Grand Junction MMTS OU 111 Remedial Investigation AddendundFacirsed Feasibility...

96

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Portniaguine and Solomon 1998), and ground water temperature (Doussan et al. 1994). Compared to calibration depended on calibration methodology; models calibrated with multiple targets simulated q more accurately of Calibration Methodology on Ground Water Flow Predictions by James E. Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H

Saiers, James

97

Uncertainty in Octanol?Water Partition Coefficient:? Implications for Risk Assessment and Remedial Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U. S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4201; USGS:? Reston, VA, 2001. ... (37)?Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment for the Hudson River Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study; U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Prepared by Menzie-Cura & Associates and TAMS Consultants, Inc. July, 1999. ...

Igor Linkov; Michael R. Ames; Edmund A. C. Crouch; F. Kyle Satterstrom

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

A review on sources, toxicity and remediation technologies for removing arsenic from drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a natural element found in the environment in organic and inorganic forms. The inorganic form is much more toxic and is found in ground water, surface water and many foods. This form is responsible ...

Ankita Basu; Debabrata Saha; Rumpa Saha; Tuhin Ghosh

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Use of Orange Peel Waste for Arsenic Remediation of Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a toxic element and is found in natural waters throughout the globe. The purpose of present study is to demonstrate the As (V) uptake by orange peel from real ground water samples through adsorption...

Mazhar I. Khaskheli; Saima Q. Memon; Ali N. Siyal

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality monitoring, notification

104

Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive

105

CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................................5 9.0 Ground- and Surface-Water MonitoringCSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TASK PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 .............................................................................................5 FIGURES #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Task Plan March 31, 2004 TASK PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION 1

106

A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION Hydraulic capture methods for remediation attempt to control the direction of ground- water1 A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera , C. T. Kelley b , C Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA The goal of a hydraulic capture model for remediation purposes

107

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in...

108

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

109

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation ... Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta, 9105 116th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2W2 ...

Zengquan Shu; Chao Li; Miodrag Belosevic; James R. Bolton; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Uranium isotopes in ground water as a prospecting technique  

SciTech Connect

The isotopic concentrations of dissolved uranium were determined for 300 ground water samples near eight known uranium accumulations to see if new approaches to prospecting could be developed. It is concluded that a plot of /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio (A.R.) versus uranium concentration (C) can be used to identify redox fronts, to locate uranium accumulations, and to determine whether such accumulations are being augmented or depleted by contemporary aquifer/ground water conditions. In aquifers exhibiting flow-through hydrologic systems, up-dip ground water samples are characterized by high uranium concentration values (> 1 to 4 ppB) and down-dip samples by low uranium concentration values (less than 1 ppB). The boundary between these two regimes can usually be identified as a redox front on the basis of regional water chemistry and known uranium accumulations. Close proximity to uranium accumulations is usually indicated either by very high uranium concentrations in the ground water or by a combination of high concentration and high activity ratio values. Ground waters down-dip from such accumulations often exhibit low uranium concentration values but retain their high A.R. values. This serves as a regional indicator of possible uranium accumulations where conditions favor the continued augmentation of the deposit by precipitation from ground water. Where the accumulation is being dispersed and depleted by the ground water system, low A.R. values are observed. Results from the Gulf Coast District of Texas and the Wyoming districts are presented.

Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for transport of pollutants from the ground surface37 to ground water. Contaminants in the vadose zone1 Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2 3 amendments into the vadose zone for in situ11 remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ

Hubbard, Susan

113

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fractured shale aquifers . Ground Water 50 ( 6 ): 826 828...2011) Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion...poses a threat to surface waters. Front Ecol Environ...Acid mine drainage remediation options: A review...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Platte River valley and ground water contamination in southwestern Grand Island. ` The ongoing drought cycle. Ground water level changes and related ground water/surface water interaction research-owned water wells. Cleanup and remediation efforts will be discussed by Gary Mader, Utilities Director, City

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

115

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

116

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

117

Joint full-waveform analysis of off-ground zero-offset ground penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction synthetic data for estimating soil electrical properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......produces much of our water resources, supports...processes that govern water resources and quality...sustainability, exploitation and remediation strategies. Amongst...geophysical techniques, ground penetrating radar (GPR...dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity......

D. Moghadas; F. Andr; E. C. Slob; H. Vereecken; S. Lambot

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Volatile Halogenated Hydrocarbons in River Water, Ground Water, Drinking Water and Swimming-Pool Water in the Federal Republic of Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing shortage of ground water it becomes more and more necessary to use surface water as a resource for drinking water and swimming-pool water preparation. In the judgement of water...

M. Sonneborn; S. Gerdes; R. Schwabe

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach to focus on ground water systems that are susceptible to fecal contamination, and requires ground water systems that are at risk of fecal contamination to take corrective action. A minor correction to the final Rule was published on November 21, 2006 (71 FR 67427). The GWR applies to all PWSs2 that use ground water

122

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

123

Work Plan for the Feasibility Study for Remedial Action at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the feasibility study is to gather sufficient information to develop and evaluate alternative remedial actions to address contamination at J-Field in compliance with the NCP, CERCLA, and SARA. This FS Work Plan summarizes existing environmental data for each AOC and outlines the tasks to be performed to evaluate and select remedial technologies. The tasks to be performed will include (1) developing remedial action objectives and identifying response actions to meet these objectives; (2) identifying and screening remedial action technologies on the basis of effectiveness, implementability, and cost; (3) assembling technologies into comprehensive alternatives for J-Field; (4) evaluating, in detail, each alternative against the nine EPA evaluation criteria and comparing the alternatives to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses; and (5) selecting the preferred alternative for each operable unit.

Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Haffenden, R.; Goyette, M.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Yuen, C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

125

Remediation of Releases Containing MTBE at Gasoline Station SitesENSR Internationals Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes ENSRs national and international experience remediating MTBE and other gasoline constituents in soil and ground water at retail gasoline station sites. ENSR has extensive experience in...

Robert M. Cataldo P.G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and 355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah Summary The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water

128

HANFORD SITE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1989 - GROUND WATER  

SciTech Connect

In a continuing effort for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. This document contains the data listing of monitoring results obtained by PNL and Westinghouse Hanford Company during the period January through December 1989. Samples taken during 1989 were analyzed and reported by United States Testing Company, Inc., Richland, Washington. The data listing contains all chemical results (above contractual reporting limits) and radiochemical results (for which the result is larger than two times the total error).

Bryce, R. W.; Gorst, W. R.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The role of science in solving the world's emerging water problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...toxic waste have created a serious ground water contamination problem in many...waste still lies in the soil. Ground water contamination is extremely expensive...future to support significant remediation efforts. Soil salinization will...

William A. Jury; Henry Vaux; Jr

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water...

132

GRR/Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Water Quality Control Act 5 CCR 1002-61 Colorado Discharge Permit System 5 CCR 1002-41 Basic Standards for Ground Water 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

133

Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Estimation of distribution coefficient of natural radionuclides in soil around uranium mines and its effect with ionic strength of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......which may contaminate the soil and ground water around uranium mining areas, have been considered. Soil and ground water samples were collected from a...release, accidental, disposal or remediation scenarios requires the availability......

S. Mishra; S. Maity; G. G. Pandit

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID CHARACTERIZATION AND POST-REMEDIATION VERIFICATION SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Light and dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) were identified in the surficial aquifer at the Northeast Site of the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center located in Largo, Florida. The composition and the horizontal and vertical extent of NAPLs were determined using historical site information, analysis of ground water and soil boring data, and analysis of free product recovered from wells. Trichloroethene, dichloroethene, methylene chloride, toluene, and oils were identified as NAPLs. Calculations were conducted to determine NAPL remediation goals for both soil and ground water. Following completion of in situ thermal remediation activities at a 9,900-cubic-meter NAPL contamination area, a sampling program was implemented to verify the success of the remediation. The program consisted of using hot media sampling techniques to collect soil and ground water samples at randomly chosen locations in three sampling events during a 6- month period. Verification data indicate that the remediation was successful.

Tabor, Charles [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Darr, Paul [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Caballero, Julian [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Pinellas Agreement Name Remediation Agreement for the Four and One-Half Acre Site in Largo, Pinellas County, Florida State Florida Agreement Type Remediation Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/ Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended/ Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act Scope Summary Remediation of property adjacent to the former Pinellas Plant Parties DOE; Florida Department of Environmental Protection Date 3/12/2001 SCOPE * Remediate the groundwater under a parcel of property adjacent to DOE's former Pinellas Plant to levels consistent with industrial use. * Complete remedial actions at the site in accordance with a Remedial Action Plan prepared by DOE and approved by FDEP. * Submit quarterly reports of interim remedial actions at the Site.

137

GRR/Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies NAC 534.444 Waiver to use water to explore for oil, gas or geothermal resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Division of Water Resources (NDWR) may grant a waiver of the

138

Regional ground-water mixing and the origin of saline fluids: Midcontinent, United States  

SciTech Connect

Ground waters in three adjacent regional flow systems in the midcontinent exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations that delineate large-scale fluid flow and mixing processes and two distinct mechanisms for the generation of saline fluids. Systematic spatial variations of major ion concentrations, H, O, and Sr isotopic compositions, and ground-water migration pathways indicate that each flow system contains water of markedly different origin. Mixing of the three separate ground waters exerts a fundamental control on ground-water composition. The three ground waters are: (i) dilute meteoric water recharged in southern Missouri; (ii) saline Na-Ca-Cl water in southeastern Kansas of far-traveled meteoric origin that acquired its salinity by halite dissolution; and (iii) Na-Ca-Cl brines in north-central Oklahoma that may have originated as Paleozoic seawater. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Musgrove, M.; Banner, J.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Dynamics of Transboundary Ground Water Management: Lessons from1 North America2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Society-Science in Transition. Water Resources Development and8 Management Series, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 167-196]9 101 Dynamics of Transboundary Ground Water Management: Lessons from1 North America2 Michael E Abstract11 Transboundary ground water management in the North American countries of Canada, the United

Kurapov, Alexander

140

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

SciTech Connect

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Summary - X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected catalyzed hydrogen peroxide without meeting the

142

Non-Lawyers' Guide to Hearings before the Colorado Ground Water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lawyers' Guide to Hearings before the Colorado Ground Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline ground waters Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water from the Lake Calumet... , and ground ... Source: Bethke, Craig - Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

144

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the following analytical reports: hydraulic conductivity and Atterberg limits of porcelain clay; laser particle size analyses of Oklahoma sand, Custer feldspar, porcelain clay and Ajax sand; X-ray diffraction analyses of Custer feldspar and porcelain clay; density and viscosity of canola oil; residual oil saturation analyses of Oklahoma sand samples with canola oil; and residual oil saturation analyses of Oklahoma sand samples with Soltrol.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Page 1 of 8 I. Introduction: Why perform RSEs? There are several reasons to be excited about the Remediation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

checklist and the various subsurface performance evaluation checklists (e.g., ground water extraction, air about the Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) initiative. This is a small effort, in cost and time of the protectiveness and performance of the remedy; D. Verifying that there are clear goals and realistic closure

US Army Corps of Engineers

146

GRR/Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19COIDeterminationOfNontributaryGroundWaterStatus.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 CRS 37-90-137 Permits to Construct Wells Outside of Designated Basins CRS 37-90-103 Underground Water Definitions CRS 37-82-101 Waters of Natural Surface Streams Subject to Appropriation CRS 37-92-102 Legislative Declaration - Basic Tenets of Colorado Water Law Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

147

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of (more)

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Water resources data for Florida, water year 1992. Volume 1B. Northeast Florida ground water. Water-data report (Annual) October 1, 1991-September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1992 for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 10 streams, miscellaneous discharge for 14 streams, continuous or daily stage for 32 streams, continuous or daily tide stage for 3 sites, periodic stage for 23 streams, peak discharge for 3 streams, and peak stage for 11 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 36 lakes, periodic elevations for 47 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 75 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 123 wells, and miscellaneous water-level measurements for 864 wells; and quality-of-water data for 38 surface-water sites and 66 wells.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water Research 38 (2004) 38693880 A reactor model for pulsed pumping groundwater remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to cost effectively remediate a carbon tetrachloride plume in Schoolcraft, Michigan. The pulsed pumping of Schoolcraft Plume A, a carbon tetrachloride plume in an unconfined aquifer in south- west Michigan (Hyndman et;carbon tetrachloride into carbon dioxide and other non- volatile organic compounds without production

Lastoskie, Christian M.

150

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

151

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

152

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

153

Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.  

SciTech Connect

The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distribution of uranium in drinking water and associated age-dependent radiation dose in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......uranium in Argentina bottled mineral waters. Radiat. Prot. Dosim (1996...exposure to natural uranium in well water. J. Environ. Radioact (2002...Identification, investigation and remediation of ground water containing elevated levels of......

S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. Chakrabarty; C. G. Sumesh; V. N. Jha; R. M. Tripathi; V. D. Puranik

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh:Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Maytechnologies for drinking water treatment. Rev. Environ.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Integrated phytobial remediation for sustainable management of arsenic in soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Arsenic (As), cited as the most hazardous substance by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR, 2005), is an ubiquitous metalloid which when ingested for prolonged periods cause extensive health effects leading to ultimate untimely death. Plants and microbes can help mitigate soil and groundwater As problem since they have evolved elaborate detoxification machineries against this toxic metalloid as a result of their coexistence with this since the origin of life on earth. Utilization of the phytoremediation and bioremediation potential of the plants and microbes, respectively, is now regarded as two innovative tools that encompass biology, geology, biotechnology and allied sciences with cutting edge applications for sustainable mitigation of As epidemic. Discovery of As hyperaccumulating plants that uptake and concentrate large amounts of this toxic metalloid in their shoots or roots offered new hope to As phytoremediation, solar power based nature's own green remediation. This review focuses on how phytoremediation and bioremediation can be merged together to form an integrated phytobial remediation which could synergistically achieve the goal of large scale removal of As from soil, sediment and groundwater and overcome the drawbacks of the either processes alone. The review also points to the feasibility of the introduction of transgenic plants and microbes that bring new hope for more efficient treatment of As. The review identifies one critical research gap on the importance of remediation of As contaminated groundwater not only for drinking purpose but also for irrigation purpose and stresses that more research should be conducted on the use of constructed wetland, one of the most suitable areas of application of phytobial remediation. Finally the review has narrowed down on different phytoinvestigation and phytodisposal methods, which constitute the most essential and the most difficult part of pilot scale and field scale applications of phytoremediation programs.

Madhumita Roy; Ashok K. Giri; Sourav Dutta; Pritam Mukherjee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effectiveness of aquamag ground brucite in water treatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of laboratory tests of the physical and chemical properties of two size fractions of Aquamag ground brucite (particle sizes 045 m and ... acid), as well as the effectiveness of brucite fo...

A. N. Belevtsev; S. A. Baikova; V. I. Zhavoronkova; N. N. Melnikova

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

DC WRRC Report No. 127 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the District of Columbia 4200 Connecticut Ave, NW Building 50, MB 5004 Washington, DC 20008 #12;ABSTRACT TITLE pollution on the District of Columbia's ground water. 'PROJECT STAFF *GOURND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY Affairs Environmental Regulation Administration Water Resources Management Division Washington, DC 20020

District of Columbia, University of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sampling, time domain reflectometry (TDR), neutron probe logging, and tensiometers [Prichard, 1999 were compared to gravimetric water content, time domain reflectometry, and soil texture measurements

Hubbard, Susan

162

Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

LeFranois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prediction Of postmine ground-water quality is encumbered with many complications resulting from the complex hydrologic system found in mine spoils. Current analytical methods such as acid/base accounting have only had limited success...

Wise, Clifton Farrell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

165

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.8 (Rule 8) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Pits are used in drilling operations to contain drilling related fluids and

166

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation Frequently Asked Questions What is a remedial investigation? A remedial investigation is a technical assessment that characterizes the soil. A remedial investigation includes the analysis of soil and water samples as well as evaluating existing data

Netoff, Theoden

167

Phytoremediation offers an ecologically and economically attractive remediation technique for soils contaminated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decade, phytoremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, and ground water has emerged1439 Phytoremediation offers an ecologically and economically attractive remediation technique Kow 3­5) and are more water soluble and bioavailable than the high MW PAHs, and are thus moderately

168

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations...........................................................................................................v Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

169

Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A new technique to monitor ground-water quality at municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEW TECHNIQUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER EQUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology A NEW TECHNIIIUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER IIUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Approved as to style and content by: Christo her C. Mathewson (Chair...

Hart, Steven Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ground-water resources of Lanfair and Fenner Valleys and vicinity, San Bernardino County, California  

SciTech Connect

Lanfair and Fenner Valleys and vicinity cover about 1300 square miles in eastern San Bernardino County, California. Average annual precipitation ranges from 3 to 10 inches over the area. Ground water is utilized primarily for stock and domestic purposes, and occurs in the unconsolidated deposits as well as in the highly fractured consolidated rocks. Ground-water levels in wells range from 5 to 600 feet below land surface, and well yields range from 3 to 1200 gallons per minute throughout the study area. Records indicate that water levels are at or near their predevelopment levels. Springs occur along faults and formational contacts and generally discharge less than 5 gallons per minute. Measured ground-water outflow from Lanfair Valley at Piute Spring ranged from 100 to 630 acre-feet per year. Outflow from Fenner Valley was estimated to be 270 acre-feet per year. Most of the water is of good quality for domestic and stock use. However, water from two wells indicates a concentration of sulfate that exceeds the recommended limit for drinking water. Water supplies are adequate for present needs. However, large-scale pumping would result in the lowering of the water table and a reduction of the ground water in storage. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Freiwald, D.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Estimating Persistent Mass Flux of Volatile Contaminants from the Vadose Zone to Ground Water  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants may persist for long time periods within low permeability portions of the vadose zone where they cannot be effectively treated and are a potential continuing source of contamination to groundwater. Setting appropriate vadose zone remediation goals requires evaluating these persistent sources in terms of their impact on meeting groundwater remediation goals. One-dimensional approaches for estimating transport of volatile contaminants in the vadose zone are considered and compared to a one-dimensional flux-continuity-based assessment of vapor-phase contaminant movement from the vadose zone to the groundwater. The flux-continuity-based assessment demonstrates that the ability of the groundwater to move contaminant away from the water table controls the vapor-phase mass flux from the vadose zone across the water table. Limitations of the one-dimensional approaches are then discussed with respect to the need for further method development and application of two- or three-dimensional numerical modeling. The carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site is used as an example of a site where persistent vadose zone contamination needs to be considered in the context of groundwater remediation.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Selection of clc, cba, andfcb Chlorobenzoate-Catabolic Genotypes from Groundwater and Surface Waters Adjacent to the Hyde Park, Niagara Falls, Chemical Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elements Dioxygenases Fresh Water microbiology Hydrolases...Restriction Fragment Length Water Microbiology georef...enrichment geochemistry ground water Hyde Park New York industrial...North America pollution remediation sediments transport United...

Michelle C. Peel; R. Campbell Wyndham

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R317-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates discharges

175

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, nonpoint source issues, recycling, composting, remediation, hazardous waste and many other waste- and water Ground Water," for the Nebraska Depart- ment of Agriculture. The results of this study will be made avaWater Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs wASTEmanagement problem

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

177

Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document.

none,

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Radon concentrations in ground and drinking water in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports 222Rn concentrations in ground and drinking water of nine cities of Chihuahua State, Mexico. Fifty percent of the 114 sampled wells exhibited 222Rn concentrations exceeding 11Bq/L, the maximum contaminant level (MCL) recommended by the USEPA. Furthermore, around 48% (123 samples) of the tap-water samples taken from 255 dwellings showed radon concentrations over the MCL. There is an apparent correlation between total dissolved solids and radon concentration in ground-water. The high levels of 222Rn found may be entirely attributed to the nature of aquifer rocks.

L. Villalba; L. Colmenero Sujo; M.E. Montero Cabrera; A. Cano Jimnez; M. Rentera Villalobos; C.J. Delgado Mendoza; L.A. Jurado Tenorio; I. Dvila Rangel; E.F. Herrera Peraza

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2000-177-TAR GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-12-000 Document Number U0066302 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0066302 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE August 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis A sheep’s foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. A sheep's foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. Moab, UT MILL TAILINGS REMOVAL Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast Utah, as a legacy to the former ore-processing site that operated for nearly three decades beginning in the mid-1950s. That is until April 2009, when the U.S. Department of Energy began moving the tailings by rail to an engineered disposal cell constructed 30 miles north near Crescent Junction, Utah. The mill tailings,

182

Ground water impact assessment report for the 216-B-3 Pond system  

SciTech Connect

Ground water impact assessments were required for a number of liquid effluent receiving sites according to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestones M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed upon by the US Department of Energy. This report is one of the last three assessments required and addresses the impact of continued discharge of uncontaminated wastewater to the 216-B-3C expansion lobe of the B Pond system in the 200 East Area until June 1997. Evaluation of past and projected effluent volumes and composition, geohydrology of the receiving site, and contaminant plume distribution patterns, combined with ground water modeling, were used to assess both changes in ground water flow regime and contaminant-related impacts.

Johnson, V.G.; Law, A.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Evelo, S.D.; Barnett, D.B.; Sweeney, M.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

185

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Medley Farms, Cherokee County, Gaffney, SC. (First remedial action), May 1991. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 7-acre Medley Farms site is a former waste disposal area located on a private farm used as pasture 6 miles south of Gaffney, Cherokee County, South Carolina. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural and light residential, and six private wells are within a 1-mile radius of the site. The site overlies a shallow saprolitic and a deeper bedrock aquifer. All residents in the near vicinity of the site are connected to the public water distribution system. EPA conducted a geological study to determine the potential for ground water contamination. Subsequent EPA studies identified VOCs in both soil and ground water. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses soil and ground water contamination as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE; and other organics including pesticides and PCBs. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Approved as to style and content by: Melv'n C. Schroeder (Chairman...

Gibson, John Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a research project designed to study methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Fieldwork and laboratory experiments were conducted to identify excursion indicators for monitoring purposes during mining, and to evaluate effective aquifer restoration techniques following mining. Many of the solution constituents were found to be too reactive with the aquifer sediments to reliably indicate excursion of leaching solution from the ore zone; however, in many cases, the concentrations of chloride and sulfate and the total dissolved solids level of the solution were found to be good excursion indicators. Aquifer restoration by ground-water sweeping consumed large quantities of ground water and was not effective for the redox-sensitive contaminants often present in the ore zone. Surface treatment methods such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis were effective in reducing the amount of water used, but also had the potential for creating conditions in the aquifer under which the redox-sensitive contaminants would be mobile. In situ restoration by chemical reduction, in which a reducing agent is added to the solution recirculated through the ore zone during restoration, can restore the ore-zone sediment as well as the ground water. This method could lead to a stable chemical condition in the aquifer similar to conditions before mining. 41 figures.

Deutsch, W.J.; Martin, W.J.; Eary, L.E.; Serne, R.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiéro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER of the Nhecolândia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland in Brazil, is the presence of both saline and freshwater manuscript, published in "Wetlands 22, 3 (2002) 528-540" DOI : 10.1672/0277-5212(2002)022[0528:GOWAGW]2.0.CO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

WATER AND WASTEWATER POLISHING USING 3M SELECTIVE SEPARATION REMEDIATION CARTRIDGE TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

3M has developed technology for selectively removing trace levels of dissolved contaminant materials from liquids using systems operating at flow rates up to 50 gallons per minute. This technology combines active particle chemistries with a particle-loaded membrane to achieve a new medium for liquid waste processing--a spiral wound filter cartridge. This technology has shown success by generating high decontamination factors and reducing contaminants to part per trillion levels. The spiral wound cartridge offers simplified installation, convenient replacement, and clean, easy disposal of a concentrated waste. By incorporating small, high surface area particles (5 to 80 microns) into a sturdy, yet porous, membrane greater removal efficiencies of even trace contaminants can be achieved at higher flow rates than with conventional column systems. In addition, the captive-particle medium prevents channeling of liquids and insures uniform flow across the sorbing particle surface. The cartridges fit into standard, commercially-available housings and whole system capital costs are substantially lower than those of column or reverse osmosis systems. Developmental work at high degrees of water polishing have included removal of mercury from contaminated wastewater, various radionuclides from process water, and organometallic species from surface water discharges. Laboratory testing and on-site demonstration data of these applications show the levels of success that have been achieved thus far.

Hoffmann, K. M.; Scanlan, T. J.; Seely, D. C.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Laboratory {open_quotes}proof of principle{close_quotes} investigation for the acoustically enhanced remediation technology  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a three phase program of Weiss Associates which investigates the systematics of using acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to enhance the in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The focus in this particular paper is a laboratory proof of principle investigation. The field deployment and engineering viability of acoustically enhanced remediation technology is also examined.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Spencer, J.W.; Hill, D.G. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Borehole summary report for five ground-water monitoring wells constructed in the 1100 Area  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the data collected during the installation and initial sampling of five ground-water monitoring wells between the 1100 Area and Richland City water supply wells. The five wells were installed to provide for early detection of contaminants and to provide data that may be used in making decisions on the management of the North Richland Well Field and recharge basins. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Bryce, R.W.; Goodwin, S.M.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

Faunt, C.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open lots or holding pens for feeding or holding livestock can be sources of ground water contamination. The safety of such operations depends on their separation from water wells, characteristics of the site, and proper management. This publication...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ground-penetrating-radar-assisted saturation and permeability estimation in bimodal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to subsequently design an efficient and reliable remediation plan. Soil water content monitoring is importantGround-penetrating-radar-assisted saturation and permeability estimation in bimodal systems Susan S from ground penetrating radar (GPR), a noninvasive, high-resolution geophysical method. The procedures

Hubbard, Susan

197

Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 300 area process trenches  

SciTech Connect

This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for process-water disposal trenches located on the Hanford Site. These trenches, designated the 300 Area Process Trenches, have been used since 1973 for disposal of water that contains small quantities of both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans contained herein represent revision and expansion of an effort initiated in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 300 Area Process Trenches as part of a regulatory compliance effort for hazardous chemicals being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interim-status facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The applicable monitoring requirements are described in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 265.90 of the federal regulations, and in WAC 173-303-400 of Washington State's regulations (Washington State Department of Ecology 1986). The program implemented for the process trenches was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. The plans for the program, contained in a document prepared by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1985, called for monthly sampling of 14 of the 37 existing monitoring wells at the 300 Area plus the installation and sampling of 2 new wells. 27 refs., 25 figs., 15 tabs.

Schalla, R.; Aaberg, R.L.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Liikala, T.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Olsen, K.B.; Rieger, J.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DETECTION AND MODELLING DF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND WATER DISCHARGES A Thesis by DOUGLAS YINCENT ROBERTS Subm1tted to the Graduate Col leqe of Texas A&M University in part1al fulf1llment of the requirements or the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August IgSS Major Subject: Geophys1cs THE DETECTION AND MODELLING OF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND HATER DISCHARGES A Thesis DOUGLAS VINCENT ROBERTS Approved as to style and content by: Earl . oskins (Chair of Committee...

Roberts, Douglas Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ground Water Surveillance Monitoring Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide assists DOE sites in establishing and maintaining surveillance monitoring programs to detect future impacts on ground water resources from site operations, to track existing ground water contamination, and to assess the potential for exposing the general public to site releases. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. OCarroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

202

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or unwanted chemicals can become a big problem. Some common disposal practices not only threaten ground water but also may be illegal. Small, unusable amounts of these products often wind up spilled, buried, dumped, or flushed onto a property. Minimizing... rules require that environmentally protective conditions be met before some disposal practices are permit- ted. Other previously common disposal prac- tices are now illegal because of their potential risks to human health and the environment. This new...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that generally parallels the Gulf Coast (Figure 1). Recent estimates place the total near-surface reserves at 11 billion short tons (Kaiser et al. , 1980). Energy companies are now developing lignite mines throughout the Texas lignite belt at a rapid... and accelerating rate. Surface mining of lignite could adversely affect another valuable Texas resource--ground water. Eighty percent of the near-surface lignite reserves are located within the Wilcox Group (Kaiser et al. , 1980), which is part of the Carrizo...

Pollock, Clifford Ralph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Dover Municipal Well 4, Morris County, Dover, NJ. (First remedial action), September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Dover Municipal Well 4 (DMW-4) site is located within the 500-year floodplain of the Rockaway River, in the Town of Dover, Morris County, New Jersey. Surrounding land use is mixed residential and commercial/light industrial. In 1980, sampling and analysis of ground water from DMW-4 identified the presence of VOCs-specifically, chlorinated solvents-above federal and state drinking water standards. Subsequently, DMW-4 was voluntarily removed from service by the Town, and standby Well 3 was activated as a potable water production well. The sources of VOC contamination have been traced to the Howmet Turbine Components Corporation (Dover Casting Division) and the New Jersey Natural Gas Company, both of which are under state administrative consent orders to remediate their individual properties. The ROD addresses remediation of the contaminated ground water in the shallow, intermediate, and deep aquifers at the DMW-4 site, as OU1. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs, including benzene, PCE and TCE, and, metals including lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes onsite pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water from both the intermediate and deep aquifers using air stripping to remove VOCs; discharging the treated water offsite to the public water supply system to be used for potable water, with reinjection of surplus quantities.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydrogeophysics. YORAM RUBIN and SUSAN S. HUBBARD (ed.) Water Science and Technology Library Series, Vol. 50.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogeophysics. YORAM RUBIN and SUSAN S. HUBBARD (ed.) Water Science and Technology Library Series, and the design of groundwater remediation proj- ects. Parameterization of these models, however, remains induction, ground penetrating radar, seismic methods, geophysical well logging, and airborne hydrogeophysics

Hubbard, Susan

207

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ground water monitoring system for effluent irrigated areas : a case study of Hawkesbury water recycling scheme.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water recycling schemes are increasingly being implemented across Australia as an effective means of converting wastewater into a valuable resource. There is currently a lack (more)

Beveridge, Gavin John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

none,

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Remediation of Soil and Ground Water Contaminated with PAH using Heat and Fe(II)-EDTA Catalyzed Persulfate Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of degrading 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic (PAH) hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heat and Fe(II)-EDTA catalyzed persulfate oxidation was investigated in the laboratory. The experiments were co...

Farhad Nadim; Kun-Chang Huang; Amine M. Dahmani

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Experiences in the Remediation of Ground Water Contaminated by Petroleum Hydrocarbons in the Vicinity of a Former Refinery Property  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1985, HPC HARRESS PICKEL CONSULT GMBH has conducted a variety of investigations on the property of a former refinery in the German Lower Rhine region, with the purpose of determining the nature and extent o...

Carsten Munk

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Study of the mechanisms of heavy metal sorption by mineral apatite: the feasibility of soil and ground water remediation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, the mechanisms of heavy metal sorption by two forms of mineral apatite were studied. The materials used include synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) and (more)

Kalu?erovi?-Radoi?i? Tatjana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell`s construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ground Water Protection Programs Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide provides a description of the elements of an integrated site-wide ground water protection program that can be adapted to unique physical conditions and programmatic needs at each DOE site. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

DOE/EA-1388: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site (September 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388 388 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Site September 2001 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ vii Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... ix 1.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................................1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

223

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

225

Behavior of partially miscible organic compounds in simulated ground water systems  

SciTech Connect

Serious ground water contamination problems result from leaks or spills of organic liquids which are partially miscible in water. Two important categories of these liquids include low molecular weight chlorinated solvents and gasoline. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) abiotically degrades in water forming approximately 17-25% 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) via an elimination reaction. Brominated analogs of TCA hydrolyze 11-13 times faster than TCA. As the number of bromines increase, the percent of elimination products increases. These geminal trihalides degrade by a unimolecular mechanism (E1/SN1). The rate coefficient for TCA degradation in buffered water at elevated temperature is approximately six times greater than hydrolysis of 1-chloropropane (SN2 mechanism) and more than 100 times greater than 1,1-dichloroethane. In the presence of sodium thiosulfate, the 1-chloropropane degradation rate increased by more than a factor of 100, 1,1-dichloroethane rate by 22 and TCA degradation by approximately two. The range of concentrations for major components of gasoline which partition into water was determined for 65 gasoline samples. Benzene concentrations in the water extracts ranged from 12.3-130 mg/l and toluene concentrations ranged from 23-185 mg/l. Fuel/water partition coefficients of seven major aromatic constituents were measured for 31 gasoline types and showed a standard deviation of 10-30%. These coefficients were highly correlated with the pure component solubilities. Chemometric techniques were applied to 20 peaks measured in the aqueous extracts of the 65 gasolines. Bivariate plots and principal component analyses show selected brands have distinguishing equilibrium concentrations, but complete separation of brands was not observed.

Cline, P.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wilson, J. T., L. E. Leach, M. Henson, and J. N. Jones. 1986. In situ biorestoration as a ground water remediation technique. Ground Water Monit. Rev. 6:56-64. 45. Yates, M. V., C. P. Gerba, and L. M. Kelly. 1985. Virus...

Jiamin Wan; John L. Wilson; Thomas L. Kieft

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi...

You, Kehua

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hydrocarbon pollution control and remediation of groundwater: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil-contaminated sediments. There are two main remediation techniques: soil washing and bio- remediation. With soil washing, contaminated soil is leached with water containing a surfactant to assist in hydrocarbon removal. In situ washing is undertaken...

L. Clark

229

Computer simulation models relevant to ground water contamination from EOR or other fluids - state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect

Ground water contamination is a serious national problem. The use of computers to simulate the behavior of fluids in the subsurface has proliferated extensively over the last decade. Numerical models are being used to solve water supply problems, various kinds of enertgy production problems, and ground water contamination problems. Modeling techniques have progressed to the point that their accuracy is only limited by the modeller's ability to describe the reservoir in question and the heterogeneities therein. Pursuant to the Task and Milestone Update of Project BE3A, this report summarizes the state of the art of computer simulation models relevant to contamination of ground water by enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemicals and/or waste fluids. 150 refs., 6 tabs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

231

An impending water crisis in Canada's western prairie provinces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...snow has remained on the ground and the maximum depths...more than half of the water they currently do...weather, snowpack, and water quality and quantity...inexpensive, or timely remediation. Major societies in the past have faced extended water shortages, often...

D. W. Schindler; W. F. Donahue

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

LeS D.4 Monitored Natural Attenuation -3 ENA OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDROCARBONS BY ADDING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN GROUND-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PEROXIDE IN GROUND- WATER CIRCULATION WELLS - A FIELD-BASED STUDY ON A LARGE PHYSICAL MODEL SCALE - Oliver natural attenuation) remediation strate- gies, it was found that most NSO-HET are highly mobile due to their high water solubility and low bio- degradation rates. In addition, some were found to be highly toxic

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

233

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOEIAL162350-65

235

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fracture-zone dewatering to control ground water inflow in underground coal mines. Report of Investigations/1985  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines investigation focuses on the identification and control of ground-water inflow problems that occur in the active sections of underground Appalachian coal mines. A fracture inflow survey of eight underground mines was conducted. Three types of mine fracture intercepts were identified, which are typical of wet section mining conditions. A mine in Preston County, WV was selected as the site for a fracture-zone dewatering experiment. Fracture trace analysis was used to site dewatering wells in a fracture valley setting ahead of mine development. The design, implementation, and results of the dewatering experiment are presented. The investigation suggests that fracture zones are responsible for the sudden release of stored ground water, which often occurs as mining sections advance beneath fracture valley topography. It is concluded, therefore, that dewatering operations that are designed to intercept the component of ground water that is stored in fracture zones will be most effective in controlling infiltration to active mine sections.

Schmidt, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

In situ Arsenic Remediation in a fractured, alkaline aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ removal of arsenic from ground water used for water supply has been accomplished in circum-neutral ground water containing high dissolved iron concentrations. In contrast, the ground water at our study...

Alan H. Welch; Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; Douglas K. Maurer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007; published 31 July 2007. [1] A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global., 2000; Keppler et al., 2000]. More relevant to this study area are reports in which bromide appears

242

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Rrecord of Decision (EPA Region 5): Chem-Central Site, Wyoming, MI. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 2-acre Chem-Central site is a bulk chemical storage facility in Wyoming, Kent County, Michigan. Land use in the area is a mixture of residential and commercial. An estimated 10,000 people live within 1 mile of the site and receive their water supply via the municipal distribution system. Two creeks, Cole Drain and Plaster Creek, lie in proximity to the site. Between 1957 and 1962, hazardous substances entered the ground as a result of faulty construction of a .T-arm pipe used to transfer liquid products from bulk storage tanks to small delivery trucks. Additional hazardous substances may have entered the ground through accidental spills. In 1977, a routine State biological survey of Plaster Creek identified a contaminated ditch containing oils with organic compounds including PCBs and metals that was discharging into Cole Drain. Between 1978 and 1986, the State and EPA focused their efforts on finding and eliminating the source of the ditch contamination through extensive investigations of area soil, ground water, and surface water. Results indicated that ground water and soil surrounding and north of the Chem-Central plant were contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses a remedy for contaminated onsite soil, contaminated offsite soil surrounding and north of the plant, and then addresses a remedy for contaminated onsite soil, contaminated offsite soil surrounding and north of the plant, and the ground water contamination plume emanating from the plant and spreading 1,800 feet northward. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, and toluene; and other organics including PAHs and PCBs. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

248

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Management of post-mining large-scale ground failures: blast swarms field experiment for calibration of permanent microseismic early-warning systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management of post-mining large-scale ground failures: blast swarms field experiment. To ensure post-mining risk management and public safety, wherever remediation is not possible, numerous real of the water level in the underground working caused by the halt of the de-watering system (Didier, 2008

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned form the Chernobyl example. 9 refs., 9 figs.

Voitsekhovitch, O.; Prister, B.; Nasvit, O.; Los, I.; Berkovski, V.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Micro-purge low-flow sampling of uranium-contaminated ground water at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to sample representative, undisturbed distributions of uranium in ground water beneath the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) prompted the application of a novel technique that is less invasive in the monitoring well. Recent studies indicate that representative samples can and should be collected without prior well volume exchange purging or borehole evacuation. Field experiments conducted at the FEMP demonstrate that under specific sampling conditions in a well-defined hydrogeologic system, representative ground water samples for a monitoring program can be obtained without removing the conventional three well volumes from the well. The assumption is made that indicator parameter equilibration may not be necessary to determine when to collect representative samples at the FEMP. Preliminary results obtained form the field experiments suggest that this may be true. The technique employs low purge rates (< 1 L/min) with dedicated bladder pumps with inlets located in the screened interval of the well, while not disturbing the stagnant water column above the screened interval. If adopted, this technique, termed micro-purge low-flow sampling, will produce representative ground water samples significantly reduce sampling costs, and minimize waste water over the monitoring life cycle at the FEMP. This technique is well suited for sites that have been fully characterized and are undergoing long-term monitoring.

Shanklin, D.E. Sidle, W.C.; Ferguson, M.E.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The influence of fracture properties on ground-water flow at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Bunker Hill Mine in northern Idaho is a large underground lead-zinc mine located in Precambrian metaquartzite rocks with virtually no primary porosity. Ground-water flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as joints, faults and relict bedding planes. Ground water that flows into the mine via the fractures is contaminated by heavy metals and by the production of acid water, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the ground-water flow system is a prerequisite to the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The data obtained include: (a) fracture type, (b) orientation, (c) trace length, (d) the number of visible terminations, (e) roughness (small-scale asperities), (f) waviness (larger-scale undulations), (g) infilling material, and (h) a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture.

Lachmar, T.E. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residence time for contaminated ground- water to degrade VC to below its maximum contamination levelReduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department). Remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlori- nated ethylenes, including vinyl chloride, has been chal

Deng, Baolin

254

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

255

Effects of agrochemical use in agricultural activities on the drinking water quality of ground and surface water: a case study of Agogo in the Asanti-Akim North District.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effects of agrochemical use in agricultural activities on the quality of ground and surface water within Agogo, a prominent tomato growing area in the (more)

Adonadaga, Melvin-Guy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix B (Part 2)  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Three-dimensional coupled ground water flow, thermal transport and/or migration of nuclides analysis by boundary element method  

SciTech Connect

In the safety analyses of radioactive waste disposal, it is important and indispensable to analyze coupled problems of ground water flow, thermal transport and/or migration of nuclides. The three-dimensional coupled problems is solved by boundary element method in this paper. The results of this method are compared with those experiments of JAERI and STRIPA SWEDEN on the thermal problem, and with those analyses of analytical and FEM results on the migration problem. In this formulation, natural convection is considered by Boussinesq approximation. An example of coupled ground water flow and migration of nuclides with decay chain U{sup 234} {yields} Th{sup 230} {yields} Ra{sup 226} is also tried.

Kawamura, Ryuji [Information and Mathematical Science Lab., Inc., Kanagawa (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Board (2005). Water Resources Management onEnvironmental Valuation and Its Economic Critics. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management,Environmental Cooperation Commission, has encouraged unilateral decision making, as water management

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measurement of Fuel Oxygenates in Tap Water Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......States, 1993-2002: U.S. Geological Water-Resources Investigations Report 03-4200...5. J.H. Farrelly. Status of source water protection. Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 22(3): 5051 (2002). 6. U.S. Environmental......

Frederick L. Cardinali; Benjamin C. Blount; Rachael Schmidt; John Morrow

262

Ground-water levels and tritium concentrations at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive-waste-disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, June 1984 to April 1989. Water - resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

The report, one in a series of reports by the USGS, summarizes ground-water level and tritium data that were collected by the USGS from June 1984 through April 1989. The report also describes the occurrence and distribution of tritium in water from selected wells. Data for ground-water levels in wells and disposal tranches and the concentrations of tritium in water from monitoring wells at the site are presented. Precipitation data were collected in conjunction with the water-level data to relate precipitation to ground-water recharge. Specific conductance data, routinely determined for ground-water samples, also were collected to compare changes in specific conductance to changes in tritium concentrations. All data are stored locally on the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System (NWIS).

Wilson, K.S.; Lyons, B.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions  

SciTech Connect

To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that the observed surface Pu residue was from the buried sources, not atmospheric fallout. (6) The

Fred J. Molz, III

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Chlorofluorocarbons, Sulfur Hexafluoride, and Dissolved Permanent Gases in Ground Water from Selected Sites In and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994 - 1997  

SciTech Connect

From July 1994 through May 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperations with the Department of Energy, sampled 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The wells were sampled for a variety of constituents including one- and two-carbon halocarbons. Concentrations of dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and trichlorotrifluororoethane (CFC-113) were determined. The data will be used to evaluate the ages of ground waters at INEEL. The ages of the ground water will be used to determine recharge rates, residence time, and travel time of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer in and near INEEL. The chromatograms of 139 ground waters are presented showing a large number of halomethanes, haloethanes, and haloethenes present in the ground waters underlying the INEEL. The chromatograms can be used to qualitatively evaluate a large number of contaminants at parts per trillion to parts per billion concentrations. The data can be used to study temporal and spatial distribution of contaminants in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Representative compressed chromatograms for all ground waters sampled in this study are available on two 3.5-inch high density computer disks. The data and the program required to decompress the data can be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey office at Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentrations were measured in selected wells to determine the feasibility of using this environmental tracer as an age dating tool of ground water. Concentrations of dissolved nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane were measured in 79 ground waters. Concentrations of dissolved permanent gases are tabulated and will be used to evaluate the temperature of recharge of ground water in and near the INEEL.

Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L.N.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Wayland, J.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Survey of blasting effects on ground water supplies in Appalachia. Part 2. Open file report, August 1980-August 1982  

SciTech Connect

This report covers an 18-month study of the performance of a 300-ft-deep test water well located at the Ayrshire Mine of the AMAX Coal Co. near Evansville, IN. Well performance, as characterized by 10-hr drawdown tests, was monitored as the strip mining operation approached the well site from distances of 2,000 to 15 ft (overburden removal). Blast-induced ground motion was measured at the surface next to the test well, and peak particle velocities in excess of 4 in/s were obtained. No evidence of changes in water quantity or quality could be directly attributed to the blasts. However, some lowering of the static water level in the observation well, and a simultaneous increase in the adjusted specific capacity of the test well, suggest that overburden removal caused lateral stress relief with consequent opening of vertical fractures.

Berger, P.R.; Froedge, D.T.; Gould, J.A.; Kreps, L.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

On-Line Purge and Trap GC-MS for Monitoring 1,3-Dichloropropene in Agricultural Water and Soil Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fumigant 1,3-DCP in water and soil samples by P...3-DCP residues in 10 ground- water samples and in soil samples...dichloropropene isomers in water by HS-SPME and GC-ECD...derived from chemical remediation of cis-1,3-dichloropropene......

Antonia Garrido Frenich; Salvador Corts Aguado; JosLuis Martnez Vidal; Francisco Javier Arrebola

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

On the challenges of tomography retrievals of a 2D water vapor field using ground-based microwave radiometers: An observation system simulation experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional water vapor fields were retrieved by simulated measurements from multiple ground-based microwave radiometers using a tomographic approach. The goal of this paper was to investigate how the various aspects of the instrument set-up (...

Vronique Meunier; David D. Turner; Pavlos Kollias

268

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

269

Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Integrated Strategy to Address Hanfords Deep Vadose Zone Remediation Challenges  

SciTech Connect

A vast majority of Hanfords remaining in-ground contaminants reside in the vadose zone of the Central Plateau, where reprocessing operations occurred. The vadose zone is comprised of about 75 meters of water-unsaturated sediments above groundwater. These contaminants have, and continue to release into groundwater that discharges to the Columbia River. If left untreated, these contaminants could remain a threat for centuries. Much of this contamination resides deep in the vadose zone, below the effective depth of tradition surface remedy influence. In 2008, the Department of Energy initiated deep vadose zone treatability testing to seek remedies for technetium-99 and uranium contamination. These tests include the application of desiccation for technetium-99 and reactive gas technologies for uranium. To complement these efforts, the Department of Energy has initiated a defense-in-depth approach to address the unique challenges for characterization and remediation of the deep vadose zone. This defense-in-depth approach will implement multiple approaches to understand and control contaminant flux from the deep vadose zone to the groundwater. Among these approaches is an increased investment in science and technology solutions to resolve deep vadose zone challenges including characterization, prediction, remediation, and monitoring.

Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Charboneau, Briant L.; Morse, John G.; Lober, Robert W.; Chronister, Glen B.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE/EA-1155 Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

55 55 Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Project Environmental Assessment of Ground- Water Compliance Activities At the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Spook, Wyoming February 1997 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office This page intentionally blank : illegible Portions of tbis DISCLAIMER document may be in electronic image products. Images are produced fiom the best available original dOClMXlf?IlL DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

272

High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scarce agricultural areas. Conventional measurements of water content (such as from time domain reflectometry [TDR], neutron probe or gravimetric techniques) are intrusive and provide information at a 'point' scale, which

Rubin, Yoram

273

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water;Objectives · To come up with a mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels

275

Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

277

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pesticide Levels in Ground and Surface Waters of Primavera do Leste Region, Mato Grosso, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......monoculture plantations, whose production has expanded greatly...and tends to sorb to organic matter from soil, it...reported as cells for minimum values means...by volatiliza- tion. Solar radiation also intensely...pesticides and other organic pollutants in river water......

Eliana F.G.C. Dores; Leandro Carbo; Maria L. Ribeiro; Ermelinda M. De-Lamonica-Freire

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Record of Decision for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198) (4/28/97)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13 13 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 1997 / Notices export to Canada should be clearly marked with Docket EA-144. Additional copies are to be filed directly with: Kevin J. Lipson, Jolanta Sterbenz, Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. Columbia Square, 555 Thirteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004-1109, (202)637-5600 and Gary A. Jeffries, CNG Energy Services Corporation, One Park Ridge Center, P.O. Box 15746, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15244-0746, (412)787-4268. A final decision will be made on these applications after the environmental impacts have been evaluated pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), and a determination is made by the DOE that the proposed actions will not adversely impact on the reliability of the U.S. electric power supply system.

280

A Framework for Sustainable Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, after more than 30 years of experience with remediation projects, it is now clear that remedial actions are frequently energy intensive, may produce their own pollutant emissions, and may disturb and cause controversy in neighboring communities. ... Regulators, industry, and communities recognize that sustainability principles must be integrated into remediation activities, and various sustainable remediation guidance documents have been developed. ...

Karin S. Holland

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative is to seek holistic solutions to DOEs groundwater contamination problems that consider not only...

282

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Assessment of precipitable water vapor derived from ground-based BeiDou observations with Precise Point Positioning approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) has been extensively studied and used for meteorological applications. However PWV estimation using the emerging BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is very limited. In this paper the PWV estimation strategy and the evaluation of the results inferred from ground-based BDS observations using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method are presented. BDS and GPS data from 10 stations distributed in the AsiaPacific and West Indian Ocean regions during the year 2013 are processed using the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software package. The BDS-PWV and GPS-PWV are derived from the BDS-only and GPS-only observations, respectively. The PPP positioning differences between BDS-only and GPS-only show a standard deviation (STD) Indian Ocean regions and that BDS alone can be used for PWV estimation with an accuracy comparable to GPS.

Min Li; Wenwen Li; Chuang Shi; Qile Zhao; Xing Su; Lizhong Qu; Zhizhao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Uranium-series isotopes transport in surface, vadose and ground waters at San Marcos uranium bearing basin, Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the U deposit area at San Marcos in Chihuahua, Mexico, hydrogeological and climatic conditions are very similar to the Nopal I, Pea Blanca U deposit, 50km away. The physicochemical parameters and activity concentrations of several 238U-series isotopes have been determined in surface, vadose and ground waters at San Marcos. The application of some published models to activity ratios of these isotopes has allowed assessing the order of magnitude of transport parameters in the area. Resulting retardation factors in San Marcos area are Rf238?25014,000 for the unsaturated zone and ?1101100 for the saturated zone. The results confirm that the mobility of U in San Marcos is also similar to that of the Nopal I U deposit and this area can be considered as a natural analog of areas suitable for geologic repositories of high-level nuclear waste.

Juan Carlos Burillo Montfar; Manuel Reyes Corts; Ignacio Alfonso Reyes Corts; Ma. Socorro Espino Valdez; Octavio Ral Hinojosa de la Garza; Diana Pamela Nevrez Ronquillo; Eduardo Herrera Peraza; Marusia Rentera Villalobos; Mara Elena Montero Cabrera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97  

SciTech Connect

>From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

DOE/EA-1313: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (03/22/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1313 DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 2005 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0069700 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Office of Legacy Management EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Site March 2005 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ....................................................................................................... vii Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................

287

DOE/EA-1312: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (September 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

288

Slow Strain Rate Testing of Alloy 22 in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters  

SciTech Connect

The proposed engineering barriers for the high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The candidate material for the external wall of the container is Alloy 22 (N06022). One of the anticipated degradation modes for the containers could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) and other environments using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). Results show that the temperature and applied potential have a strong influence on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer EAC in SCW solution. Limited results show that sodium fluoride solution is more detrimental than sodium chloride solution.

King, K J; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Performance of an experimental ground-coupled heat pump system for heating, cooling and domestic hot-water operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) system is a type of renewable energy technology providing space heating and cooling as well as domestic hot water. However, experimental studies on GCHP systems are still insufficient. This paper first presents an energy-operational optimisation device for a GCHP system involving insertion of a buffer tank between the heat pump unit and fan coil units and consumer supply using quantitative adjustment with a variable speed circulating pump. Then, the experimental measurements are used to test the performance of the GCHP system in different operating modes. The main performance parameters (energy efficiency and CO2 emissions) are obtained for one month of operation using both classical and optimised adjustment of the GCHP system, and a comparative analysis of these performances is performed. In addition, using TRNSYS (Transient Systems Simulation) software, two simulation models of thermal energy consumption in heating, cooling and domestic hot-water operation are developed. Finally, the simulations obtained using TRNSYS are analysed and compared to experimental data, resulting in good agreement and thus the simulation models are validated.

Calin Sebarchievici; Ioan Sarbu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evaporative Concentration of 100x J13 Ground Water at 60% Relative Humidity and 90C  

SciTech Connect

In these experiments we studied the behavior of a synthetic concentrated J13 solution as it comes in contact with a Ni-Cr-Mo-alloy selected for waste canisters in the designated high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concentrated synthetic J13 solution was allowed to drip slowly onto heated test specimens (90 C, 60% relative humidity) where the water moved down the surface of the specimens, evaporated and minerals precipitated. Mineral separation or zoning along the evaporation path was not observed. We infer from solid analyses and geochemical modeling, that the most corrosive components (Ca, Mg, and F) are limited by mineral precipitation. Minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include thermonatrite, natrite, and trona, all sodium carbonate minerals, as well as kogarkoite (Na{sub 3}SO{sub 4}F), halite (NaCl), and niter (KNO{sub 3}). Calcite and a magnesium silicate precipitation are based on chemical analyses of the solids and geochemical modeling. The most significant finding of this study is that sulfate and fluoride concentrations are controlled by the solubility of kogarkoite. Kogarkoite thermodynamic data are needed in the Yucca Mountain Project database to predict the corrosiveness of carbonate brines and to establish the extent to which fluoride is removed from the brines as a solid.

Staggs, K; Maureen Alai,; Hailey, P; Carroll, S A; Sutton, M; Nguyen, Q A

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

292

Integration of biotechnology in remediation and pollution prevention activities  

SciTech Connect

The North American Free Trade Agreement/North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation provides a mechanism for an international collaboration between the US, Canada, and Mexico to jointly develop, modify, or refine technologies that remediate or protect the environment. These countries have a vested interest in this type of collaboration because contaminants do not respect the boundaries of a manufacturing site, region, city, state, or country. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of a diverse group of individuals who address a variety of environmental issues. ESD is involved in basic and applied research on the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants; environmental assessment; environmental engineering; and demonstrations of advanced remediation technologies. The remediation and protection of the environment includes water, air, and soils for organic, inorganic, and radioactive contaminants. In addition to remediating contaminated sites, research also focuses on life-cycle analyses of industrial processes and the production of green technologies. The author focuses this discussion on subsurface remediation and pollution prevention; however, the research activities encompass water, soil and air and many of the technologies are applicable to all environments. The discussion focuses on the integration of biotechnology with remediation activities and subsequently linking these biological processes to other remediation technologies.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 25 Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography remediation. Previous near-surface geophysical time-lapse studies have focused on electrical or electromagnetic (EM) techniques (including ground-penetrating radar) or borehole methods. To evaluate the utility

Hubbard, Susan

294

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

295

Workplan/RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, S01-S22 - Volume I - Text and Volume II - Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the assessment of environmental impacts resulting from releases of hazardous substances from the facilities in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, including Solvent Tanks 650-01E to 650-22E, also referred to as Solvent Tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina.

Conner, K.R.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

Bishop, Scott Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Numerical modelling of ground water flow using MODFLOW, Indian Journal of Science, 2013, 2(4), 86-92, www.discovery.org.in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management approaches. However, there should be no expectation of a single `true' model, and model outputsRESEARCH Kumar, Numerical modelling of ground water flow using MODFLOW, Indian Journal of Science management or impact of new development scenarios. However, if the modelling studies are not well designed

Kumar, C.P.

298

Protection of ground and surface waters, January 1982-August 1987: Citations from AGRICOLA (Agricultural Online Access) concerning diseases and other environmental considerations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The citations in this bibliography are selected from English-language material from the international literature on the agricultural aspects of the pollution of ground and surface water by chemicals. Some of the subject areas include: Agricultural operations; Pesticides; Legislation; Land use; Urban hydrology and pollution; Food processing wastes; and Waste treatment.

Bebee, C.N.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognised since the birth of agriculture, the landspreading of industrial...full life cycle assessment (LCA). For example, blending high-nutrient-content...cradle-to-grave) of an LCA can also lead to misleading...remediation option is best. In LCA, impacts are classified as...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

302

UMTRA Ground Water Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

... 7 Figure 3. Uranium Distribution from April 2013 Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site ......

303

UMTRA Ground Water Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and viability of the compliance strategy. The current version of the GCAP is in review with NRC. Ongoing monitoring requirements will be evaluated and modified as...

304

Ground Water Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to conc~ntrate their turbine business efforts in the electric power generation market. In 1979, Westinghouse Canada Inc., Turbine and Generator Division, embarked on an intensive expansion program to increase production capabili ties and improve... capacity well was recorded. This well was drilled in the Town of Renfrew, February 1963, for United Dairy and Poultry Coop. From the well drillers log, it was determined that the well was approximately 700 feet deep with a casing diameter of eight...

Greaves, K.; Chave, G. H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final  

SciTech Connect

The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources

308

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Motors Site in General Motors Site in Adrian, Michigan Department of Energy OiZce of Assistant Manager for Environmental Management Oak Ridge Operations January 2001 69 Printed on recycledhcydable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE GENERAL MOTORS SITE ADRIAN, MICHIGAN JANUARY 200 1 Prepared for United States Army Corps of Engineers Under Contract No. DACW45-98-D-0028 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. TABLES ...............................................................................................................................................

309

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

SAIC

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 58 (2012) Volunteer Ground-Water Monitoring Coming to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management Districts (WMDs) or the Florida Department of Environmental1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program being monitored for water levels by the state's water management districts

Florida, University of

312

Remediation of Uranium Impacted Sediments in a Watercourse - 12486  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, remediation was initiated for a non-operational fuel cycle facility previously used for government contract work. Between 2009 and the spring of 2011, remediation efforts were focused on demolition of contaminated buildings and removal of contaminated soil. In the late spring of 2011, the last phase of remediation commenced involving the removal of contaminated sediments from portions of a 1,200 meter long gaining stream. Planning and preparation for remediation of the stream began in 2009 with submittal of permit applications to undertake construction activities in a wetland area. The permitting process was lengthy and involved securing permits from multiple agencies. However, early and frequent communication with stakeholders played an integral role in efficiently obtaining the permit approvals. Frequent communication with stakeholders throughout the planning and remediation process also proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. The remediation of the stream involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation and disposal. Many safeguards were employed to protect several species of concern in the work area, water management during project activities, challenges encountered during the project, methods of Final Status Survey, and stream restoration. The planning and permitting effort for the Site Brook remediation began in May 2009 and permits were approved and in place by February 2011. The remediation and restoration of the Site Brook began in April 2011 and was completed in November 2011. The remediation of the Site Brook involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation, disposal, FSS, and restoration. Early and frequent communications with stakeholders proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. Challenges encountered during the remediation effort were overcome by proper planning and having preparedness procedures in place prior to executing the work. With the remediation and restoration successfully completed, the only remaining task is to monitor/maintain the restoration for 10 years. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB, Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) analysis structure including characterization of uncertainty, and (iii) analysis results for each of the ground water protection standards. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of protecting surface water, groundwater, and ecological receptors. For more information, contact: Eric Pierce Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS 6038 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 pierceem@ornl.gov (865) 574-9968 Kurt Gerdes DOE-EM Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation kurt.gerdes@em.doe.gov (301) 903-7289 Sediment Biota Groundwater Flow Fluctuating Water Table Hg in building structures and rubble Waterborne mercury (mercury being transported via water being released from the facilities to the creeks) Hg currently present in the creek and sediments along the base of the creek

315

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect

THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

BERGMAN TB; STEFANSKI LD; SEELEY PN; ZINSLI LC; CUSACK LJ

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baker and Williams Baker and Williams Warehouses Site in New York, New York, 7997 - 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 7 995 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES SITE IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 1991-1993 NOVEMBER 1995 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 __ CONTENTS .- ~_- _- ..- ^_ FIGURES . ...,.,.....,,........,,.,_.....,.,.,.__,....,,,,, v TABLES ,.,__...,,....,..._._..,,,,_._...,.,.,,.,,,..._,,,, vi ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..v~

319

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' at the C. H. Schnoor Site, Springdale, Pennsylvania, in 1 994 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE C. H. SCHNOOR SITE SPRINGDALE, PENNSYLVANIA, IN 1994 NOVEMBER 1996 prep&ed for United States Department of ~nergy Oak Ridge Operations Off= r Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. '14501 CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi UNITS OF MEASURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

320

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alba Craft Laboratory and Alba Craft Laboratory and Vicinity Properties Site in Oxford, Ohio C Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office January 1997 $$@T Op% 3 @!B . i~d!l Ab Printed on recycled/recyclable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE FORMER ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY AND VICINITY PROPERTIES SITE IN OXFORD, OHIO JANUARY 1997 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC0591 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. v TABLES.. .............................................................................................................................................. vi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Aliquippa Forge Site Aliquippa Forge Site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKE.~ FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ALIQUIPPA FORGE SITE IN ALIQUIPPA, PENNSYLVANIA NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for . UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-9 1 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TABLES vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii UNITSOFMEASURE ix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

322

Advanced Remediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

Krahn, St.; Miller, C.E. [The United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and the constitutive mutant strain G4 5223 PR1 in aquifer microcosms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carcinogenic properties (9). Remediation of ground- water aquifers containing TCE...H. 1990. Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution. Science 250...situ biorestoration as a ground water remediation technique. Ground Water...

M L Krumme; K N Timmis; D F Dwyer

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Cherokee County/Galena, Kansas (Second remedial action), September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee County site is a lead and zinc mining area in the southeastern corner of Kansas. The 25 square-mile Galena subsite is one of six subsites within the Cherokee County site and consists of large areas covered by mine wastes, water-filled subsidence craters, and open mine shafts. The approximately 3,500 Galena residents receive their water supply from two deep aquifer wells. EPA began investigations of the Galena subsite in 1985 and determined that the shallow ground-water aquifer and surface water were contaminated with elevated concentrations of metals. EPA Region VII responded by installing water-treatment units on several private wells. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and surface water are metals including cadmium, lead, and zinc. The selected remedial action for the site includes the removal, consolidation, and onsite placement in mine pits, shafts, and subsidences of surface mine wastes; diversion and channelization of surface streams with recontouring and vegetation of land surface; and investigation of deep aquifer well quality.

Not Available

1989-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): East Multnomah County Ground Water Contamination, Operable Unit 2, Multnomah County, OR, December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the selected remedial action for soil and shallow groundwater contamination within the Troutdale Gravel Aquifer (TGA) at the Cascade Corporation (Cascade) site, in Gresham, Oregon.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Substation grounding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Designing a proper substation grounding system is quite complicating. Many parameters affect its design. In order for a grounding design to be safe, it needs (more)

Baleva, Inna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 1999 Operable Unit (OU) III Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study(RI/FS) and was designated as AreaOU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven REMEDIATION Executive Summary

329

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment... of regulations, primarily contained in Chapter 287 of the Texas Administrative Code, to provide for licensing of well drillers and pump installers and establish standards for drilling, capping and plugging water wells. For wells drilled before the effective date...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Kinetic Studies on the Hydrogen Peroxide-Enhanced In Situ Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons in Water-Saturated Ground Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Techniques are rapidly developing for aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons in lower water-bearing formations. It is well known that...

Dr. E. R. Barenschee; Dr. O. Helmling; S. Dahmer; B. Del Grosso

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA); Nitao, John J. (Castro Valley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

335

Consulting, Construction and Operating Results of a Full-Scale Biotechnological Plant for the Oxidation of Iron and Manganese with Simultaneous Elimination of Volatile Chlorinated Hydrocarbons from Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ground water in the south part of Hannover, known ... Sdstadt, is partially polluted with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (C1HC). This contamination originated from a ... the factory stands as well as the...

V. Quentmeier; M. Saake

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou), Liberty County, TX. (Second remedial action), September 1991. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 500-acre Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou) site is in Liberty County, Texas. Current land use in the area is divided among cropland, pasture, range, forest, and small rural communities. Since 1971, numerous undocumented disposal activities occurred onsite involving primarily petrochemical wastes. The ROD for OU2 focuses on three areas of contamination at the site affecting soil and ground water contamination, known as the main waste area, the east disposal area, and the Bayou disposal area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs; and metals including lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes treating 302,800 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using in-situ vapor extraction to remove VOCs, controlling vertical air infiltration using an engineered soil and synthetic liner cap; consolidating lead-contaminated soil in the Main Waste Area, followed by capping.

Not Available

1991-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect

This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

R. P. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

PCB Concentration in Fish in a River System after Remediation of Contaminated Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An 1991 investigation of PCB concentrations in water and fish along a river was repeated in 1996 after the completion of a remediation of PCB-containing sediment in a lake within the river system. ... The results indicated, that changes in background exposure must be taken into account when evaluating the success of remedial actions measures carried out over several years. ...

Gudrun Bremle; Per Larsson

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Review on electrical discharge plasma technology for wastewater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As wastewater remediation becomes a global concern, the development of innovative advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment is still a major challenge. With regard to its fast removal rate and environmental compatibility, plasma technology is considered as a promising remediation technology for water remediation. The principles of electrical plasma with liquids for pollutant removal and the reactors of various electrical discharge types are outlined in this review. To improve energy efficiency, combination of plasma technology with catalysts has attracted significant attention. The present review is concerned about present understanding of the mechanisms involved in these combined processes. Further on, detailed discussions are given of the effects of various factors on the performance of pulsed electrical plasma technology in water treatment processes. Finally, special attention is paid to the future challenges of plasma technology utilized for industrial wastewater treatment.

Bo Jiang; Jingtang Zheng; Shi Qiu; Mingbo Wu; Qinhui Zhang; Zifeng Yan; Qingzhong Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nutrients, pesticides, surfactants, and trace metals in ground water from the Howe and Mud Lake areas upgradient from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Reconnaissance-level sampling for selected nutrients, pesticides, and surfactants in ground water upgradient from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted during June 1989. Water samples collected from eight irrigation wells, five domestic or livestock wells, and two irrigation canals were analyzed for nutrients, herbicides, insecticides and polychlorinated compounds, and surfactants. In addition to the above constituents, water samples from one irrigation well, one domestic well, and one irrigation canal were analyzed for arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen ranged from less than the reporting to 6.10 mg/L (milligrams per liter), and orthophosphate concentrations as phosphorus ranged from less than the reporting level to 0.070 mg/L (micrograms per liter). Concentrations of 2,4-D in two water samples were 0.1 {mu}g/L and 0.10 {mu}g/L. Water samples analyzed for 15 other herbicides, 10 carbamate insecticides, 11 organophosphorus insecticides, and 15 organochlorine insecticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls, and gross polychlorinated naphthalenes all had concentration below their reporting levels. Concentrations of surfactants ranged from 0.02 to 0.35 mg/L. Arsenic, barium, chromium, selenium, and silver concentrations exceeded reporting levels in most of the samples. 19 refs., 1 fig., 19 tabs.

Edwards, D.D.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Bennett, C.M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Novel Remediation Schemes for Groundwater and Urban Runoff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Anthropogenic environmental contamination is having a profound effect on ground and surface water bodies. Contaminants, such as, chlorinated solvents in groundwater and heavy metals (more)

Olson, Pamela Renee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Soil and Ground Water Using Zero-Valent Iron Under Batch and Semi-Batch Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical remediation of soil and groundwater containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was carried out under batch and semi-batch conditions using different iron species: (Fe(II) (sulphate solution); Fe0 ...

Dbora V. Franco; Leonardo M. Da Silva; Wilson F. Jardim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Characterization of organic-rich colloids from surface and ground waters at the actinide-contaminated Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloids, i.e. nanoparticles and macromolecules, play an important role in the environmental dispersion of actinides. Thus, colloids (3kDa0.5?m) were collected and purified from three different environments, i.e. surface water, pond water and near-surface ground water at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado, where elevated actinide concentrations had previously been documented. Their chemical composition was determined in order to better understand their role in actinide migration. All three types of colloid samples were found to be similar in chemical composition, with a higher percentage of organic carbon, OC (518%), than any other measured component, and only small amounts of Si, Mn, Al, and Fe (1.5% or below). Analytically determined components account for 4056% of the colloidal matter, with water likely making up the difference. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of colloidal material from all three sample types indicate the presence of cellulose or chitin, likely from plant (terrestrial and/or aquatic) material. Other major components include humic acid type particles, with only small amounts (<5%) of mineral particles. Our findings of colloids high in organic and low in inorganic matter content agree with previously reported results on Pu(IV) associated with an acidic natural macromolecular organic compound that also contains small amounts of Fe. Pu/OC and Fe/OC ratios both showed a steady decrease from surface water to pond water to groundwater, with a more marked decrease in the Fe/OC ratio, but no significant change in overall colloidal organic carbon (COC) concentrations.

Kimberly A. Roberts; Peter H. Santschi; Gary G. Leppard; M.Marcia West

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

RISK ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATION OF MILITARY AND AMMUNITION SITES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contamination of soil and water with explosives, especially 2,4,6-...et al.... 2003). Facilities for the treatment of explosive contaminated ground- and surface water have to be operated over decades. Since ... n...

ANDR GERTH; ANJA HEBNER

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 August 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Todd Nelson, Washington Closure media@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9097 RICHLAND, WASH. - After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy's (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site's River Corridor. The $57 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project began with nearly two years of preparation and characterization before reaching their

349

Evaluation of preservation methods for selected nutrients in ground water at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Water from 28 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was sampled as part of the US Geological Survey`s quality-assurance program to determine the effect of different preservation methods on nutrient concentrations. Samples were preserved with filtration and with mercuric chloride and chilling, chilling only, or sulfuric acid and chilling. The samples were analyzed for ammonia, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, and orthophosphate by the US Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory. The study was done in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. The comparison between samples preserved with mercuric chloride and chilling and samples preserved by chilling only showed that all sample pairs were in statistical agreement. Results for ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate samples preserved with sulfuric acid and chilling were within the 95 percent confidence level of the results for the samples preserved by the other two methods and can be considered equivalent to them. Results of this study indicate that discontinuing the use of mercuric chloride as a preservation method for nutrients in water samples will not affect the comparability of data collected at the INEL before and after October 1, 1994.

Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Groundwater Nitrogen Source Identification and Remediation in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater nitroGen source identification and remediation in the texas hiGh plains and rollinG plains reGions Paul Delaune, Bridget R. Scanlon, Robert C. Reedy, Robert C. Schwartz, Louis Baumhardt, Lucas F. Gregory Texas Water Resources... Institute TR-451 September 2013 GROUNDWATER NITROGEN SOURCE IDENTIFICATION AND REMEDIATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS AND ROLLING PLAINS REGIONS FINAL REPORT FUNDING PROVIDED BY THE TEXAS STATE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION BOARD THROUGH A CLEAN...

Delaune, P.; Scanlon, B.; Reedy, R.; Schwartz, R.; Baumhardt, L.; Gregory, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state.The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

353

Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

Tunison, Douglas Irvin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Use of Risk Analysis on Remedial Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative risk assessment (RA) is a tool used in determining a remedial alternatives effectiveness of reducing public health ... to occur at a site. Under the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) ...

Teresa A. Schuller; Denice H. Wardrop

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solution for remediation of metal-contaminated ground water and soil in...g. land and ground water remediation). Extensive...filtration of ground water while supporting...following site remediation), alter...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Anaerobes to the Rescue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groundwater remediation. References...F. H. , Ground-Water Microbiology...geochemistry ground water halogenated...pollution remediation tetrachloroethylene...groundwater remediation. References...Chapelle, Ground-Water Microbiology...

Derek R. Lovley

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modeling. Ground Water 27: 823-834...after active remediation. Biodegradation...intrinsic remediation of a BTEX...benzene in ground water beneath a...enrichment ground water hydrocarbons...reclamation remediation soils spectra...

Silvia A. Mancini; Ania C. Ulrich; Georges Lacrampe-Couloume; Brent Sleep; Elizabeth A. Edwards; Barbara Sherwood Lollar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

M. J. Appel

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ground-water levels and tritium concentrations at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, June 1984 to April 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Maxey Flats disposal site, Kentucky encompasses about 280 acres near the edge of a flat-topped ridge. The ridge is underlain by fractured shale and sandstone beds of the Nancy Member and the Farmers Member of the Borden Formation of Mississippian age. Groundwater flow in the strata beneath the site occurs through fractures, and flow patterns are difficult to delineate. The potentiometric surface also is difficult to delineate because several saturated and unsaturated zones are present in the rocks. Generally, ground-water levels in wells intersecting permeable fractures fluctuated seasonally and were lowest from December through June and highest from July through November. Water levels in the disposal trenches fluctuations less than those in wells, and for most trenches the fluctuations were less than 0.5 foot. From June 1984 to April 1989, tritium concentrations in groundwater ranged from 0 to 2,402,200 picocuries/ml. The greatest and most variable tritium concentrations were in wells along the northwest side of the site. The major conduit of groundwater flow from the trenches in the northwestern part of the site is a fractured sandstone bed that forms the base of most trenches. Elsewhere along the site perimeter, elevated levels of tritium were not detected in wells, and mean tritium were not detected in wells, and mean tritium concentrations showed little change between 1986 and 1988.

Wilson, K.S.; Lyons, B.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

A large scale environmental assessment: The Clinch River Remedial Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The USEPA identified the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee as a Superfund National Priorities List site in 1989. Facilities at the ORR have released a variety of radiological, organic, and inorganic contaminants to the local aquatic environment as a result of nuclear weapons production, uranium enrichment, and energy research and development activities from the mid 1940s to the present. The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) was initiated to meet the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to determine the nature and extent of hazardous releases to the aquatic environment. Phase 1 of the CRRI consisted of sampling and analysis of selected sites representing differing levels of contamination to determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in off-site water, sediment, and fish. Sampling activities in support of Phase 2 of the remedial investigation were designed to assist in defining the nature and extent of the contaminants of concern in sediment, water and biota, and to provide information for assessing the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with those contaminants. A concurrent study evaluated potential remedial alternatives and identified effective and acceptable corrective measures. An overview of the CRRI, including a history of the facilities and their contaminant releases, and the regulatory context in which the remedial investigation occurred is presented.

LeHew, R.; Harris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bargaining over Remedies in Merger Bruce Lyons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the internationally standard 2-phase investigation structure and remedy negotiations of the form practiced by the EC jurisdictions, remedies can be agreed in either phase of investigation. In particular, both the EU and US merger regulations allow remedies to be agreed in either phase of the investigation. Either de jure (as in the EU

Feigon, Brooke

365

Paper 2H-03, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds--2002. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper 2H-03, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds--2002. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated. INTRODUCTION Recent detection of perchlorate in several surface waters and groundwater wells used to supply

366

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

367

DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facilitys Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPFs proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Arsenic-Free, Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. Worldburden from arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh. Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mercury contaminated sediment sitesAn evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

372

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

373

Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

374

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Work Plan Addendum for the TNX Area Operable Unit Groundwater Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present a sampling and analysis plan for the Water Table Aquifer for purposes of obtaining additional data for remedial decision-making with respect to radioactive contamination in the groundwater.

Brewer, K.

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Ogden Defense Depot, Operable Unit 1, Weber County, UT. (Second remedial action), June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Since 1941, the 1,100-acre Ogden Defense Depot (DDOU) site, located in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, has been a key installation in the Department of Defense supply system. Operable Unit 1, which is located in the southwest part of the DDOU, is composed of the backfill material in the Plain City Canal, Burial Site 1, and Burial Site 3-B. Burial Site 1 was reported to have been used for the disposal of riot control agent (chloroacetophenone) and white smoke (hexachloroethane) containers in the 1940's. In the early 1960's, Burial Site 3-B was reportedly the burying ground for over 1,000 arctic-style rubber boots. The ROD addresses a final remedy for OU1 that will reduce the principal threats posed by contaminated soil and shallow ground water at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, and ground water are VOCs, including TCE; other organics, including dioxins and pesticides; and metals, including arsenic and lead.

Not Available

1992-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Embrittlement Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA, August 30, 2005 Funding and Duration * Timeline - Project start date: 7/20/05 - Project end date: 7/19/09 - Percent complete: 0.1% * Budget: Total project funding: 300k/yr * DOE share: 75% * Contractor share: 25% * Barriers - Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) - Assessment of hydrogen compatibility of the existing natural gas pipeline system for transporting hydrogen - Suitable steels, and/or coatings, or other materials to provide safe and reliable hydrogen transport and reduced capital cost 2 Team and Collaborators 3 * Industrial Partners: SECAT

378

Gordon Research Conferences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Transforma-tions at the Solid-Water Interface." W...ULmitations of the Remediation of Ground Waters Contaminated by Organic...C. Kavanaugh, "Remediation and Engineering Constraints...and Uncertainty in Ground-Water Remedia-tion Modeling...

Carlyle B. Storm

1994-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

H. M. Sulloway

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

382

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Full Document...

383

Groundwater remediation technologies for trichloroethylene and technetium-99.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??M. Eng. The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program (ITRD) made technology recommendations after reviewing thirty in situ remediation technologies (more)

Uhl, John Nicholas, 1960-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

D. E. Shanklin

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOEs contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

2004-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young-Rainey Star Center  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a fieldscale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at a site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The STAR Center is a former DOE facility. The remediation project covered an area of 930 m2 (10,000 ft2) and depths extending to 10.5 m (35 ft) below ground surface. In July 2001, DOEs contractor awarded a subcontract to SteamTech Environmental Services for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. McMillan-McGee Corporation implemented the process. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted over a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Results of the sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects

Gavaskar, A.R. [ed.; Chen, A.S.C. [ed.; none,

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

390

Remediation of the Highland Drive South Ravine, Port Hope, Ontario: Contaminated Groundwater Discharge Management Using Permeable Reactive Barriers and Contaminated Sediment Removal - 13447  

SciTech Connect

The Highland Drive South Ravine (HDSR) is the discharge area for groundwater originating from the Highland Drive Landfill, the Pine Street North Extension (PSNE) roadbed parts of the Highland Drive roadbed and the PSNE Consolidation Site that contain historical low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). The contaminant plume from these LLRW sites contains elevated concentrations of uranium and arsenic and discharges with groundwater to shallow soils in a wet discharge area within the ravine, and directly to Hunt's Pond and Highland Drive South Creek, which are immediately to the south of the wet discharge area. Remediation and environmental management plans for HDSR have been developed within the framework of the Port Hope Project and the Port Hope Area Initiative. The LLRW sites will be fully remediated by excavation and relocation to a new Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) as part of the Port Hope Project. It is projected, however, that the groundwater contaminant plume between the remediated LLRW sites and HDSR will persist for several hundreds of years. At the HDSR, sediment remediation within Hunt's Ponds and Highland Drive South Creek, excavation of the existing and placement of clean fill will be undertaken to remove current accumulations of solid-phase uranium and arsenic associated with the upper 0.75 m of soil in the wet discharge area, and permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) will be used for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater to prevent the ongoing discharge of uranium and arsenic to the area in HDSR where shallow soil excavation and replacement has been undertaken. Bench-scale testing using groundwater from HDSR has confirmed excellent treatment characteristics for both uranium and arsenic using permeable reactive mixtures containing granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). A sequence of three PRBs containing ZVI and sand in backfilled trenches has been designed to intercept the groundwater flow system prior to its discharge to the ground surface and the creek and ponds in the HDSR. The first of the PRBs will be installed immediately up-gradient of the wet discharge area approximately 50 m from the creek, the other two will be installed across the area of shallow soil replacement, and all will extend from ground surface to the base of the water table aquifer through which the impacted groundwater flows. The PRBs have been designed to provide the removal of uranium and arsenic for decades, although the capacity of the treatment mixture for contaminant removal suggests that a longer period of treatment may be feasible. The environmental management plan includes an allowance for on-going monitoring, and replacement of a PRB(s) as might be required. (authors)

Smyth, David; Roos, Gillian [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada)] [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Ferguson Jones, Andrea [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada); Case, Glenn [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada); Yule, Adam [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Impact of microstructure on the effective diffusivity in random packings of hard spheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes like catalysis, filtration, oil recovery, ground water remediation, chromatography, trans- port

Torquato, Salvatore

393

Adaptive biorthogonal spline schemes for advectionreaction equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equations arise from petroleum reservoir simulation, ground- water contaminant remediation, and many other

394

Remedy Evaluation Framework for Inorganic, Non-Volatile Contaminants in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in the vadose zone may act as a potential long-term source of groundwater contamination and need to be considered in remedy evaluations. In many cases, remediation decisions for the vadose zone will need to be made all or in part based on projected impacts to groundwater. Because there are significant natural attenuation processes inherent in vadose zone contaminant transport, remediation in the vadose zone to protect groundwater is functionally a combination of natural attenuation and use of other remediation techniques, as needed, to mitigate contaminant flux to groundwater. Attenuation processes include both hydrobiogeochemical processes that serve to retain contaminants within porous media and physical processes that mitigate the rate of water flux. In particular, the physical processes controlling fluid flow in the vadose zone are quite different and generally have a more significant attenuation impact on contaminant transport relative to those within the groundwater system. A remedy evaluation framework is presented herein that uses an adaptation of the established EPA Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation approach and a conceptual model based approach focused on identifying and quantifying features and processes that control contaminant flux through the vadose zone. A key concept for this framework is to recognize that MNA will comprise some portion of all remedies in the vadose zone. Thus, structuring evaluation of vadose zone waste sites to use an MNA-based approach provides information necessary to either select MNA as the remedy, if appropriate, or to quantify how much additional attenuation would need to be induced by a remedial action (e.g., technologies considered in a feasibility study) to augment the natural attenuation processes and meet groundwater protection goals.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Advanced Remedial Methods for Metals and Radionuclides in Vadose Zone Environments  

SciTech Connect

Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport or toxicity of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in arid environments where the vadose zone can be up to hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges that limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of the contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to underlying aquifers prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Shear-thinning fluids (i.e., surfactants) can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting reactive remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 20% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory-/ intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Hubbard, Susan; Miracle, Ann L.; Zhong, Lirong; Foote, Martin; Wu, Yuxin; Jansik, Danielle P.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

397

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

398

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

399

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Microsoft PowerPoint - Grndwater&WastWtrRemediation_TechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundwater and Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils at a glance  system can be configured as either in situ or ex situ  technology can treat wastewater, seepage, surface water and/or groundwater  technology can remediate waters contaminated with sulfate, nitrate/nitrite, redox sensitive metals, or chlorinated solvents This technology can be used to treat wastewater, seepage, surface water and/or groundwater contaminated with sulfate, nitrate/nitrite, perchlorate, redox sensitive metals, or chlorinated solvents. Sulfate-laden waters are produced by the government (primarily DOD and DOE), the mining industry (particularly coal and iron ore), the power generation industry (coal fired plants), and some chemical companies. Nitrate/nitrite contaminated waters are produced by the

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microbial Communities in Contaminated Sediments, Associated with Bioremediation of Uranium to Submicromolar Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...influence the remediation process. We...14.6 m below ground surface (bgs...hydrogeology and remediation performance...Additional clean water was injected...approach for in situ remediation. Ground Water 44: 266-274...

Erick Cardenas; Wei-Min Wu; Mary Beth Leigh; Jack Carley; Sue Carroll; Terry Gentry; Jian Luo; David Watson; Baohua Gu; Matthew Ginder-Vogel; Peter K. Kitanidis; Philip M. Jardine; Jizhong Zhou; Craig S. Criddle; Terence L. Marsh; James M. Tiedje

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Global Water Sustainability:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ground Water and Drinking Water EPA 816-R-04-003...oil and gas produced water treatment. Journal of Hazardous...92-99 Jurenka B (2007) Electrodialysis (ED) and Electrodialysis...usbr.gov/pmts/water/publications/reportpdfs...

Kelvin B. Gregory; Radisav D. Vidic; David A. Dzombak

405

Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545  

SciTech Connect

Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this process also provides new opportunities to think differently and look at the bigger picture of the overall benefit we are providing with our remediation projects. The opportunities from the move towards GSR are very real. They will help us make remedial actions truly more beneficial to the environment and to society. They will also allow (or force) remediation practitioners to think outside of the usual realm of approaches to find newer and more beneficial technologies. (authors)

Simpkin, Thomas J. [CH2M HILL, Denver, Colorado (United States); Favara, Paul [CH2M HILL, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products on indoor air quality. The emissions of two wood remedial treatment products (water in real conditions during a roof renovation work in an old building. A petroleum-based solvent product of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products. Simple models can be applied to emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

Site Remediation in a Virtual Environment Information and Computing Sciences Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scientific judgement and intuition. In environmental remediation, the goal is to clean up contaminants either to mobilize and extract hydrocarbon contaminants from a volume of saturated soil/rock. Several wells are drilled in the vicinity of the contaminant, water and/or chemicals are injected into some of the wells

408

Wastewater remediation using coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?Small-scale domestic septic tanks discharge excess nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, as well as pathogens, which can degrade local water supplies. Unfortunately, traditional chemical and physical tre...

D. W. Kirk; C. Q. Jia; J. Yan

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Remedial Measures for Correcting Slides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scope of field investigations should include topography, geology, water, weather, and history of slope changes. If a slide has occurred, the shape of sliding surface should also be determined.

Yang H. Huang

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An optimized groundwater extraction system for the toxic burning pits area of J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Testing and disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals at the J-Field area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) have resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater. The discharge of contaminated groundwater to on-site marshes and adjacent estuaries poses a potential risk to ecological receptors. The Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area is of special concern because of its disposal history. This report describes a groundwater modeling study conducted at J-Field that focused on the TBP area. The goal of this modeling effort was optimization of the groundwater extraction system at the TBP area by applying linear programming techniques. Initially, the flow field in the J-Field vicinity was characterized with a three-dimensional model that uses existing data and several numerical techniques. A user-specified border was set near the marsh and used as a constraint boundary in two modeled remediation scenarios: containment of the groundwater and containment of groundwater with an impermeable cap installed over the TBP area. In both cases, the objective was to extract the minimum amount of water necessary while satisfying the constraints. The smallest number of wells necessary was then determined for each case. This optimization approach provided two benefits: cost savings, in that the water to be treated and the well installation costs were minimized, and minimization of remediation impacts on the ecology of the marsh.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCHs Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Enhanced dispersion in cylindrical packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...method dispersivity geometry ground water heterogeneity hydrodynamics numerical models pollution pore water porosity remediation simulation tracers 2001 07...processes including groundwater remediation, secondary oil recovery...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

How to accelerate the Fernald remediation  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Reising, J. [USDOE Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (Redirected from Ground Electromagnetic Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

418

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center

419

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center

420

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan Colorado School of Mines, Colorado 80021 #12;The S.M. Stoller Corporation Flood Plain Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study ..................................................................................................... 1-8 1.6 Previous Investigations

422

Technique for rapid establishment of American lotus in remediation efforts  

SciTech Connect

A technique for increasing the establishment rate of American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) and simplifying planting was developed as part of a pond remediation project. Lotus propagation techniques typically require scarification of the seed, germination in heated water, and planting in nursery containers. Then mature (~ 1 yr) nursery-grown stock is transferred to planting site or scarified seed are broadcast applied. Mature plants should grow more quickly, but can be sensitive to handling, require more time to plant, and cost more. Scarified seeds are easier to plant and inexpensive, but have a lag time in growth, can fail to germinate, and can be difficult to site precisely. We developed an intermediate technique using small burlap bags that makes planting easier, provides greater germination success, and avoids lag time in growth. Data on survival and growth from experiments using mature stock, scarified seeds, and bag lotus demonstrate that bag lotus grow rapidly in a variety of conditions, have a high survival rate, can be processed and planted easily and quickly, and are very suitable for a variety of remediation projects

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Goins, Kenneth N [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL; Morris, Gail Wright [ORNL; Riazzi, Adam [Lincoln County HS, Hamlin WV; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Conservative solute approximation to the transport of a remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary This study presents a novel mathematical model for describing the transport of the remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field in an anisotropic aquifer. To develop the mathematical model, the radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are calculated first by using an analytical solution for steady-state drawdown distribution near a vertical circulation well. Next, the obtained radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are then incorporated into a three-dimensional axisymmetrical advectiondispersion equation in cylindrical coordinates from which to build the reagent transport equation. The Laplace transform finite difference technique is applied to solve the three-dimensional axisymmetrical advectiondispersion equation with spatial variable-dependent coefficients. The developed mathematical model is used to investigate the effects of various parameters such as hydraulic conductivity anisotropy, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, the placement of the extraction and injection screened intervals of the vertical circulation well and the injection modes on the transport regime of the remedial reagent. Results show that those parameters have different degrees of impacts on the distribution of the remedial reagent. The mathematical model provides an effective tool for designing and operating an enhanced groundwater remediation in an anisotropic aquifer using the vertical circulation well technology.

Jui-Sheng Chen; Cheng-Shin Jang; Chung-Ting Cheng; Chen-Wuing Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mineral surfaces and bioavailability of heavy metals: A molecular-scale perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prioritize remediation efforts and to...example, waterrock interactions...approach are remediation efforts and...in drinking water in Bangladesh...prioritize remediation efforts and...geochemistry ground water heavy metals...

Gordon E. Brown; Jr.; Andrea L. Foster; John D. Ostergren

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

THE REMEDIATION OF ABANDONED IRON ORE MINE SUBSIDENCE IN ROCKAWAY TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY  

SciTech Connect

This report represents the fourth Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report issued in connection with the subsidence remediation projects undertaken by Rockaway Township in Morris County, New Jersey. This report provides a summary of the major project work accomplished during this reporting period and contemplated for the subsequent reporting period. This report is issued as part of the project reporting provisions set forth in the Cooperators Agreement between the United States Government--Department of Energy, and Rockaway Township. The purpose of the Cooperators Agreement is for the Department of Energy to provide technical and financial assistance in a coordinated effort with Rockaway Township to develop and implement a multi-phased plan to remediate ground stability problems associated with abandoned mining activity. Primarily during the 1800's, extensive iron ore mining and prospecting was undertaken in Rockaway Township, part of the Dover District Mining region in Morris County. The abandoned mining activity has resulted in public safety hazards associated with ground collapse and surface subsidence features evolving in both developed and undeveloped areas within Rockaway Township. During this reporting period the Engineering Design for remediation of the surface safety hazards associated with the White Meadow Mine was completed. Construction Plans and Technical Specifications were completed and competitive bids were solicited by the Township for completion of the work. The electrical resistivity survey analysis and report was completed for the Green Pond Mines site at the Township Compost Storage Facility. The geophysical survey results confirmed evidence of abandoned mining activity at the Green Pond Mine site which was previously identified. During this reporting period, the time frame of the Cooperative Agreement between the Township and the Department of Energy was extended. An additional site of subsidence with in the Township related to abandoned mining activity at Mount Hope Road was selected by Rockaway Township to be considered for remediation and inclusion under the Cooperative Agreement.

Gary Gartenberg, P.E., P.P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Contaminated Water Using a Dense  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discharge of organic compounds require that new, innovative tech- nologies and methods of remediation dioxide, making the DMP reactor a promising tool in the future remediation of water. Chemical and physical is transformed into a more toxic material or a substance that is more difficult to remediate, the treatment

Dandy, David

428

Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOEs Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOEs Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

Mays, David C. [University of Colorado Denver

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biological processes provide an innovative solution for remediation of metal-contaminated ground...non-engineered, and their remediation is practically and fiscally...g. land and ground water remediation). Extensive site-specific...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect

The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

R. P. Wells

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume; and (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,c) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006b), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for this site, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006). As outlined in the next section, the CCC/USDA also believes that air sparging does not represent a viable remedial alternative. The CCC/USDA therefore proposes to collect the technical data required to evaluate the potential viability of a phytoremediation approach for this site and, if appropriate, to support the development of a remedial design.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Remediation Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 June 6, 1997 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of noncompliances associated with the dispersal of radioactive material during the remediation of trenches. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company - EA-97-03 Consent Order, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA 98-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation , Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

434

Ground Vibration Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of ground vibration is important for checking of amplitudes of ... confirmation of efficiency of control measures of ground vibration. The properties of measuring instruments used can affect the resul...

Dr. Milutin Srbulov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Rethinking remediation technologies for desertified landscapes  

SciTech Connect

Shrub-dominated communities have replaced native grasslands throughout much of the arid Southwest during the past 120 years. Most currently available remediation technologies are uneconomical due to large inputs of energy, fertilizers, herbicides and labor, or are ecologically ineffective due to harsh environments and the highly competitive nature of these native shrubs. Our analysis of these historical remediation technologies together with new information on ecosystem processes has led us to pursue an ecologically-based approach in which more limited inputs are targeted to promote natural processes of regeneration. Advantages to this approach include lower costs, reduced reliance on agronomic practices, and maintenance of natural landscape features. Disadvantages include longer time required for desired changes to occur, and a need for increased understanding of arid land processes.

Herrick, J.E.; Havstad, K.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Coffin, D.P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund`s National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

2010sr31_box-remediation.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, November 18, 2010 Thursday, November 18, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 292-2484 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov SRS Recovery Act TRU Waste Project Ahead of Schedule with Box Remediation Program Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) started off the last 12 months of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act with an enormous success in its legacy transuranic (TRU) waste program. The H-Canyon

439

Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials  

SciTech Connect

During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.

Gour-Tsyh Yeh; Jin-Ping Gwo; Malcolm D. Siegel; Ming-Hsu Li; Yilin Fang; Fan Zhang; Wensui Luo; Steve B. Yabusaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Remedial design through effective electronic associations  

SciTech Connect

Black and Veatch Special Projects Corp. (BVSPC) used an environmental data management system (EDMS) to consolidate x-ray fluorescence (XRF), global positioning system (GPS), and laboratory analytical data into a unique and flexible electronic database. Cost savings were acknowledged in all phases of the remedial design due to the development and use of the EDMS and its distinct associations with various electronic software packages. The EDMS allowed effective and efficient completion of the remedial design investigation of the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site. The Site is a 125-year old mining community in Jasper County, Missouri. Approximately 6,500 residences are now located within the 60 square-mile Superfund Site where lead and zinc were mined. Smelting and mining activities were conducted in several areas throughout the community. These operations left approximately 9 million tons of mine wastes at the Site upon completion of the mining activities. The purpose of the remedial design investigation was to quantify and identify the residential yards that were adversely affected by these activities.

Deis, J.L.; Wankum, R.D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Well testing in coalbed methane (CBM) wells: An environmental remediation case history  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, methane seepage was observed near coalbed methane wells in southwestern Colorado. Well tests were conducted to identify the source of the seeps. The well tests were complicated by two-phase flow, groundwater flow, and gas readsorption. Using the test results, production from the area was simulated. The cause of the seeps was found to be depressuring in shallow coal near the surface, and a remediation plan using water injection near the seep area was formulated.

Cox, D.P.; Young, G.B.C.; Bell, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Case Study of Urban Residential Remediation and Restoration in Port Hope, Canada - 13250  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Municipality of Port Hope, Ontario, is located some 100 km east of Toronto and has been the location of radium and/or uranium refining since the 1930's. Historically, these activities involved materials containing radium-226, uranium, arsenic and other contaminants generated by the refining process. In years past, properties and sites in Port Hope became contaminated from spillage during transportation, unrecorded, un-monitored or unauthorized diversion of contaminated fill and materials, wind and water erosion and spread from residue storage areas. Residential properties in Port Hope impacted by radioactive materials are being addressed by the Canadian federal government under programs administered by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office (LLRWMO) and the Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office (PHAIMO). Issues that currently arise at these properties are addressed by the LLRWMO's Interim Waste Management Program (IWM). In the future, these sites will be included in the PHAIMO's Small Scale Sites (SSS) remedial program. The LLRWMO has recently completed a remediation and restoration program at a residential property in Port Hope that has provided learnings that will be applicable to the PHAIMO's upcoming SSS remedial effort. The work scope at this property involved remediating contaminated refinery materials that had been re-used in the original construction of the residence. Following removal of the contaminated materials, the property was restored for continued residential use. This kind of property represents a relatively small, but potentially challenging subset of the portfolio of sites that will eventually be addressed by the SSS program. (authors)

Geddes, Brian [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, 140 Quarry Park Blvd., Calgary, AB, T2C 3G3 (Canada)] [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, 140 Quarry Park Blvd., Calgary, AB, T2C 3G3 (Canada); DeJong, John [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Port Hope, ON (Canada)] [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Port Hope, ON (Canada); Owen, Michael [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, 196 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON, L1A 3V5 (Canada)] [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, 196 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON, L1A 3V5 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

University of Florida Soil and Water Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to soil properties, water/soil quality, and water/soil management · Highlight important and/or innovative environmental contamination prevention strategies and remediation techniques that serve to protect and promote

Ma, Lena

446

Hopes for the Future: Restoration Ecology and Conservation Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...into CO 2 and water. However, the...and contaminated ground-water streams. This...more conservative remediation personnel. On...and contaminated ground-water streams. This...more conservative remediation personnel. On...

Andy P. Dobson; A. D. Bradshaw; A. J. M. Baker

1997-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

447

Microbial Dehalorespiration with 1,1,1-Trichloroethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...known (6), TCA remediation remains problematic...TCA in soils and ground water, thereby aiding...liter in drinking water (4). TCA is...known (6), TCA remediation remains...TCA in soils and ground water, thereby aiding...

Baolin Sun; Benjamin M. Griffin; Hctor L. Ayala-del-R??o; Syed A. Hashsham; James M. Tiedje

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tracking Hexavalent Cr in Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Soils, U.S. EPA Ground Water Issue Paper, EPA...Reactive Barriers: Remediation of Chlorinated and...Cr-52 drinking water geochemistry ground water hexavalent chromium...pump-and-treat remediation stable isotopes toxic...

David Blowes

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Distribution of the catabolic transposon Tn5271 in a groundwater bioremediation system.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Toluene metabolism Water Microbiology georef...chemical waste ground water Hyde Park Site...pollutants pollution remediation sediments sludge...A GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM 89 b...gene sequences in ground- water and SBR samples...

R C Wyndham; C Nakatsu; M Peel; A Cashore; J Ng; F Szilagyi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

451

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research-derived, science-based information to help answer diverse water questions and also to produce for environmentally-friendly remediation of contaminated water bodies. Sarah Keithley, of the University of TexasTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute

452

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

453

Investigating habitat value to inform contaminant remediation options: Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Rebecca A. Efroymson; Mark J. Peterson; Christopher J. Welsh; Daniel L. Druckenbrod; Michael G. Ryon; John G. Smith; William W. Hargrove; Neil R. Giffen; W. Kelly Roy; Harry D. Quarles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Contaminant Remediation Decisions: Approach  

SciTech Connect

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Welsh, Christopher John Edward [ORNL; Druckenbrod, Daniel L [ORNL; Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Quarles III, Harry Dewitt [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek  

SciTech Connect

Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burris, J.A. [C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

457

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 January 2011 Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003] The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Procedure. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 More Documents & Publications CX-009415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011

458

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

459

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

460

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East Dakota County, Minnesota\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2.1.doc A2 Table\\19\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2

Netoff, Theoden

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.