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1

Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Geologic Map of Site Area ........................................................................................................ E1.O Stream Flow Measurements ...................................................................................................... E2.0 Estimates of Ground Water Flow .............................................................................................. E3.0 .......................................... MODFLOW Flow Budget Analysis for OU 1 1 1 Model Subregions E4.0 ............................................................................ Burro Canyon Aquifer Ground Water Model E5.0 This page intentionally left blank

2

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow almost always involves some sort (Yeh 1986; Poeter and Hill 1997; Hill et al. 1998). Other data beside hydraulic head have been used in calibration of ground water models, including rates of ground water exchange with streams and other surface

Saiers, James

3

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

4

Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and are not required by MODPATH or MT3D. 3.6.4 Flow Model Calibration The IRA Work Plan states that the model would be calibrated using October 2002 water levels. However,...

5

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Probability Models for Annual Extreme Water-Equivalent Ground Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of annual extreme water-equivalents of ground snow (reported as inches of water) measured up through the winter of 1979–80 at 76 weather stations in the northeast quadrant of the United States is presented. The analysis ...

Bruce Ellingwood; Robert K. Redfield

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Computer simulation models relevant to ground water contamination from EOR or other fluids - state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect

Ground water contamination is a serious national problem. The use of computers to simulate the behavior of fluids in the subsurface has proliferated extensively over the last decade. Numerical models are being used to solve water supply problems, various kinds of enertgy production problems, and ground water contamination problems. Modeling techniques have progressed to the point that their accuracy is only limited by the modeller's ability to describe the reservoir in question and the heterogeneities therein. Pursuant to the Task and Milestone Update of Project BE3A, this report summarizes the state of the art of computer simulation models relevant to contamination of ground water by enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemicals and/or waste fluids. 150 refs., 6 tabs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

12

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

13

Colorado Ground Water Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Ground Water Commission Place Colorado Website http:water.state.co.usgroun References Colorado Ground Water Commission...

14

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Length Design for Ground Source Heat Pumps. ” InternationalClosed-Loop/Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems Installationon Closed-Loop Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems. ” ASHRAE

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ground water protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

18

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

20

Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designated Ground Water Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Designated Ground Water Basin Map Details Activities (0) Areas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle,...

22

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

23

Water budget for SRP burial ground area  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide migration from the SRP burial ground for solid low-level waste has been studied extensively. Most of the buried radionuclides are fixed on the soil and show negligible movement. The major exception is tritium, which when leached from the waste by percolating rainfall, forms tritiated water and moves with the groundwater. The presence of tritium has been useful in tracing groundwater flow paths to outcrop. A subsurface tritium plume moving from the southwest corner of the burial ground toward an outcrop near Four Mile Creek has been defined. Groundwater movement is so slow that much of the tritium decays before reaching the outcrop. The burial ground tritium plume defined to date is virtually all in the uppermost sediment layer, the Barnwell Formation. The purpose of the study reported in this memorandum was to investigate the hypothesis that deeper flow paths, capable of carrying substantial amounts of tritium, may exist in the vicinity of the burial ground. As a first step in seeking deeper flow paths, a water budget was constructed for the burial ground site. The water budget, a materials balance used by hydrologists, is expressed in annual area inches of rainfall. Components of the water budget for the burial ground area were analyzed to determine whether significant flow paths may exist below the tan clay. Mean annual precipitation was estimated as 47 inches, with evapotranspiration, run-off, and groundwater recharge estimated as 30, 2, and 15 inches, respectively. These estimates, when combined with groundwater discharge data, suggest that 5 inches of the groundwater recharge flow above the tan clay and that 10 inches flow below the tan clay. Therefore, two-thirds of the groundwater recharge appears to follow flow paths that are deeper than those previously found. 13 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

Hubbard, J.E.; Emslie, R.H.

1984-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ground water work breakdown structure dictionary  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the activities that are necessary to assess in ground water remediation as specified in the UMTRA Project. These activities include the following: site characterization; remedial action compliance and design documentation; environment, health, and safety program; technology assessment; property access and acquisition activities; site remedial actions; long term surveillance and licensing; and technical and management support.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Stream Discharge Measurements, Ground Water Level Data, and Ground Water Well Hydrographs This page intentionally left blank Contents Section .................................................................................. Surface Water Time-Concentration Plots D1.O ............................................................................................... Stream Discharge Measurements D2.0 ............................................................. Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots for Uranium D3.0 .......................................................................................................... Ground Water Level Data D4.0 ..............................................................................................

27

Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water (Indiana) Ground Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting

28

Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality Surface and Ground Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQualitySurfaceandGround&oldid612197...

29

U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWMON 1.12-1 GWMON 1.12-1 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan for the Land Farm Pilot Test Monument Valley, Arizona August 2000 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Ofice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-5 1 1-001 5-21-000 Document Number U0106701 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0106701 Contents Contents 1.0 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Pilot-Test Extraction Wellfield 2 4.0 Water Elevation Measurements and Monitoring ............... 4

30

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

31

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City,...

32

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called

33

Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution  

SciTech Connect

The problem of trying to remove ground-water pollution by pumping and treating are pointed out. Various Superfund sites are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many chemicals have been discarded in an undocumented manner, and their place in the groundwater is not known. Results of a remedial program to remove perchloroethylene at a concentration of 6132 parts per billion from groundwater in a site in New Jersey showed that with an average extraction rate of 300 gallons per minute from 1978 to 1984 contamination level was lowered below 100 parts per billion. However, after shutdown of pumping the level rose to 12,588 parts per billion in 1988. These results lead the author to propose that the practical solutions for water supplies may be treatment at the time it enters the system for use.

Abelson, P.H.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ground water hydrology report: Revision 1, Attachment 3. Final  

SciTech Connect

This report presents ground water hydrogeologic activities for the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. The Department of Energy has characterized the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the site and determined that the proposed remedial action would comply with the requirements of the EPA ground water protection standards.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling reducibility on ground terms using constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling reducibility on ground terms using constraints Isabelle GNAEDIGa , H´el`ene KIRCHNERb a on ground terms using (dis)equational constraints. We show in particular that innermost (ir)reducibility can on the ground term algebra that any rewriting chain starting from any term termi- nates, provided that terms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003  

SciTech Connect

Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

38

Modeling and Experimental Research on Ground-Source Heat Pump in Operation by Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source Heat Pump(GSHP) is becoming the more and more focus of the world¡¯s attention as a HVAC technique of energy saving and environment protection. This paper first introduced the experiment for Ground-Source water/water Heat Pump. The heat ... Keywords: Ground-Source Heat Pump(GSHP), Neural Network(NN) Predication modeling

Jianping Chen; Zhiwei Lian; Lizheng Tan; Weifeng Zhu; Weiqiang Zhang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Earthquake ground motion modeling on parallel computers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and discuss the performance of a parallel elastic wave propagation simulator that is being used to model and study earthquake-induced ground motion in large sedimentary basins. The components of the system include mesh generators, ...

Hesheng Bao; Jacobo Bielak; Omar Ghattas; Loukas F. Kallivokas; David R. O'Hallaron; Jonathan R. Shewchuk; Jifeng Xu

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality monitoring, notification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive

42

DOE/EA-1268: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site December 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office...

43

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook,...

44

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations Ignasi in forthcoming publications. Keywords-grounding analysis; earthing analysis, underground substations; I to a river (at substations next to hydroelectric dams), or the grounding system of a buried electrical

Colominas, Ignasi

45

Ground motion data for International Collider models  

SciTech Connect

The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ground Motion Model of the SLAC Site ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motion p(?, L) can be written as p(?, L) = p(?)2(1 ? c(?, L)) which in turn can be transformed into P(?, k) [9]. We present a ground motion model for the SLAC site. This Measurements [2, 6] show that the fast motion in a rea-model is based on recent ground motion studies performed sonably quiet site consists primarily of elastic waves prop-at SLAC as well as on historical data. The model includes agating with a high velocity v (of the order of km/s). wave-like, diffusive and systematic types of motion. An The correlation is then completely defined by this velocity attempt is made to relate measurable secondary properties (which may be a function of frequency) and by the distri-of the ground motion with more basic characteristics such bution of the noise sources. In the case where the waves as the layered geological structure of the surrounding earth, propagate on the surface and are distributed uniformly in depth of the tunnel, etc. This model is an essential step in azimuthal angle, the correlation is given by c(?, L) = evaluating sites for a future linear collider. ?cos(?L/v cos(?))?? = J0(?L/v) and the corresponding 2-D spectrum of the ground motion is P(?, k) = 2p(?) / ? (?/v(f)) 2 ? k2, |k | ? ?/v(f). The absolute power spectrum of the fast motion, assumed for the SLAC model, corresponds to measurements performed at 2 AM in one of the quietest locations at SLAC, sector 10 of the linac [2], (see Fig.1). The spatial properties are defined by the phase velocity found from correlation measurements v(f) = 450 + 1900 exp(?f/2) (with v in m/s, f in Hz) [2]. 1

Andrei Seryi; Tor Raubenheimer

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

49

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

50

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach to focus on ground water systems that are susceptible to fecal contamination, and requires ground water systems that are at risk of fecal contamination to take corrective action. A minor correction to the final Rule was published on November 21, 2006 (71 FR 67427). The GWR applies to all PWSs2 that use ground water

51

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

55

GROUND WATER PROTECTION ISSUES WITH GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Closed loop vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps are grouted to facilitate heat transfer and prevent ground water contamination. The grout must exhibit suitable thermal conductivity as well as adequate hydraulic sealing characteristics. Permeability and infiltration tests were performed to assess the ability of cementitious grout to control vertical seepage in boreholes. It was determined that a superplasticized cement-sand grout is a more effective borehole sealant than neat cement over a range of likely operational temperatures. The feasibility of using non-destructive methods to verify bonding in heat exchangers is reviewed.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Calibration and validation of a distributed energy water balance model using satellite data of land surface temperature and ground discharge measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed hydrological models of energy and mass balance need as inputs many soil and vegetation parameters, which are usually difficult to define. This paper will try to approach this problem by performing a pixel to pixel calibration procedure ...

Chiara Corbari; Marco Mancini

58

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

GRR/Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Water Quality Control Act 5 CCR 1002-61 Colorado Discharge Permit System 5 CCR 1002-41 Basic Standards for Ground Water 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

60

GRR/Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies NAC 534.444 Waiver to use water to explore for oil, gas or geothermal resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Division of Water Resources (NDWR) may grant a waiver of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill 5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill Tailings Site by using the selected alternative stated in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 1, 1997 EA-1155: Final Environmental Assessment Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site,

62

Modeling 18° Water Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of 18° Water formation is investigated with an isopycnic-coordinate model of the North Atlantic. A 30-year spinup integration is used as a “control” experiment in which the upper water column in the Sargasso Sea is shown to be in ...

Robert Marsh; Adrian L. New

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

64

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

GRR/Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19COIDeterminationOfNontributaryGroundWaterStatus.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 CRS 37-90-137 Permits to Construct Wells Outside of Designated Basins CRS 37-90-103 Underground Water Definitions CRS 37-82-101 Waters of Natural Surface Streams Subject to Appropriation CRS 37-92-102 Legislative Declaration - Basic Tenets of Colorado Water Law Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

66

Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System Simulation Using Visual Modeling Tool For Hvacsim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems incorporate both ground loop heat exchangers and supplemental heat rejecters, such as cooling towers, cooling ponds, or pavement heating systems. HVACSIM+ capabilities have recently been extended by the addition of ground loop heat exchanger models, water-to-water and waterto-air heat pump models, pavement heating system models, and heat rejection pond models. New component models are discussed and a hybrid ground source heat pump system with heated pavement as a supplemental cooler is simulated using the visual modeling tool. First, though, an introduction to a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+ is given. The user interface that originally came with the program could not be characterized as user-friendly. The new graphical interface allows users to develop system models by hooking components together. Provisions for controlling the simulation, setting the component parameters, editing the boundary file, and plotting the output are also included.

M. H. Khan; A. Varanasi; J. D. Spitler; D. E. Fisher; R. D. Delahoussaye

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

68

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

69

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

70

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the research and development work done until now in earthing analysis is devoted to cases where the soil can be modelled in terms of an homogeneous and isotropic semi-infinite continuous medium, being the soil resistivity an order of magnitude ... Keywords: grounding analysis, earthing analysis, underground substations

Ignasi Colominas; Jose Paris; Xesus Nogueira; Fermin Navarrina; Manuel Casteleiro

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ground-Based FSSP and PVM Measurements of Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently published ground-based measurements of liquid water content (LWC) measured in fogs by two microphysical instruments, the FSSP-100 and PVM-100, are evaluated. These publications had suggested that the PVM-100 underestimated LWC ...

H. Gerber; Glendon Frick; Alfred R. Rodi

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

78

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.8 (Rule 8) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Pits are used in drilling operations to contain drilling related fluids and

79

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations...........................................................................................................v Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

80

The ground state of the Kondo model with large spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we prove that the ground state of the Kondo model with large spin is nondegenerate, apart from a SU(2) spin degeneracy in the case of half filling. The ground state spin is found for the system, and the energy level orderings are discussed. Finally, the existence of ferrimagnetism in some cases is proved. PACS numbers: 75.10.Lp 75.30.Mb, 75.50.Gg The Kondo models, or single and lattice impurity models, are one of the most challenging subjects in strongly correlated systems 1–3. Recent developments of reflection positivity technique in the spin space make it possible to establish some rigorous results for the half-filled strongly correlated electron systems 4–9. Theory of reflection positivity in the spin space for the single- and multi-channel Kondo models with spin 1/2 was developed recently and a series of rigorous results on the ground state properties were proved 8,9. However some materials are described by the Kondo models with large spin, such as (La1?xXx)MnO3 with X = Ba, Ca, Sr etc. and the localised spin s = 3/2 10. Due to more degrees of freedom in the case of large spin than in the case of spin 1/2, usually it is very hard to extract rigorous results for those systems. As a generalisation of the theory for the Kondo model with spin 1/2, we will investigate the Kondo model with large spin and provide some rigorous results on the ground state of the Kondo model in the case of half filling. Let us first write down the Hamiltonian we will investigate:

Shun-qing Shen; Jisi Sci; Kijsi Sj

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1981, 299 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radionuclide chemical contaminants. This report is one of a series prepared annually to document and evaluate the status of ground water at the Hanford Site. Two substances, tritium and nonradioactive nitrate, are easily transported in ground water; therefore, these substances are used as primary tracers to monitor the movement of contaminated ground water. Data collected during 1981 describe the movement of tritium and the nonradioactive nitrate plumes as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay. The gross beta (/sup 106/Ru) levels have become so low that it will no longer be considered a major radionuclide contaminant. The tritium plume continues to show increasing concentrations near the Columbia River. While it is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, its contribution to the river has not been distinguished from other sources at this time. This plume shows much the same configuration as in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980. The size of the nitrate plume appears stable. Concentrations of nitrate in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continue to be high as a result of past leaks from the evaporation facility. The overall quality of the ground water at the Hanford Site is generally comparable to that of other ground waters in eastern Washington. Any exceptions to this statement will be noted in this report.

Eddy, P.A.; Cline, C.S.; Prater, L.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical or horizontal ground-coupling, an open groundwater loop, or a surface water loop. This paper discusses system performance characteristics, component selection procedures presently being used, improvements currently being considered and future possibilities for improved efficiency and reliability. Optimum designs require proper matching of the heat pump unit to the water circulation system, the building space heating/cooling load and water heating requirements. General trends resulting from system and component choices will be discussed. Water heating methods with these heat pumps will be considered.

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R317-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates discharges

85

Infiltration/ground water linkage in the southwest: Response of shallow ground water to interannual variations of precipitation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic gradients, residence times and the hydrochemistry of shallow ground water are linked to the episodic precipitation and recharge events characteristic of the arid southwest. In this region, the amount of precipitation, and corresponding biomass, is dependant upon altitude with greater frequency and duration in the montane highlands and less in the desert lowlands. Results from a four-year study at the Rio Calaveras research site in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico show a strong correlation between the physical and hydrochemical properties of shallow ground water and variations of seasonal precipitation and infiltration. For example, the water table shows a dramatic response to snowmelt infiltration during years of abundant snow pack (El Nifio) and diminished response during years of reduced snow pack (La Niiia). The chemical structure of shallow ground water is also affected by the precipitation regime, primarily by variations in the flux of reductants (organic carbon) and oxidants (dissolved oxygen) from the vadose zone to the water table. Generally, oxic conditions persist during spring snowmelt infiltration shifting to anoxic conditions as biotic and abiotic processes transform dissolved oxygen. Other redox-sensitive constituents (ferrous iron, manganese, sulfate, nitrate, and nitrite) show increasing and decreasing concentrations as redox fluctuates seasonally and year-to-year. The cycling of these redox sensitive solutes in the subsurface depends upon the character of the aquifer materials, the biomass at the surface, moisture and temperature regime of the vadose zone, and frequency of infiltration events.

Groffman, A. R. (Armand R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Assessment of Water Balance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generating plants perform water balance studies for a variety of reasons, and they use a range of different modeling approaches and tools to accomplish their specific objectives. This EPRI report presents the results of a project conducted with the objective of providing the industry and the interested public with an assessment of the value of water balance models to conserve and manage water. The report provides an overview of the state-of-the-art water balance models and identifies ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

WATER DIVERSION MODEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS M&O 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity to volumetric moisture content. The van Genuchten curve fit parameters were determined from a least squares fit to the measured Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA) data for Overton Sand backfill and the crushed tuff invert. These constitutive properties are direct inputs to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated saturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) codes and characterize the constitutive properties for these materials within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Models are currently being developed for pitting and general corrosion of the drip shield. This AMR develops flow analysis methods (Section 6.2.4) to bound the diversion performance of the drip shield at different stages of degradation by corrosion. Further, this report also develops flow analysis methods for the conceptual model under the assumption of negligible corrosion of the drip shield (Section 5.12) as indicated by design studies (TBV-3808). The conceptual model can be used to bound the diversion performance of the drip shield. In addition, this report provides a simple bounding calculation for assessing flow through apertures within the drip shield (Section 5.4 to 5.8). The bounding calculation uses several assumptions (Sections 5.4 to 5.8). The flow relationship presented in Section 6.2.5 can be used in conjunction with a NUFT analysis of moisture potential around the DS to bound the flow through the drip shield. As an alternative to performing NUFT calculations to assess the partitioning of flow, an analysis approach based upon a closed-form analytical solution at isothermal temperature is developed in Section 6.3.

J.B. Case

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of dispersion modeling by State Air Pollution hics. Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAS) is increasing. Dispersion modeling provides a quick and efficient means of determining the downwind impact of pollutant release from a source. The SAPRAS are charged with the task of insuring that public exposure levels of these pollutants are less than the standards set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Estimating the concentration of pollutant at some distance downwind, in most cases the property line, allows that SAPRAS to determine whether or not a source needs to install additional means of control in order to decrease the rate of pollutant release. One set of models approved for regulatory use by the US EPA is Industrial Source Complex (ISC). ISC includes SCREEN: which is a simple screening model with imbedded meteorological data, and ST3 which is a more refined model requiring meteorological data to be provided. ISC models are based on the concept of Gaussian dispersion. The concentration determined using the ISC models are a result of determining concentrations based on a single wind speed and direction for a one hour time period. The first step in the formulation of a new model was to incorporate smaller time periods into the concentration predictions, in order to account for variation or wind speed and direction within an hour period. For ground-level sources, the vertical distribution involves mathematically dispersing the pollutant underground, then reflecting it back up. The next step taken in the new model development was the incorporation of a triangular distribution in the Medical plane. The triangular distribution is entirely above ground. Once the new model was formulated, a sample modeling procedure was performed in order to compare the behavior of the new model as compared to ISC ST3. Examination of the characteristics of the two models, the meteorological data, and the output from the modeling procedures allows the comparison and contrast of the behavioral characteristics of the two models.

Fritz, Bradley Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites AGENCY: U.S. DEP.4RTMENT OF ENERGY ACTIOK: FL&-DING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP-ACT (FONSI) SU$IM$RY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement ground lvater compliance strategies for two Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTR.4) Project sites near Slick Rock. Colorado. The purpose of the strategies is to comply with U.S. En\.ironmental Protection .Qency (EP.Aj ground n'ater standards defined in Title 40 Codr ~fF~d~w/ iieplutio?r.s (CFR) Part 192. and in so doing. protect human health and the en\.ironment. Ground water at the Slick Rock sites is contaminated with residual radioactive materials from hisTorica acti\,ities, associated with the processin of uranium ore, The planned action (~formeri>,.

90

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE August 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis A sheep’s foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. A sheep's foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. Moab, UT MILL TAILINGS REMOVAL Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast Utah, as a legacy to the former ore-processing site that operated for nearly three decades beginning in the mid-1950s. That is until April 2009, when the U.S. Department of Energy began moving the tailings by rail to an engineered disposal cell constructed 30 miles north near Crescent Junction, Utah. The mill tailings,

91

Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2000-177-TAR GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-12-000 Document Number U0066302 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0066302 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado

92

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

93

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations. 2 I.

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effects of uranium mining of ground water in Ambrosia Lake area, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal ore-bearing zone in the Ambrosia Lake area of the Grants uranium district is the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). This unit is also one of the major artesian aquifers in the region. Significant declines in the potentiometric lead within the aquifer have been recorded, although cones of depression do not appear to have spread laterally more than a few miles. Loss of potentiometric head in the Westwater Canyon Member has resulted in the interformational migration of ground water along fault zones from overlying aquifers of Cretaceous age. This migration has produced local deterioration in chemical quality of the ground water.

Kelly, T.E.; Link, R.L.; Schipper, M.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

N /A

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which will provide industry with information necessary to respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident, dated March 12, 2012. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the EPRI (2004, 2006)...

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which developed an updated GMM for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) for use by licensees of nuclear generating plants to respond to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soil and ground water  

SciTech Connect

This program systematically evaluates the use of acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to increase fluid and contaminant extraction rates from a wide range of unconsolidated soils. Successful completion of this program will result in a commercially-viable, advanced in-situ remediation technology that will significantly reduce clean-up times and costs. This technology should have wide applicability since it is envisioned to augment existing remediation technologies, such as traditional pump and treat and soil vapor extraction, not replace them. The overall program has three phases: Phase 1--laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase 2--technology scaling study; Phase 3--field demonstration. Phase 1 of the program, corresponding to this period of performance, has as its primary objectives to provide a laboratory-scale proof of concept, and to fully characterize the effects of AEFs on fluid and contaminant extraction rates in a wide variety of soil types. The laboratory measurements of the soil transport properties and process parameters will be used in a computer model of the enhanced remediation process. A Technology Merit and Trade Study will complete Phase 1.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Rynne, T.M.; Spencer, J.W. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, oils, cleaners, batteries, pesticides and wood preservatives are commonly used in households and on farms, but they can be hazardous to ground water if handled improperly. This publication explains proper methods of using, storing and disposing of hazardous materials.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ground vibration model studies for APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

An analytical ground vibration model is developed for study of the vibration effects on the beam motion in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The different physical parameters associated with the wave characteristics and the vibration modes needed for the study are taken from the vibration studies carried out at the APS site. The implementation has been carried out using Mathematica{trademark}. The study is carried out for the frequency range 1--35 Hz, with a number of sources changing from one through ten. The program written in Mathematica{trademark}, calculates orbit distortion, beta wave change, tune change, dispersion change, and chromaticity change. However, the main parameter studied for the APS storage ring has been the orbit distortion. The merit factor associated with different modes excited by the vibrations has been calculated.

Koul, R.K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Thermal Discharge Retrievals with Ground Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at a mid-latitude cold-water site along the Atlantic coast near Plymouth, MA. In contrast to the relative uniformity of the sea-surface temperature in the open ocean the water temperature near Pilgrim exhibits strong spatial gradients and temporal variability. This made it critical that all images be accurately registered in order to extract temperature values at the six buoy locations. Sixteen images during a one-year period from August 2000 to July 2001 were selected for the study. The RMS error of Pilgrim water temperature is about 3.5 C for the 4 buoys located in open water. The RMS error of the combined temperatures from 3 of the open-water buoys is 2.8 C. The RMS error includes errors in the ground truth. The magnitude of this error is estimated to range between 0.8 and 2.3 C. The two main components of this error are warm-layer effect and spatial variability. The actual error in the MTI retrievals for Pilgrim daytime conditions is estimated to be between 2.7 and 3.4 C for individual buoys and between 1.7 and 2.7 C for the combined open-water buoys.

Kurzeja, R.J.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 8): Libby Ground Water Contamination Site, Libby, Montana, September 1986. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned wood-treating operations on the mill property are the source of ground-water contamination at the Libby Ground Water Contamination site in the northwest corner of Montana. In 1979, shortly after installation of private wells, some homeowners detected the presence of a creosote odor, and EPA monitoring in 1981 confirmed ground-water contamination. Based on 1984 well sample results, Champion International Corporation implemented the Buy Water Plan. Under this program, individuals with contaminated ground water wells agree to cease using their wells and use water from the public water system operated by the City of Libby. The program, indefinite in term, would be terminated upon the elimination of the threat of contamination, if the well owner provides a written termination notice, or if other alternatives become available. The primary contaminants of concern include: VOCs, PAHs, PCP, organics, inorganics, heavy metals, and creosote. Selected remedies are proposed and included in the report.

Not Available

1986-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

An update on the SRP burial ground area water balance and hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the burial ground area prepared by Hubbard and Emslie concluded that about 15 inches, almost one-third of the average annual precipitation, normally infiltrates the land surface and recharges the groundwater. Also, evapotranspiration was estimated to average 30 inches annually, and runoff from the land surface was estimated as 1 to 3 inches. More information has become available recently from lysimeter studies, climatic stations, groundwater studies, and stream discharge measurements. These additional data generally support the conclusions above with some modifications. The type of vegetation cover on the land surface affects the site hydrology and water budget components of evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The lysimeter studies indicate that about 12 inches more water is lost annually to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration with deep-rooted pine trees present than in areas where bare soil or shallow-rooted grass cover occur. Therefore, recharge in the burial ground area may differ from that with similar soils in forested areas of the Savannah River Plant. Study of the hydrologic properties of soils in the burial ground area indicates that infiltration rates for the soils generally are relatively high, exceeding one inch per hour. Runoff as overland flow tends to occur only with intense rainfall events of 1 inch or more. The soil-water characteristic curves are representative of relatively coarse-textured soils.

Wells, D.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site; Cook, J.W.

1986-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water monitoring procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring is the primary method used to protect our ground-water resources. The primary objectives of monitoring programs are to detect, to attribute, and to mitigate any changes in-water quality or quantity. Previous monitoring programs have had numerous problems including the failure to produce usable information and the failure to balance the competing factors of cost-effectiveness and environmental protection. A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water procedure was designed which consists of eight steps and two feedback loops. The reason for monitoring must first be determined before clear monitoring goals can be set. Characterization of the site allows proper design of the monitoring network. Data is then collected and analyzed creating usable information. Applying this new information to the information expansion loop permits a better understanding of the initial site characterization. Finally evaluating the entire routine to determine the effectiveness of the program allows the optimization loop to modify the system for greater efficiency. The value of this procedure was tested at selected sites in the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas. The mine, which is currently in compliance with state regulations, is not operating an efficient monitoring program. The problems included over-monitoring of metals in and around reclaimed mine blocks, over-monitoring by monitoring wells in the same aquifer, and the failure to attribute changes in a monitoring well near a dewatering well. The feedback loops helped to optimize the entire program by recognizing problems in the stratigraphic column and modifying the monitoring program to lower monitoring costs. Three major benefits are gained by using this procedure: the ground-water monitoring routine can be made more cost-effective, environmental protection will be increased, and environmental liability will be decreased.

Doucette, Richard Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the “Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures ” page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Water and Surface Energy Balance Modeling in Botswana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From January-March 1989 an intensive field campaign was held in the eastern savanna of Botswana, Africa, to collect ground data to parameterize models which can be used to determine the physical status and water-balance terms of the earth's ...

A. A. Van de Griend; M. Owe; H. F. Vugts; S. D. Prince

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites  

SciTech Connect

This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Simplified two layer model substation ground grid design methodology  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a simplified approach to the design of substation ground grids in non-uniform soil conditions. The procedure is based on the interpretation of principles enunciated in the IEEE Standard 80-1986, with the supporting data having been obtained from actual field tests on substation ground grids.

Lazzara, J.; Barbeito, N. (Florida Power Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Implementation and validation of a Ground Source Heat Pump model in MATLAB.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the project is the implementation of a simple Ground-Source Heat Pump (GSHP) system model in MATLAB. The program is able to run… (more)

Casetta, Damien

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according to their "leachability.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE/EA-1388: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site (September 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388 388 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Site September 2001 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ vii Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... ix 1.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................................1

134

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity “hotspots,” yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Systems modelling for effective mine water management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about the difficulties in securing water have led the Australian coal mining industry to seek innovative ways to improve its water management and to adopt novel strategies that will lead to less water being used and more water being reused. ... Keywords: Mining, Sustainable development, Systems model, Water balance, Water resources management

Claire M. Côte; Chris J. Moran; Christopher J. Hedemann; Christian Koch

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ground-state ammonia and water in absorption towards Sgr B2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Odin submillimetre-wave satellite telescope to observe the ground state transitions of ortho-ammonia and ortho-water, including their 15N, 18O, and 17O isotopologues, towards Sgr B2. The extensive simultaneous velocity coverage of the observations, >500 km/s, ensures that we can probe the conditions of both the warm, dense gas of the molecular cloud Sgr B2 near the Galactic centre, and the more diffuse gas in the Galactic disk clouds along the line-of-sight. We present ground-state NH3 absorption in seven distinct velocity features along the line-of-sight towards Sgr B2. We find a nearly linear correlation between the column densities of NH3 and CS, and a square-root relation to N2H+. The ammonia abundance in these diffuse Galactic disk clouds is estimated to be about (0.5-1)e-8, similar to that observed for diffuse clouds in the outer Galaxy. On the basis of the detection of H218O absorption in the 3 kpc arm, and the absence of such a feature in the H217O spectrum, we conclude that the water...

Wirström, E S; Black, J H; Hjalmarson, Å; Larsson, B; Olofsson, A O H; Encrenaz, P J; Falgarone, E; Frisk, U; Olberg, M; Sandqvist, Aa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Relational Grounding Facilitates Development of Scientifically Useful Multiscale Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular automata, agent-based models h (ABM), and actornodes (LN-ODE), and an agent-based model (ABM) of granulomathat, in effect, the agent-based model depends intricately

Hunt, C Anthony; Ropella, Glen EP; Lam, Tai; Gewitz, Andrew D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometric Observations of Precipitable Water Vapor: A Comparison with Ground Truth from Two Radiosonde Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-channel microwave radiometric measurements of precipitable water vapor are compared with values determined from two types of radiosondes. The first type is used in conventional soundings taken by the National Weather Service. The second is ...

Ed R. Westwater; Michael J. Falls; Ingrid A. Popa Fotino

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to Improve Ground Motion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: USC Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at...

148

BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOEIAL162350-65

149

Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.

Alpers, C.N.; Hamlin, S.N.; Hunerlach, M.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modeling ground soldier situational awareness for constructive simulation with rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior models that control simulated warfighters in most modeling and simulation (M&S) efforts are fairly simple, relying predominantly on behavior scripting and simple rules to produce actions. As a result, the simulated entities do not reflect ...

Scott Neal Reilly; James Niehaus; Peter Weyhrauch

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly, building owners are turning to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems to improve energy efficiency. Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems with a vertical closed ground loop heat exchanger are one of the more widely used systems. Over the last thirty years, a number of simulation models have been developed to calculate the performance of the ground heat exchanger (GHX). The several computer programs can evaluate the GCHP systems as a part of the whole-building energy simulation. This paper briefly presents a general introduction to GSHP systems and the GCHP system, and reviews the currently developed GCHP models and compares computer programs for a GCHP design. In addition, GHX models which play an important role on the GCHP performance are reviewed. Finally, several widely recognized computer simulation programs for building energy analysis are compared regarding their GCHP simulation capability.

Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

Xing, Lu [Oklahoma State University; Cullin, James [Oklahoma State University; Spitler, Jeffery [Oklahoma State University; Im, Piljae [ORNL; Fisher, Daniel [Oklahoma State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei Caldera Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei Caldera Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We present here a consistent model, which explains the mechanisms of unrest phenomena at Campi Flegrei (Italy), both at short-term (years) and at secular scales. The model consists basically of two effects: the first one is related to the elastic response of the shallow crust to increasing pressure within a shallow magma chamber; the second involves the fluid-dynamics of shallow aquifers in response to increasing pressure and/or temperature at depth. The most important roles in the proposed model

156

Source to tap urban water cycle modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuous expansion of urban areas is associated with increased water demand, both for domestic and non-domestic uses. To cover this additional demand, centralised infrastructure, such as water supply and distribution networks tend to become more ... Keywords: Metabolism models, Optimisation, Urban water cycle, Water demand management

Evangelos Rozos; Christos Makropoulos

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Alternative scenarios of green consumption in Italy: An empirically grounded model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any transition towards a more environmentally sustainable world will strongly depend on people's willingness to adopt the best available practices. We present here the Consumption Italy (CITA) model, an empirically grounded agent-based model designed ... Keywords: Agent-based-modelling, Carbon footprint, Environmental policies, Household consumption

Giangiacomo Bravo, Elena Vallino, Alessandro K. Cerutti, Maria Beatrice Pairotti

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Study of the Reactions Controlling the Mobility of Uranium in Ground and Surface Water Systems in Contact with Apatite  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to define the mechanisms, equilibria, kinetics, and extent of sorption of aqueous uranium onto hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)) for a range of pH, ionic strength, aqueous uranium concentration, dissolved carbon/air CO{sub 2}, and mineral surface area. We conducted chemical modeling, batch and flow-through experiments, chemical analysis, x-ray absorption and diffraction measurement, and electron microscopy. Our motivation was the need to immobilize U in water and soil to prevent it's entry into water supplies and ultimately, biological systems. Applying hydroxyapatite to in-situ treatment of uranium-bearing ground water could be an effective, low cost technology. We found that hydroxyapatite quickly, effectively, and reversibly sorbed uranium at a high capacity by inner-sphere complexation over a wide range of conditions. Our results indicate that at aqueous uranium concentrations below 10-20 ppb: (1) equilibrium sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite occurs in hours, regardless of pH; (2) in ambient and CO{sub 2}-free atmospheres, over 98% of initial uranium is sorbed to hydroxyapatite, (3) in waters in equilibrium with higher air CO{sub 2} concentrations, sorption removed over 97% of aqueous uranium, except above pH 9, where aqueous uranium concentrations were reduced by less than 40%, and (4) at near-neutral pH, bicarbonate alkalinities in excess of 500 slightly retarded sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite, relative to lower alkalinities. Uranium sorption and precipitation are reversible and are not appreciably affected by ionic strength. The reversibility of these reactions requires that in situ treatment be carefully monitored to avoid breakthrough and de-sorption of uranium unto ground water. At typical surface conditions, sorption is the only mode of uranium sequestration below 20-50 ppb U - above this range, precipitation of uranium phosphate minerals begins to dominate sequestration processes. We verified that one m{sup 2} of hydroxyapatite can sorb over 7.53 X 10{sup -6} moles or 1.8 mg of uranium in agreement with calculations based on phosphate and calcium oxide sites on the unit cell. Our work is significant because small masses of hydroxyapatite can sorb appreciable masses of uranium quickly over a wide range of chemistries. Preliminary work with ground water containing 260 ppb of uranium and cow bone char indicates that its sorptive capacity is appreciable less than pure hydroxyapatite. Pure crystalline hydroxyapatite sequestered 2.9 mg of uranium per m{sup 2} as opposed to 0.083 mg of uranium sequestered per m{sup 2} of cow bone char, or 27% versus 3.5% by surface area, respectively. Extended x-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy defined mono- and bidentate sorption of uranium to phosphate and calcium oxide groups on the hydroxyapatite surface. The EXAFS data indicate that up to several thousand parts U per million parts hydroxyapatite, surface complexation, and not precipitation, is the predominant process. Above this uranium: hydroxyapatite mass ratio, precipitation of meta-autunite (H{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})2(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 10H{sub 2}0) dominates the sequestration process.

Taffet, M

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Discontinuous Galerkin Global Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discontinuous Galerkin shallow water model on the cubed sphere is developed, thereby extending the transport scheme developed by Nair et al. The continuous flux form nonlinear shallow water equations in curvilinear coordinates are employed. The ...

Ramachandran D. Nair; Stephen J. Thomas; Richard D. Loft

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling water emission from low-mass protostellar envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within low-mass star formation, water vapor plays a key role in the chemistry and energy balance of the circumstellar material. The Herschel Space Observatory will open up the possibility to observe water lines originating from a wide range of excitation energies.Our aim is to simulate the emission of rotational water lines from envelopes characteristic of embedded low-mass protostars. A large number of parameters that influence the water line emission are explored: luminosity, density,density slope and water abundances.Both dust and water emission are modelled using full radiative transfer in spherical symmetry. The temperature profile is calculated for a given density profile. The H2O level populations and emission profiles are in turn computed with a non-LTE line code. The results are analyzed to determine the diagnostic value of different lines, and are compared with existing observations. Lines can be categorized in: (i) optically thick lines, including ground-state lines, mostly sensitive to the cold outer part; (ii) highly excited (E_u>200-250 K) optically thin lines sensitive to the abundance in the hot inner part; and (iii) lines which vary from optically thick to thin depending on the abundances. Dust influences the emission of water significantly by becoming optically thick at the higher frequencies, and by pumping optically thin lines. A good physical model of a source, including a correct treatment of dust, is a prerequisite to infer the water abundance structure and possible jumps at the evaporation temperature from observations. The inner warm (T>100 K) envelope can be probed byhighly-excited lines, while a combination of excited and spectrally resolved ground state lines probes the outer envelope. Observations of H218O lines, although weak, provide even stronger constraints on abundances.

T. A. van Kempen; S. D. Doty; E. F. van Dishoeck; M. R. Hogerheijde; J. K. Joergensen

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Critique of the Climatic Record of “Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground” in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water equivalent of snow on the ground (SWE) has been measured daily since 1952 at National Weather Service first-order stations whenever snow depth exceeded 5 cm (2 in). These data are used in snowmelt analyses, snow climatology, and snow ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mechanistic Modeling of Photocatalytic Water Disinfection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goal of this research was to develop a mechanism-based model for photocatalytic disinfection of bacteria in water using suspended catalyst pthesiss in batch… (more)

Dalrymple, Omatoyo Kofi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Forecasting model.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents The Nambe Pueblo Water Budget and Water Forecasting model. The model has been constructed using Powersim Studio (PS), a software package designed to investigate complex systems where flows and accumulations are central to the system. Here PS has been used as a platform for modeling various aspects of Nambe Pueblo's current and future water use. The model contains three major components, the Water Forecast Component, Irrigation Scheduling Component, and the Reservoir Model Component. In each of the components, the user can change variables to investigate the impacts of water management scenarios on future water use. The Water Forecast Component includes forecasting for industrial, commercial, and livestock use. Domestic demand is also forecasted based on user specified current population, population growth rates, and per capita water consumption. Irrigation efficiencies are quantified in the Irrigated Agriculture component using critical information concerning diversion rates, acreages, ditch dimensions and seepage rates. Results from this section are used in the Water Demand Forecast, Irrigation Scheduling, and the Reservoir Model components. The Reservoir Component contains two sections, (1) Storage and Inflow Accumulations by Categories and (2) Release, Diversion and Shortages. Results from both sections are derived from the calibrated Nambe Reservoir model where historic, pre-dam or above dam USGS stream flow data is fed into the model and releases are calculated.

Brainard, James Robert

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) show promise for reducing house energy consumption, and a desuperheater can potentially further reduce energy consumption where the heat pump from the space conditioning system creates hot water. Two unoccupied houses were instrumented to document the installed operational space conditioning and water heating efficiency of their GSHP systems. This paper discusses instrumentation methods and field operation characteristics of the GSHPs, compares manufacturers' values of the coefficients of performance calculated from field measured data for the two GSHPs, and compares the measured efficiency of the desuperheater system to other domestic hot water systems.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DC WRRC Report No. 103 Background Study of the Ground Water in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow at outlet from tower: Water Spray Guns: Water quantity for conditioning: Water quantity by controlling the amount of water returned from the atomizing nozzles. The water, when sprayed into the tower around the outside of the tower, and connected to the spray headers by means of flexible hoses. Water

District of Columbia, University of the

168

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Large-Scale Urban Modeling by Combining Ground Level Panoramic and Aerial Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the United States Ge- ographic Survey. One aerial image is shown in Fig. 1(a). Another inherentLarge-Scale Urban Modeling by Combining Ground Level Panoramic and Aerial Imagery Lu Wang, Suya You a high resolution orthorecti- fied aerial image to provide the building footprints. Users draw

Shahabi, Cyrus

171

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 7 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 8 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '05. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 589.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 30.8 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon : Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 5 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 12 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY06. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 355.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 19.3 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide project coordination and technical assistance to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality enhancement and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Enhancement Reserve Program (CREP) and other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Three of those four streams and one other major Sherman County stream are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Temperature in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has resulted in providing technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, two implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 3 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '04. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in reducing the backlog of conservation projects within Sherman County, while adhering to the objectives set forth for this grant.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including 119 WASCBs, 74,591 feet of terraces, 3 spring developments, 24,839 feet of riparian or pasture cross fencing, 1,072 acres of direct seed trials, 14 landowners implementing 34 CREP contracts, and the development of 5 additional CREP contracts slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY07. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 1898.3 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting approximately 52 miles of riparian or intermittent stream channel habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

DEVELOPMENT OF A POPULATION BALANCE MODEL TO SIMULATE FRACTIONATION OF GROUND SWITCHGRASS  

SciTech Connect

The population balance model represents a time-dependent formulation of mass conservation for a ground biomass that flows through a set of sieves. The model is suitable for predicting the change in size and distribution of ground biomass while taking into account the flow rate processes of particles through a grinder. This article describes the development and application of this model to a switchgrass grinding operation. The mass conservation formulation of the model contains two parameters: breakage rate and breakage ratio. A laboratory knife mill was modified to act as a batch or flow-through grinder. The ground switchgrass was analyzed over a set of six Tyler sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 mm (top sieve) to 1 mm (bottom sieve). The breakage rate was estimated from the sieving tests. For estimating the breakage ratio, each of the six fractions was further ground and sieved to 11 fractions on a set of sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 to 0.25 mm (and pan). These data formed a matrix of values for determining the breakage ratio. Using the two estimated parameters, the transient population balance model was solved numerically. Results indicated that the population balance model generally underpredicted the fractions remaining on sieves with 5.66, 4.00, and 2.83 mm apertures and overpredicted fractions remaining on sieves with 2.00, 1.41, and 1.00 mm apertures. These trends were similar for both the batch and flow-through grinder configurations. The root mean square of residuals (RSE), representing the difference between experimental and simulated mass of fractions, was 0.32 g for batch grinding and 0.1 g for flow-through grinding. The breakage rate exhibited a linear function of the logarithm of particle size, with a regression coefficient of 0.99.

Naimi, L.J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lau, A.K. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation; Emami, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Afzal, M [University of New Brunswick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaporative Concentration of 100x J13 Ground Water at 60% Relative Humidity and 90C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these experiments we studied the behavior of a synthetic concentrated J13 solution as it comes in contact with a Ni-Cr-Mo-alloy selected for waste canisters in the designated high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concentrated synthetic J13 solution was allowed to drip slowly onto heated test specimens (90 C, 60% relative humidity) where the water moved down the surface of the specimens, evaporated and minerals precipitated. Mineral separation or zoning along the evaporation path was not observed. We infer from solid analyses and geochemical modeling, that the most corrosive components (Ca, Mg, and F) are limited by mineral precipitation. Minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include thermonatrite, natrite, and trona, all sodium carbonate minerals, as well as kogarkoite (Na{sub 3}SO{sub 4}F), halite (NaCl), and niter (KNO{sub 3}). Calcite and a magnesium silicate precipitation are based on chemical analyses of the solids and geochemical modeling. The most significant finding of this study is that sulfate and fluoride concentrations are controlled by the solubility of kogarkoite. Kogarkoite thermodynamic data are needed in the Yucca Mountain Project database to predict the corrosiveness of carbonate brines and to establish the extent to which fluoride is removed from the brines as a solid.

Staggs, K; Maureen Alai,; Hailey, P; Carroll, S A; Sutton, M; Nguyen, Q A

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Results of Year-Round Remotely Sensed Integrated Water Vapor by Ground-Based Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years of measurements with a time resolution of 1 min, some climatological findings on precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid water (CLW) in central Europe are given. A weak diurnal cycle is apparent. The mean overall ...

J. Güldner; D. Spänkuch

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Resource Requirements for Fault-Tolerant Quantum Simulation: The Transverse Ising Model Ground State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost, in both computational space and time, of calculating the energy of the ground state of the transverse Ising model on a fault-tolerant quantum computer is estimated using the Quantum Logic Array (QLA) architecture model. The QLA is a homogeneous, scalable, tile-based quantum architecture design employing concatenated quantum error correction for the construction of logical qubits and gates, based on experimentally viable ion-trap device technology parameters and components. The error correction requirements for calculating the energy on the QLA architecture are comparable to those for factoring large integers via Shor's quantum factoring algorithm number due to the exponential scaling of the computational timesteps with the precision. As a result, a fault-tolerant QLA-based quantum computer which can factor 1024-bit integers can also be used to calculate the Ising ground-state energy with precision of up to 7 decimal digits.

Clark, Craig R; Metodi, Tzvetan S; Gasster, Samuel D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Validation of AIRS Retrievals of Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor Using Measurements from a Network of Ground-Based GPS Receivers over the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust and easily implemented verification procedure based on the column-integrated precipitable water (IPW) vapor estimates derived from a network of ground-based global positioning system (GPS) receivers has been used to assess the quality of ...

M. K. Rama Varma Raja; Seth I. Gutman; James G. Yoe; Larry M. McMillin; Jiang Zhao

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental Determination of Water Vapor Profiles from Ground-Based Radiometer Measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor profiles have been obtained from radiometer measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz and ground values of humidity, temperature and pressure. The inversion technique was based on minimum variance estimation, including constraints derived ...

B. G. Skoog; J. I. H. Askne; G. Elgered

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Water Vapor Flux Measurements from Ground-Based Vertically Pointed Water Vapor Differential Absorption and Doppler Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, two lidar systems were used to measure the vertical water vapor flux in a convective boundary layer by means of eddy correlation. This was achieved by combining a water vapor differential absorption lidar and a heterodyne wind ...

Andreas Giez; Gerhard Ehret; Ronald L. Schwiesow; Kenneth J. Davis; Donald H. Lenschow

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

Kwong, S.; Small, J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, The British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Documentation of INL’s In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model  

SciTech Connect

A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an in situ retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The document discusses each of the three phases used in the model.

Earl D Mattson; Larry Hull

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Computer-aided modeling of superconducting striplines with ground planes using critical state models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for publication 29 May 2001 The effect of ground planes on the current-induced critical states and flux and the field and current distribution10,11 and the surface impedance from hysteretic loss4 was obtained penetration for a thin superconducting strip carrying a microwave current has been calculated numerically

Sridhar, Srinivas

187

Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting – A Systems Dynamics Model  

SciTech Connect

A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The major water consumption was during the remediation of the insitu retorting zone.

Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A water utility industry conceptual asset management data warehouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timely decision making is critical in today’s competitive business world and in recent times, data warehousing has been employed by numerous companies to satisfy the needs of accurate and timely information. Data warehousing has traditionally been employed for financial and customer relationship analysis with current applications now moving to other domains, such as the medical and power industries. The asset management industry is one that has seen great strides in recent years due to improved technology, but data warehousing of asset management information has been lacking. A literature review was undertaken to determine data warehousing applications in the area of asset management, and with the lessons learned, a conceptual model of data warehousing for asset management is proposed. The water utility industry is chosen to provide a grounded example of an enterprise data warehouse model that integrates data from various local information systems. The particular issues faced in the asset management domain are highlighted, and several water utility applications are presented. KEY WORDS: data warehousing, asset management, water utility industry, design 1.

Avin Mathew; Sheng Zhang; Lin Ma; Doug Hargreaves

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

Hall, L.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground—Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote ...

D. D. Turner; W. F. Feltz; R. A. Ferrare

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling Hydrogen Water Chemistry for BWR Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedwater hydrogen injection can effectively reduce stress corrosion cracking in BWR recirculation systems. Simulations using a new water radiolysis model indicate that such injections produce different effects in various regions of the BWR primary circuit. For example, higher concentrations of hydrogen are necessary to suppress oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in the core bypass and bottom plenum than in the recirculation system.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Whole-Building Energy Simulation with a Three-Dimensional Ground-Coupled Heat Transfer Model: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, finite-element, heat-transfer computer program was developed to study ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings. It was used in conjunction with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program to analyze ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings, and the results were compared with the simple ground-coupled heat transfer models used in whole-building energy simulation programs. The detailed model provides another method of testing and refining the simple models and analyzing complex problems. This work is part of an effort to improve the analysis of the ground-coupled heat transfer in building energy simulation programs. The output from this detailed model and several others will form a set of reference results for use with the BESTEST diagnostic procedure. We anticipate that the results from the work will be incorporated into ANSI/ASHRAE 140-2001, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs.

Deru, M.; Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models G. Feingold National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Lane Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction The effect of aerosols on cloud microphysical and radiative properties (the "indirect effect") has the greatest uncertainty of all known climate-forcing mechanisms. Increases in aerosol concentrations result in higher concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increased cloud droplet concentrations, and smaller droplet sizes (Twomey 1974). A possible secondary effect is the suppression of rainfall.

197

Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earthquake simulations help scientists understand the hazards posed by Earthquake simulations help scientists understand the hazards posed by future earthquakes. Earthquake computational models are validated by simulating well-recorded historical earthquakes and comparing simulation results to observational data. The purple border shows the extent of the 3-D structural model in the 3-D inversion. Events in red, with stations in blue. En-Jui Lee, University of Wyoming Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: USC Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science Researchers will use Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) dynamic rupture simulation software to investigate high-frequency seismic energy

198

Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 1–2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy ...

Paul E. Racette; Ed R. Westwater; Yong Han; Albin J. Gasiewski; Marian Klein; Domenico Cimini; David C. Jones; Will Manning; Edward J. Kim; James R. Wang; Vladimir Leuski; Peter Kiedron

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A: Bronstert 1 Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A con- straint for development in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil. Quanti cation of natural water

Bronstert, Axel

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Spin Liquid Ground State of the $S=1/2$ Kagome Heisenberg Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensed matter physicists have long sought a realistic two-dimensional (2D) magnetic system whose ground state is a {\\it spin liquid}---a zero temperature state in which quantum fluctuations have melted away any form of magnetic order. The nearest-neighbor $S=1/2$ Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice has seemed an ideal candidate, but in recent years some approximate numerical approaches to it have yielded instead a valence bond crystal. We have used the density matrix renormalization group to perform very accurate simulations on numerous cylinders with circumferences up to 12 lattice spacings, finding instead of the valence bond crystal a singlet-gapped spin liquid with substantially lower energy that appears to have $Z_2$ topological order. Our results, through a combination of very low energy, short correlation lengths and corresponding small finite size effects, a new rigorous energy bound, and consistent behavior on many cylinders, provide strong evidence that the 2D ground state of this model is a gapped spin liquid.

Simeng Yan; David A. Huse; Steven R. White

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

A hydrologic information system for water availability modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas water availability modeling has undergone a transition from paper-based documents to digital databases and GIS maps. This results in many discrete components: a water… (more)

Siler, Clark D., 1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Simulation of a viscous fluid spreading by a bidimensional shallow water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a numerical method to solve the Cauchy problem based on the viscous shallow water equations in an horizontally moving domain. More precisely, we are interested in a flooding and drying model, used to modelize the overflow of a river or the intrusion of a tsunami on ground. We use a non conservative form of the two-dimensional shallow water equations, in eight velocity formulation and we build a numerical approximation, based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, in order to compute the solution in the moving domain.

Di Martino, Bernard; Paoli, Jean-Martin; Simonnet, Pierre; 10.1016/j.apm.2011.01.015

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Determining an optimal sampling frequency for measuring bulk temporal changes in ground-water quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, statistical methods are used to determine an optimal sampling and analysis plan. When the DQO decision rule for instituting remedial actions is based on a critical change in water quality, the monitoring program design must ensure that this change can be detected and measured with a specified confidence. Usually the focus is on the change at a single monitoring location and the process is limited to addressing the uncertainty inherent in the analytical methods and the variability at that location. However, new strategies that permit ranking the waste sites and prioritizing remedial activities require the means for assessing overall changes for small regions over time, where both spatial and temporal variability exist and where the uncertainty associated with these variations far exceeds measurement error. Two new methods for assessing these overall changes have been developed and are demonstrated by application to a waste disposal site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These methods incorporate historical data where available and allow the user to either test the statistical significance of a linear trend or of an annual change compared to a baseline year for a group of water quality wells.

Moline, G.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DOE/EA-1312: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (September 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

208

DOE/EA-1313: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (03/22/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1313 DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 2005 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0069700 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Office of Legacy Management EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Site March 2005 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ....................................................................................................... vii Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................

209

Pesticides in ground water database: A compilation of monitoring studies, 1971-1991. Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report presents summary results on pesticide monitoring of ground water from 1971 to 1991. It is compiled from ground water monitoring projects performed primarily by federal agencies, state agencies and research institutions. The data is well and sample specific. The report is broken into a National Summary and 10 US EPA regional volumes. The information is presented as text, maps, graphs and tables on a national, EPA regional and state/county level. The Region 8 volume is comprised of data from Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Hoheisel, C.; Karrier, J.; Lees, S.; Davies-Hilliard, L.; Hannon, P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cold Water Model Simulation of Aluminum Liquid Fluctuations ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production ... Cold Water Model Simulation of Aluminum Liquid Fluctuations Induced by Anodic Gas in New ...

213

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part I: Airborne to Ground-Based Lidar Systems and Comparisons with Chilled-Mirror Hygrometer Radiosondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor data measured with airborne and ground-based lidar systems during the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002), which took place in the Southern Great Plains during 13 May–25 June 2002 were investigated. So far, the data collected ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Thorsten Schaberl; Paolo Di Girolamo; Donato Summa; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; David N. Whiteman; Belay B. Demoz; Edward V. Browell; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Susan Kooi; Junhong Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Decay widths of ground-state and excited {Xi}{sub b} baryons in a nonrelativistic quark model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decay processes of ground and excited bottom baryons are studied in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} nonrelativistic quark model with all model parameters fixed in the sector of light quarks. Using as an input the recent mass of {Xi}{sub b} and the theoretical masses of {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}, narrow decay widths are predicted for the ground-state bottom baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}. The work predicts large decay widths, about 100 MeV for the {rho}-type orbital excitation states of {Xi}{sub b}.

Limphirat, Ayut [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Liberal Arts, Rajamangala University of Technology Isan, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Kobdaj, Chinorat; Suebka, Prasart; Yan, Yupeng [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Particle-Water Based Model for Water Retention Hysteresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A particle-water discrete element-based approach to describe water movement in partially saturated granular media is presented and tested. Water potential is governed by both capillary bridges, dominant at low saturations, and pressure of entrapped air, dominant at high saturations. The approach captures the hysteresis of water retention during wetting and drainage by introducing local evolution of liquid-solid contact angles at the level of pores and grains. Next, extensive comparisons against experimental data are presented. While this is made without involving any fitting parameters, the method demonstrates relative high success by achieving a correlation coefficient of at least 82%, and mostly above 90%.

Yixiang Gan; Federico Maggi; Giuseppe Buscarnera; Itai Einav

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of numerical models of vertical ground heat exchangers and experimental verification : domain decomposition and state model reduction approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground-source heat pump systems with vertical ground heat exchangers (GHE) are gaining popularity worldwide for their higher coefficients of performance and lower CO2 emissions. However,… (more)

KIM, Eui-Jong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Dynamic modeling and control of hybrid ground source heat pump systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are one of the fastest growing applications of renewable energy in the world with annual increases of 10% over… (more)

Chen, Chang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Advanced modeling of vertical ground source heat pumps using finite element techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing energy demand and environmental pollution in United States has been led toward using renewable energy sources over recent decades. Ground-source heat pump systems are… (more)

Komari Zadeh, Seyed Omid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling And Optimal Design Of A Central Solar Heating Plant With Heat Storage In The Ground Using Modelica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the modeling of a central solar heating plant with seasonal storage in the ground using the new object-oriented physical systems modeling language Modelica. Main emphasis is put on the hierarchical decomposition of the system model and on the re-engineering of an existing Fortran code for the ground store model. The object-oriented physical system model is compiled to a mathematical description in the form of ordinary di#erential equations #ODE#. The ODE model is used to formulate and solve nonlinear optimization problems. We show design optimization results obtained for given weather conditions in Switzerland. The heating system is designed to cover the annual load of a housing area for space heating of about 500 MWh to 95# by solar. The optimization results have been validated with the help of initial-value simulations using TRNSYS, a special-purpose simulation software for thermal energy systems.

R. Franke

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

McNeil, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system for the .Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company which will accept models of ground-water conditions operations on the Hanford ground-water regime which moves through ancient sand and gravel channels deep under environmental impacts as essential factors in the planning, design and construction of water resources projects

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

225

ANN and ANFIS models for performance evaluation of a vertical ground source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to demonstrate the comparison of an artificial neural network (ANN) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for the prediction performance of a vertical ground source heat pump (VGSHP) system. The VGSHP system using ... Keywords: Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, Coefficient of performance, Ground source heat pump, Membership functions, Vertical heat exchanger

Hikmet Esen; Mustafa Inalli

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modelling of a vertical ground coupled heat pump system by using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the applicability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to estimate of performance of a vertical ground coupled heat pump (VGCHP) system used for cooling and heating purposes experimentally. The system involved three heat exchangers ... Keywords: Cooling, Ground, Heat exchanger, Heat pump, Heating, Neural network

Hikmet Esen; Mustafa Inalli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

UMTRA Ground Water Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

... 7 Figure 3. Uranium Distribution from April 2013 Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site...

228

MODELING OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC CONTENT IN PRODUCED WATER J. McFarlane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC CONTENT IN PRODUCED WATER J. McFarlane Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37830-6181 INTRODUCTION Off-shore discharge of produced water into the North Sea is limited to a monthly average of 40 mg·L-1 3 . Effective remediation of produced water off

229

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), and many other agencies and organizations, have worked with Ralph Wurbs over the years to develop WRAP (the Water Rights Analysis Package). The WRAP model simulates management of the water resources of a river basin, or multiple-basin region, under a priority-based water allocation system. The model facilitates assessment of hydrologic and institutional water availability/reliability for existing and proposed requirements for water use and management. Basin-wide impacts of water resources development projects and management strategies may be evaluated. The software package is generalized for application to any river/reservoir/use system, with input files being developed for the particular river basin of concern. The model is documented by reference and users manuals that may be downloaded from this site along with the software. WRAP is incorporated in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System.

Wurbs, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

Ruiz, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incorporate both ground loop heat exchangers and supplemental heat rejecters, such as cooling towers, cooling-to-air heat pump (Yavuzturk 2000), heated pavement systems (Chiasson, et al. 2000a), shallow cooling ponds

234

Prediction of In-Cloud Icing Conditions at Ground Level Using the WRF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-cloud icing on aircraft and ground structures can be observed every winter in many countries. In extreme cases ice can cause accidents and damage to infrastructure such as power transmission lines, telecommunication towers, wind turbines, ski ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Jón Egill Kristjánsson; Lasse Makkonen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Mixed Exponential Distribution Model for Retrieving Ground Flash Fraction from Satellite Lightning Imager Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian inversion method is introduced for retrieving the fraction of ground flashes in a set of flashes observed from a (low earth orbiting or geostationary) satellite lightning imager. The method employs a constrained mixed exponential ...

W. J. Koshak

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Novel Charging Station and Computational Modeling for High Thermal Conductivity Heat Pipe Thermal Ground Planes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal ground planes (TGPs) are planar, thin (thickness of 3 mm or less) heat pipes which use two-phase heat transfer. TGPs are innovative high-performance, integrated… (more)

Ababneh, Mohammed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

INVESTIGATION OF USAGE OF VELOCITY AND PRESSURE DATA WITHIN A WATER DISTRIBUTION LAB MODEL FOR CALIBRATING HYDRAULIC MODELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water distribution modeling for hydraulics and water quality is an important tool for managing system performance of water utilities. An important component of a water… (more)

Ashby, Robert Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Review: Review of soil water models and their applications in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture is the highest consumer of water resources in Australia. Soil water models play a vital role in agriculture in terms of estimating water use, water allocation and current water status at a given scale. This paper reviews widely-used soil ... Keywords: Applications, Complex models, Data availability, Limitations, Model review, Performances, Simple models, Soil water modelling, Water balance

Kemachandra Ranatunga; Eloise R. Nation; David G. Barratt

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NREL Develops Heat Pump Water Heater Simulation Model (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A new simulation model helps researchers evaluate real-world impacts of heat pump water heaters in U.S. homes.

Hudon, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against * steady state and transient operational cell data. Complete fuel cell water transport model improvements * and code package development to include two phase flow....

242

Meteorological Applications of Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals from the Ground-Based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is a well-calibrated ground-based instrument that measures high-resolution atmospheric emitted radiances from the atmosphere. The spectral resolution of the instrument is better than one ...

Wayne F. Feltz; William L. Smith; Robert O. Knuteson; Henry E. Revercomb; Harold M. Woolf; H. Ben Howell

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A simple model to help understand water use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that needs to be rejected; and therefore, less cooling water is required per kWh produced. Since between 85 the cooling system; and therefore, less cooling water is required per kWh produced. One way to increase BA simple model to help understand water use at power plants Anna Delgado and Howard J. Herzog

244

Isolated Waves and Eddies in a Shallow Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water beta-channel model was used to carry out numerical experiments with cyclonic and anticyclonic disturbances of various strengths. The model is inviscid, so fluid elements conserve potential vorticity q when unforced. Regions of ...

Michael K. Davey; Peter D. Killworth

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Antarctic Bottom Water Variability in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural variability of the Weddell Sea variety of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is examined in a long-term integration of a coupled climate model. Examination of passive tracer concentrations suggests that the model AABW is predominantly ...

Agus Santoso; Matthew H. England

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2001 APRIL 15 AND 2005 JANUARY 20 GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENTS BY THE MILAGRO WATER CERENKOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER CERENKOV DETECTOR BY Trevor Morgan B.S., University of New Hampshire (2004) DISSERTATION Submitted

California at Santa Cruz, University of

247

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project: Shear Wave Velocity Measurements at Seismic Recording Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site characterization studies for the EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project. The primary purpose of this investigation was to develop S-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a depth of 30 m, or more, and to estimate the average shear wave velocity of the upper 30 m (VS30) at thirty three (33) seismic instrument sites located in the Central and Eastern United States. Results are presented in individual seismic recording station site ...

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Simulation of an Arctic Ground Blizzard Using a Coupled Blowing Snow–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground blizzard occurred from 16 to 18 November 1996 in the northern sectors of the Mackenzie River basin of Canada and the adjacent Beaufort Sea. This hazardous event, accompanied by a low-level jet with wind speeds approaching 20 m s?1 and ...

Stephen J. Déry; M. K. Yau

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Snow–Ground Interface Temperatures in the Kuparuk River Basin, Arctic Alaska: Measurements and Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air and snow–ground interface temperatures were measured during two winters at 33 stations spanning the 180-km-long Kuparuk basin in arctic Alaska. Interface temperatures averaged 7.5°C higher than air temperatures and varied in a manner that was ...

Brian Taras; Matthew Sturm; Glen E. Liston

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Water Quality Modeling in Kranji Catchment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the process and results of applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to characterize bacterial fate and transport in the Kranji Catchment of Singapore. The goal of this process is to predict ...

Granger, Erika C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Three-dimensional "Mercedes-Benz" model for water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce a three-dimensional version of the Mercedes-Benz model to describe water molecules. In this model van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds are given explicitly through a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian orientation-dependent terms, respectively. At low temperature the model freezes forming Ice-I and it reproduces the main peaks of the experimental radial distribution function of water. In addition to these structural properties, the model also captures the thermodynamical anomalies of water: the anomalous density profile, the negative thermal expansivity, the large heat capacity and the minimum in the isothermal compressibility.

Cristiano L. Dias; Tapio Ala-Nissila; Martin Grant; Mikko Karttunen

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Deployment and Evaluation of a System for Ground-Based Measurement of Cloud Liquid Water Turbulent Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct interception of windblown cloud water by forests has been dubbed “occult deposition” because it represents a hydrological input that is hidden from rain gauges. Eddy correlation studies of this phenomenon have estimated cloud water fluxes ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Peter M. Anthoni; Richard J. Vong; Anthony C. Delany; Gordon D. Maclean

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Modeling Studies of Geothermal Systems with a Free Water Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulators developed for geothermal reservoir engineering applications generally only consider systems which are saturated with liquid water and/or steam. However, most geothermal fields are in hydraulic communicatino with shallow ground water aquifers having free surface (water level), so that production or injection operations will cause movement of the surface, and of the air in the pore spaces above the water level. In some geothermal fields the water level is located hundreds of meters below the surface (e.g. Olkaria, Kenya; Bjornsson, 1978), so that an extensive so that an extensive unsaturated zone is present. In other the caprock may be very leaky or nonexistent [e.g., Klamath Falls, oregon (Sammel, 1976)]; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; (Grant et al., 1984) in which case ther eis good hydraulic communication between the geothermal reservoir and the shallow unconfined aquifers. Thus, there is a need to explore the effect of shallow free-surface aquifers on reservoir behavior during production or injection operations. In a free-surface aquifer the water table moves depending upon the rate of recharge or discharge. This results in a high overall storativity; typically two orders of magnitude higher than that of compressed liquid systems, but one or two orders of magnitude lower than that for liquid-steam reservoirs. As a consequence, various data analysis methods developed for compressed liquid aquifers (such as conventional well test analysis methods) are not applicable to aquifer with a free surface.

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heat Pump Water Heating Modeling in EnergyPlus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Eric Wilson Craig Christensen March 1, 2012 2 Modeling Issues Results Motivation Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling... 3 Gap: Existing analysis tools cannot accurately model HPWHs with reasonable runtime. 4 What have we achieved so far? Laboratory Evaluations 14 x Field Monitoring 5 Closing the Gap Laboratory Evaluations 6 sec timestep hourly timestep 14 x Field Monitoring CARB 6 Why is modeling important? * Performance varies: Can't just use EF * System interaction o HPWH affects building heating and cooling o Space conditions affect HPWH performance 7 Modeling Goals * Manage Risks o Accuracy o Run time o Occupant satisfaction * Flexibility to explore the effects of:

260

Modeling cooling water discharges from the Burrard Generating Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-A three-dimensional numerical model was applied to examine the impact of the Burrard Generating Station cooling water on the circulation patterns and thermal regime in the receiving water of Port Moody Arm. A key aspect of this study involved properly incorporating the submerged cooling water buoyant jet into the 3D model. To overcome the scale and interface barriers between the near-field and far-field zones of the buoyant jet, a sub-grid scheme was applied, and the coupled system of equations of motion, heat conservation and state are solved with a single modeling procedure over the complete field. Special care was taken with the diffusion and jet entrainment by using a second order turbulence closure model for vertical diffusion and the Smagorinsky formula for horizontal diffusion as well as jet entrainment. The model was calibrated and validated in terms of buoyant jet trajectory, centerline dilution, and temperature and velocity profiles. Extensive modeling experiments without and with the Burrard Generating Station in operation were then carried out to investigate the receiving water circulations and thermal processes under the influence of the cooling water discharge. The model results reveal that under the influence of the cooling water discharge, peak ebb currents are stronger than peak flood currents in the near-surface layer, and the reverse is true in the near-bottom layer. Meanwhile, the model revealed a well-developed eddy at the southeast side of the buoyant jet in the near-surface layer. It is also found that the warmer water released from the cooling water discharge is mainly confined to the upper layer of the Arm, which is largely flushed out of the Arm through tidal mixing processes, and a corresponding inflow of colder water into the Arm occurs within the lower layer. I.

J. Jiang; D. B. Fissel; D. D. Lemon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Relationship between Precipitation Rates at the Ground and Aloft—A Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two cloud-resolving mesoscale models, the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model (KAMM) and the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), were used to study reflectivity factor–...

Nikolai Dotzek; Thorsten Fehr

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Souza Torres, K. [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil)] [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil); Haghighipour, N., E-mail: ocwinter@pq.cnpq.br [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modelling an urban water system on the edge of chaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viewing an urban water system as a complex adaptive system provides new opportunities for analysis and avoids some critical simplifications. Taking this perspective, it is possible to explore the inter-related effects of changes to the system. This is ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Integrated assessment, Socio-technical analysis, Water services

Magnus Moglia; Pascal Perez; Stewart Burn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Assimilation of Satellite Precipitable Water in a Meteorological Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lack of local humidity observations over a large portion of the globe hinders any improvement of humidity forecasting in meteorological models. However, satellite microwave radiometers routinely provide fields of precipitable water content ...

M. A. Filiberti; L. Eymard; B. Urban

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Prognostic Cloud Water Parameterization for Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient new prognostic cloud water parameterization designed for use in global climate models is described. The scheme allows for life cycle effects in stratiform clouds and permits cloud optical properties to be determined interactively. ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Mao-Sung Yao; William Kovari; Kenneth K-W. Lo

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A model of the domestic hot water load  

SciTech Connect

The electrical load required to supply domestic hot water is an important load for two reasons: (1) It represents a large portion (30 to 50%) of the domestic load; (2) It is a load which can easily be controlled by the consumer or the supplier, because the use of the hot water need not coincide with the heating of hot water. A model representing the electrical system load due to hot water consumption from storage water heaters is provided. Variable parameters include the average amount of water used, the mean and deviation of distributions of usage times, thermostat settings, inlet water temperature and electrical heating element ratings. These parameters are used to estimate the after diversity electricity demand profile, and were verified for accuracy by comparison with measurements. The model enables this prediction of the effects of load control, examples of which are given in this paper. The model is also useful for evaluation of the response which could be expected from demand-side management options. These include changing the size of heating elements, reduction in water consumption and reduction in thermostat settings.

Lane, I.E. [Energy Efficiency Enterprises, Lynnwood Manor (South Africa); Beute, N. [Cape Technikon, Cape Town (South Africa)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Extraction and integration of window in a 3d building model from ground view images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Details of the building facades are needed for high quality fly-through visualization or simulation applications. Windows form a key structure in the detailed facade reconstruction. In this paper, given calibrated facade texture (i.e. the rectified texture), we extract and reconstruct the 3D window structure of the building. We automatically extract windows (rectangles in the rectified image) using a profile projection method, which exploits the regularity of the vertical and horizontal window placement. We classify the extracted windows using 2D dimensions and image texture information. The depth of the extracted windows is automatically computed using window classification information and image line features. A single ground view image is enough to compute 3D depths of the facade windows in our approach. 1

Sung Chun Lee; Ram Nevatia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Title An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6031E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Liping, Philip Haves, and Walter F. Buhl Conference Name SimBuild 2012 IBPSA Conference Date Published 08/2012 Abstract The accurate prediction of cooling and dehumidification coil performance is important in model-based fault detection and in the prediction of HVAC system energy consumption for support of both design and operations. It is frequently desirable to use a simple cooling coil model that does not require detailed specification of coil geometry and material properties. The approach adopted is to match the overall UA of the coil to the rating conditions and to estimate the air-side and water-side components of the UA using correlations developed by Holmes (1982). This approach requires some geometrical information about the coil and the paper investigates the sensitivity of the overall performance prediction to uncertainties in this information, including assuming a fixed ratio of air-side to water-side UA at the rating condition. Finally, simulation results from different coil models are compared, and experimental data are used to validate the improved cooling coil model.

273

An Empirical Analysis of Bulk Cn2 Models over Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines some of the difficulties associated with the determination of C2n over water in a coastal region using a bulk model. The analysis shows the need to supplement bulk models with elements that do not belong to traditional Monin–...

Guy Potvin; Denis Dion; Jacques Claverie; Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; J. Luc Forand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Shallow-Water Model of the Diurnal Dryline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores the diurnal variation in the movement and structure of the dryline using a one-dimensional shallow-water model. The model is adapted to test some common theories of dryline motion including the diurnal variation in surface ...

Jennifer A. Miller; Thomas A. Kovacs; Peter R. Bannon

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Improving Water Management: Applying ModelBuilder to site water impoundments using AEM survey data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ArcGIS ModelBuilder was used to create a GIS-based decision support model that incorporated digital elevation data and electromagnetic geophysical results gathered by helicopter to screen potential sites for water disposal impoundments produced from coal bed natural gas.

Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Harbert, W.P.; Ackman, T.E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Grounding intentionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I argue that current attempts to ground intentionality face one of two challenges. Either the grounding feature of intentionality will be itself intentional or the grounding feature is disparate in nature from the representational capacity of an intentional mental state and therefore no connection between the two can be taken to exist. I examine two current accounts of intentionality and the features they utilize to ground it. I maintain that both views fall prey to one or both of the objections I raise. I conclude that any account of intentionality will need to meet both of these challenges in order to be counted successful.

Huizenga Steven R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Transmission Model and Ground-Truth Investigation of Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model of atmospheric transmission is used to investigate some of the multichannel sea surface temperature (MCSST) algorithms that are currently in use. The model is used with a set of atmospheric data to derive algorithms for the AVHRR and ...

I. J. Barton

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal dab was collected from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) measurement and covered the twenty-one year span 1970- 1990. The ESRD data was gathered from the Texas Department of Health Kidney Program ESRD Registry for the five-year span 1988-1992. This registry included more than 99% of incident ESRD cases over the same time period. The 1990 U.S. Census data was used to estimate county population by age, race and sex. Exposure was defined as residence in a county with ground water measurements that fell in the highest quartile for each metal (mercury 0.297ug/, arsenic 3.216ug/l, lead 4.685ug/l, cadmium 1.423ug/l, cumulative metal level 8.911ug/l). Outcome was defined as an incident case of ESRD between the years 1988-1992 and examined as five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Among 254 Texas counties, 52 had at least 7 years of metal measurements for lead and cadmium, 51 counties had at least 7 years of metal measurements for arsenic and mercury and 50 counties had 7 years of measurements for all four metals. Linear and logistic regression procedures were carried out to examine the relationship between heavy metal ground water levels and incidence of ESRD. None of the metals demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship with five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Counties with high levels of heavy metals did not indicate an increased odds of having a five-year ESRD incidence per 10,000 persons above the 1988-1992 state average. The percentage of Black or Hispanic persons in a county was a positive predictor of increased five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons.

Bishop, Scott Alan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Predicting Cloud-to-Ground and Intracloud Lightning in Weather Forecast Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new prognostic, spatially and temporally dependent variable is introduced to the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). This variable is called the potential electrical energy (Ep). It was used to predict the dynamic contribution of the ...

Barry H. Lynn; Yoav Yair; Colin Price; Guy Kelman; Adam J. Clark

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modeling on quicksand: dealing with the scarcity of ground truth in interdomain routing data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers studying the interdomain routing system, its properties and new protocols, face many challenges in performing realistic evaluations and simulations. Modeling decisions with respect to AS-level topology, routing policies and traffic matrices ... Keywords: bgp, interdomain routing, simulations

Phillipa Gill; Michael Schapira; Sharon Goldberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Modeling studies of geothermal systems with a free water surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical simulator was developed for the modeling of air-steam-water systems. The simulator was applied to various problems involving injection into or production from a geothermal reservoir in hydraulic communication with a shallow free-surface aquifer. First, a one-dimensional column problem is considered and the water level movement during exploitation is studied using different capillary pressure functions. Second, a two-dimensional radial model is used to study and compare reservoir depletion for cases with and without a free-surface aquifer. Finally, the contamination of a shallow free-surface aquifer due to cold water injection is investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain an understanding of the response of a reservoir in hydraulic communication with a unconfined aquifer during exploitation or injection and to determine under which circumstances conventional modeling techniques (fully saturated systems) can be applied to such systems.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Water Management Lessons for California from Statewide Hydro-economic Modeling Using the CALVIN Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model. The general approach taken dates back to Roman times, when Frontinus (97 AD) began his oversight of Rome’s water system with a systematic inventory and quantification of its water system. This approach has been formalized and expanded in the modern era as economists, planners, and engineers have sought to grapple with complex water management systems and problems. In California water supply and demands are inconvenient in space and time. Most water availability is in northern California from winter precipitation and spring snow-melt; whereas water demands are more in the south during the dry summer. Consequently, major floods and seasonal and multiyear droughts characterize water resources in California. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the major north-south hub for this water network. Population growth, climate change, a vulnerable Delta, and decentralized water governance pose opportunities and challenges to water management in California. Portfolios of water management activities, including diverse general policy tools, demand management, and operations and supply expansion options, are available to manage competing demands in complex situations. Exploring promising portfolios of actions is the main intent of the CALVIN model. The CALVIN model

Jay R. Lund; Richard E. Howitt; Josué Medellín-azuara; Marion W. Jenkins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Statistical model for assessing the risk of hail damage to any ground installation. Technical report, June 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a statistical model which has been developed to determine the risk of damage by large hail to any ground installation (such as a solar flat plate collector). The model is based on data for the number of haildays per year, hailstone size distribution, and storm severity (expressed in number of hailstones per square meter per storm). Other than parameters derived from the raw meteorological data available, the parameters of the model are the number of years of surface exposure and the exposure area size. The end result is the probability of a hailstone of a given size striking a given surface area in a given number of years. The maximum probable hailstone size is used as a convenient index of hail risk. The data upon which to base a prediction model are sparse at this time, covering few geographic locations; much of the information available is deficient in sampling consistency and/or sample size. For this reason, this report fully documents the derivation and use of the model for future applications, when more and better data are collected. The FORTRAN source code to calculate the risk model digitally is included in APPENDIX D. This model improves on previous work in: (1) the use of more thorough statistical procedures and a more rigorous accounting of storm severity; (2) a more thorough investigation into the two probability density distributions commonly used (Poisson and negative binomial) to describe hailday frequencies, and (3) an attempt to define more rigorously the distribution of hailstone sizes. A sensitivity analysis was performed and conclusions are drawn from the results.

Cox, M; Armstrong, P R

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Methodology for modeling the migration of EOR chemicals in fresh water aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop a method for modeling the transport of EOR chemicals accidentally released to fresh water aquifers. Six examples involving hypothetical releases of EOR chemicals at surrogate aquifer sites are used to illustrate the application of this method. Typical injection rates and concentrations of EOR chemicals used at current or proposed projects were obtained from the literature and used as the basis for the hypothetical accidents. Four surrogate aquifer sites were selected from States where chemical flooding methods are employed. Each site is based on real hydrological data but presented in such a way to avoid identification with existing EOR fields. A significant amount of data is required to model ground water systems. The hypothetical examples help to indicate the type of data needed. The computer results illustrate that high levels of contamination are possible for many years. In addition, due to these high levels of contamination, it is possible for contaminants to migrate offsite of the EOR field. There are a variety of pathways through which EOR chemicals could be accidentally released to fresh water aquifers during normal EOR operations. There is insufficient EOR experience to date, however, to forecast risks accurately. 119 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

Royce, B.; Garrell, M.; Kahn, A.; Kaplan, E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Monte Carlo technique in modeling ground motion coherence in sedimentary filled valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Accepted 9 August 2009 Keywords: Coherence of seismic waves Numerical modeling of seismic wave be significant for engineering applications. For example in large structures such as bridges or extended power plants, spatially variable excitations at different points along their foundations can cause catastrophic

Cerveny, Vlastislav

288

Ground movements due to excavation in clay: physical and analytical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-22 CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 7.1 Introduction 7-1 7.2 Achievements 7-2 7.2.1 Development of a novel technique for deep excavation in centrifuge 7-2 7.2.2 Observations from small scale centrifuge model tests...

Lam, Sze Yue

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Particle-based model for water simulation  

SciTech Connect

The Smooth-Particle Applied Mechanics (SPAM) model is a relatively recent physical modeling technique It can model both fluids and solids using free-moving particles An implemented SPAM model is described that solved the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to produce animations of splashing and pooling water Because the particle positions are known explicitly each timestep, the SPAM technique produces data amenable to visualization A ray-tracing renderer is also described It samples the underwater light-field distribution and stores tbe information into a Light Accumulation Lattice which is used for scattered light calculations and caustics.

Max, N., LLNL

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modeling hydrogen water chemistry for BWR applications: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results of calculated concentrations of O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ and other hydrogen-oxygen species in various regions of the primary circuit for 9 BWRs for various concentrations of feedwater hydrogen. The calculations were performed by computer simulation using the GE-Harwell radiolysis model and compared with hydrogen water chemistry test data and results from a mass balance model. 36 refs., 57 figs., 9 tabs.

Ruiz, C.P.; Lin, C.C.; Wong, T.L.; Robinson, R.N.; Law, R.J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

Properties of Ground States in the Bogoliubov-Dirac-Fock Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Bogoliubov-Dirac-Fock model that allows to consider relativistic electrons interacting with the vacuum in the presence of an external electrostatic field. It can be seen as a Hartree-Fock approximation of QED, where photons are neglected. A state is described by its one-body density matrix: an infinite rank, self-adjoint operator which is a compact perturbation of the negative spectral projector of the free Dirac operator. We are interested in the properties of minimizers of the BDF-energy in the presence of an external field with charge density $\

Jérémy Sok

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 3 A steady-state simulation model for a water-to-water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 3 ABSTRACT A steady-state simulation model for a water Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E. Student Member ASHRAE Member ASHRAE Hui Jin is a graduate student-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (www.ashrae.org). Published in ASHRAE Transactions 2002, Vol 108, P

294

Detection of water absorption in the dayside atmosphere of HD 189733 b using ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy at 3.2 microns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a 5 sigma detection of water absorption features in the dayside spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. We used high-resolution (R~100,000) spectra taken at 3.2 microns with CRIRES on the VLT to trace the radial velocity shift of the water features in the planet's dayside atmosphere during 5 hours of its 2.2 day orbit as it approached secondary eclipse. Despite considerable telluric contamination in this wavelength regime, we detect the signal within our uncertainties at the expected combination of systemic velocity (Vsys=-3 +5-6 km/s) and planet orbital velocity (Kp=154 +14-10 km/s), and determine a H2O line contrast ratio of (1.3+/-0.2)x10^-3 with respect to the stellar continuum. We find no evidence of significant absorption or emission from other carbon-bearing molecules, such as methane, although we do note a marginal increase in the significance of our detection with the inclusion of carbon dioxide in our template spectrum. This result demonstrates that ground-based, high-resolution spectrosc...

Birkby, J L; Brogi, M; de Mooij, E J W; Schwarz, H; Albrecht, S; Snellen, I A G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Model for Aggregated Water Heater Load Using Dynamic Bayesian Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to the new generation power grid, or “smart grid”, requires novel ways of using and analyzing data collected from the grid infrastructure. Fundamental functionalities like demand response (DR), that the smart grid needs, rely heavily on the ability of the energy providers and distributors to forecast the load behavior of appliances under different DR strategies. This paper presents a new model of aggregated water heater load, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs). The model has been validated against simulated data from an open source distribution simulation software (GridLAB-D). The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the DBN model accurately tracks the load profile curves of aggregated water heaters under different testing scenarios.

Vlachopoulou, Maria; Chin, George; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Kalsi, Karanjit

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data Sources from Satellite, Ground Radar, and a Numerical Model Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Seo,...

297

Price and Non-Price Influences on Water Conservation: An Econometric Model of Aggregate Demand under Nonlinear Budget Constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRICE INFLUENCES ON WATER CONSERVATION: ECONOMETRIC AN MODELPrice Influences on Water Conservation: An Econometric ModelPrice Influences on Water Conservation: An Econometric Model

Corral, Leonardo; Fisher, Anthony C.; Hatch, Nile W.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging Tools (May 1983) A Model for Water Factor Measurements With Fission-Neutron Logging Tools (May 1983) A Model for...

299

POD/DEIM nonlinear model order reduction of an ADI implicit shallow water equations model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider a 2-D shallow-water equations (SWE) model on a @b-plane solved using an alternating direction fully implicit (ADI) finite-difference scheme on a rectangular domain. The scheme was shown to be unconditionally stable for ... Keywords: Discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM), Finite difference methods, Proper orthogonal decomposition, Reduced-order models (ROMs), Shallow water equations

R. ?Tefnescu; I. M. Navon

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sea water intrusion model of Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

During the 1960s and 1970s, Amchitka Island, Alaska, was the site of three underground nuclear tests, referred to as Milrow, Long Shot and Cannikin. Amchitka Island is located in the western part of the Aleutian Island chain, Alaska. The groundwater systems affected by the three underground nuclear tests at Amchitka Island are essentially unmonitored because all of the current monitoring wells are too shallow and not appropriately placed to detect migration from the cavities. The dynamics of the island`s fresh water-sea water hydrologic system will control contaminant migration from the three event cavities, with migration expected in the direction of the Bering Sea from Long shot and Cannikin and the Pacific Ocean from Milrow. The hydrogeologic setting (actively flowing groundwater system to maintain a freshwater lens) suggests a significant possibility for relatively rapid contaminant migration from these sites, but also presents an opportunity to use projected flowpaths to a monitoring advantage. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a conceptual model of the Amchitka groundwater system and to produce computer model simulations that reflect the boundary conditions and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. The simulations will be used to assess the validity of the proposed conceptual model and highlight the uncertainties in hydraulic properties of the aquifer. The uncertainties will be quantified by sensitivity analyses on various model parameters. Within the limitations of the conceptual model and the computer simulations, conclusions will be drawn regarding potential radionuclide migration from the three underground nuclear tests.

Wheatcraft, S.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Hydrology/Hydrogeology Dept., Environmental and Resource Science

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Biofuels and water quality: challenges and opportunities for simulation modeling  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of the various impacts of biofuel feedstock production on hydrology and water quality is complex. Mathematical models can be used to efficiently evaluate various what if scenarios related to biofeedstock production and their impacts on hydrology and water quality at various spatial and temporal scales. Currently available models, although having the potential to serve such purposes, have many limitations. In this paper, we review the strengths and weaknesses of such models in light of short- and long term biofeedstock production scenarios. The representation of processes in the currently available models and how these processes need to be modified to fully evaluate various complex biofeedstock production scenarios are discussed. Similarly, issues related to availability of data that are needed to parameterize and evaluate these models are presented. We have presented a vision for the development of decision support tools and ecosystem services that can be used to make watershed management decisions to minimize any potentially adverse environmental impacts while meeting biofeedstock demands. We also discuss a case study of biofeedstock impact simulation in relation to watershed management policy implications for various state and federal agencies in the USA.

Engel, Bernard A. [Purdue University; Chaubey, Indrajeet [Purdue University; Thomas, Mark [Purdue University; Saraswat, Dharmendra [University of Arkansas; Murphy, Patrick [Purdue University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

On-line Hydraulic State Estimation in Urban Water Networks Using Reduced Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Predictor-Corrector (PC) approach for on-line forecasting of water usage in an urban water system is presented and demonstrated. The M5 Model-Trees algorithm is used to predict water demands and Genetic Algorithms (GAs) ...

Preis, Ami

304

Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation  

SciTech Connect

A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for a particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

Wetter, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Commentary by Jerry S. Szymanski and C.B. Archambeau regarding ``Spring deposits and late pleistocene ground-water levels in southern Nevada``, by J. Quade. Special report number 16, Contract number 94/96.0003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a critical analysis of a paper presented at the 5th Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management. The thrust of this paper was to determine the historic level of ground water in the vicinity of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. This author reviews conclusions reached by the former author and analyzes reference materials used to obtain his assessment of paleo-ground water levels. This author disagrees with the conclusions and analytical methods used. This author presents information relative to water table fluctuations as a result of intrusion of geothermal fluids and makes claim that such intrusion would jeopardize the integrity of the repository by flooding.

Szymanski, J.S.; Archambeau, C.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Simplified Procedure for Sizing Vertical Ground Coupled Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified technique for the sizing of vertical U-tube ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) heat exchangers for Texas climates was developed utilizing a transient simulation model of a ground coupled heat pump and weather and soil data for Texas. The simulation model discretized the ground heat exchanger into elements and computed the temperature distribution surrounding the heat exchanger on a minute-by-minute basis. Hundreds of runs were made with the model for a wide range of ground temperatures, ground thermal properties (density, thermal conductivity, and specific heat), and outdoor weather. A set of sizing charts were developed from the model runs that could provide quick reference on the size of the ground heat exchanger. Corrections for ground temperature, ground density, ground thermal conductivity, and indoor air temperature were presented. Soil temperature and thermal conductivity were found to be the most important parameters for sizing GCHP heat exchangers. Results from the simplified method were compared to two available heat exchanger sizing methods: the National Water Well Association (NWWA) and the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA). The simplified method predicted shorter lengths than those from either of these two methods.

O'Neal, D. L.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Aldred, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Water injection has been recognized as a powerful techniquefor enhancing energy recovery from vapor-dominated geothermal systemssuch as The Geysers. In addition to increasing reservoir pressures,production well flow rates, and long-term sustainability of steamproduction, injection has also been shown to reduce concentrations ofnon-condensible gases (NCGs) in produced steam. The latter effectimproves energy conversion efficiency and reduces corrosion problems inwellbores and surface lines.This report reviews thermodynamic andhydrogeologic conditions and mechanisms that play an important role inreservoir response to water injection. An existing general-purposereservoir simulator has been enhanced to allow modeling of injectioneffects in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,including effects of non-condensible gases of different solubility.Illustrative applications demonstrate fluid flow and heat transfermechanisms that are considered crucial for developing approaches to insitu abatement of NCGs.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Simple Dynamical Model of the Warm-Water Branch of the Middepth Meridional Overturning Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-gravity model is presented of the warm-water branch of the middepth meridional overturning circulation in a rectangular basin with a circumpolar connection. The model describes the balance between production of warm water by Ekman ...

R. M. Samelson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based...

312

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling and Test-and-Rate Methods for Innovative Thermosiphon Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in modeling and test-and-rate methods for thermosiphon solar domestic water heaters.

Burch, J.; Shoukas, G.; Brandemuhl, M.; Krarti, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimating market penetration of steam, hot water and chilled water in commercial sector using a new econometric model  

SciTech Connect

For the first time in the public domain, we have estimated the energy consumption and expenditures of district steam, hot water, and chilled water. Specifically, the combined energy consumption and expenditures of steam, hot water, and chilled water in 1989 were approximately 800 trillion Btu and 7 billion dollars, respectively. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for estimating market penetration of steam, hot water, and chilled water systems in commercial buildings over the next 20 years. This research sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) used the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) to provide information on energy consumption and expenditures and related factors in about 6000 buildings. A general linear model to estimated parameters for each of the three equations for steam, hot water, and chilled water demand in the buildings. A logarithmic transformation was made for the dependent variable and most of the explanatory variables. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot water, and chilled water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. This model should be of interest to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved with planning and implementing community-based energy-conserving and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL has a long history of successful research to understand and improve the cost of renewable energy technologies, their possible deployment scenarios, and the economic impacts of this deployment. As a research laboratory, NREL is a neutral third party and can provide an unbiased perspective of methodologies and approaches used to estimate direct and indirect economic impacts of offshore renewable energy projects. Deployment and Economic Impact NREL's economic analysis team is working to provide stakeholders with the tools necessary to understand potential deployment scenarios of water power technologies and the economic impacts of this deployment. The team is working to improve the representation of marine and

316

Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water easy. Since refrigeration equipment runs more than heat pumps, energy savings can be large for ground-coupled refrigeration. The paper presents a design procedure for ground loops for heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration. It gives an overview of the commercial ground-coupled systems in Louisiana that have both refrigeration and heat pumps. Systems vary from small offices to a three-story office building with 187 tons. A chain of hamburger outlets uses total ground-coupling in all of its stores. A grocery store has ground-coupling for heat pumps and refrigeration. Desuperheaters provide 80 percent of the hot water for a coin laundry in the same building. A comparison of energy costs in a bank with a ground-coupled heat pump system to a similar bank with air-conditioning and gas for heat revealed a 31 percent reduction in utility costs for the ground-coupled building. Two buildings of the Mississippi Power and Light Co. have ground-coupled heat pumps in one, and high efficiency air source heat pumps in the other. Energy savings in nine months was 60,000 kWh (25 percent), and electric peak demand was reduced 42 kW (35 percent).

Braud, H. J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part I: The Land Dynamics (LaD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model of large-scale land (continental) water and energy balances is presented. The model is an extension of an earlier scheme with a record of successful application in climate modeling. The most important changes from the original ...

P. C. D. Milly; A. B. Shmakin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ground-Based Observations and Modeling of the Visibility and Radar Reflectivity in a Radiation Fog Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a radiation fog layer at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (51.97°N, 4.93°E) on 23 March 2011 was observed with ground-based in situ and remote sensing observations to investigate the relationship between ...

R. Boers; H. Klein Baltink; H. J. Hemink; F. C. Bosveld; M. Moerman

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Extending the Model of Residential Water Conservation Nature and Scope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d e l of Residential Water Conservation Nature and Scope ByK e y W o r d s : Urban Water conservation and demand, waterof price-induced water conservation with other drought

Corral, Leonardo; Fisher, Anthony; Hatch, Nile W

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solvation characteristics of a model water-soluble polymer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in mixtures of d-water (deuterated water) and d-alco- hols (deuterated ... The identification of any commercial product or trade name does not imply ...

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some cities, the municipal sewer system collects both storm water and sanitary sewage in the same pipes. During dry weather these sewers carry all the sanitary sewage to the wastewater treatment plant for treatment. However, when rainstorms or snow melt increase the amount of runoff, the combined flow of sanitary sewage and storm water can exceed the capacity of the sewer system, which can cause serious problems like the storm water and sewage mix are discharged untreated into the river or the sewage backs up into streets and basement. Storm water treated in the sewage treatment plant also causes unnecessary energy use. Sewer systems can also have unintended ground water entering the network, which occurs because of hydraulic pressure on the buried sewer lines infiltration. Therefore, separating the storm water/infiltration and sanitary sewage reduces the possibility of sewage discharge during heavy rain periods, and saves energy.

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

A model for improvement of water heating heat exchanger designs for residential heat pump water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat pump water heaters are a promising technology to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. A key component is the water heating heat exchanger.… (more)

Weerawoot, Arunwattana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying phytoplankton in water characterized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of the water quality of shallow lakes: A mixture modelling approach to quantifying Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, POB 35, H-8237, Hungary Remote sensing has significantly over recent years, the application of satellite remote sensing to lake water is constrained

Tyler, Andrew N.

326

Watershed modeling using large-scale distributed computing in Condor and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models are increasingly being used to quantify the effects of best management practices (BMPs) on water quality. While these models offer the ability to study multiple BMP scenarios, and to analyze impacts of various management decisions on watershed ... Keywords: Condor, Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Program, Lincoln Lake, Soil and Water Assessment Tool Model, TeraGrid, best management practices

Margaret W Gitau; Li-Chi Chiang; Mohamed Sayeed; Indrajeet Chaubey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM is required to maintain water supplies while water is essential to produce energy. However, the models and energy generally dealt with them separately, the two resources are highly interconnected. Energy

328

A general water supply planning model: Evaluation of decentralized treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing population, diminishing supplies and variable climatic conditions can cause difficulties in meeting water demands; especially in arid regions where water resources are limited. Given the complexity of the system and the interactions among ... Keywords: Decentralized wastewater treatment system, System dynamics, Water conservation, Water supply

G. Chung; K. Lansey; P. Blowers; P. Brooks; W. Ela; S. Stewart; P. Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

An Improved Model for Assessing the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in Boiling Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly two decades, hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) has been used as a remedial measure to protect boiling water reactor (BWR) structural components against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In this paper, computer modeling is used to evaluate the effectiveness of HWC for BWRs. The DEMACE computer code, equipped with an updated chemical reaction set, G values, and a Sherwood number, is adopted to predict the chemical species concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) responses to HWC in the primary heat transport circuit of a typical BWR. In addition, plant-specific neutron and gamma dose rate profiles are reported. DEMACE is calibrated against the data of oxygen concentration variation as a function of feedwater hydrogen concentration in the recirculation system of the Chinshan Unit 2 BWR.The determinant result for assessing the effectiveness of HWC is the ECP. For a typical BWR/4-type reactor such as Chinshan Unit 2, it is found that protecting the core channel and the lower plenum outlet is quite difficult even though the feedwater hydrogen concentration is as high as 2 ppm, based on the predicted species concentration and ECP data. However, for regions other than those mentioned earlier, a moderate amount of hydrogen added to the feedwater (0.9 ppm) is enough to achieve the desired protection against IGSCC.

Yeh, T.-K. [National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Chu Fang [Taiwan Power Company (China)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

GEOtop: A Distributed Hydrological Model with Coupled Water and Energy Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new distributed hydrological model, called GEOtop. The model accommodates very complex topography and, besides the water balance, unlike most other hydrological models, integrates all the terms in the surface energy balance ...

Riccardo Rigon; Giacomo Bertoldi; Thomas M. Over

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis · Simulated at the power plant level with 4841 individual plants modeled · Plants distinguishedProject Impetus · Energy-Water Roadmap findings: ­ Reduce fresh water consumption in electric power generation Surface Water Ground Water Population Growth Industry Fuels Wind Hydro Solar Thermoelectric #12;System

Keller, Arturo A.

333

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 5, is an applications guide of the three computer programs. SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS, for the purpose of designing a safe substation grounding system. The applications guide utilizes four example substation grounding systems for the purpose of illustrating the application of the programs, SOMIP, SMECC, and SGSYS. The examples are based on data provided by four contributing utilities, namely, Houston Lighting and Power Company, Southern Company Services, Puget Sound Power and Light Company, and Arizona Public Service Company. For the purpose of illustrating specific capabilities of the computer programs, the data have been modified. As a result, the final designs of the four systems do not necessarily represent actual grounding system designs by these utilities. The example system 1 is a 138 kV/35 kV distribution substation. The example system 2 is a medium size 230 kV/115 kV transmission substation. The third example system is a generation substation while the last is a large 525 kV/345 kV/230 kV transmission substation. The four examples cover most of the practical problems that a user may encounter in the design of substation grounding systems.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of an integrated building load-ground source heat pump model as a test bed to assess short- and long-term heat pump and ground loop performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) have the ability to significantly reduce the energy required to heat and cool buildings. Historically, deployment of GSHP's in the… (more)

Gaspredes, Jonathan Louis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Diffusion Experiments with a Global Discontinuous Galerkin Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-order diffusion scheme is developed for the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) global shallow-water model. The shallow-water equations are discretized on the cubed sphere tiled with quadrilateral elements relying on a nonorthogonal curvilinear ...

Ramachandran D. Nair

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

How Well Do Climate Models Reproduce North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation and the subsequent evolution of the subtropical mode water (STMW) involve various dynamic and thermodynamic processes. Proper representation of mode water variability and contributions from various processes in climate models is ...

Shenfu Dong; Kathryn A. Kelly

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

How Well Do Climate Models Reproduce North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation and the subsequent evolution of the Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) involve various dynamic and thermodynamic processes. Proper representation of mode water variability and contributions from various processes in climate models is ...

Shenfu Dong; Kathryn A. Kelly

338

Diabatic Forcing and Initialization with Assimilation of Cloud Water and Rainwater in a Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, diabatic initialization, diabatic forcing, and liquid water assimilation techniques are tested in a semi-implicit hydrostatic regional forecast model containing explicit representations of grid-scale cloud water and rainwater. ...

William H. Raymond; William S. Olson; Geary Callan

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

340

RELAP5/MOD3 modeling of water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas  

SciTech Connect

The capability of the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code to analyze water hammer transients due to water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas is investigated. The code-calculated results have been compared with those obtained from simple ideal analytical models. Good agreement is obtained between the calculation and analytical results in the initial period of the transient during which the water column or slug retains its sharp interface and suffers from little breakup or dissipation. As the transient proceeds, the code-calculated hydrodynamic loads are generally less than those implied by the analytical models. This is most likely due to the breakup of the water phase, which is not taken into account in the analytical models. Effects of time step and mesh sizes have also been studied. The results show that the usual Courant time limit applies. Finally, a sample calculation, corresponding to a water hammer transient in a typical Westinghouse four-loop reactor head vent system piping, is presented. The transient is induced by the opening of a relief valve and accelerating a trapped water slug through the pipeline. Hydrodynamic loads (i.e., force-time curves) on various pipe segments have been evaluated by appropriate postprocessing of the transient results. The calculated peak forces at selected pipe segments compare favorably with those estimated from the analytical models.

Yeung, W.S.; Shirkov, J.; Seifaee, F. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An intelligent pattern recognition model to automate the categorisation of residential water end-use events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid dissemination of residential water end-use (e.g. shower, clothes washer, etc.) consumption data to the customer via a web-enabled portal interface is becoming feasible through the advent of high resolution smart metering technologies. However, ... Keywords: Dynamic time warping algorithm, Gradient vector filtering, Hidden Markov model, Residential water flow trace disaggregation, Water demand management, Water end-use event, Water micro-component

K. A. Nguyen, R. A. Stewart, H. Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: An application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison ... Keywords: Model comparison, Qualitative response models, Quantitative models

B. G. J. S. Sonneveld; M. A. Keyzer; L. Stroosnijder

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) use the earth's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Fact Sheet Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) use the earth's constant. Waste heat can be used to heat hot water. System Types There are two types of ground source heat pumps, closed loop and open loop systems. Closed loop heat pumps use the earth as the heat source and heat sink

Paulsson, Johan

345

Impact of Scale and Aggregation on the Terrestrial Water Exchange: Integrating Land Surface Models and Rhône Catchment Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models (LSMs) used in climate modeling include detailed above-ground biophysics but usually lack a good representation of runoff. Both processes are closely linked through soil moisture. Soil moisture however has a high spatial ...

Reto Stöckli; Pier Luigi Vidale; Aaron Boone; Christoph Schär

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling patterns of hot water use in households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

various usage characteristics associated with electric, gas-Usage: A Review of Published Metered Studies. Prepared for Gasgas, may be an incentive for people with electric water heaters to reduce their hot water usage.

Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modeling the water consumption of Singapore using system dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water resources are essential to life, and in urban areas, the high demand density and finite local resources often engender conditions of relative water scarcity. To overcome this scarcity, governments intensify infrastructure ...

Welling, Karen Noiva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Stakeholder driven update and improvement of a national water resources model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that water management must be based on an integrated approach, considering the entire freshwater cycle. This has in particularly been endorsed in Europe by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) imposing integrated ... Keywords: Denmark, Groundwater, Integrated modelling, Model updating, National model, Stakeholder involvement

Anker Lajer HøJberg; Lars Troldborg; Simon Stisen; Britt B. S. Christensen; Hans JøRgen Henriksen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

The five volume report comprises the user manual, installation, and validation manual and an applications guide for the SGA (Substation Grounding Analysis) software package. SGA consists of four computer programs: (1) SOMIP, (2) SMECC, (3) SGSYS, and (4) TGRND. The first three programs provide a comprehensive analysis tool for the design of substation grounding systems to meet safety standards. The fourth program, TGRND, provides a state of the art analysis tool for computing transient ground potential rise and ground system impedance. This part of the report, Volume 1, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SOMIP (SOil Measurement Interpretation Program). This program computes the best estimate of the parameters of a two layer soil model from usual soil resistivity measurements. Four pin or three pin soil measurements can be accommodated. In addition, it provides error bounds on the soil parameters for a given confidence level. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SOMIP and provides two test cases for validation purposes. 4 refs.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A hybrid system model of seasonal snowpack water balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is estimated that seasonal snow cover is the primary source of water supply for over 60 million people in the western United States. Informed decision making, which ensures reliable and equitable distribution of this limited water resource, thus needs ... Keywords: hybrid systems, hydrology, snowmelt, water resources

Branko Kerkez; Steven D. Glaser; John A. Dracup; Roger C. Bales

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

352

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Integrated modelling of risk and uncertainty underlying the cost and effectiveness of water quality measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an overview of the most important sources of uncertainty when analysing the least cost way to improve water quality. The estimation of the cost-effectiveness of water quality measures is surrounded by environmental, economic ... Keywords: Cost-effectiveness, Integrated modelling, Risk, Uncertainty, Water quality

Roy Brouwer; Chris De Blois

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or… (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository The study summarizes the initial work on numerical modeling, simulations, and experimental results related to nuclear waste storage in a salt repository. The study reflects the project's preliminary effort at simulating the fluid flow and heat transport processes, before treating the fully coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic-chemical (TMHC) coupled processes in the future. Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository More Documents & Publications Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository

356

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

357

Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the scale dependence of height-resolved temperature T and water vapor q variability are valuable for improved subgrid-scale climate model parameterizations and model evaluation. Variance spectral benchmarks for T and q obtained ...

B. H. Kahn; J. Teixeira; E. J. Fetzer; A. Gettelman; S. M. Hristova-Veleva; X. Huang; A. K. Kochanski; M. Köhler; S. K. Krueger; R. Wood; M. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Water Vapor-Energy Balance Model Designed for Sensitivity Testing of Climatic Feedback Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zonal mean water vapor-energy balance (WEB) model is formulated to assess feedback interactions of the hydrologic cycle and lapse rate with the radiative fluxes, snow-dependent albedo and transport mechanisms. The WEB model is designed for ...

Robert G. Gallimore

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION AT THE MINERAL-WATER INTERFACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION AT THE MINERAL-WATER INTERFACE © 2007 Kristian W. Paul All Rights Reserved i #12;MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Tropical Water and Energy Cycles in a Cumulus Ensemble Model. Part I: Equilibrium Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cumulus ensemble model is used to study the tropical water and energy cycles and their role in the climate system. The model includes cloud dynamics, radiative processes, and microphysics that incorporate all important production and conversion ...

C. H. Sui; K. M. Lau; W. K. Tao; J. Simpson

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Initialization of Soil-Water Content in Regional-Scale Atmospheric Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the soil-water content fields required as initial conditions for land surface components within atmospheric prediction models. This is done using a model of the hydrologic ...

Christopher B. Smith; Mercedes N. Lakhtakia; William J. Capehart; Toby N. Carlson

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor Temperature for District Heating Systems. ” ASHRAEAssessment of Buried District Heating Piping. ” ASHRAE

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University. viii California Energy Commission (CEC).CMF. Sacramento, California: California Energy Commission.California Energy Commission (CEC). 2004. 2005 Building

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Used for GSHP. ” ASHRAE Transactions 106 (2): 434–and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE). 2005.2005 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals. Atlanta, Georgia:

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A New Narrowband Radiation Model for Water Vapor Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of radiation models is a critical issue in climate studies. However, calculations from different radiation models used in climate calculations disagree with one another, and with more detailed models, at levels significant to many ...

Juying X. Warner; Robert G. Ellingson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Simulation of Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump Systems and Experimental Validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid ground source heat pump systems incorporate both ground loop heat exchangers and auxiliary heat rejecters, such as cooling towers, fluid coolers, cooling ponds, or pavement heating systems. The design of the hybrid ground source heat pump system involves many degrees of freedom; e.g. the size of the cooling tower interacts with the control strategy, the ground loop heat exchanger design, and other parameters. This paper presents a simulation of such a system using a direct contact evaporative cooling tower as the supplemental heat rejecter. The simulation is performed in a component-based modeling environment using component models of a vertical ground loop heat exchanger, plate frame heat exchanger, cooling tower, circulating pumps, and heat pumps. Seven months (March to September 2005) of five-minutely experimental data from a hybrid ground source heat pump system were used for validation purposes. The source side of the system consists of two packaged water-to-water heat pumps, a three-borehole ground loop heat exchanger, and a direct contact evaporative cooling tower, isolated by a plate frame heat exchanger. The load side serves two small buildings with hydronic heating and cooling. Experimental validations of each component simulation and the entire system simulation are presented.

Jason E. Gentry; Jeffrey D. Spitler; Daniel E. Fisher; Xiaowei Xu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measurement and Modeling of Algal Biokinetics in Highly Eutrophic Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 of 20 Introduction Algae are now recognized as aLarge standing crops of algae can support higher trophicproductivity, but large algae blooms can also impair water

Stringfellow, William T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Shallow Water Model of the Winter Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow water equations are used to investigate the interaction of planetary wave-breaking with a “diabatic” forcing. The numerical integrations demonstrate the formation of a sharp gradient in potential vorticity at the edge of the polar ...

Martin Juckes

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Use of electrodialysis for concentrating simulated (Model) drainage collector waters  

SciTech Connect

The volume of mineralized drainage collector waters (DCW) increased as the result of development of soil reclamation. For example, this volume is 0.3 km/sup 3//yr in the Ashkhabad province alone, and the total for the Turkmen SSR is 5 km/sup 3//hr. The degree of mineralization of DCW varies from 2 to 33 g/liter. About 50% of the mineralization of DCW is made up of hardness salts. Desalination of mineralized DCW and their return the water-supply system would decrease consumption of fresh water and diminish salination of existing water sources. The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of obtaining highly concentrated brines during desalination of simulated DCW without preliminary softening with the use of MK-100M cation-exchange membrane obtained by chemical modification of homogeneous MK-100 cation-exchange membrane with the ethylenediamine.

Grebenyuk, V.D.; Veisov, B.K.; Chebotareva, R.D.; Braude, K.P.; Nefedova, G.Z.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

67   3.2.3 Temperature-gradient (heat-pipe)water management ( e.g . , heat-pipe effect), examination ofsubstantially due to this heat-pipe effect. Due to the

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improved Retrieval of Integrated Water Vapor from Water Vapor Radiometer Measurements Using Numerical Weather Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor radiometer (WVR) retrieval algorithms require a priori information on atmospheric conditions along the line of sight of the radiometer in order to derive opacities from observed brightness temperatures. This paper's focus is the mean ...

Steven R. Chiswell; Steven Businger; Michael Bevis; Fredrick Solheim; Christian Rocken; Randolph Ware

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modeling and Analysis for Control of Reactant and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions due to the inclusion of compressibility, we employ the simplifying evaporation/condensation model

Stefanopoulou, Anna

375

Mathematical Model for Efficient Water Flow Curic Vladimir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry, Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 39, pp. 1353- 1374, 2004 [6] Jeppson R. Analysis of flow

Krejiæ, Nata�a

376

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components In the United States currently there are approximately 104 operating light water reactors. Of these, 69 are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and 35 are boiling water reactors (BWRs). In 2007, the 104 light-water reactors (LWRs) in the United States generated approximately 100 GWe, equivalent to 20% of total US electricity production. Most of the US reactors were built before 1970 and the initial design lives of most of the reactors are 40 years. It is expected that by 2030, even those reactors that have received 20-year life extension license from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

377

Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

380

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository The study summarizes the initial work on numerical modeling, simulations, and experimental results related to nuclear waste storage in a salt repository. The study reflects the project's preliminary effort at simulating the fluid flow and heat transport processes, before treating the fully coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic-chemical (TMHC) coupled processes in the future. Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository More Documents & Publications Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Transmission Line Grounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published a comprehensive grounding report. Published in two parts, the report covered the theoretical and practical aspects of transmission line grounding practices. To further improve the tools available for grounding analysis, an investigation into practical ways to calculate the fault current distribution and ground potential rise of the transmission line grounding system was conducted. Furthermore, a survey of utilities has documented industry pr...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

Incorporating Anthropogenic Water Regulation Modules into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic activities have been significantly perturbing global freshwater flows and groundwater reserves. Despite numerous advances in the development of land surface models (LSMs) and global terrestrial hydrological models (GHMs), relatively ...

Yadu Pokhrel; Naota Hanasaki; Sujan Koirala; Jaeil Cho; Pat J.-F. Yeh; Hyungjun Kim; Shinjiro Kanae; Taikan Oki

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (Redirected from Ground Electromagnetic Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

384

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (< 100 C), water exists in both liquid and vapor phases. Furthermore, state-of-the-art membranes require the use of water to provide high conductivity and fast proton transport. Thus, there is a tradeoff between having enough water for proton conduction (ohmic losses), but not too much or else the buildup of liquid water will cause a situation in which the reactant-gas-transport pathways are flooded (mass-transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Modelling water dynamics with DNDC and DAISY in a soil of the North China Plain: A comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the DNDC and Daisy model to simulate the water dynamics in a floodplain soil of the North China Plain was tested and compared. While the DNDC model uses a simple cascade approach, the Daisy model applies the physically based Richard's ... Keywords: China, DNDC, Daisy, Model comparison, Model evaluation, Modelling, North China Plain, Soil water content

Roland Kröbel; Qinping Sun; Joachim Ingwersen; Xinping Chen; Fusuo Zhang; Torsten Müller; Volker Römheld

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Using hydrodynamic modeling for estimating flooding and water depths in grand bay, alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for using hydrodynamic modeling to estimate inundation areas and water depths during a hurricane event. The Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC) is used in this research. EFDC is one of the most commonly applied models ... Keywords: EFDC, flooding, grand bay, grid generation, hydrodynamics, inundation, modeling

Vladimir J. Alarcon; William H. McAnally

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Nonlinear Steady-State Model of the North Water Polynya, Baffin Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear, steady-state model of the North Water (NOW), the Arctic's largest polynya, is presented. The model follows in the spirit of the recently developed latent and sensible heat polynya model of Mysak and Huang, but extends it in several ...

M. S. Darby; A. J. Willmott; L. A. Mysak

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wave fronts. However, in most power plant transient performance models, there are few heat exchangersAdvanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor and a Heat Introduction This paper presents two advanced modeling methods, and two applications, for power plant

Mitchell, John E.

389

Variational Data Assimilation with a Variable Resolution Finite-Element shallow-water Equations Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adjoint model of a finite-element shallow-water equations model was obtained with a view to calculate the gradient of a cost functional in the framework of using this model to carry out variational data assimilation (VDA) experiments using ...

Keyun Zhu; I. Michael Navon; Xiaolei Zou

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transient analysis of grounding systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the problem of computing the ground potential rise of grounding systems during transients. Finite element analysis is employed to model the constituent parts of a grounding system. Short lengths of earth embedded electrodes are characterized as transmission lines with distributed inductance, capacitance and leakage resistance to earth. Leakage resistance to earth is accurately computed with the method of moments. The other parameters of the finite element, namely inductance and capacitance, are computed from the resistance utilizing Maxwell's equations. This modeling enables the computation of the transient response of substation grounding systems to fast or slow waves striking the substation. The result is obtained in terms of a convolution of the step response of the system and the striking wave. In this way the impedance of substation systems to 60 cycles is accurately computed. Results demonstrate the dependence of the 60 cycle impedance on system parameters. The methodology allows to interface this model of a substation ground mat with the Electromagnetic Transient Analysis Program thus, allowing explicit representation of earth effects in electromagmatic transients computations.

Meliopoulos, A.P.; Moharam, M.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry and effectively collaborate with all associated stakeholders. JEDI Modeling NREL worked with industry members to develop and provide public access to an easy-to-use input-output model that estimates the jobs and economic development impacts (JEDI) of MHK projects in the United States. The JEDI

392

Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control  

SciTech Connect

Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented.

Feeley, J.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Incorporation of system operation strategies in water rights modeling and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the state of Texas. Effective management of this stochastic resource requires that the availability of water for various uses be estimated to a high degree of confidence. The availability of water is constrained by a variety of hydrologic, physical, environmental, and institutional factors. The adoption of the doctrine of prior appropriation by the state of Texas and the administration of the associated system of water rights places a significant institutional constraint upon the availability of water in the state. This thesis describes a generalized river basin simulation model (TAMUWRAP) capable of analyzing the hydrologic and institutional availability of water to specific users under a prior appropriative system of water rights. The model analyzes the availability of water to individual water rights considering system reservoir operations, return flows, hydroelectric power generation, negative incremental inflows between basin locations, and buffer zone operations. The model can also determine the availability of water to groups of water rights with multiple dates of priority and storage in multiple reservoirs. A case study applying TAMUWRAP to the Brazos River Basin in Texas is presented. The effects of various model options upon simulation results are demonstrated, concentrating on the system of reservoirs and water right permits owned by the Brazos River Authority. The effects of the incorporation of a system reservoir operating permit into the Texas water rights permit structure is investigated. Study results indicate that the Bmws River Authority benefits from conjunctive operation of its system of reservoir and might be able to increase its annual permitted diversion amount with a system permit.

Dunn, David Douglas

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Numerical Modeling of Coupled Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in an Urban Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dominguez Channel Watershed (DCW), located in the southern portion of Los Angeles County (Figure A.1), drains about 345 square miles into the Los Angeles Harbor. The cities and jurisdictions in DCW are shown in Figure A.2. The largest of these include the cities of Los Angeles, Carson, and Torrance. This watershed is unique in that 93% of its land area is highly developed (i.e. urbanized). The watershed boundaries are defined by a complex network of storm drains and flood control channels, rather than being defined by natural topography. Table (1) shows a summary of different land uses in the Dominguez Channel Watershed (MEC, 2004). The Dominguez Watershed has the highest impervious area of all watersheds in the Los Angeles region. The more impervious the surface, the more runoff is generated during a storm. Storm water runoff can carry previously accumulated contaminants and transport them into receiving water systems. Point sources such as industrial wastewater and municipal sewage as well as urban runoff from commercial, residential, and industrial areas are all recognized as contributors to water quality degradation at DWC. Section 303(d) of the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) requires states to identify and report all waters not meeting water quality standards and to develop action plans to pursue the water quality objectives. These plans specify the maximum amount of a given pollutant that the water body of concern can receive and still meet water quality standards. Such plans are called Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). TMDLs also specify allocations of pollutant loadings to point and non-point sources taking into account natural background pollutant levels. This demonstrates the importance of utilizing scientific tools, such as flow and transport models, to identify contaminant sources, understand integrated flow paths, and assess the effectiveness of water quality management strategies. Since overland flow is a very important component of the water balance and hydrology of DCW, a parallel, distributed watershed model that treats flow in groundwater and surface water in a dynamically coupled manner will be used to build a flow model of the watershed. This coupled model forms the basis for modeling and understanding the transport of contaminants through the Dominguez Channel Watershed, which can be used in designing and implementing TMDLs to manage the water quality in this basin. In this report, the coupled surface water-groundwater flow model of DCW will be presented. This flow model was calibrated against a storm that occurred in February 21st, 2004. The model and approach are explained further in the following sections.

Rihani, J F; Maxwell, R M

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Numerical Modeling System of the Hydrological Cycle for Estimation of Water Fluxes in the Huaihe River Plain Region, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To analyze the water budget under human influences in the Huaihe River plain region in China, the authors have developed a numerical modeling system that integrates water flux algorithms into a platform created by coupling a soil moisture model ...

Xi Chen; Yongqin David Chen; Zhicai Zhang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but the authors have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. The authors proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water (Table 1). They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100 \\261 10% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80% of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but they have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. Their proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water. They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100--210% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80 % of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Soil Moisture Modeling Based on Multiyear Observations in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple soil moisture models useful for drought monitoring and climate change studies were proposed, based on 4-yr ground observations of root-zone soil moisture in Sahelian Niger. One is a water balance model that calculates soil moisture ...

Y. Yamaguchi; M. Shinoda

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Boiler Water Deposition Model, Part 1: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sources of availability and performance losses in fossil units involve deposition on water- and steam-touched surfaces, with the most acute effects occurring in boilers and turbines. Earlier deposition state-of-knowledge assessments sponsored by EPRI established three broad classifications of deposition phenomena (EPRI reports 1004194 and 1004930). However, within these classifications are many processes and influencing factors that need to be considered in order to make meaningful improvements in d...

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Program on Technology Innovation: Hybrid Models of Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation for Nickel Alloy Welds in Low-Electrochemical Potential (ECP) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed hybrid models of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel alloy welds.  These models are able to account for differences in tensile properties of each heat, applied stress intensity factor, dissolved hydrogen, water temperature, and the increase in local strain rate caused by the moving crack. The new models show promise for reducing uncertainty in predicting PWSCC for nickel alloy welds by a statistically and practically ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Exploring a Multiresolution Modeling Approach within the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to solve the global shallow-water equations with a conforming, variable-resolution mesh is evaluated using standard shallow-water test cases. While the long-term motivation for this study is the creation of a global climate modeling ...

Todd D. Ringler; Doug Jacobsen; Max Gunzburger; Lili Ju; Michael Duda; William Skamarock

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Mathematical modelling of processes of reject water treatment in moving bed bioreactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient treatment of reject water originating from sludge digestion process was achieved by implementing a moving bed bioreactor. Since the ongoing processes in the reactor were unclear, model development was chosen in order to map them. To describe ... Keywords: ANAMMOX, MBBR, nitrogen removal, reject water, steady-state simulation

Viola Somogyi; Bence Fazekas; Endre Domokos; Ákos Rédey

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Age of Water and Ventilation Timescales in a Global Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The age of water in the World Ocean is studied using a passive age tracer introduced into a global ocean model. Additional information is derived from a transient “dye” tracer that tracks the time-dependent spreading of surface waters into the ...

Matthew H. England

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Shallow water numerical model of the wave generated by the Vajont landslide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 9th 1963 a huge landslide fell into the Vajont artificial reservoir in Northern Italy, and displaced the water which overtopped the dam and produced a destructive wave that inundated the valley causing about 2000 casualties and complete devastation. ... Keywords: Finite volume scheme, Moving boundary condition, Numerical model, Shallow water equations, Vajont landslide

Silvia Bosa; Marco Petti

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

407

A PV-Based Shallow-Water Model on a Hexagonal–Icosahedral Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new global shallow-water model has been developed. It uses a hexagonal–icosahedral grid, potential vorticity as a prognostic variable, and a conservative, shape-preserving scheme for advection of mass, potential vorticity, and tracers. A semi-...

John Thuburn

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Scheme for Parameterizing Ice-Cloud Water Content in General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of ice clouds are a primary issue for climate and climate change. Evaluating these optical properties in three-dimensional models for studying climate will require a method to calculate the ice water content of such clouds. ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Leo J. Donner

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Shallow-Water Model that Prevents Nonlinear Steepening of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow-water model is used as a testbench for understanding many fundamental dynamical problems (e.g. certain wave–mean interaction problems). One sometimes wants to allow large-amplitude gravity waves to propagate significant distances in ...

Oliver Bühler

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An Idealized Model of the World Ocean. Part I: The Global-Scale Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation, three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean, employing idealized versions of the real topography and surface boundary conditions, is used to study the water mass structure of the World Ocean. In particular, the response ...

Michael D. Cox

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Influences of Topography on the Modeling of Abyssal Water Masses. Part I: Effects of Channel Representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Connections between basins below 4000 m, which may or may not be resolved in computer-generated model topography, have been found to have a considerable impact on the movement of Antarctic Bottom Water and on deep ocean temperatures. Blocked ...

Ross J. Murray; C. J. C. Reason

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Model Analysis of the Behavior of the Mediterranean Water in the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the Mediterranean Water in the North Atlantic Ocean sector of a global ocean general circulation model is explored, starting from its entry point at the Strait of Gibraltar. The analysis focuses primarily on one experiment in ...

Yanli Jia; Andrew C. Coward; Beverly A. de Cuevas; David J. Webb; Sybren S. Drijfhout

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Global Circulation in an Axially Symmetric Shallow Water Model Forced by Equinoctial Differential Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solutions of an axially symmetric inviscid shallow-water model (SWM) on the earth forced by equinoctial differential heating are constructed using numerical integration of the time-dependent equations and analysis of their steady states. The ...

Ori Adam; Nathan Paldor

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1 , John D Pye2 to efficiently gasify biomass would offer one potential source of sustainable hydrocarbons and deliver desirable

415

A Numerical Modeling Study of Warm Offshore Flow over Cool Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of boundary layer evolution in offshore flow of warm air over cool water are conducted and compared with aircraft observations of mean and turbulent fields made at Duck, North Carolina. Two models are used: a two-dimensional,...

Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson; Larry Mahrt; Phil Barbour

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Surface Ocean Fluxes and Water-Mass Transformation Rates in the Coupled NCAR Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distributions of the air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater and water mass transformation rates from a control integration of the coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Climate System Model (CSM) are compared with ...

Scott C. Doney; William G. Large; Frank O. Bryan

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Water and Energy Budgets of a Florida Mesoscale Convective System: A Combined Observational and Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale water and energy budgets are diagnosed for a squall line during the Convection and Precipitation Electrification Experiment and combined with the results of the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model. The fine temporal and ...

J. Halverson; M. Garstang; J. Scala; W-K. Tao

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Satellite-Scale Snow Water Equivalent Assimilation into a High-Resolution Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four methods based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) are tested to assimilate coarse-scale (25 km) snow water equivalent (SWE) observations (typical of passive microwave satellite retrievals) into finescale (1 km) land model simulations. ...

Gabriëlle J. M. De Lannoy; Rolf H. Reichle; Paul R. Houser; Kristi R. Arsenault; Niko E. C. Verhoest; Valentijn R. N. Pauwels

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content Radar Algorithm Evaluation Using an Explicit Cloud Microphysical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cirrus cloud simulations performed using a model with explicit cloud microphysics is applied to testing ice water content retrieval algorithms based on millimeter-wave radar reflectivity measurements. The simulated ice particle size ...

Kenneth Sassen; Zhien Wang; Vitaly I. Khvorostyanov; Graeme L. Stephens; Angela Bennedetti

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Idealized Annually Averaged Macroturbulent Hadley Circulation in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of midlatitude eddies and the thermally driven Hadley circulation is studied using an idealized shallow-water model on the rotating sphere. The contributions of the annually averaged differential heating, vertical advection of ...

Ori Adam; Nili Harnik

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Simple Parameterization of Cloud Water Related Variables for Use in Boundary Layer Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple parameterization of cloud water related variables has been developed which can be used in meteorological models that use a prognostic equation for the turbulent kinetic energy. Based on the results of large-eddy simulations (LES), ...

J. W. M. Cuijpers; P. Bechtold

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School classroom space-conditioning equipment in hot and humid climates is often excessively burdened by the requirement to dehumidify incoming air to maintain proper thermal comfort and air quality. To that end, application of new or modified technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School District, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy Office of the State of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The retrofit classroom, along with a similar baseline classroom (employing a water source heat pump supplied by a boiler/cooling tower loop), were instrumented with an Internet-based system to control and monitor performance, efficiency, and a variety of air states. Those include classroom air, outdoor air, semi-conditioned fresh air, and supply air. Particular attention was dedicated to the humidity content and the carbon dioxide content of conditioned space (classroom) air and to the intake rate of forced fresh air. This field study builds on a previous laboratory study of a water-source heat pump coupled to an enthalpy recovery system. The laboratory work showed good potential for reducing the moisture load from forced ventilation air. At simulated outdoor conditions of 90°F (32.2°C) and 90% RH, the enthalpy recovery wheel in the nominal 2-ton system was able to capture and exhaust 9.9 lb of moisture that would otherwise have to be handled solely by the cooling coil.

Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Contamination of ground and surface waters due to uranium mining and milling. Volume I: Biological processes for concentrating trace elements from uranium mine waters. Open file report 25 Jul 79-14 Sep 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from uranium mines in the Ambrosia Lake district near Grants, N. Mex., contains uranium, selenium, radium, and molybdenum. A novel treatment process for waters from two mines, sections 35 and 36, to reduce the concentrations of the trace contaminants was developed. Particulates are settled by ponding and the waters are passed through an ion exchange resin to remove uranium; barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and radium from the mine waters. The mine waters are subsequently passed through three consecutive algae ponds prior to discharge. Water, sediment, and biological samples were collected over a 4-year period and analyzed to assess the role of biological agents in removal of inorganic trace contaminants from the mine waters.

Brieley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes NREL's development of a HPWH model for use in hourly building energy simulation programs, such as BEopt; this presentation was given at the Building America Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

Wilson, E.; Christensen, C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membrane, liquid and ice phases; the movement of ice throughthe membrane, vapor, and ice phases. As in their 1-D model,species, element index, or ice phase = into the control

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes NREL's development of a HPWH model for use in hourly building energy simulation programs, such as BEopt; this presentation was given at the Building America Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

Wilson, E.; Christensen, C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

J.M. Calle

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

430

Preliminary Modeling, Testing, and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's gas tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional gas storage tank water heaters, but savings depends on the draw pattern. A one-node model incorporating heat exchanger mass is used to address this and other issues. Key model parameters are determined from least-squares regression on short-term data, including burner efficiency, thermal capacitance, and thermal loss coefficient. The calibrated model agrees with data to ~5% on Qgas, with temperature RMS deviation of ~4..deg..C. Efficiency with a standard realistic draw is 71%, compared to 81% predicted from standard energy-factors. Adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater solves issues of oscillations with solar pre-heat, low-flow and hot-water-delay issues. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal data protocols for model parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the Davis Energy Group used the and the Davis Energy Group used the Domestic Hot Water Event Schedule Generator to accurately quantify effects of low and high water usage on distribution system measures such as pipe insulation, home run plumbing, and demand-controlled recirculation loops. As progress continues with high-R, tightly sealed thermal enclosures, domestic hot water becomes an increasingly important energy use in high-performance homes. Building America research has improved our ability to model hot water use so new hot water technologies can be more accurately assessed and more readily integrated into high-performance homes. Energy savings for certain residential building technologies depend greatly on occupant behavior. Domestic hot water use is a good example. Simulating

432

In situ photoelectron spectroscopy study of water adsorption on model biomaterial surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy at near ambient conditions, we compare the interaction of water with four different model biomaterial surfaces: self-assembled thiol monolayers on Au(111) that are functionalized with methyl, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups, and phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid films on Silicon. We show that the interaction of water with biomaterial surfaces is mediated by polar functional groups that interact strongly with water molecules through hydrogen bonding, resulting in adsorption of 0.2-0.3 ML water on the polar thiol films in 700 mTorr water pressure and resulting in characteristic N1s and P2p shifts for the POPC films. Provided that beam damage is carefully controlled, in situ electron spectroscopy can give valuable information about water adsorption which is not accessible under ultra-high vacuum conditions.

Salmeron, Miquel; Ketteler, Guido; Ashby, Paul; Mun, B.S.; Ratera, I.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Kasemo, B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Accurate Liquid Water Path Retrieval from Low-Cost Microwave Radiometers Using Additional Information from a Lidar Ceilometer and Operational Forecast Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water clouds have an important impact on the radiative balance of the earth. The use of ground-based dual-frequency microwave radiometers to derive both liquid water path (LWP) and water vapor path (WVP) is well established, but uncertainties ...

Nicolas Gaussiat; Robin J. Hogan; Anthony J. Illingworth

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 January 29, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration RELAP-7 is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code. Development started in October 2011, and during the past quarter the initial capabilities of RELAP-7 were demonstrated by simulating a steady-state single-phase pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two parallel loops and multiple reactor core flow channels (Fig. 1). The PWR configuration matched that of the Three Mile Island 1 LWR, which is a benchmark problem from the

435

GSFLOW--Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management of wastewater treatment plant effluent using percolation ponds, injection wells, or controlled capacity of percolation ponds (infiltration rate/day x area x days/month) and of injection wells (gpm are explained next. Details of the DAU assignments are provided in the file "Daulist.xls" (Software and Data

436

Measurement and Modeling of Algal Biokinetics in Highly Eutrophic Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor apparently limiting growth, identified using the model, are carbon dioxidecarbon dioxide solubility (calculated as a percent of total inorganic carbon) was identified as the factorfactor of either mineral concentration (M) as measured by suspended mineral solids (TSS minus VSS), carbon dioxide

Stringfellow, William T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings realized by water conservation or efficiencythe benefits and costs of water conservation or efficiencycost savings from water conservation requires knowing the

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

A hybrid neural network and ARIMA model for water quality time series prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate predictions of time series data have motivated the researchers to develop innovative models for water resources management. Time series data often contain both linear and nonlinear patterns. Therefore, neither ARIMA nor neural networks can be ... Keywords: ARIMA, Backpropagation, Hybrid model, Neural networks, Time series

Durdu Ömer Faruk

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modeling Residual Chlorine Decay for Optimization of Booster Chlorination in Urban-rural Water Distribution System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key procedure of optimization of the control of the booster chlorination is modeling the relationship between the concentration of the spot of the booster chlorination (after dosing) and the concentration of the monitoring points on the remote end ... Keywords: Residual chlorine decay, Hybrid transfer function model, Optimization of booster chlorination, Urban-rural water distribution system

Jingqing Liu; Zuozi Huang; Shengwei Tan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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