Sample records for ground water modeling

  1. Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiers, James

    (Portniaguine and Solomon 1998), and ground water temperature (Doussan et al. 1994). Compared to calibration depended on calibration methodology; models calibrated with multiple targets simulated q more accurately of Calibration Methodology on Ground Water Flow Predictions by James E. Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H

  2. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  3. Practical probabilistic ground-water modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodbury, A. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Geological Engineering; Render, F. [Ministry of Natural Resources, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Ulrych, T. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current emphasis by the public and scientific communities on environmental risk suggests that methods of probabilistic analysis for subsurface flow and transport will become more heavily utilized. Moreover, a probabilistic framework forces the explicit acknowledgement and treatment of uncertainty. The major obstruction to the effective use of probabilistic models is the determination of the statistical properties of unknown model parameters. In this paper the authors use the principal of minimum relative entropy (MRE) to determine the prior pdf, p(m) of a set of model parameters, (m) based on limited information. The pdf is of the form of a multivariate truncated exponential distribution. In this paper the authors use p(m) in Monte Carlo simulations to provide expected values in field variables such as drawdowns, pumping rates, and confidence limits. The examples presented illustrate some dangers associated with the practice in probabilistic modeling of assigning Gaussian pdf`s as priors. First, such an assumption for the input parameters actually injects more information into the problem than may actually exist, whether consciously or unconsciously. This fact is born out by comparison with minimum relative entropy theory. Second, the output parameters as suggested from the Monte Carlo analysis cannot be assumed to be Gaussian distributed even when the prior pdf is in Gaussian form. In a practical setting, the significance of this result and the approximation of Gaussian form would depend on the cost, risk, and consequences of the decision being made.

  4. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  5. Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water Model

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North SiteD&Dir^0 0 039Ground

  6. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  7. Status of the ground water flow model for the UMTRA Project, Shiprock, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional numerical model was constructed for the alluvial aquifer in the area of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Shiprock, New Mexico, site. This model was used to investigate the effects of various hydrologic parameters on the evolution of the ground water flow field. Results of the model are useful for defining uncertainties in the site conceptual model and suggesting data collection efforts to reduce these uncertainties. The computer code MODFLOW was used to simulate the two-dimensional flow of ground water in the alluvium. The escarpment was represented as a no-flow boundary. The San Juan River was represented with the MODFLOW river package. A uniform hydraulic conductivity distribution with the value estimated by the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and a uniform recharge distribution was used. Infiltration from the flowing artesian well was represented using the well package. The ground water flow model was calibrated to ground water levels observed in April 1993. Inspection of hydrographs shows that these levels are representative of typical conditions at the site.

  8. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the terms of the above referenced grant, the following summary serves as the Final Report for that grant. The grant relates to work performed at two separate sites, the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site south of Gillette, Wyoming, and the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Site near Rock Springs, Wyoming. The primary concern to the State of Wyoming at each site is ground water contamination (the primary contaminants of concern are benzene and related compounds), and the purpose of the grant has been to provide tiding for a Geohydrologist at the appropriate State agency, specifically the Land Quality Division (LQD) of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. The LQD Geohydrologist has been responsible for providing technical and regulatory support to DOE for ground water remediation and subsequent surface reclamation. Substantial progress has been made toward remediation of the sites, and continuation of LQD involvement in the remediation and reclamation efforts is addressed.

  9. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  10. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  11. The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Douglas Vincent

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Montana and northern Idaho. The infrared imagery was collected in the 8. 5 to 11, 7 um region and recorded on film negative and magnetic tape. Sections of the film record were digitized using a vidicon camera to facilitate its digital image processing... over a water body for influx of 'thermal poilu . ants', such as ground water or power plant effluents, which are at a different temperature than the receiving body. In fact, the data collected by the sensor displays a nearly instantaneous record...

  12. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

  13. Case Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    , or the lack thereof, of ground water flow systems driven by similar hydrogeologic and economic conditionsCase Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and Application to the North China Plain of a ground water flow system in the North China Plain (NCP) subject to severe overexploitation and rapid

  14. International Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    beginning to be recognized. The hidden nature of ground water and the lack of international law governingInternational Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia by Todd Jarvis1,2, Mark Giordano3 conducted on transboundary water, transboundary water law, and the mitigation of transboundary water

  15. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  16. Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

  17. Special Section on Ground Water Research in China Featured in This Issue of Ground Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of Ground Water by Xun Zhou1, Jiu J. Jiao2, and Mary P. Anderson3 Contained in this issue of Ground Water, Groundwater Resources and the Related Environ- Hydrogeologic Problems in China, Beijing: Seismological Press

  18. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  19. Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Si-Yong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater...

  20. Proceedings of the National Groundwater National Ground Water Association Southwest focused ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA, June 3-4, pp:87-90.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA

  1. Ground water protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

  2. Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive provisions and funding mechanisms to the extent that funds are available to enable the state to take corrective action at...

  3. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  4. Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ag chemical best management practices 7. soil testing 8. voluntary or mandatory educational programs regulate ground water development (well spacing regulations, well drilling prohibitions) and ground water by implementing the above GMA regulations, well drilling may be halted or conditioned. NRD permits are required

  5. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  6. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  7. Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

  8. Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

  9. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  10. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  11. DEVELOPMENTS IN GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY : AN OVERVIEW C. P. Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    . Surface water storage and ground water withdrawal are traditional engineering approaches which of storage and circulation as ground water. The large alluvial tract extending over 2000 km in length from which allows ground water storage in the weathered residium and its circulation in the underlying

  12. MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MUHAMMAD HAIDER KHAN AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.............................................. 1 1

  13. 120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

  14. Regional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    )over long periods of time when the potential change in ground water storage becomes negligible compared storage other than discharge to streams. One such loss term is evapotranspiration (ET) from ground waterRegional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska by Jozsef Szilagyi1m2,F. Edwin

  15. A Multiscale Investigation of Ground Water Flow at Clear Lake, Iowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, William W.

    targets. The model produced ground water inflow and outflow rates of 14,300 and 9200 m3/d, respectively­related problems in the lake and its water- shed, their likely causes, and potential remedial measuresA Multiscale Investigation of Ground Water Flow at Clear Lake, Iowa by William W. Simpkins Abstract

  16. Ground-water flow and transport modeling of the NRC-licensed waste disposal facility, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a simulation study of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from disposal at the NRC licensed waste disposal facility in West Valley, New York. A transient, precipitation driven, flow model of the near-surface fractured till layer and underlying unweathered till was developed and calibrated against observed inflow data into a recently constructed interceptor trench for the period March--May 1990. The results suggest that lateral flow through the upper, fractured till layer may be more significant than indicated by previous, steady state flow modeling studies. A conclusive assessment of the actual magnitude of lateral flow through the fractured till could however not be made. A primary factor contributing to this uncertainty is the unknown contribution of vertical infiltration through the interceptor trench cap to the total trench inflow. The second part of the investigation involved simulation of the migration of Sr-90, Cs-137 and Pu-239 from the one of the fuel hull disposal pits. A first-order radionuclide leach rate with rate coefficient of 10{sup {minus}6}/day was assumed to describe radionuclide release into the disposal pit. The simulations indicated that for wastes buried below the fractured till zone, no significant migration would occur. However, under the assumed conditions, significant lateral migration could occur for radionuclides present in the upper, fractured till zone. 23 refs., 68 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Simplifying Ground Water Transfers in Integrated Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -714 need new high-capacity wells in FA basins for e.g. ethanol plants so ethanol plant buys water and/or ground water rights from local irrigators buying water: use on-site former irrigation well for ethanol plant or else pipe water from existing from irrigation well to ethanol plant buying rights: cap

  18. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  19. Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant...

  20. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  1. EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in...

  2. Coliphages and bacteria in ground water from Tehran, Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariatpanahi, M.; Anderson, A.C.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microbial quality of Tehran's ground water and selected springs, using coliphages and selected bacteria as indicator organisms. The water table in Tehran varies from approximately 160 meters in the north to approximately 5 meters in the south. Individual wells and subterranean man-made aqueducts (qanate) tap the ground water. Since Tehran lacks municipal sewage facilities, waste disposal is by means of seepage pits, privies and leaching cesspools. There is potential for waste from these sites to leach into the ground water, particularly in the south where the water table is near the surface and the clay content of the soil holds moisture during periods of heavy rainfall.

  3. A model of ATL ground motion for storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Walker, Nicholas J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS A. WolskiMODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS* A. Wolski # ,

  4. MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS Thesis Approved by: Dr.................................................................................................................... 16 MODELING OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS

  5. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  6. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  7. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites.

  8. Ground water impact assessment report for the 216-B-3 Pond system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, V.G.; Law, A.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Evelo, S.D.; Barnett, D.B.; Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water impact assessments were required for a number of liquid effluent receiving sites according to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestones M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed upon by the US Department of Energy. This report is one of the last three assessments required and addresses the impact of continued discharge of uncontaminated wastewater to the 216-B-3C expansion lobe of the B Pond system in the 200 East Area until June 1997. Evaluation of past and projected effluent volumes and composition, geohydrology of the receiving site, and contaminant plume distribution patterns, combined with ground water modeling, were used to assess both changes in ground water flow regime and contaminant-related impacts.

  9. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

  10. Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - african ground water Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ground water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african ground water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Differences between European and...

  13. Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanaugh, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

  14. ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By ANDREW D. CHIASSON Bachelor of Applied 1999 #12;ii ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser..............................................................................................................1 1.1. Overview of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems ..............................................1 1

  15. Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation Steven W. Schlosser to ground motion sim- ulations, in which ground model datasets are fully materi- alized into octress stored as a service techniques in which scientific computation and storage services become more tightly intertwined. 1

  16. Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

  17. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  18. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  19. IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

  20. Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

  1. Dynamics of Transboundary Ground Water Management: Lessons from1 North America2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    -Society-Science in Transition. Water Resources Development and8 Management Series, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 167-196]9 101 Dynamics of Transboundary Ground Water Management: Lessons from1 North America2 Michael E Abstract11 Transboundary ground water management in the North American countries of Canada, the United

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  3. Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

  4. A review and assessment of variable density ground water flow effects on plume formation at UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard assumption when evaluating the migration of plumes in ground water is that the impacted ground water has the same density as the native ground water. Thus density is assumed to be constant, and does not influence plume migration. This assumption is valid only for water with relatively low total dissolved solids (TDS) or a low difference in TDS between water introduced from milling processes and native ground water. Analyses in the literature suggest that relatively minor density differences can significantly affect plume migration. Density differences as small as 0.3 percent are known to cause noticeable effects on the plume migration path. The primary effect of density on plume migration is deeper migration than would be expected in the arid environments typically present at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, where little or no natural recharge is available to drive the plume into the aquifer. It is also possible that at some UMTRA Project sites, a synergistic affect occurred during milling operations, where the mounding created by tailings drainage (which created a downward vertical gradient) and the density contrast between the process water and native ground water acted together, driving constituents deeper into the aquifer than either process would alone. Numerical experiments were performed with the U.S. Geological Survey saturated unsaturated transport (SUTRA) model. This is a finite-element model capable of simulating the effects of variable fluid density on ground water flow and solute transport. The simulated aquifer parameters generally are representative of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site where some of the highest TDS water from processing has been observed.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline ground waters Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water from the Lake Calumet... , and ground ... Source: Bethke, Craig - Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  7. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  8. Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule Arne National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Received 1 October 1996; accepted 5 February 1997 Two new calculations of the electronic energy of the ground state of the water molecule yield energies lower than those

  9. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  10. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  11. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  14. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  15. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) activities related to sources of ground-water contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black-Coleman, W.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains a listing of EPA programs and activities, as of October 1986, that address 33 sources of potential ground-water contamination. The information on each activity is presented in a matrix format that is organized by type of contamination source. The following information is presented for each program and activity listed: title, lead office, contact person, type of activity (study, regulation, guidance, strategy, etc.) status, and a summary of the activity. The 33 sources of ground-water contamination are discussed in the 1984 EPA Office of Technology report: Protecting the Nations Ground Water from Contamination.

  16. Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

  17. Ground state energy fluctuations in the Nuclear Shell Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Velazquez; Jorge G. Hirsch; Alejandro Frank; Jose Barea; Andres P. Zuker

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states.

  18. GROUND WATER USE FOR COOLING: ASSOCIATED AQUIFER TEMPERATURE CHANGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steam-electric power plants, large voluMes of surface waters are used for cooling the planes condensers

  19. Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeFranois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

  20. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  2. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  3. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feron, Eric

    constraint in the departure process at busy airports like Boston Logan International airport. For example1 Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports Kari Andersson1 , Francis Carr2 , Eric Feron3 and William D. Hall4 Abstract: Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruland, R.M.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Clifford Ralph

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ember) (Member (Member) F...

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  8. Modeling of Standing Column Wells in Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Zheng Deng O'Neill, Ph.D., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling of Standing Column Wells in Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Zheng Deng O'Neill, Ph.D., P Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years, ground source heat pump-surface environment: · Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems (Closed-loop) · Surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems

  9. Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

  10. Ground-state energy and frustration of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and related models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobe, Sigismund

    Ground-state energy and frustration of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and related models S. Kobe-glass containing up to N = 90 spins. A ground-state energy per spin e 0 = -0.7636 ± 0.0004 is found from the N with those of two related models, which can be introduced by replacing all interactions of the SK model

  11. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

    1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

  12. Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage Water Heater .point for modeling storage water heaters. The algorithmsfired, natural draft storage water heater. Figure 1 shows a

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  14. 40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

  16. Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

  18. Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.; Raber, E.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

  19. LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiéro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER of the Nhecolândia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland in Brazil, is the presence of both saline and freshwater manuscript, published in "Wetlands 22, 3 (2002) 528-540" DOI : 10.1672/0277-5212(2002)022[0528:GOWAGW]2.0.CO

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Durango, Colorado (the Durango site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1986 to 1991. An evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. Exposure could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. In addition, environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Durango site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Durango site will be used to determine what is necessary to protect public health and the environment, and to comply with the EPA standards.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  6. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  7. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a ground water compliance strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Durango, Colorado. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment to provide the public with information concerning the potential effects of this proposed strategy.

  8. Evaluation of ground-based remotely sensed liquid water cloud properties using shortwave radiation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    properties of low level water clouds. A number of remote sensing retrieval techniques provide either radar-only retrie- vals or combine millimeter-wave radar with microwave radiometer measurements (Frisch et al., 1995 radiation measurements from the ground. The remote sensing observations of radar reflectivity, microwave

  9. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites. The sites consist of two areas designated as the North Continent (NC) site and the Union Carbide (UC) site. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at both sites and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 5 miles east of the original sites. Maximum concentration limits (MCLs) referred to in this environmental assessment are the standards established in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192 (40 CFR 192) unless noted otherwise. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the NC site are uranium and selenium. Uranium is more prevalent, and concentrations in the majority of alluvial wells at the NC site exceed the MCL of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Selenium contamination is less prevalent; samples from only one well had concentrations exceeding the MCL of 0.01 mg/L. To achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 at the NC site, DOE is proposing the strategy of natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls and continued monitoring. Ground water flow and transport modeling has predicted that concentrations of uranium and selenium in the alluvial aquifer will decrease to levels below their respective MCLs within 50 years.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the potential for impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site caused by the burning of coal containing uranium to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities and not for those constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Because background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking, any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background. The incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination and disposing of the contaminated soils in an engineered disposal cell. The UMTRA Ground Water Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under the UMTRA Ground Water Project, results of this risk assessment will help determine what ground water compliance strategy may be applied at the site.

  12. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Open lots or holding pens for feeding or holding livestock can be sources of ground water contamination. The safety of such operations depends on their separation from water wells, characteristics of the site, and proper management. This publication...

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  15. On crystal ground state in the Schrdinger-Poisson model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Komech

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-periodic ground state is shown to exist for lattices of smeared ions in $\\R^3$ coupled to the Schr\\"odinger and scalar fields. The elementary cell is necessarily neutral. The 1D, 2D and 3D lattices in $\\R^3$ are considered, and a ground state is constructed by minimizing the energy per cell. The case of a 3D lattice is rather standard, because the elementary cell is compact, and the spectrum of the Laplacian is discrete. In the cases of 1D and 2D lattices, the energy functional is differentiable only on a dense set of variations, due to the presence of the continuous spectrum of the Laplacian that causes the infrared divergence of the Coulomb bond. Respectively, the construction of electrostatic potential and the derivation of the Schr\\"odinger equation for the minimizer in these cases require an extra argument. The space-periodic ground states for 1D and 2D lattices give the model of the nanostructures similar to the carbon nanotubes and graphene respectively.

  16. Ground Water Surveillance Monitoring Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide assists DOE sites in establishing and maintaining surveillance monitoring programs to detect future impacts on ground water resources from site operations, to track existing ground water contamination, and to assess the potential for exposing the general public to site releases. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  18. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  19. Simple one-dimensional lattice model for lipids in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alina Ciach; Jakub P?kalski

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lattice model for binary mixture of lipids and water is introduced and investigated. The orientational degrees of freedom of the amphiphilic molecules are taken into account in the same way as in the model for oil-water-surfactant mixtures introduced earlier by Johan H\\o ye and co-authors. The ground state of the model is discussed in detail, and the mean-field stability analysis of the disordered phase is performed. The model is compared to the recently introduced lattice model for colloidal self-assembly.

  20. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements.

  1. Absence of Energy Level Crossing for the Ground State Energy of the Rabi Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Hirokawa; Fumio Hiroshima

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hamiltonian of the Rabi model is considered. It is shown that the ground state energy of the Rabi Hamiltonian is simple for all values of the coupling strength, which implies the ground state energy does not cross other energy

  2. TECHNICAL EVALUATION REPORT TUBA CITY FINAL PHASE I GROUND-WATER COMPLIANCE ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remediation at the site, and is expected to last approximately 3 years. Phase I includes installation of additional recovery wells and Phase II will include expansion of remediation capacity and monitoring to ensure the aquifer restoration standards are met. Phases I and II of ground-water remediation are expected to last approximately 12 years. DESCRIPTION OF THE REQUEST: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has requested concurrence from the U.S. Nuclear

  3. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    or unwanted chemicals can become a big problem. Some common disposal practices not only threaten ground water but also may be illegal. Small, unusable amounts of these products often wind up spilled, buried, dumped, or flushed onto a property. Minimizing... rules require that environmentally protective conditions be met before some disposal practices are permit- ted. Other previously common disposal prac- tices are now illegal because of their potential risks to human health and the environment. This new...

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

  5. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

  7. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  9. Large Plate Lysimeter Efficiency for Collecting Water Transported from Soil to Ground Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T

    2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A large, zero-tension, plate lysimeter (3.05 x 2.13 m) was installed to intercept percolating soil water at Bikini Atoll (11 35'N, 165 25'E), a former nuclear test-site. In two experiments controlled amounts of irrigation water were applied over the lysimeter and leachate water was collected. Evapotranspiration (ET) calculations were made using the Penman-Monteith equation and climate data collected at the atoll. The efficiency of the lysimeter was essentially 100% in contrast to low efficiencies reported for smaller plate lysimeters. Lysimeter design, installation, and water balance results are discussed.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  11. Economic, Hydrologic and Environmental Appraisal of Texas Inter-basin Water Transfers: Model Development and Initial Appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia; McCarl, Bruce A.

    impacts and water quality changes. Water-related models that deal with hydrologic and environmental issues commonly focus on the quantity issues such as water supply and water flow but do not have economic or water quality dimensions (Wurbs, 2003... on combining surface and ground water by integrating the Edwards Aquifer Groundwater and River System Simulation Model (EDSIMR). 2 Modeling framework Economic theory indicates that water should be allocated to the highest valued users in order to achieve...

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  15. Selected ground-water data for Yucca Mountain region, southern Nevada and eastern California, through December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCamera, R.J.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey, in support of the US Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, collects, compiles, and summarizes hydrologic data in the Yucca Mountain region. The data are collected to allow assessments of ground-water resources during studies to determine the potential suitability of Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste. Data on ground-water levels at 36 sites, ground-water discharge at 6 sites, and ground-water withdrawals within Crater Flat, Jackass Flats, Mercury Valley, and the Amargosa Desert are presented for calendar year 1996. Data collected prior to 1996 are graphically presented and data collected by other agencies (or as part of other programs) are included to further indicate variations of ground-water levels, discharges, and withdrawals through time. A statistical summary of ground-water levels at seven wells in Jackass Flats is presented to indicate potential effects of ground-water withdrawals in support of US Department of Energy activities near Yucca Mountain. The statistical summary includes the number of measurements, the maximum, minimum, and median water-level altitudes, and the average deviation of measured water-level altitudes for selected baseline periods and for calendar years 1992--96. At two water-supply wells and a nearby observation well, median water levels for calendar year 1996 were slightly lower (0.3 to 0.4 foot) than for the respective baseline periods. At four other wells in Jackass Flats, median water levels for 1996 were unchanged, slightly lower (0.2 foot), and slightly higher (0.2 and 0.7 foot) than for the respective baseline periods.

  16. Ground water elevation monitoring at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Salt Lake City, Utah, Vitro processing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1994, a ground water level monitoring program was begun at the Vitro processing site. The purpose of the program was to evaluate how irrigating the new golf driving range affected ground water elevations in the unconfined aquifer. The program also evaluated potential impacts of a 9-hole golf course planned as an expansion of the driving range. The planned golf course expansion would increase the area to be irrigated and, thus, the water that could infiltrate the processing site soil to recharge the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in ground water could migrate off the site or could discharge to bodies of surface water in the area. The potential effects of expanding the golf course have been evaluated, and a report is being prepared. Water level data obtained during this monitoring program indicate that minor seasonal mounding may be occurring in response to irrigation of the driving range. However, the effects of irrigation appear small in comparison to the effects of precipitation. There are no monitor wells in the area that irrigation would affect most; that data limitation makes interpretations of water levels and the possibility of ground water mounding uncertain. Limitations of available data are discussed in the conclusion.

  17. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes of this WD&R model (CRWMS M&O 2000b) are to quantify and evaluate the distribution and drainage of seepage water within emplacement drifts during the period of compliance for post-closure performance. The model bounds the fraction of water entering the drift that will be prevented from contacting the waste by the combined effects of engineered controls on water distribution and on water removal. For example, water can be removed during pre-closure operation by ventilation and after closure by natural drainage into the fractured rock. Engineered drains could be used, if demonstrated to be necessary and effective, to ensure that adequate drainage capacity is provided. This report provides the screening arguments for certain Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that are related to water distribution and removal in the EBS. Applicable acceptance criteria from the Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs) developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; and 1999d) are also addressed in this document.

  18. HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+ M.H. Khan, 74078, USA ABSTRACT This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems

  19. Parameter estimation of coupled water and energy balance models based on stationary constraints of surface states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jian

    [1] We use a conditional averaging approach to estimate the parameters of a land surface water and energy balance model and then use the estimated parameters to partition net radiation into latent, sensible, and ground ...

  20. Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Fertilizer Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertilizer is a major source of ground water contamination. This publication emphasizes the best management practices for storing fertilizers, whether you are building a new facility or modifying an existing one. It also includes information on safe...

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

  6. Ground Water Protection Programs Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides a description of the elements of an integrated site-wide ground water protection program that can be adapted to unique physical conditions and programmatic needs at each DOE site. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  7. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  9. Implementation and validation of a Ground Source Heat Pump model in MATLAB.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casetta, Damien

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The aim of the project is the implementation of a simple Ground-Source Heat Pump (GSHP) system model in MATLAB. The program is able to run (more)

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  13. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements.

  14. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that the observed surface Pu residue was from the buried sources, not atmospheric fallout. (6) The

  15. Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

    2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

  16. Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Simulation of a Smart Water Heater. In Workshop inFreezers, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Room and Central AirNovember. ADL. 1982b. Water Heater Computer Model Users

  17. Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North Site This pageSurface Water

  18. 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 |44 Basic Standards

  19. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

  1. Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Bradley Keith

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    into the concentration predictions, in order to account for variation or wind speed and direction within an hour period. For ground-level sources, the vertical distribution involves mathematically dispersing the pollutant underground, then reflecting it back up. The next...

  2. Proposed ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the US DOE water resources protection strategy for the Green River, Utah mill tailings disposal site. The modifications in the original plan are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. All aspects are discussed in this report.

  3. What is Nonpoint Source Pollution? Nonpoint Source Pollution, or people pollution, is a contamination of our ground water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    , recreational water activities, the fishing industry, tourism and our precious drinking water resources, humans and fish. Do not dump used motor oil down storm drains or on the ground. Recycle all used motor such as fertilizing the lawn, walking pets, changing motor oil and littering. With each rainfall, pollutants generated

  4. Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III, SAPT-5st, and VRT(MCY-5f) surfaces FRANK N. KEUTSCH1 , NIR GOLDMAN2 , HEATHER A. HARKER3 , CLAUDE of the water dimer very well. The VRT(MCY-5f) and especially the VRT(ASP-W)III potentials show larger

  5. Analysis of Water Modeling of Air Entrainment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Analysis of Water Modeling of Air Entrainment S.C. Jain Professor and Research Engineer Dept. Civil, C., "Analysis of Water Modeling of Air Entrainment," in Proceedings of the 48th SFSA Technical An analysis is reported of the water modeling experiments of Bates et al. (1994) to study air entrainment

  6. Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

  7. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  8. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC 7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

  9. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  10. Comment and response document for the ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) responses to comments from both the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Utah are provided in this document. The Proposed Ground Water Protection Strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah, presents the proposed (modified) ground water protection strategy for the disposal cell at the Green River disposal site for compliance with Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192. Before the disposal cell was constructed, site characterization was conducted at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to determine an acceptable compliance strategy. Results of the investigation are reported in detail in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a). The NRC and the state of Utah have accepted the final RAP. The changes in this document relate only to a modification of the compliance strategy for ground water protection.

  11. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

  12. Selecting ground-motion models developed for induced seismicity in geothermal areas1 Benjamin Edwards1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : geothermal power, induced seismicity, ground-motion prediction, seismic hazard, spectral35 analysis3642 Landau (Germany) geothermal power plant in 2009, which caused macroseismic intensities up to V+,431 Selecting ground-motion models developed for induced seismicity in geothermal areas1 Benjamin

  13. Multiscale modeling of spatially variable water and energy balance processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Famiglietti, J. S; Wood, E. F

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MULTISCALE WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE MODELING Wood, E. F. ,spatially variable water and energy balance processes J. S.modeling. Water and energy balance models are developed at

  14. Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North Site This pageSurface

  15. Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

  16. A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei Caldera Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Mechanical...

  17. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  18. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007; published 31 July 2007. [1] A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global., 2000; Keppler et al., 2000]. More relevant to this study area are reports in which bromide appears

  20. Brine contamination of ground water and streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report defines the extent of oil-field-brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area. The report is based largely on data collected during the period October 1984 through November 1985. Water samples were collected from streams and wells in the study area. Data from a previous study conducted in the vicinity of the nearby Tatum Salt Dome were used for background water-quality information. Natural surface-water quality was determined by sampling streamflow from a nearby basin having no oil field activities and from samples collected in an adjacent basin during a previous study.

  1. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beckenbach, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R. [California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  2. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu [Oklahoma State University; Cullin, James [Oklahoma State University; Spitler, Jeffery [Oklahoma State University; Im, Piljae [ORNL; Fisher, Daniel [Oklahoma State University

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  3. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  4. Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Forecasting model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, James Robert

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents The Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Water Forecasting model. The model has been constructed using Powersim Studio (PS), a software package designed to investigate complex systems where flows and accumulations are central to the system. Here PS has been used as a platform for modeling various aspects of Nambe Pueblo's current and future water use. The model contains three major components, the Water Forecast Component, Irrigation Scheduling Component, and the Reservoir Model Component. In each of the components, the user can change variables to investigate the impacts of water management scenarios on future water use. The Water Forecast Component includes forecasting for industrial, commercial, and livestock use. Domestic demand is also forecasted based on user specified current population, population growth rates, and per capita water consumption. Irrigation efficiencies are quantified in the Irrigated Agriculture component using critical information concerning diversion rates, acreages, ditch dimensions and seepage rates. Results from this section are used in the Water Demand Forecast, Irrigation Scheduling, and the Reservoir Model components. The Reservoir Component contains two sections, (1) Storage and Inflow Accumulations by Categories and (2) Release, Diversion and Shortages. Results from both sections are derived from the calibrated Nambe Reservoir model where historic, pre-dam or above dam USGS stream flow data is fed into the model and releases are calculated.

  5. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

  6. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  7. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  8. Modeling the evolution of communication: From stimulus associations to grounded symbolic associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cangelosi, Angelo

    an explanation for the fact that animal communication and human language differ. A variety of animalModeling the evolution of communication: From stimulus associations to grounded symbolic (UK) angelo@soc.plym.ac.uk Abstract. This paper describes a model for the evolution of communication

  9. The ground state problem for a quantum Hamiltonian model describing friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ground state problem for a quantum Hamiltonian model describing friction Laurent Bruneau friction introduced in [4]. This model consists of a particle which interacts with a bosonic reservoir is violated in the case of linear friction, but satis#28;ed when the friction force is proportional

  10. Integrated energy and water conservation modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsabert, S. de; Liner, B.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is required to provide federal facility managers with a clear determination of the impact of water conservation practices on energy consumption. This paper introduces the WATERGY model, which is a spreadsheet model to analyze total energy savings associated with water conservation efforts. The contribution of this effort is the development of a synergistic model based on engineering algorithms as opposed to lumped parameter estimates. The model explicitly details the relationships between direct and indirect water and energy savings. Irrigation, plumbing fixture, appliance, and boiler blowdown savings comprise the direct water component of the model. Reduction in leakage and unaccounted-for water in the distribution system are calculated as indirect water savings. Direct energy savings are calculated for hot water production. Indirect energy savings associated with distribution and collection, electric line losses, and unaccounted-for gas are determined by the model. Data sources, algorithms, and engineering assumptions used in the development of the model are detailed. The model capabilities are demonstrated for a hypothetical federal facility.

  11. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (52 FR 36000 (1987)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, 42 USC {section}7901 et seq., the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has determined that for Slick Rock, this assessment shall include hydrogeologic site characterization for two separate uranium processing sites, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site, and for the proposed Burro Canyon disposal site. The water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4. The following site characterization activities are discussed in this attachment: Characterization of the hydrogeologic environment, including hydrostratigraphy, ground water occurrence, aquifer parameters, and areas of recharge and discharge. Characterization of existing ground water quality by comparison with background water quality and the maximum concentration limits (MCL) of the proposed EPA ground water protection standards. Definition of physical and chemical characteristics of the potential contaminant source, including concentration and leachability of the source in relation to migration in ground water and hydraulically connected surface water. Description of local water resources, including current and future use, availability, and alternative supplies.

  12. Ground state of the asymmetric Rabi model in the ultrastrong coupling regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Tuo Shen; Zhen-Biao Yang; Mei Lu; Rong-Xin Chen; Huai-Zhi Wu

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the ground states of the single- and two-qubit asymmetric Rabi models, in which the qubit-oscillator coupling strengths for the counterrotating-wave and corotating-wave interactions are unequal. We take the transformation method to obtain the approximately analytical ground states for both models and numerically verify its validity for a wide range of parameters under the near-resonance condition. We find that the ground-state energy in either the single- or two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model has an approximately quadratic dependence on the coupling strengths stemming from different contributions of the counterrotating-wave and corotating-wave interactions. For both models, we show that the ground-state energy is mainly contributed by the counterrotating-wave interaction. Interestingly, for the two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model, we find that, with the increase of the coupling strength in the counterrotating-wave or corotating-wave interaction, the two-qubit entanglement first reaches its maximum then drops to zero. Furthermore, the maximum of the two-qubit entanglement in the two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model can be much larger than that in the two-qubit symmetric Rabi model.

  13. Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

  14. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been caused to a lack of water; rather it is believedconsider how, given a lack of clear water management goals,incomplete due to a lack of surface water measurements. Not

  15. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Board (2005). Water Resources Management onEnvironmental Valuation and Its Economic Critics. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management,Environmental Cooperation Commission, has encouraged unilateral decision making, as water management

  16. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies.

  17. Development and chemical quality of a ground-water system in cast overburden as the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borbely, Evelyn Susanna

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -water conditions which develop in response to surface mining. TMPA has supported research at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in order to meet the needs of mine develop- ment and permitting, Most of the data on ground-water conditions 1n reclaimed spoil has been... on the west by the Navasota River, on the south by Gibbons Creek, and on the north by State Highway 30 (Figure 1). This area includes the Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station. Lignite is extracted from two pits within the permit boundary, termed the A...

  18. Exact ground states of a staggered supersymmetric model for lattice fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huijse, L. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Moran, N. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, ENS and CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland, Maynooth (Ireland); Vala, J. [Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland, Maynooth (Ireland); School of Theoretical Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Schoutens, K. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, P.O. Box 94485, NL-1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a supersymmetric model for strongly interacting lattice fermions in the presence of a staggering parameter. The staggering is introduced as a tunable parameter in the manifestly supersymmetric Hamiltonian. We obtain analytic expressions for the ground states in the limit of small and large staggering for the model on the class of doubly decorated lattices. On this type of lattice there are two ground states, each with a different density. In one limit we find these ground states to be a simple Wigner crystal and a valence bond solid state. In the other limit we find two types of quantum liquids. As a special case, we investigate the quantum liquid state on the one dimensional chain in detail. It is characterized by a massless kink that separates two types of order.

  19. Multiscale modeling of clay-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebrahimi, Davoud

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering properties of soils are highly affected by clay content and clay-water interactions. However, existing macro-scale continuum models have no length scale to describe the evolution of the clay microstructure ...

  20. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  1. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  2. Finite-Difference Modeling of Noise Coupling between Power/Ground Planes in Multilayered Packages and Boards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    system become increasingly more critical regarding the signal integrity and electromagnetic interference electromagnetic interference. Hence, accurate modeling of power/ground planes is critical to estimate the noise

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  4. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, D.M.; Bacon, D.J.; Massey-Norton, J.T.; Miller, J.D.

    1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  5. Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground management of savannahs and woodlands requires accurate estimates of the woody biomass. For these reasons, developing new methods to accurately estimate woody biomass and its changes is high on the political

  6. Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal, Avigdor

    Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services Eran Toch semantic Web services. We envision a world in which a designer defines a "virtual" Web service as part of a business process, while requiring the system to seek actual Web services that match the specifi- cations

  7. The ground state energy of the mean field spin glass model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flora Koukiou

    2010-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    From the study of a functional equation of Gibbs measures we calculate the limiting free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model at a particular value of (low) temperature. This implies the following lower bound for the ground state energy $\\epsilon_0$ \\[\\epsilon_0\\geq -0.7833\\cdots,\\] close to the replica symmetry breaking and numerical simulations values.

  8. A model study of the effects of climatic precipitation changes on ground temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    . The cumulative effect of these processes governs the heat flux at the ground surface and couples surface air of a prairie region in the southern Great Plains of North America and force the model with meteorological data heat within the soil, vegetation, and air; chemical weathering; and biological processes

  9. Probabilistic Conic Mixture Model and its Applications to Mining Spatial Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeds, University of

    to image data is a basic task in pattern recognition and spatial data mining and also is an important a reliable report after the inspection. The patterns appearing in the B-scans [5] of GPR data have shapesProbabilistic Conic Mixture Model and its Applications to Mining Spatial Ground Penetrating Radar

  10. Chlorofluorocarbons, Sulfur Hexafluoride, and Dissolved Permanent Gases in Ground Water from Selected Sites In and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994 - 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L.N.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Wayland, J.E.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From July 1994 through May 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperations with the Department of Energy, sampled 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The wells were sampled for a variety of constituents including one- and two-carbon halocarbons. Concentrations of dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and trichlorotrifluororoethane (CFC-113) were determined. The data will be used to evaluate the ages of ground waters at INEEL. The ages of the ground water will be used to determine recharge rates, residence time, and travel time of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer in and near INEEL. The chromatograms of 139 ground waters are presented showing a large number of halomethanes, haloethanes, and haloethenes present in the ground waters underlying the INEEL. The chromatograms can be used to qualitatively evaluate a large number of contaminants at parts per trillion to parts per billion concentrations. The data can be used to study temporal and spatial distribution of contaminants in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Representative compressed chromatograms for all ground waters sampled in this study are available on two 3.5-inch high density computer disks. The data and the program required to decompress the data can be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey office at Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentrations were measured in selected wells to determine the feasibility of using this environmental tracer as an age dating tool of ground water. Concentrations of dissolved nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane were measured in 79 ground waters. Concentrations of dissolved permanent gases are tabulated and will be used to evaluate the temperature of recharge of ground water in and near the INEEL.

  11. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 29, NO. 11, PAGES 3727-3740, NOVEMBER 1993 Modeling of Multiphase Transport of Multicomponent Organic Contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 29, NO. 11, PAGES 3727-3740, NOVEMBER 1993 Modeling of Multiphase. Although these organic liquids are designatedas "nonaque- ous," i.e., immiscible with water, their solubilities in water are, in fact, sufficientto render large quantities of ground- water unfit for human use

  12. VARIATIONS IN RADON-222 IN SOIL AND GROUND WATER AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wollenberg, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water 222Rn by gamma-ray spectrometry. There was no clearlyradioelement content by gamma-ray spectrometry. Results are

  13. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction ..85 Groundwater Modeling:Groundwater Modeling ..109 Introduction 269. Chapter 6 : Groundwater Modeling 6.1 Introduction This

  14. Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Image of a pipe...

  15. Rev. 02/15/10 Construction: Any construction project regardless of size that disturbs soil, ground cover, or uses water (including pressure washing) that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. 02/15/10 Construction: Any construction project regardless of size that disturbs soil, ground/proposed construction project: EHS Office Use Only Recommendations: ______________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________ _____________________ Approval Date Storm Water Management Program The University of Texas at Austin Notification of Construction

  16. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Tucci

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

  17. Electrosorption on carbon aerogel electrodes as a means of treating low-level radioactive wastes and remediating contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Tri Duc; Farmer, Joseph C.; DePruneda, Jean H.; Richardson, Jeffery H.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel separation process based upon carbon aerogel electrodes has been recently developed for the efficient removal of ionic impurities from aqueous streams. This process can be used as an electrical y- regenerated alternative to ion exchange, thereby reducing-the need for large quantities of chemical regenerants. Once spent (contaminated), these regenerants contribute to the waste that must be disposed of in landfills. The elimination of such wastes is especially beneficial in situations involving radioactive contaminants, and pump and treat processing of massive volumes of ground water. A review and analysis of potential applications will be presented.

  18. Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

  19. Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Source Heat Pump Subprogram Overview

  20. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) in cooperation with the US Geological Survey and the National Institutes for Water Resources has focused wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, water resource economics, water

  1. User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.F.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

  2. Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

  3. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  4. Copyright 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation 2009 National Ground Water Association.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Following a Release of Neat Ethanol onto Pre-existing NAPL by Brent P. Stafford, Natalie L. Cápiro, Pedro J.J. Alvarez, and William G. Rixey Abstract Neat ethanol (75.7 L) was released into the upper capillary zone the capillary zone to 10 cm below the water table. Maximum aqueous concentrations of ethanol were 20% v

  5. USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water at the land surface can occur at discreet locations, such as in stream channels, or be distributed on temperature include viscosity, density, and surface tension, all of which affect hydraulic conductivity the sun, radiant cooling into space, and evapotranspi- ration, in addition to the advective and conductive

  6. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The predominant factors which affect spoil water quality have not been completely identified to date. Therefore, the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas was chosen as a test site to evaluate the potential factors that can affect the geochemical...

  7. web page: http://w3.pppl.gov/~ zakharov At the ground level of integrated modeling1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    web page: http://w3.pppl.gov/~ zakharov At the ground level of integrated modeling1 Leonid E-independent environment and integrating them with its capabilities (e.g., java). (f) . . . of other integrations (WEB of D

  8. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), and many other agencies and organizations, have worked with Ralph Wurbs over the years to develop WRAP (the Water Rights Analysis Package). The WRAP model simulates management of the water resources of a...

  9. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort.

  10. 5 CCR 1002-41 Basic Standards for Ground Water | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 |44 Basic Standards for

  11. ARM 17-30-10 - Ground Water Pollution Control System | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,InformationWind Energy JumpEnergyApplication

  12. Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    >From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

  13. An experimental study of heating performance and seasonal modeling of vertical U-tube ground coupled heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Randal E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HEATING PERFORMANCE AND SEASONAL MODELING OF VERTICAL U-TUBE GROUND COUPLED HEAT PUMPS A Thesis by RANDAL E. MARGO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulftilment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HEATING PERFORMANCE AND SEASONAL MODELING OF VERTICAL U-TUBE GROUND COUPLED HEAT PUMPS A Thesis by RANDAL E. MARGO Approved...

  14. A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

    system simulation module. The DOE-2.2 is the simulation engine of eQUEST. The eQUEST/DOE- 2.2 program uses an enhanced g-function algorithm, which was proposed by Eskilson (1987) at Lund University, Sweden, for fast calculation of the borehole wall... & Renewable Energy: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus/ Eskilson, P. 1987. Thermal analysis of heat extraction boreholes. Lund, Sweden: Doctoral thesis, University of Lund, Dept. of Mathmatics. Fisher, D., & Rees, S. 2005. Modeling ground...

  15. Water Sim 5.0 Model API Both researchers and water managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Water Sim 5.0 Model API Both researchers and water managers indicated that a different type not similar between different researchers and between different water managers. Thus it would not be possible that implements a simplified visual interface to the model is provided as an example of using the What is Water

  16. Taming Coulomb interactions in models for ions and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extended Simple Point Charge (SPC/E) Model H-bonds in SPC/E water result from frustrated ion pairing Max gCammon, and Rossky, J. Chem. Phys. 80, 4448 (1984) Water and short water models near hydrophobic walls SPC/E water

  17. Ground water and snow sensor based on directional detection of cosmogenic neutrons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Marleau, Peter; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron detector is being developed to measure the cosmic ray neutron flux in order to measure soil moisture. Soil that is saturated with water has an enhanced ability to moderate fast neutrons, removing them from the backscatter spectrum. The detector is a two-element, liquid scintillator detector. The choice of liquid scintillator allows rejection of gamma background contamination from the desired neutron signal. This enhances the ability to reconstruct the energy and direction of a coincident neutron event. The ability to image on an event-by-event basis allows the detector to selectively scan the neutron flux as a function of distance from the detector. Calibrations, simulations, and optimization have been completed to understand the detector response to neutron sources at variable distances and directions. This has been applied to laboratory background measurements in preparation for outdoor field tests.

  18. Slow Strain Rate Testing of Alloy 22 in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, K J; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed engineering barriers for the high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The candidate material for the external wall of the container is Alloy 22 (N06022). One of the anticipated degradation modes for the containers could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) and other environments using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). Results show that the temperature and applied potential have a strong influence on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer EAC in SCW solution. Limited results show that sodium fluoride solution is more detrimental than sodium chloride solution.

  19. Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaggiani, N.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

  20. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Appendixes to Attachment 3: Appendix A, Hydrological services calculations: Appendix B, Ground water quality by location, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains chemical analysis data for ground water for the following: elements; cyanides; chlorides; dissolved organic carbon; fluorides; silica; sulfates; sulfides; dissolved solids; nitrates; and nitrites.

  1. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

    2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  2. Nathan Holmberg Modeling of Turbulent Water over Natural Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    Nathan Holmberg 2514355 1 Modeling of Turbulent Water over Natural Terrain Project Report Abstract of this project is to try to model flowing water in rivers, over waterfalls etc with the intent that the model can to represent certain effects, such as the motion of deep water waves to the exclusion of all else, to more

  3. SIMULATION, MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF A WATER TO AIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIMULATION, MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF A WATER TO AIR HEAT PUMP By ARUN SHENOY Bachelor December, 2004 #12;SIMULATION, MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF A WATER TO AIR HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved................................................................3 2.1. Equation fit water to air heat pump and chiller models...............................3 2

  4. On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model Pedro Avellaneda1 ; Thomas P. Ballestero2 of these parameters are provided for modeling purposes and other urban storm-water quality applications. A normal runoff models are commonly used for urban storm-water quality applications DeCoursey 1985; Tsi- hrintzis

  5. PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS By HUI JIN Bachelor of Science validation of the water-to-air heat pump model. It's hard to find any words to express the thanks to my BASED MODELS OF WATER SLOURCE HEAT PUMPS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser Dean of the Graduate College ii

  6. Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

  7. Fundamental Studies of the Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters via Reduction by Zero-Valent Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; Amrhein, Christopher

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the United States and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man's actions. For instance, the burial of chemical wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements (including radioisotopes) that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. Uranium is a particularly widespread contaminant at most DOE sites including Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, Hanford, Idaho (INEEL), and Fernald. The uranium contamination is associated with mining and milling of uranium ore (UMTRA sites), isotope separation and enrichment, and mixed waste and TRU waste burial. In addition, the careless disposal of halogenated solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis at many DOE sites. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop th e fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  8. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) program in cooperation with the US Geological Survey and the National Institutes for Water Resources has wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality

  9. An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Scott Alan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

  10. Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and Climate Change Analyses of Extreme Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California hydrology. J. Am. Water Resources Association 39,Land Surface and Ground Water Model for use in WatershedN.L. , 2003: California Water Resources Research, CEC Sept

  11. Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

  12. Ground-water data for the Nevada Test Site 1992, and for selected other areas in South-Central Nevada, 1952--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water data collected from wells and test holes at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site have been compiled in a recently released report. These data were collected by the US Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, in support of the US Department of Energy, Environmental Restoration and Hydrologic Resources Management Programs. Depth-to-water measurements were made at 53 sites at the Nevada Test Site from October 1, 1991, to September 30, 1992, and at 60 sites in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site from 1952 to September 30, 1992. For water year 1992, depth to water ranged from 288 to 2,213 feet below land surface at the Nevada Test Site and from 22 to 1,460 feet below land surface at sites in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site. Total ground-water withdrawal data compiled for 12 wells at the Nevada Test Site during calendar year 1992 was more than 400 million gallons. Tritium concentrations in water samples collected from five test holes at the Nevada Test Site in water year 1992 did not exceed the US Environmental Protection Agency drinking, water limit.

  13. Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas...

  14. A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restricti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restrictions or loss of the water supply is not likely

  15. Ground Water Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, K.; Chave, G. H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a thorough study of products and anticipated growth, the Turbine and Generator Division of Westinghouse Canada Inc. concluded that a component feeder plant for fabrication and machining of turbine components was required. This facility now...

  16. UMTRA Ground Water Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the GrandSr:s I ] t1Verification

  17. UMTRA Ground Water Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the GrandSr:s I ]

  18. Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, K.

    Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

  19. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 2 W. Imperatori1 and CO2 Storage Security Division, BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, 450607 Orlans Cedex 2, France.8 9 affects ground motions, particularly in terms of peak ground velocity (PGV). The decay of PGV14

  20. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  1. Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 58 (2012) Volunteer Ground-Water Monitoring Coming to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Water Management Districts (WMDs) or the Florida Department of Environmental1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program being monitored for water levels by the state's water management districts

  2. On the ground state calculation of a many-body system using a self-consistent basis and quasi-Monte Carlo: An application to water hexamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, Ionu?, E-mail: ionutg@gmail.com; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A. [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Jitomirskaya, Svetlana [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum many-body system, the Self-Consistent Phonons (SCP) method provides an optimal harmonic approximation by minimizing the free energy. In particular, the SCP estimate for the vibrational ground state (zero temperature) appears to be surprisingly accurate. We explore the possibility of going beyond the SCP approximation by considering the system Hamiltonian evaluated in the harmonic eigenbasis of the SCP Hamiltonian. It appears that the SCP ground state is already uncoupled to all singly- and doubly-excited basis functions. So, in order to improve the SCP result at least triply-excited states must be included, which then reduces the error in the ground state estimate substantially. For a multidimensional system two numerical challenges arise, namely, evaluation of the potential energy matrix elements in the harmonic basis, and handling and diagonalizing the resulting Hamiltonian matrix, whose size grows rapidly with the dimensionality of the system. Using the example of water hexamer we demonstrate that such calculation is feasible, i.e., constructing and diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in a triply-excited SCP basis, without any additional assumptions or approximations. Our results indicate particularly that the ground state energy differences between different isomers (e.g., cage and prism) of water hexamer are already quite accurate within the SCP approximation.

  3. NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudon, K.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes.

  4. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing, and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization This presentation, which focuses on...

  5. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Part of a 100 million fuel cell award...

  6. Lotic Water Hydodynamic Model | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lotic Water Hydodynamic Model Re-direct Destination: Abstract Not Provided times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current state Most recent view Today Week...

  7. MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

  8. Large-N scaling behavior of the ground-state energy and fidelity in the Dicke Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Liu; Yu-Yu Zhang; Qing-Hu Chen; Ke-Lin Wang

    2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the numerically exact solution to the Dicke model proposed previously, we study the quantum criticality in terms of the ground-state (GS) energy, fidelity, and the order parameter. The finite size scaling analysis for the average fidelity susceptibility (FS) and second derivative of GS energy are performed. The correlation length exponent is obtained to be $\

  9. Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E.; Stone, R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

  10. ASHRAE Transactions: Research 3 A steady-state simulation model for a water-to-water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASHRAE Transactions: Research 3 ABSTRACT A steady-state simulation model for a water Reciprocating vapor compression heat pumps and chill- ers have been the target of a number of simulation models

  11. Modeling exposure to depleted uranium in support of decommissioning at Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebinger, M.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oxenburg, T.P. [Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Proving Ground was used by the US Army Test and Evaluation Command for testing of depleted uranium munitions and closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This paper integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

  12. Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prithiviraj, Manikandan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used for Diesel sprays. However...

  13. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of concern. The model is documented by reference and users manuals that may be downloaded from this site along with the software. WRAP is incorporated in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System....

  14. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , display the results of management changes, and forecast the effects of waste management practices operations on the Hanford ground-water regime which moves through ancient sand and gravel channels deep under system for the .Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company which will accept models of ground-water conditions

  15. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

  16. 152 / JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / APRIL 1999 UNCERTAINTY OF ONE-DIMENSIONAL GROUND-WATER FLOW IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    -WATER FLOW IN STRONGLY HETEROGENEOUS FORMATIONS By Hongbin Zhan1 and Stephen W. Wheatcraft2 ABSTRACT

  17. Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

  18. Water Quality Modeling Hydraulics and Hydrology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : ­ Streamflows ­ Lake basin ­ Meteorology (wind/sun/precip...) · Outputs: ­ Vertical Temperature distribution ­ E. Coli · Temperature changes ­ Long term and short term · Lake circulation ­ Lake circulation ­ Outputs: · Oxygen distribution in water column · Nutrient distribution in water column (N

  19. Development of an integrated building load and ground source heat pump model to assess heat pump and ground loop design and performance in a commercial office building.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Jacob Dale

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) offer an efficient method for cooling and heating buildings, reducing energy usage and operating cost. In hot, arid regions such (more)

  20. On crystal ground state in the Schrdinger-Poisson model: point ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Komech

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-periodic ground state is shown to exist for lattices of point ions in $\\R^3$ coupled to the Schr\\"odinger and scalar fields. The coupling requires the renormalization of the selfaction because of the singularity of the Coulomb potential. The ground state is constructed by minimization of the renormalized energy per cell. This energy is bounded from below when the charge of each ion is positive. The elementary cell is necessarily neutral.

  1. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  2. Water Quality Modeling in Kranji Catchment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granger, Erika C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the process and results of applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to characterize bacterial fate and transport in the Kranji Catchment of Singapore. The goal of this process is to predict ...

  3. Watershed and Receiving Water Modeling Introduction ....................................................................................................................................843

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    .EXE / 1.05 FEMWATER model / documentation 1.00 Jul 93 INSTALGC.EXE / 1.16 GCSOLAR model / documentation 1

  4. Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment... of regulations, primarily contained in Chapter 287 of the Texas Administrative Code, to provide for licensing of well drillers and pump installers and establish standards for drilling, capping and plugging water wells. For wells drilled before the effective date...

  6. Grounding-line migration in plan-view marine ice-sheet models: results of the ice2sea MISMIP3d intercomparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models (SSA, AHySSA) produce larger ice sheets than modelsplan-view ice-sheet models they produce different results.the Antarctic ice sheet should at least produce grounding-

  7. Phase Coexistence Properties of Polarizable Water Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been proposed. The SPC [3], the SPC/E [4] and the TIP4P [5] models are widely used. These models for in the parameterization. Thus the dipole moment of the TIP4P model is 2.18D and that of the SPC model is 2.27D: both the experimental value. For the SPC model, the critical temperature is 10% smaller and the crit­ ical density is 16

  8. Phase Coexistence Properties of Polarizable Water Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposed. The SPC 3 , the SPC E 4 and the TIP4P 5 models are widely used. These models consist of a Lennard. Thus the dipole moment of the TIP4P model is 2.18D and that of the SPC model is 2.27D: both are higher. For the SPC model, the critical temperature is 10 smaller and the crit- ical density is 16 smaller than

  9. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  10. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description of a simplified model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1069 Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description dégénérées. Nous étudions la condensation de Bose de ce système en fonction de la densité, négligeant dans-hole gas in a simple model semiconductor, with direct gap and isotropic, non degenerate bands. We study

  12. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    may vary with reservoir storage content and/or stream flow. Chapters 3 and 4 of the Reference Manual describe the component features of the SIM simulation model, which are organized in two categories. River basin hydrology includes... naturalized stream flows, reservoir net evaporation- precipitation, and channel losses (Chapter 3 of the Reference Manual). Water rights include all aspects of water management including water supply diversions, return flows, environmental instream flow...

  13. Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling with WRAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    , or age. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 WRAP Modeling System .............................................................................................. 1 Documentation... .......................................................................................................................... 1 Computer Programs .................................................................................................................. 2 Data Files...

  14. Development of a Water Management Model for the Metropolitan Water District (NW Tucson)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , fountains, evaporative coolers, rainwater collection and water reuse. The choices the model users--data collection and adjusting or adding to the existing Powersim model. As more data was collected for both area. The models also contain a default setting that was determined from the data collected

  15. Water Quality Modeling in Estuaries Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simple still has utility · Utility of "simple" models Outline #12;Evolution of Models 1970's Modern #12 R. fall-line P loadingPotomac R. fall-line P loading Spatial variability in rainfall #12;Data Issues. Unaggregated Grid #12;Simple Still Has Utility Scavia et al. (2003) Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Model Streeter

  16. Payback Analysis for Ground Source Heat Pump Retrofits Using eQuest Modeling Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlers, Drake

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much research and analysis done on the performance and potential energy savings related to installing a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. Much of this research has been dedicated to the new construction industry, and focused on a...

  17. Modelling and Simulation of a Polluted Water Pumping Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Modelling and Simulation of a Polluted Water Pumping Process Chitra Alavani1 , Roland Glowinski2 concentration when a polluted water pumping ship follows a pre­assigned trajectory to remove the pollutant. We, sea currents and pumping process and the reaction due to the extraction of oil, implying

  18. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Daily Modeling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -2011) Contract 582-12-10220 (2011-2013) Technical Report No. 430 Texas Water Resources Institute The Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 August 2012 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 Water Rights Analysis... Package (WRAP) Modeling System .......................... 1 WRAP Documentation ..................................................................................................... 1 WRAP Programs...

  19. "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management." Teresa Culver Associate Professor tculver@virginia.edu ce.virginia.edu/faculty/culvert.html Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.6375 Environmental & Water Resources Group We

  20. The water supercooled regime as described by four common water models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaspina, David C; Pereyra, Rodolfo G; Szleifer, Igal; Carignano, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature scale of simple water models in general does not coincide with the natural one. Therefore, in order to make a meaningful evaluation of different water models a temperature rescaling is necessary. In this paper we introduce a rescaling using the melting temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum of the heat capacity to evaluate four common water models (TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P-2005, TIP5P-Ew and Six-Sites) in the supercooled regime. Although all the models show the same general qualitative behavior, the TIP5P-Ew appears as the best representation of the supercooled regime when the rescaled temperature is used. We also analyze, using thermodynamic arguments, the critical nucleus size for ice growth. Finally, we speculate on the possible reasons why atomistic models do not usually crystalize while the coarse grained mW model do crystallize.

  1. The prediction of the effectiveness of interceptor trenches in the remediation of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, Mary Katherine

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . LIST OF FIGURES. . LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION. . Objectives. Previous Works Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SITE DESCRIPTIONS . . Site A. Site B. Site C . . . FIELD STUDIES. . . Site A. . Site B. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 15... . . 68 . 71 --. . 73 -- 77 Figure LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. General layout of Site A showing ground-flow in the vicinity of the interceptor trench 2. Schematic cross-sectional view of the interceptor trench at Site A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10...

  2. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  3. Nutrients, pesticides, surfactants, and trace metals in ground water from the Howe and Mud Lake areas upgradient from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, D.D.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Bennett, C.M.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconnaissance-level sampling for selected nutrients, pesticides, and surfactants in ground water upgradient from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted during June 1989. Water samples collected from eight irrigation wells, five domestic or livestock wells, and two irrigation canals were analyzed for nutrients, herbicides, insecticides and polychlorinated compounds, and surfactants. In addition to the above constituents, water samples from one irrigation well, one domestic well, and one irrigation canal were analyzed for arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen ranged from less than the reporting to 6.10 mg/L (milligrams per liter), and orthophosphate concentrations as phosphorus ranged from less than the reporting level to 0.070 mg/L (micrograms per liter). Concentrations of 2,4-D in two water samples were 0.1 {mu}g/L and 0.10 {mu}g/L. Water samples analyzed for 15 other herbicides, 10 carbamate insecticides, 11 organophosphorus insecticides, and 15 organochlorine insecticides, gross polychlorinated biphenyls, and gross polychlorinated naphthalenes all had concentration below their reporting levels. Concentrations of surfactants ranged from 0.02 to 0.35 mg/L. Arsenic, barium, chromium, selenium, and silver concentrations exceeded reporting levels in most of the samples. 19 refs., 1 fig., 19 tabs.

  4. The ground state energy of the three dimensional Ginzburg-Landau model in the mixed phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayman Kachmar

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Ginzburg-Landau functional defined over a bounded and smooth three dimensional domain. Supposing that the strength of the applied magnetic field varies between the first and second critical fields, in such a way that $H_{C_1}\\ll H\\ll H_{C_2}$, we estimate the ground state energy to leading order as the Ginzburg-Landau parameter tends to infinity.

  5. Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farid Marandi, Sayena

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

  6. Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model as embedded in HWSim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this scheme for operating TANK with HWSim is successful.LBNL # Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model asCalifornia. Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model

  7. Modeling water content effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, T.E.; Zawodzinski, T.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water content and transport is the key factor in the one-dimensional, steady-state model of a complete polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) described here. Water diffusion coefficients, electroosmotic drag coefficients, water sorption isotherms, and membrane conductivities, all measured in our laboratory as functions of membrane water content, were used in the model. The model predicts a net-water-per-proton flux ratio of 0.2 H{sub 2}O/H{sup +} under typical operating conditions, which is much less than the measured electroosmotic drag coefficient for a fully hydrated membrane. It also predicts an increase in membrane resistance with increased current density and demonstrates the great advantage of thinner membranes in alleviating this resistance problem. Both of these predictions were verified experimentally under certain conditions. We also describe the sensitivity of the water concentration profile and associated observables to variations in the values of some of the transport parameters in anticipation of applying the model to fuel cells employing other membranes. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Uncertainty propagation in a model for the estimation of the1 ground level concentration of dioxin/furans emitted from a waste2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty propagation in a model for the estimation of the1 ground level concentration of dioxin concentration of dioxin/furans emitted from a waste gasification plant. Under the17 condition of insufficient

  9. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is overdrafted from ground water storage basins. 3 In 1976supply, pumping from ground water storage reservoirs mayIn of ground formation which reduces the water storage

  10. Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa Jurgen Schuol,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa Ju¨rgen Schuol,1,2 Karim C. Abbaspour,1 Hong a semidistributed hydrological model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), the freshwater components blue water. J. B. Zehnder (2008), Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa, Water Resour. Res., 44

  11. Integrated Water Management and Modeling at Multiple Spatial Scales David Ezechiel Rosenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    Integrated Water Management and Modeling at Multiple Spatial Scales Abstract Water shortages from actions that minimize costs or maximize benefits across a variety of water shortage conditions, describe interdependencies when adopting multiple actions together. Fourth, list the shortage or water

  12. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    be affected by manure, milk solids, ammonia, phosphorus, and detergents. Wastewater from the dairy milking center is made up of waste from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt, bulk tank rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), and should... topics: 1. Combining wastes 2. Application methods 3. Slow surface infiltration Combining Wastes When milking center wastes are combined with manure a common disposal system can be used for both types of waste. A liquid manure storage facility, properly...

  13. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Do you store pesticides on your land? 2. Do you use or store any agricultural chemicals near a water well? 3. Are chemicals stored on a permeable surface such as wood, gravel or soil, or are chemicals stored on an impermeable surface with no curb... contamination. This guide will provide information about the following areas: 1. Pesticide storage 2. Mixing and loading practices 3. Spill clean up 4. Container disposal 5. Other management practices 6. Evaluation table 7. Pesticide Leachability Chart...

  14. Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model as embedded in HWSim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL # Evaluation of TANK water heater simulation model asEvaluation of TANK water heater simulation model as embeddedwater to be drawn from a water heater to meet a schedule of

  15. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Homogeneous ice nucleation evaluated for several water models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Espinosa; E. Sanz; C. Valeriani; C. Vega

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we evaluate by means of computer simulations the rate for ice homogeneous nucleation for several water models such as TIP4P, TIP4P/2005,TIP4P/ICE, and mW (following the same procedure as in Sanz et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc.135, 15008 (2013)]) in a broad temperature range. We estimate the ice-liquid interfacial free-energy, and conclude that for all water models {\\gamma} decreases as the temperature decreases. Extrapolating our results to the melting temperature, we obtain a value of the interfacial free-energy between 25 and 32 mN/m in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental values. Moreover, we observe that the values of {\\gamma} depend on the chosen water model and this is a key factor when numerically evaluating nucleation rates, given that the kinetic prefactor is quite similar for all water models with the exception of the mW (due to the absence of hydrogens). Somewhat surprisingly the estimates of the nucleation rates found in this work for TIP4P/2005 are slightly higher than those of the mW model, even though the former has explicit hydrogens. Our results suggest that it may be possible to observe in computer simulations spontaneous crystallization of TIP4P/2005 at about 60 K below the melting point.

  17. Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification. [STEALTH Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R.T.; Trent, B.C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

  18. Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent, B.C.; Langland, R.T.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

  19. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  20. Substation grounding programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

  1. Fundamental Studies of The Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters Via Reduction By Zero-Valent metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jory A. Yarmoff; Christopher Amrhein

    2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites, and in other areas of the U.S.. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant compounds with Fe filings and single- and poly-crystalline surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  2. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

  3. A simple model to help understand water use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Background Thermal power plants convert heat into power in the form of electricity. The heat is generated energy. The heat rate (HR, kJ/kWh) of a power plant is the amount of heat input required (kA simple model to help understand water use at power plants Anna Delgado and Howard J. Herzog

  4. CoalWater Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Fabio

    CoalWater Slurry technology: problems and modeling solutions A. Fasano, E. De Angelis, A viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation Firenze - 29 october viscosity reaches extremely high values and the product becomes useless. Sedimentation: it's also a long

  5. {sup 222}Rn in water: A comparison of two sample collection methods and two sample transport methods, and the determination of temporal variation in North Carolina ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, J.H. III [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering] [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this field experiment were: (1) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the radon concentrations of samples collected by EPA`s standard method, using a syringe, and an alternative, slow-flow method; (2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the measured radon concentrations of samples mailed vs samples not mailed; and (3) determine whether there was a temporal variation of water radon concentration over a 7-month period. The field experiment was conducted at 9 sites, 5 private wells, and 4 public wells, at various locations in North Carolina. Results showed that a syringe is not necessary for sample collection, there was generally no significant radon loss due to mailing samples, and there was statistically significant evidence of temporal variations in water radon concentrations.

  6. Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................................................................... 95 x LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Schematic of the Flocchini box model.............................................................. 7 Figure 2. Layout of test plots... in Table 1. EFs developed using the two modeling methods were found not to be statistically different for all the four species at the 95% confidence level. No difference was observed even in the standard deviation values of the EFs developed using...

  7. Optimized Wang-Landau sampling of lattice polymers: Ground state search and folding thermodynamics of HP model proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wst; David P. Landau

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Coarse-grained (lattice-) models have a long tradition in aiding efforts to decipher the physical or biological complexity of proteins. Despite the simplicity of these models, however, numerical simulations are often computationally very demanding and the quest for efficient algorithms is as old as the models themselves. Expanding on our previous work [T. W\\"ust and D. P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 178101 (2009)], we present a complete picture of a Monte Carlo method based on Wang-Landau sampling in combination with efficient trial moves (pull, bond-rebridging and pivot moves) which is particularly suited to the study of models such as the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model of protein folding. With this generic and fully blind Monte Carlo procedure, all currently known putative ground states for the most difficult benchmark HP sequences could be found. For most sequences we could also determine the entire energy density of states and, together with suitably designed structural observables, explore the thermodynamics and intricate folding behavior in the virtually inaccessible low-temperature regime. We analyze the differences between random and protein-like heteropolymers for sequence lengths up to 500 residues. Our approach is powerful both in terms of robustness and speed, yet flexible and simple enough for the study of many related problems in protein folding.

  8. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  9. A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China)| Open EnergyEnergyCaldera

  10. NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 00, no. 0/ xxxx 0000/pages 0000 1 2012, The Author(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    1745­6592.2012.01392.x Modeling Dehalococcoides sp. Augmented Bioremediation in a Single Fracture System by Jagadish Torlapati, T. Prabhakar Clement, Charles E. Schaefer, and Kang-Kun Lee Introduction efforts has resulted in widespread contamination of groundwater and soil systems. The toxicity

  11. Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

  12. Construction and Analysis of Ground Models and their Refinements as a Foundation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brger, Egon

    for reliable system development which allows one to bridge the gap between informal requirements and executable, in the semiconductor industry also called "golden models" [92, pg.26]1 . They define, as system reference documenta

  13. Air dispersion modeling of particulate matter from ground-level area sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meister, Michael Todd

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) often use dispersion modeling to predict downwind concentrations of particulate matter (PM) from a facility. As such, a facility may be granted or denied an operating permit based on the results...

  14. Model for Aggregated Water Heater Load Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to the new generation power grid, or smart grid, requires novel ways of using and analyzing data collected from the grid infrastructure. Fundamental functionalities like demand response (DR), that the smart grid needs, rely heavily on the ability of the energy providers and distributors to forecast the load behavior of appliances under different DR strategies. This paper presents a new model of aggregated water heater load, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs). The model has been validated against simulated data from an open source distribution simulation software (GridLAB-D). The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the DBN model accurately tracks the load profile curves of aggregated water heaters under different testing scenarios.

  15. Dynamic water wave pressures on a recurved model seawall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rismiller, Gregory Ross

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. Jerry L. Machemehl The dynamic pressures acting on a I:5 scale recurved model seawall caused by breaking water waves were investigated. The magnitude, location and distribution of the shock and secondary pressures were determined from physical... and incident wave height increased, the magnitude of the shock and secondary pressure increased. Shock pressures as great as 3. 72 kN/m~ were recorded, while a change in water depth of 0. 01m caused a mean pressure increase of approximately 0. 09 k...

  16. Differential Equation Model for the Ground to First 2+ State Excitation Energy E2 of Even-Even Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R . C. Nayak; S. Pattnaik

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose here a new model termed as the Differential Equation Model for the ground to first 2+ state excitation energy E2 of a given even-even nucleus, according to which the energy E2 is expressed in terms of its derivatives with respect to the neutron and proton numbers. This is based on a similar derivative equation satisfied by its complementary physical quantity namely the Reduced Electric Quadrupole Transition Probability B(E2) in a recently developed model. Although the proposed differential equation for E2 has been perceived on the basis of its close similarity to B(E2), its theoretical foundation otherwise has been clearly demonstrated. We further exploit the very definitions of the derivatives occurring in the differential equation in the model to obtain two different recursion relations for E2, connecting in each case three neighboring even-even nuclei from lower to higher mass numbers and vice-verse. We demonstrate their numerical validity using the available data throughout the nuclear chart and also explore their possible utility in predicting the unknown E2 values.

  17. Substation grounding programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. It can be used to compute transient ground potential rise due to lightning or switching, and the ground impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) at specified frequencies. This report, Volume 4, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program TGRND (Transient GRouNDing System Analysis Program). This program computes transient ground potential rise resulting from lightning, switching, or other transient electric currents injected to a grounding system. The program also computes the impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) of a grounding system as a function of frequency. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program TGRND and provides a test case for validation purposes.

  18. XXII ICTAM, 2529 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE SHEETSHELF GROUNDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    melting of the polar ice caps due to global warming, a dynamical collapse of the ice sheets has the dynamical stability of shelving ice sheets. INTRODUCTION The Antarctic ice cap contains several tensXXII ICTAM, 2529 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE

  19. Significance of steam separator models for BWR water level transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akiyama, T.; Shida, T.; Shibuya, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss-of-power accident (LOPA) test is required in the series of startup tests for a new plant. In this test, the reactor water level goes down further than in other tests, but it stays a sufficient margin above the lower limit level. However, there is a tendency for simulation results to give an overly conservative water level response compared with test data. Such a situation requires greater standby pump capacity in the feedwater system. After reviewing several possible model improvements, it was noted that the performance of the steam separator has a significant effect on the reactor water level calculation for this event. To develop an improved model, the inverse problem approach (IPA) was applied. The IPA consists of three main procedures: (a) state estimation from the sensed signal, (b) forced simulation to replace the method variable with the estimated state, and (c) introducing hypothetical parameters and tracing them so that the difference between calculated and measured reactor water levels is minimized during the simulation. The simulation results are summarized.

  20. Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water Systems, Vol. 12 (edited by W. James). CHI. Guelph, Ontario, pp. 257 294. 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water AND EXAMINATION OF A MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM DATABASE Robert Pitt, Alex Maestre, Renee Morquecho of Water 104(b)3 grant in 2001 to collect and evaluate stormwater data from a representative number

  1. On-line Hydraulic State Estimation in Urban Water Networks Using Reduced Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preis, Ami

    A Predictor-Corrector (PC) approach for on-line forecasting of water usage in an urban water system is presented and demonstrated. The M5 Model-Trees algorithm is used to predict water demands and Genetic Algorithms (GAs) ...

  2. Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    for Undergraduates, 2006 #12;Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Urban Hydrology Water's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) Solves differential and algebraic equations involved in calculatingModeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water: Detailed Modeling

  3. Biofuels and water quality: challenges and opportunities for simulation modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Bernard A. [Purdue University; Chaubey, Indrajeet [Purdue University; Thomas, Mark [Purdue University; Saraswat, Dharmendra [University of Arkansas; Murphy, Patrick [Purdue University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the various impacts of biofuel feedstock production on hydrology and water quality is complex. Mathematical models can be used to efficiently evaluate various what if scenarios related to biofeedstock production and their impacts on hydrology and water quality at various spatial and temporal scales. Currently available models, although having the potential to serve such purposes, have many limitations. In this paper, we review the strengths and weaknesses of such models in light of short- and long term biofeedstock production scenarios. The representation of processes in the currently available models and how these processes need to be modified to fully evaluate various complex biofeedstock production scenarios are discussed. Similarly, issues related to availability of data that are needed to parameterize and evaluate these models are presented. We have presented a vision for the development of decision support tools and ecosystem services that can be used to make watershed management decisions to minimize any potentially adverse environmental impacts while meeting biofeedstock demands. We also discuss a case study of biofeedstock impact simulation in relation to watershed management policy implications for various state and federal agencies in the USA.

  4. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, Franois; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  5. Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable water use is implementing integrated water resources management (IWRM). It provides the best framework for balancing

  6. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  7. Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

  8. Differences between Physical Water Models and Steel Continuous Casters: A Theoretical Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    lower surface velocities and surface waves in the water model, especially for thinner cross sections to the similar kinematic viscosity of water and steel, and the ease of constructing and visualizing flow in waterDifferences between Physical Water Models and Steel Continuous Casters: A Theoretical Evaluation R

  9. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

  10. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  11. MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R. Lund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R University of California, Davis April 2003 #12;MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme;TABLE OF CONTENTS i INTRODUCTION

  12. Modeling and analysis of water-hammer in coaxial pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesana, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid-structure interaction is studied for a system composed of two coaxial pipes in an annular geometry, for both homogeneous isotropic metal pipes and fiber-reinforced (anisotropic) pipes. Multiple waves, traveling at different speeds and amplitudes, result when a projectile impacts on the water filling the annular space between the pipes. In the case of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic thin pipes we compute the wavespeeds, the fluid pressure and mechanical strains as functions of the fiber winding angle. This generalizes the single-pipe analysis of J. H. You, and K. Inaba, Fluid-structure interaction in water-filled pipes of anisotropic composite materials, J. Fl. Str. 36 (2013). Comparison with a set of experimental measurements seems to validate our models and predictions.

  13. A study of density of states and ground states in hydrophobic-hydrophilic protein folding models by equi-energy sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kou, Samuel

    A study of density of states and ground states in hydrophobic-hydrophilic protein folding models June 2006 We propose an equi-energy EE sampling approach to study protein folding in the two a detailed study of the thermodynamics of HP protein folding, in particular, on the temperature dependence

  14. Selenium speciation in ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  15. Ground Water Protection (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality...

  16. Business Model Innovation for Sanitation and Water Services in Low-income Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Business Model Innovation for Sanitation and Water Services in Low-income Countries PEAK Advanced- trepreneurs as well as private firms agree that the business model determines whether scaling up of water and sanitation services is successful or not. Business models can unlock the value potential of water

  17. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  18. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of America, Boulder, CO. #12;Problem and Research Objectives: Coal bed methane (CBM) development, 2001). CBM extraction involves pumping methane and ground water out of coal seams. The gas and water://wwweng.uwyo.edu/civil/research/water/epmodeler.html. University of Wyoming, Laramie. 4. Wilkerson, G. V., 2002. A GIS model for evaluating the impacts of coal bed

  19. Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiny, A. C; Jorgensen, T. M; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

  20. A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 5530, (2001)] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN/m, in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, JACS, 135, 15008, (2013)]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2)and 28(2) mN/m for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is of approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover, we find that when the basal plane is exposed to the fluid the interface alternates regions of cubic ice with regions of hexagonal ice.

  1. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an overview of ground loops for space-conditioning heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration in residential and commercial applications. In Louisiana, a chain of hamburger drive-ins uses total ground...

  2. Substation grounding programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

  3. Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

  4. Using ground based geophysics to evaluate hydrogeologic effects of subsurface drip irrigation systems used to manage produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Veloski, G.A.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory has been evaluating various geophysical methods for site characterization regarding environmental issues associated with fossil fuels including produced water management. A relatively new method of managing produced water from coal bed natural gas production is through subsurface drip irrigation. This system involves disposing the produced water near the bottom of the root zone in agricultural fields, which would provide a beneficial use of this resource. The focus of this paper is to present results from a pre-injection geophysical survey for site assessment and background data. A pre-construction survey of approximately 1.2 km2 was completed in June 2007 using a Geophex GEM-2 broadband sensor over six fields along the Powder River floodplain. Quality assurance measures included drift checks, duplicate line surveys, and repeat field surveys using the Geometrics OhmMapper instrument. Subsequent surveys will be completed once the system is installed and operational. Geophysical inversion models were completed to provide a detailed cross-section of the subsurface geoelectrical structure along each line. Preliminary interpretations reveal that the subsurface conductivity distribution correlates to geomorphologic features.

  5. Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  7. Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

  8. An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan De La Vega

    2014-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 9, 2014 ... Abstract: This study investigates a pump scheduling problem for the collection, transfer and storage of water in water supply systems in urban...

  9. Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply, Carnegie Mellon University ABSTRACT Assessments of the impacts of proposed drinking water standards have. In this research, a new modeling framework is described for evaluating the impacts of multiple drinking water

  10. IEEE TRANSACTION ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS 1 Water Surface Modeling from A Single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    water brings unique challenges [15]. Major difficulties include it- s lack of matchable featuresIEEE TRANSACTION ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS 1 Water Surface Modeling from A Single and Phillip Willis Abstract--We introduce a video based approach for producing water surface models. Recent

  11. Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems. Signature Date 3 #12;Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG

  12. Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution and forestry-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution and forestry practices in Galloway, SW Scotland.forestry.gov.uk/fr/acidification #12;4 #12;Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution

  13. Ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final, Revision 2, Version 5: Appendix E to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this appendix is to provide a ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Green River, Utah. Compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards will be achieved by applying supplemental standards (40 CFR {section} 192.22(a); 60 FR 2854) based on the limited use ground water present in the uppermost aquifer that is associated with widespread natural ambient contamination (40 CFR {section} 192.11(e); 60 FR 2854). The strategy is based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The strategy will result in compliance with Subparts A and C of the EPA final ground water protection standards (60 FR 2854). The document contains sufficient information to support the proposed ground water protection strategy, with monitor well information and ground water quality data included as a supplement. Additional information is available in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a), the final completion report (DOE, 1991b), and the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1994a).

  14. forreading. COLLABORATIVE MODELING TO EVALUATE WATER MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ; and Manager (Pati~no-Gomez), Integrated Water Resources Management Branch, Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia

  15. Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    source water acquisition, wastewater production, reuse and recycle, and subsequent transportation, about 19,000-26,000 m3 of water is used to complete each well. A wastewater production forecast . Furthermore, the injected water that remains underground accounts for 0.3% of all water consumption in the US

  16. Energy and Water Interactions: Insights from Mathematical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    EnergyUse Water Use or Environmental Impact More More Less Less 0 0 Biofuels Production? Seawater desalting Water-Water TradeoffsEnergyUse Water Use or Environmental Impact More More Less Less 0 0 Biofuels Production? Seawater improvements Solar generation agriculture substitution? Pumping Shale oil Production? Drip irrigation-SW Trade

  17. Optimization of a Chilled Water Plant Using a Forward Plant Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of some energy conservation measures. This model is based on a Wire-to-Water efficiency concept to simulate the plant power for producing cooling. The fluctuation of the chilled water loop supply and return temperature difference is also considered...

  18. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interest in subcritical (hot/liquid) water from 298 K to 473subcritical region. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H 2 S in CO 2 -Water

  19. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  20. Variational Analysis of Mass Spectra and Decay Constants for Ground State Pseudoscalar and Vector Mesons in Light-Front Quark Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Li, Ziyue

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the variational principle, we compute mass spectra and decay constants of ground state pseudoscalar and vector mesons in the light-front quark model with the QCD-motivated effective Hamiltonian including the hyperfine interaction. By smearing out the Dirac delta function in the hyperfine interaction, we avoid the issue of negative infinity in applying the variational principle to the computation of meson mass spectra. In comparison with the previous computation handling the hyperfine interaction as perturbation, our variational analysis provides an overall improvement on the agreement with the experimental data of mass spectra for the ground state pseudoscalar and vector mesons from $\\pi$ to $\\Upsilon$. By taking a larger harmonic oscillator basis in our trial wave function, we also obtain the better agreement between the experimental data of decay constants and the results from our model calculation for these mesons.

  1. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  2. Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

  3. Development and Application of a Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Simulation Model for Residential Code-Compliance Simulation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Sung Lok

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study was to improve residential energy efficiency in Texas by developing an improved tool for home builders and code officers to use for evaluating their designs. It was achieved by developing a new ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP...

  4. Modeling of trihalomethane (THM) formation via chlorination of the water from Dongjiang River (source water for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    , Guangzhou, 510275, PR China c Water and Aquatic Sciences Research Program, University of Victoria, Victoria online 22 August 2007 Abstract The Dongjiang River is the major source of drinking water supply for Hong

  5. The Riacho Fundo water basin: a case study for qualitative modelling sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    of sustainable development related problems. The models aim at supporting stakeholders to understand the systemsThe Riacho Fundo water basin: a case study for qualitative modelling sustainable development Paulo presents a working plan for modelling relevant aspects of sustainability issues in the Riacho Fundo water

  6. New Approach to Modelling Water Paths in Managed Rainforests Nick A CHAPPELL*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    pathways (e.g., pressure and kinematic waves) would require much re-programming and reNew Approach to Modelling Water Paths in Managed Rainforests Nick A CHAPPELL*1 , Wlodek TYCH1 for such forecasts. Limits to catchment models using micro-scale physics: When using catchment models based on soil-water

  7. Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines Zhenhao, 2007 A thermodynamic model calculating the solubility of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in pure water phase. With this specific interaction approach, this model is able to predict H2S solubility in other

  8. APPROACHES TO EVALUATE WATER QUALITY MODEL PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY FOR ADAPTIVE TMDL IMPLEMENTATION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is particularly handy for that task. (KEY TERMS: total maximum daily load; water quality model; ecological quality management and decisions such as total maximum daily load (TMDL) determinations (NRC 2001). ModelsAPPROACHES TO EVALUATE WATER QUALITY MODEL PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY FOR ADAPTIVE TMDL IMPLEMENTATION1

  9. E-mail: whare@udc.eduhttp://www.udc.edu//wrri Integrating Water Quality Monitoring and Modeling as a Tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    system Ground water quality Storm water Wastewater treatment plant Rainfall runoff Environmental and biological water quality parameters in water and wastewater. Examples are: (1) Senion2, (2) Titrino, (3) p the research and training needs of our faculty, students as well as water and wastewater operators. The main

  10. Modeling the water consumption of Singapore using system dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welling, Karen Noiva

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are essential to life, and in urban areas, the high demand density and finite local resources often engender conditions of relative water scarcity. To overcome this scarcity, governments intensify infrastructure ...

  11. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Model Description and User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Dunn, David D.

    by the Texas Water Resources Institute, U.S. Geological Survey, Brazos River Authority, Texas Advanced Technology Program, Texas Water Development Board, and Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. W. Brian Walls, David D. Dunn, Anil R. Yerramreddy...

  12. Substation grounding programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 5, is an applications guide of the three computer programs. SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS, for the purpose of designing a safe substation grounding system. The applications guide utilizes four example substation grounding systems for the purpose of illustrating the application of the programs, SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS. The examples are based on data provided by four contributing utilities, namely, Houston Lighting and Power Company, Southern Company Services, Puget Sound Power and Light Company, and Arizona Public Service Company. For the purpose of illustrating specific capabilities of the computer programs, the data have been modified. As a result, the final designs of the four systems do not necessarily represent actual grounding system designs by these utilities. The example system 1 is a 138 kV/35 kV distribution substation. The example system 2 is a medium size 230 kV/115 kV transmission substation. The third example system is a generation substation while the last is a large 525 kV/345 kV/230 kV transmission substation. The four examples cover most of the practical problems that a user may encounter in the design of substation grounding systems.

  13. Water quantity and quality model for the evaluation of water-management strategies in the Netherlands: application to the province of Friesland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, J.J.; Griffioen, P.S.; Groot, S.; Los, F.J.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Netherlands have a rather complex water-management system consisting of a number of major rivers, canals, lakes and ditches. Water-quantity management on a regional scale is necessary for an effective water-quality policy. To support water management, a computer model was developed that includes both water quality and water quantity, based on three submodels: ABOPOL for the water movement, DELWAQ for the calculation of water quality variables and BLOOM-II for the phytoplankton growth. The northern province of Friesland was chosen as a test case for the integrated model to be developed, where water quality is highly related to the water distribution and the main trade-off is minimizing the intake of (eutrophicated) alien water in order to minimize external nutrient load and maximizing the intake in order to flush channels and lakes. The results of the application of these models to this and to a number of hypothetical future situations are described.

  14. Polarization model for water and its ionic dissociation Frank H. Stillinger and Carl W. Davida)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    engage in hydrogen bonding to one another. Minimum-energy structures have been detennined for the waterCient to treat the individual water molecules as rigid bodies. An early example of a rigid molecule pairPolarization model for water and its ionic dissociation products Frank H. Stillinger and Carl W

  15. A mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    activity in soil varies with water content, soil texture and structure, temperature, energy and nutrientA mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils H.W. HUNT1 *, A@nrel.colostate.edu Abstract: Equations were developed to predict soil matric potential as a function of soil water content

  16. Use of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) was about 50% of normal during 20002001. The ensuing drought-related water shortage led to seriousUse of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate of Upper-driven interannual (and longer) variability is evident. Evaporation and the other components of the water balance

  17. University of Central Florida Overcoming extreme water conditions through computer modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    can better predict the effects of extreme water events," he added. Hagen's team produced an accurateUniversity of Central Florida Overcoming extreme water conditions through computer modeling In recent years, we've witnessed the devastating effects of too much water. The great Indian Ocean tsunami

  18. Finite-Volume-Particle Methods for Models of Transport of Pollutant in Shallow Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurganov, Alexander

    Finite-Volume-Particle Methods for Models of Transport of Pollutant in Shallow Water Alina Chertock of shallow water equations and the pollutant propagation is described by a transport equation. The idea and the pollution computations: the shallow water equations are numerically integrated using a #12;nite- volume

  19. Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast Vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast@stanford.edu Abstract: The dynamics of water at the surface of artificial membranes composed of aligned multibilayers pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiments are performed at various hydration levels, x ) 2 - 16 water

  20. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process Abstract: The study investigates water quality pollution impacts on urbanization by analyzing temporal, more populations were moved from rural area into urban area, and more costs were input in water quality

  1. Multiple regression models: A methodology for evaluating trihalomethane concentrations in drinking water from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    September 2001; accepted 28 January 2002 Abstract The presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water in finished drinking water, using data from the Menidi Treatment Plant of Athens. A number of routinely Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Multiple regression model; Trihalomethanes; Drinking water

  2. Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    processes of PAH with subcritical water [5,6] since it provides the extractability limit which can be used groups, for the representation of the solubility of solid PAH in subcritical water. These hal-00872639Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model

  3. Substation grounding programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five volume report comprises the user manual, installation, and validation manual and an applications guide for the SGA (Substation Grounding Analysis) software package. SGA consists of four computer programs: (1) SOMIP, (2) SMECC, (3) SGSYS, and (4) TGRND. The first three programs provide a comprehensive analysis tool for the design of substation grounding systems to meet safety standards. The fourth program, TGRND, provides a state of the art analysis tool for computing transient ground potential rise and ground system impedance. This part of the report, Volume 1, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SOMIP (SOil Measurement Interpretation Program). This program computes the best estimate of the parameters of a two layer soil model from usual soil resistivity measurements. Four pin or three pin soil measurements can be accommodated. In addition, it provides error bounds on the soil parameters for a given confidence level. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SOMIP and provides two test cases for validation purposes. 4 refs.

  4. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  5. Kinematic wave model for water movement in municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendz, David; Singh, Vijay P.; Rosqvist, H??kan; Bengtsson, Lars

    convection-dispersion equation (CDE). Furthermore, the soil water diffusivity, defined by Klute [1952], and the forms of Department of Water Resources Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering..., Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. 3Division of Land and Water Resources, Royal Institute of Tech- nology, Stockholm, Sweden. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union. Paper number 98WR01109. 0043-1397/98/98 WR-01109509.00 hydraulic...

  6. United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Leslie Lee Summer 2013 tx H2O 3 Photo by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife UNITED How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible Managing surface water supplies in Texas is complex, to say the least. Multiple... of conditions. W#15;P enables surface water managers throughout Texas to allocate water resources, plan for the future and ensure there is enough water for environmental as well as human needs. A statewide surface water permitting system is born Prior...

  7. Water Quality Modeling and Monitoring in the California North Delta Area Raffi Jirair Moughamian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    hydraulic model of the northern part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the North Delta). It was produced A water quality model, including salinity and temperature, has been linked to a one-dimensional, MIKE 11 Description.................................................................................20 Hydrodynamics

  8. An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The conservation of energy and water resources so that they are available for ..... activated during the planning period may be used as an alternative measure to...

  9. Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Fenelon

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

  10. Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... to determine the economic and financial life-cycle costs of building and operating four water treatment facilities in South Texas. One facility was the Southmost Regional Water Authority Regional Desalination Plant near Brownsville. Sturdi- vant said...

  11. Water Research 38 (2004) 33313339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Water Research 38 (2004) 3331­3339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting out associated with transferring solutes from water to a salt solution to the difference in surface tensions likely reflects the inability of the simple surface tension model to account for all interactions among

  12. Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Liquid Water Dynamics in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller in a Model Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Flow Channel by Chris Miller Bachelors of Engineering, University in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is a critical issue in ensuring high cell performance. The water production

  13. A model of water streaking down a wall David A. Benson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Hill, 1976; Glass et al., 1989a; Selker et al., 1992]. A wave-like (kinematic) model using Rich- ardsA model of water streaking down a wall David A. Benson Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert aperture fracture. A digital photograph of the wall suggests that the vertical distribution of water

  14. A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water carrying capacity. Keywords Visitation model Á Recreation management Á Water quality Á River visitation Á Clark, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA 123 Environmental Management DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9079-5 #12

  15. Dosimetry Modeling for Predicting Radiolytic Production at the Spent Fuel - Water Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William H.; Kline, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of the alpha, beta, and gamma dose from spent fuel as a function of particle size and fuel to water ratio was examined. These doses will be combined with modeling of G values and interactions to determine the concentration of various species formed at the fuel water interface and their affect on dissolution rates.

  16. AGGLOMERATION OF GAS HYDRATE IN A WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION: EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AGGLOMERATION OF GAS HYDRATE IN A WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION: EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDIES Ana of gas hydrates in water-in-oil emulsion is investigated at the laboratory pilot scale on a flow loop, rheology, chord length distribution, modeling Corresponding author: Phone: +33 477420286 Fax +33 477429694

  17. Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

  18. Title: Hydraulic modeling of a mixed water level control hydro-mechanical gate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Title: Hydraulic modeling of a mixed water level control hydro-mechanical gate Ludovic Cassan1 Abstract: The article describes the hydraulic functioning of a mixed water level control hydro- mechanical of the model to reproduce the functioning of this complex hydro-mechanical system. CE database Subject headings

  19. Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK Benchmarking models for the Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a unique set of characteristics. #12;Benchmark Models for the Water Framework Directive (BMW) OBJECTIVE Models Estuary Models Cost-effectiveness Models GENERIC SWAT Conference: 2 - 4 July 2003 http://www.vyh.fi/eng/research/euproj/bmw you BMW homepage: http://www.vyh.fi/eng/research/euproj/bmw/homepage.htm #12;

  20. Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

  1. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  2. Review of soil water models with respect to savanna hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derry, Julian F; Russell, Graham; Liedloff, Adam C

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective management leading towards sustainable rangeland production in arid and semi-arid regions will stem from effective soil water management and comprehension of the hydrological properties of the soil in relation to pastoralism. However...

  3. Extending and Condensing the Brazos River Basin Water Availability Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph; Kim, T.

    of Texas. This report documents an investigation that consisted of developing, testing, and applying procedures for (1) extending WAM hydrology datasets to cover a longer period-of-analysis and (2) condensing WAM water right datasets to focus on a...

  4. Water Network Optimization with Wastewater Regeneration Models Linlin Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    by different industries. For example, the chemicals, petroleum refining, and metal sectors primarily use water-based decomposition algorithm in order to solve the resulting nonconvex Mixed-integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP

  5. Modelling of unidirectional thermal diffusers in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of the temperature field and velocity field induced by a unidirectional thermal diffuser in shallow water. A multiport thermal diffuser is essentially a pipe laid ...

  6. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    . Basin-wide impacts of water resources development projects and management strategies may be evaluated. The software package is generalized for application to any river/reservoir/use system, with input files being developed for the particular river basin...

  7. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling efforts, quantify the flux of groundwater nutrients to the lower Truckee River; 2. Using benchWater Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Ground- and Surface Water Exchange

  8. Coastal Dynamics 2013 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Coastal Dynamics 2013 1915 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES in coastal vegetated waters with short waves. The model adopts the 3-D phase-averaged shallow water flow mesh in the vertical direction. The flow model is coupled with a spectral wave deformation model called

  9. Two-state thermodynamics of the ST2 model for supercooled water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A., E-mail: anisimov@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Palmer, Jeremy C.; Debenedetti, Pablo G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Poole, Peter H. [Department of Physics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic properties of the ST2 model for supercooled liquid water exhibit anomalies similar to those observed in real water. A possible explanation of these anomalies is the existence of a metastable, liquidliquid transition terminated by a critical point. This phenomenon, whose possible existence in real water is the subject of much current experimental work, has been unambiguously demonstrated for this particular model by most recent simulations. In this work, we reproduce the anomalies of two versions of the ST2 model with an equation of state describing water as a non-ideal mixture of two different types of local molecular order. We show that the liquidliquid transition in the ST2 water is energy-driven. This is in contrast to another popular model, mW, in which non-ideality in mixing of two alternative local molecular orders is entropy-driven, and is not sufficiently strong to induce a liquidliquid transition.

  10. A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    on flow and salinity of the stream and the floodplains. The first part deals with water and salt balance in reservoirs. The primary purpose of the model is to predict outflow salinity from the reservoir storage and inflow information in advance... management strategy, yet the method to predict outflow salinity has not been adequately examined. The study reported here examined the water and salt balance in a reservoir using a two-layer model. This model assumes that inflow blends with the storage...

  11. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  12. Application of collision-based two dimensional Monte Carlo method in a simulated microscale ground water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Kiwhan

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the use of Monte Carlo method has been prevalent in nuclear engineering, it has yet to fully blossom in the study of solute transport in porous media. By using an etched-glass micromodel, an attempt is made to apply Monte Carlo method...

  13. Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, J.L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outdoor Temperature for District Heating Systems. ASHRAEAssessment of Buried District Heating Piping. ASHRAE

  14. Variable Infiltration Capacity model (VIC) is a macro-scale energy and water balance model with lake and wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkauer, Keith

    of surface storage in a low- gradient Arctic watershed, Water Resour. Res., 39(4), 1087, doi: 10.1029/2002WR (VIC) Cold Land Process Model Updates, Global and Planetary Change, 38, 151-159, 2003. Sathulur, K., L drainage, and expanding industrial and urban areas. The water table position usually acts as the dominant

  15. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  16. Modeling water uptake by a root system growing in a fixed soil volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrieu, J L Blengino; Tarzia, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water uptake by roots of plants is examined for an ideal situation, with an approximation that resembles plants growing in pots, meaning that the total soil volume is fixed. We propose a coupled water uptake-root growth model. A one-dimensional model for water flux and water uptake by a root system growing uniformly distributed in the soil is presented, and the Van Genuchten model for the transport of water in soil is used. The governing equations are represented by a moving boundary model for which the root length, as a function of time, is prescribed. The solution of the model is obtained by front-fixing and finite element methods. Model predictions for water uptake by a same plant growing in loam, silt and clay soils are obtained and compared. A sensitivity analysis to determine relative effects on water uptake when system parameters are changed is also presented and shows that the model and numerical method proposed are more sensitive to the root growth rate than to the rest of the parameters. This se...

  17. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  18. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  19. Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

  20. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced melt-water, film boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe the gas-sparging enhanced film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and an overlying water layer. The model accounts for thermal radiation across the vapor film, bulk liquid subcooling, interfacial area enhancement due to sparging gas, and melt entrainment into the overlying water layer. In this paper, the modeling approach is described, and a comparison with the lead-Freon 11 and lead-water film boiling experiment data of Greene is made. Predictions are then made for the case of film boiling over corium in the presence of sparging concrete decomposition gases. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Towards benchmarking an in-stream water quality model Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 623633, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . The project Benchmark Models for the Water Framework Directive (BMW, project website address http:// www.environment. This latter process is benchmarking. The BMW project considers models, primarily of water quality, categorised

  2. Theoretical and experimental bases for the dual-water model for interpretation of shaly sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavier, C.; Coates, G.; Dumanoir, J.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple petrophysical model proposed by Waxman and Smits (WS) in 1968 and Waxman and Thomas (WT) in 1972 accounts for the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of clays on the resistivity of shaly sands. This model has been well accepted by the industry despite a few inconsistencies with experimental results. It is proposed that these inconsistencies resulted from the unaccounted presence of salt-free water at the clay/water interface. Electrochemistry indicates that this water should exist, but is there enough to influence the results. Both a theoretical study and reinterpretation of Waxman-Smit-Thomas data show that there is. The corresponding new model starts from the Waxman and Smits concept of supplementing the water conductivity with a conductivity from the clay counterions. The crucial step, however, is equating each of these conductivity terms to a particular type of water, each occupying a representative volume of the total porosity. This approach has been named the ''dual-water'' (DW) model because of these two water types-the conductivity and volume fraction of each being predicted by the model. The DW concept is also supported by log data and has been successfully applied to the interpretation of thousands of wells. However, the scope of this paper remains limited to the theoretical and experimental bases of the DW model.

  3. On the transferability of three water models developed by adaptive force matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hongyi; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is perhaps the most simulated liquid. Recently three water models have been developed following the adaptive force matching (AFM) method that provides excellent predictions of water properties with only electronic structure information as a reference. Compared to many other electronic structure based force fields that rely on fairly sophisticated energy expressions, the AFM water models use point-charge based energy expressions that are supported by most popular molecular dynamics packages. An outstanding question regarding simple force fields is whether such force fields provide reasonable transferability outside of their conditions of parameterization. A survey of three AFM water models, B3LYPD-4F, BLYPSP-4F, and WAIL are provided for simulations under conditions ranging from the melting point up to the critical point. By including ice-Ih configurations in the training set, the WAIL potential predicts the melting temperate, TM, of ice-Ih correctly. Without training for ice, BLYPSP-4F underestimates TM...

  4. Three Models for Water ooding in a Naturally Fractured Petroleum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE MODELS FOR WATERFLOODING IN A NATURALLY. FRACTURED ... 1. Introduction. For the purposes of this paper a naturally fractured reservoir.

  5. MODEL INTEGRATION FOR ASSESSING FUTURE HYDROCLIMATE IMPACTS ON WATER RESOURCES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    and boron in the San Joaquin River High levels of salt and boron not only affect the water quality but also: San Joaquin Basin San Joaquin River, Millerton Lake Merced River, Exchequer Reservoir Tuolumne River, New Don Pedro Reservoir Stanislaus River, New Melones Reservoir SACRAMENTO BASIN DELTA Vernalis SAN

  6. Liberalization in the Water Sector: Three leading models.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the pervasive changes in other infrastructure sectors, one must note the remarkably slow pace of reform in the water sector. Moreover, the most systematic reforms until now have been implemented in developed . By reform, we mean substantial changes in decision rights, changes that modify the governance and in many

  7. Mechanistic Modelling of Water Vapour Condensation in Presence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    analysis of the water vapour condensation from the multicomponent mixture of condensable and noncondensable attention has been paid to the influence of the light gas and induced buoyancy forces on the condensation the multicomponent gas distribution and condensation heat transfer degradation are directly related

  8. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  9. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  10. Many Task Computing for Modeling the Fate of Oil Discharged from the Deep Water Horizon Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida and a 3D oil spill model. The ocean models used here resolve the Gulf at 2 km and the SouthMany Task Computing for Modeling the Fate of Oil Discharged from the Deep Water Horizon Well tons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In order to understand the fate and impact of the discharged

  11. Systematic Improvement of a Classical Molecular Model of Water Lee-Ping Wang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    -consistent polarizable model such as AMOEBA. The model is parameterized using ForceBalance, a systematic optimization calculations. We show that iAMOEBA is a highly accurate model for water in the solid, liquid, and gas phases properties beyond the training data set including the phase diagram. The increased accuracy of iAMOEBA over

  12. DYNAMIC MODEL OF AN INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMP USING WATER AS REFRIGERANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 DYNAMIC MODEL OF AN INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMP USING WATER AS REFRIGERANT CHAMOUN MARWAN to improve industrial energy efficiency, the development of a high temperature heat pump using water vapor as refrigerant is investigated. Technical problems restraining the feasibility of this industrial heat pump

  13. Development of pipe deterioration models for water distribution systems using EPR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Development of pipe deterioration models for water distribution systems using EPR L. Berardi, O of Exeter, North Park Road, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK The economic and social costs of pipe failures in water for critical pipes that balance investment with expected benefits in a risk-based management context

  14. A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer BOREAS - (the) BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study C - Carbon CABi A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land partitioning of energy, the evapotranspiration of water and if the land-surface is a sink or a source of CO2

  15. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff MeetingWater Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design fuel cell design and operation; Demonstrate improvements in water management resulting in improved

  16. Evaluation of the CRITERIA Irrigation Scheme Soil Water Balance Model in Texas Initial Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaiti, G.; Fipps, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CRITERIA model was created in the 1990s in Italy, and is based on the soil water balance computation procedures developed at the Wageningen University in the Netherlands in the 1980s. CRITERIA has been used as an analysis and regional water...

  17. Risk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    : Water quality; Risk; Monte Carlo; Sensitivity analysis; Eutrophication 1. Introduction 1.1. Motivation recognised in the development of some decision-support tools, for example, QUAL2E- UNCAS (Brown and BarnwellRisk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

  18. The Expanding Dairy Industry: Impact on Ground Water Quality and Quantity with Emphasis on Waste Management System Evaluation for Open Lot Dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Wolfe, Mary Leigh

    manner that is similar to practices in the desert Southwest. Typical animal spacings in open lots are 56 m2 (600 square feet) pa cow. Large amounts of water are used for manure removal and milk sanitation, resulting in significant volumes of process...

  19. Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress, i.e. , the ground water storage [Toomey et al. ,and longer time scales, as ground water storage multidecadal

  20. Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but they have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. Their proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water. They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100--210% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80 % of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

  1. Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but the authors have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. The authors proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water (Table 1). They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100 \\261 10% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80% of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

  2. Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy experiments?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, United States b Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States c Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Received

  3. EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4 Availability | Version 4.4h | SWMM5 and other best management practices (BMPs). Version 4.3 (May 1994) contains corrections and enhancements

  4. Deterministic and stochastic modeling of the water entry and descent of three-dimensional cylindrical bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lynn)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective physics-based model has been developed that is capable of reliably predicting the motion of a three-dimensional mine-shaped object impacting the water surface from air and subsequently dropping through the ...

  5. Model studies to investigate the effects of fixed streamlines on water flooding performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Axel Venton

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODEL STUDIES TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTS OF FIXED STREAMLINES ON WATER FLOODING PERFORMANCE A Thesis by Axel Venton Green Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  6. Green Water Flow Kinematics and Impact Pressure on a Three Dimensional Model Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariyarathne, Hanchapola Appuhamilage Kusalika Suranjani

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow kinematics of green water due to plunging breaking waves interacting with a simplified, three-dimensional model structure was investigated in laboratory. Two breaking wave conditions were tested: one with waves impinging and breaking...

  7. Incorporating and Evaluating Environmental Instream Flows in a Priority Order Based Surface Water Allocation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, Mark

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-objective optimization model to characterize the tradeoffs between water supply shortages and fish 10 population capacity in a stream on the west-slope of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Harman and Stewardson (2005) evaluated a range...

  8. Modeling and mapping of MaeLa refugee camp water supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Navid

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and use of a model, using the EPANET computer code, to simulate the three-hour intermittent MaeLa refugee camp water supply. In coordination with Aide Medicale Internationale, a field ...

  9. Price and Non-Price Influences on Water Conservation: An Econometric Model of Aggregate Demand under Nonlinear Budget Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corral, Leonardo; Fisher, Anthony C.; Hatch, Nile W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    declining-block tarrifs: An econometric study using micro-ON WATER CONSERVATION: ECONOMETRIC AN MODEL OF AGGREGATEWater Conservation: An Econometric Model of Aggregate Demand

  10. Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and GLDAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed, Tajdarul H; Famiglietti, James S; Rodell, Matthew; Chen, Jianli; Wilson, Clark R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in theand ground- water stores, so that we were unable to quantify their potentially considerable contributions to storage

  11. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

  12. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Programming Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRAP interface program was developed as a Fortran QuickWin application. SIM simulates the river/reservoir water allocation/management/use system for input sequences of monthly naturalized flows and net evaporation rates. (Chapter 2) SIMD (D for daily... management, and other utility functions. Many different Fortran compiler/IDE packages are sold by various companies. The WRAP programs are in standard Fortran that can be compiled with the various compilers. The compiler, linker, and development...

  13. Preliminary Modeling, Testing, and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's gas tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional gas storage tank water heaters, but savings depends on the draw pattern. A one-node model incorporating heat exchanger mass is used to address this and other issues. Key model parameters are determined from least-squares regression on short-term data, including burner efficiency, thermal capacitance, and thermal loss coefficient. The calibrated model agrees with data to ~5% on Qgas, with temperature RMS deviation of ~4..deg..C. Efficiency with a standard realistic draw is 71%, compared to 81% predicted from standard energy-factors. Adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater solves issues of oscillations with solar pre-heat, low-flow and hot-water-delay issues. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal data protocols for model parameter extraction.

  14. Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.; Christensen, C.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes NREL's development of a HPWH model for use in hourly building energy simulation programs, such as BEopt; this presentation was given at the Building America Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  15. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site: Second interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Haug, A.; Kelley, V.A.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site in southeastern New Mexico. The study resulted in an estimation of the transmissivity distrubution, hydraulic potentials, flow field, and fluid densities in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT-II was employed for the numerical modeling, using variable-fluid-density and a single-porosity formulation. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the WIPP controlled zone (Zone 3). The work performed consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra using two approaches: (1) steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution, i.e., of the situation before sinking if the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981; and (2) superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic responses to excavation of the three WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. Boundary conditions (prescribed constant fluid pressures and densities) were estimated using hydraulic-head and fluid-density data obtained from about 40 wells at and near the WIPP site. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 107 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation of Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation Janet Lyons Organized by the Automotive Research Center Sponsored by U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC

  17. Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation of Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation by the Automotive Research Center Sponsored by U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) National Automotive Center

  18. Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

  19. Presented at: 2000 Conference on Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling (Feb 24-25, Toronto, Ontario). Published in: Models and Applications to Urban Water Systems, Monograph 9. Edited by William James, CHI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    1 Presented at: 2000 Conference on Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling (Feb 24-25, Toronto, Ontario). Published in: Models and Applications to Urban Water Systems, Monograph 9. Edited by William organic and metallic toxicants in urban storm-induced discharges that can contribute to receiving water

  20. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

  1. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Rehfeldt

    2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for groundwater management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model and provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral groundwater flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment (TSPA).

  2. Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado Martn, Anna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

  3. A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mnster, Westflische Wilhelms-Universitt

    A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

  4. A General Method for Conserving Energy and Potential Enstrophy in Shallow-Water Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salmon, Rick

    A General Method for Conserving Energy and Potential Enstrophy in Shallow-Water Models RICK SALMON numerical models that conserve analogs of the energy and potential enstrophy; one need only discretize, in the inviscid limit, conserve energy and an arbitrary ad- ditional invariant related to the potential vorticity

  5. A perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    In a limited-area numerical weather prediction model, the lateral boundaries are not physical boundaries interest since the early days of numerical weather prediction. Several good reviews are availableA perfectly matched layer formulation for the nonlinear shallow water equations models: The split

  6. Agricultural Water Management xxx (2003) xxxxxx A GIS-based model to estimate the regionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and landscape features that affect patterns in water available to plants, soil drainage, and aeration (Jaynes. Recent advances in GIS technology fa- cilitate the seamless integration of GIS and computer-based modeling. Multiple approaches exist to integrate GIS and hydrological models (Maidment, 1993; Abel et al

  7. An improved simple polarisable water model for use in biomolecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmann, Stephan J.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van, E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zrich, CH-8093 Zrich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy of biomolecular simulations depends to some degree on the accuracy of the water model used to solvate the biomolecules. Because many biomolecules such as proteins are electrostatically rather inhomogeneous, containing apolar, polar, and charged moieties or side chains, a water model should be able to represent the polarisation response to a local electrostatic field, while being compatible with the force field used to model the biomolecules or protein. The two polarisable water models, COS/G2 and COS/D, that are compatible with the GROMOS biomolecular force fields leave room for improvement. The COS/G2 model has a slightly too large dielectric permittivity and the COS/D model displays a much too slow dynamics. The proposed COS/D2 model has four interaction sites: only one Lennard-Jones interaction site, the oxygen atom, and three permanent charge sites, the two hydrogens, and one massless off-atom site that also serves as charge-on-spring (COS) polarisable site with a damped or sub-linear dependence of the induced dipole on the electric field strength for large values of the latter. These properties make it a cheap and yet realistic water model for biomolecular solvation.

  8. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  9. The Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters Probed by Raman Spectroscopy, NMR and Structural Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    of water in different states, e.g., bulk water, water clusters, aqueous solutions of ions or organicThe Structure of Water in Crystalline Aluminophosphates: Isolated Water and Intermolecular Clusters are used to elucidate the properties of water in Metavariscite, AlPO4-H3, AlPO4-8 and VPI-5. The framework

  10. Workshop on Hydrologic Modeling with SWAT and Groundwater Modeling with MODFLOW (26-27 December 2014) International Conference on Modeling Tools for Sustainable Water Resources Management (28-29 December 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014) International Conference on Modeling Tools for Sustainable Water Resources Management (28 for hydrologic data analysis, pre / post processing, and hydrologic modeling Water Resources Management Water application of SWAT model for water manage- ment Prof. Upmanu Lall Columbia University, USA Prof. A.K. Gosain

  11. Using Simulation Models for District Chilled Water Distribution Systems Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the design. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how the using of the computerized simulation model can give the engineer the ability to explore many more alternative design scenarios and to identify more cost-effective and robust designs. The University...

  12. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  13. Predaceous Ground Beetles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Predaceous Ground Beetles Caterpillar Hunters and Bombardier Beetles Rick Minzenmayer, Extension Agent-IPM Chris Sansone, Extension Entomologist Texas Cooperative Extension genus Calosoma, a brightly colored ground beetle. Some species are called...

  14. Liquid polymorphism, order-disorder transitions and anomalous a Monte Carlo study of the Bell-Lavis model for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    the lack of consensus concerning the origin of water-like anomalies, it is widely believed of the Bell-Lavis model for water Carlos E. Fiore Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Paran for liquid water is investigated through numerical simulations. The lattice- gas model on a triangular

  15. Technical Note/ Improved Water Table Dynamics in MODFLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    series of ground water simulation codes, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, is possi- bly the most storage as well as the physical dimensions of the sat- urated region. The change in storage is modeled of the cell. While the change in storage occurs at the water table, the influence is applied to the entire

  16. Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients: 8 ounces egg noodles, uncooked 1 pound ground turkey 1 onion. Meanwhile, brown ground turkey and onions in non stick skillet until meat is no longer pink and onions cup of egg noodles on plate, top with 1/2 cup of turkey mixture. Equipment: Knife Cutting board

  17. Preliminary Modeling, Testing and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Thornton, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional storage-tank water heaters, because thermal losses to the environment are much less. Although standard test results are available to compare tankless heaters with storage tank heaters, actual savings depend on the draw details because energy to heat up the internal mass depends on the time since the last draw. To allow accurate efficiency estimates under any assumed draw pattern, a one-node model with heat exchanger mass is posed here. Key model parameters were determined from test data. Burner efficiency showed inconsistency between the two data sets analyzed. Model calculations show that efficiency with a realistic draw pattern is {approx}8% lower than that resulting from using only large {approx}40 liter draws, as specified in standard water-heater tests. The model is also used to indicate that adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater ameliorates unacceptable oscillations that tankless with feedback control can experience with pre-heated water too hot for the minimum burner setting. The added tank also eliminates problematic low-flow cut-out and hot-water-delay, but it will slightly decrease efficiency. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal protocols for parameter extraction.

  18. Conceptual design of a regional water quality screening model. [RFF; Reach; HANFORD; ARQUAL; SEAS; NASQUAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water quality assessment methodology is intended to predict concentrations at future times and to estimate the impacts on water quality of energy-related activities (including industrial boilers). Estimates of impacts on water quality at future times are based on incremental changes in pollutant inputs to the body water. Important features of the model are: use of measured concentrations to account for existing conditions; consideration of incremental changes in pollutant loads; emphasis on the energy sector and industrial boilers; analysis restricted to streams only; no attempt to fully account for pollutant behavior; and flexible design, so that future improvements can be incorporated. The basic approach is very similar to the one used by Argonne's ARQUAL model but will allow more complex pollutant behavior and more flexibility in use. (PSB)

  19. A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

  20. Modeling the heating of the Green Energy Lab in Shanghai by the geothermal heat pump combined with the solar thermal energy and ground energy storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Candice Yau May

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This work involves the study of heating systems that combine solar collectors, geothermal heat pumps and thermal energy storage in the ground. Solar collectors (more)