Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

2

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

3

Ground water protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called

5

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

7

UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, oils, cleaners, batteries, pesticides and wood preservatives are commonly used in households and on farms, but they can be hazardous to ground water if handled improperly. This publication explains proper methods of using, storing and disposing of hazardous materials.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

11

Colorado Ground Water Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Ground Water Commission Place Colorado Website http:water.state.co.usgroun References Colorado Ground Water Commission...

12

Ground water work breakdown structure dictionary  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the activities that are necessary to assess in ground water remediation as specified in the UMTRA Project. These activities include the following: site characterization; remedial action compliance and design documentation; environment, health, and safety program; technology assessment; property access and acquisition activities; site remedial actions; long term surveillance and licensing; and technical and management support.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

14

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary...

15

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties, management practices and watering techniques.

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

17

Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designated Ground Water Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Designated Ground Water Basin Map Details Activities (0) Areas...

18

EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle,...

19

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

20

Water budget for SRP burial ground area  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide migration from the SRP burial ground for solid low-level waste has been studied extensively. Most of the buried radionuclides are fixed on the soil and show negligible movement. The major exception is tritium, which when leached from the waste by percolating rainfall, forms tritiated water and moves with the groundwater. The presence of tritium has been useful in tracing groundwater flow paths to outcrop. A subsurface tritium plume moving from the southwest corner of the burial ground toward an outcrop near Four Mile Creek has been defined. Groundwater movement is so slow that much of the tritium decays before reaching the outcrop. The burial ground tritium plume defined to date is virtually all in the uppermost sediment layer, the Barnwell Formation. The purpose of the study reported in this memorandum was to investigate the hypothesis that deeper flow paths, capable of carrying substantial amounts of tritium, may exist in the vicinity of the burial ground. As a first step in seeking deeper flow paths, a water budget was constructed for the burial ground site. The water budget, a materials balance used by hydrologists, is expressed in annual area inches of rainfall. Components of the water budget for the burial ground area were analyzed to determine whether significant flow paths may exist below the tan clay. Mean annual precipitation was estimated as 47 inches, with evapotranspiration, run-off, and groundwater recharge estimated as 30, 2, and 15 inches, respectively. These estimates, when combined with groundwater discharge data, suggest that 5 inches of the groundwater recharge flow above the tan clay and that 10 inches flow below the tan clay. Therefore, two-thirds of the groundwater recharge appears to follow flow paths that are deeper than those previously found. 13 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

Hubbard, J.E.; Emslie, R.H.

1984-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Stream Discharge Measurements, Ground Water Level Data, and Ground Water Well Hydrographs This page intentionally left blank Contents Section .................................................................................. Surface Water Time-Concentration Plots D1.O ............................................................................................... Stream Discharge Measurements D2.0 ............................................................. Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots for Uranium D3.0 .......................................................................................................... Ground Water Level Data D4.0 ..............................................................................................

23

Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water (Indiana) Ground Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting

24

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Source Heat Pumps to someone by E-mail Ground-Source Heat Pumps to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Ground-Source Heat Pumps on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

25

Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality Surface and Ground Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQualitySurfaceandGround&oldid612197...

26

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water Management Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

29

Water Management Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

30

U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWMON 1.12-1 GWMON 1.12-1 U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan for the Land Farm Pilot Test Monument Valley, Arizona August 2000 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Ofice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-5 1 1-001 5-21-000 Document Number U0106701 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0106701 Contents Contents 1.0 Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Scope ........................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Pilot-Test Extraction Wellfield 2 4.0 Water Elevation Measurements and Monitoring ............... 4

31

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

32

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City,...

33

Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Geologic Map of Site Area ........................................................................................................ E1.O Stream Flow Measurements ...................................................................................................... E2.0 Estimates of Ground Water Flow .............................................................................................. E3.0 .......................................... MODFLOW Flow Budget Analysis for OU 1 1 1 Model Subregions E4.0 ............................................................................ Burro Canyon Aquifer Ground Water Model E5.0 This page intentionally left blank

34

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Management Planning to someone by E-mail Water Management Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

35

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Application of numerical models of ground water flow almost always involves some sort (Yeh 1986; Poeter and Hill 1997; Hill et al. 1998). Other data beside hydraulic head have been used in calibration of ground water models, including rates of ground water exchange with streams and other surface

Saiers, James

36

Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution  

SciTech Connect

The problem of trying to remove ground-water pollution by pumping and treating are pointed out. Various Superfund sites are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many chemicals have been discarded in an undocumented manner, and their place in the groundwater is not known. Results of a remedial program to remove perchloroethylene at a concentration of 6132 parts per billion from groundwater in a site in New Jersey showed that with an average extraction rate of 300 gallons per minute from 1978 to 1984 contamination level was lowered below 100 parts per billion. However, after shutdown of pumping the level rose to 12,588 parts per billion in 1988. These results lead the author to propose that the practical solutions for water supplies may be treatment at the time it enters the system for use.

Abelson, P.H.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ground water hydrology report: Revision 1, Attachment 3. Final  

SciTech Connect

This report presents ground water hydrogeologic activities for the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. The Department of Energy has characterized the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the site and determined that the proposed remedial action would comply with the requirements of the EPA ground water protection standards.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

40

NETL: Produced Water Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PWMIS Home Produced Water Management Information System The Produced Water Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information for managing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) Ground Water Protection (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality monitoring, notification

43

Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive

44

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according to their "leachability.

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE/EA-1268: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site December 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office...

46

Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning Best Management Practice: Water Management Planning October 7, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans. Water management plans should provide clear information about how a facility uses water from the time it is piped in to its ultimate disposal. Knowing how water is used and what it costs enables Federal agencies to make appropriate water management decisions. Overview Federal facility water management plans should include the following: Water Use Policy Statement and Goals Senior management should indicate support for water efficiency in a material way. This can be done in two ways:

47

Water Resource Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Management (Indiana) Water Resource Management (Indiana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Investor-Owned...

48

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Energy and Federal Energy and Water Management Awards to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy and Water Management Awards on AddThis.com... Project Assistance Training Outreach Awards for Saving Energy Federal Energy and Water Management Better Buildings Federal Award

49

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook,...

50

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Contacts on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency...

51

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Best Management Practices Analysis and Evaluation Case Studies Resources Contacts Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets

52

Probability Models for Annual Extreme Water-Equivalent Ground Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of annual extreme water-equivalents of ground snow (reported as inches of water) measured up through the winter of 1979–80 at 76 weather stations in the northeast quadrant of the United States is presented. The analysis ...

Bruce Ellingwood; Robert K. Redfield

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Use Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: Using reverse osmosis to superpurify water reduces bacterial growth and mineral build up, allowing the system to circulate water up to four times in the High-Performance Computing Center. LANSCE cooling towers circulate water for evaporative cooling. LANL is testing methods for decreased water and chemical use at this location. Gabriel C. Herrera of LANL checks gauges on piping inside the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF). Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: In an effort to reduce water consumption, the SERF was constructed to treat and process sanitary effluent water used for cooling the supercomputing facilities. Sandia Canyon: Water from the SERF is used to keep the wetlands healthy to transform hexavalent into trivalent chromium.

55

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Rate Escalations to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Rate Escalations on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Best Management Practices Analysis and Evaluation Water Rate Escalations Evaluation Service Contracts Case Studies Resources

56

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Water Efficiency Best Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Best Management Practices Water Efficiency Best Management Practices Water Sense at Work Logo for the EPA WaterSense The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed WaterSense at Work, a compilation of water-efficiency best management practices (BMPs), to help commercial and institutional facilities understand and manage water use, help facilities establish effective water-management programs, and identify projects and practices that reduce facility water use. FEMP originally developed Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices (BMPs) in response to Executive Order (E.O.) 13123 requirements, which required Federal agencies to reduce water use through cost-effective water efficiency improvements. E.O. 13423 supersedes E.O. 13123. To account for the superseded requirement changes, water use patterns, and advancing technologies, the Environmental Protection Agency's WaterSense Office updated the original BMPs.

57

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

59

Systems modelling for effective mine water management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about the difficulties in securing water have led the Australian coal mining industry to seek innovative ways to improve its water management and to adopt novel strategies that will lead to less water being used and more water being reused. ... Keywords: Mining, Sustainable development, Systems model, Water balance, Water resources management

Claire M. Côte; Chris J. Moran; Christopher J. Hedemann; Christian Koch

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07 On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach to focus on ground water systems that are susceptible to fecal contamination, and requires ground water systems that are at risk of fecal contamination to take corrective action. A minor correction to the final Rule was published on November 21, 2006 (71 FR 67427). The GWR applies to all PWSs2 that use ground water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis and Evaluation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Analysis and Evaluation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management...

63

NETL: Produced Water Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Produced Water Management Technology Descriptions Fact Sheet - Underground Injection for Disposal PWMIS Home Intro to Produced Water Technology Descriptions Basic Separation...

64

River Forecast Application for Water Management: Oil and Water?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing water resources generally and managing reservoir operations specifically have been touted as opportunities for applying forecasts to improve decision making. Previous studies have shown that the application of forecasts into water ...

Kevin Werner; Kristen Averyt; Gigi Owen

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Water Management Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Act (Massachusetts) Management Act (Massachusetts) Water Management Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water Resources Management Advisory Committee within the MA Department of Environmental Protection to oversee the development of standards, rules and regulations for water resources

67

Management of the Hanford water table and waste management implications  

SciTech Connect

The geology and hydrology of the Hanford Reservation are reviewed, with emphasis on ground water flow, to identify those areas that should be restricted from unconditional release due to radionuclide cortamination or radioactive waste storage as well as those areas that would have no hydrological restrictions. The effects of the discharge of large quantities of cooling water from the radiochemical plants on ground water flow were also evaluated. (CH)

Tomlinson, R.E.; Isaacson, R.E.; Brown, D.J.; Veatch, M.D.

1970-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and are not required by MODPATH or MT3D. 3.6.4 Flow Model Calibration The IRA Work Plan states that the model would be calibrated using October 2002 water levels. However,...

69

Design of a digital management system for the sintering material ground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many kinds and a large number of raw materials in the sintering material ground to be managed, while it is difficult to obtain the precise inventory values, which often leads to high cost. Furthermore, the external factors of material ground ... Keywords: Digital, management system., optimization methods, prediction methods, sintering material ground

Yan Cai; Min Wu; Jin-Ni Zhou; Xin Chen

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

71

Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites  

SciTech Connect

This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Total Energy & Water Quality Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a generic model for an energy and water quality management system for the water community, and defines standard specifications for software applications required to minimize energy costs within the constraints of water quality and operation goals.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

GROUND WATER PROTECTION ISSUES WITH GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Closed loop vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps are grouted to facilitate heat transfer and prevent ground water contamination. The grout must exhibit suitable thermal conductivity as well as adequate hydraulic sealing characteristics. Permeability and infiltration tests were performed to assess the ability of cementitious grout to control vertical seepage in boreholes. It was determined that a superplasticized cement-sand grout is a more effective borehole sealant than neat cement over a range of likely operational temperatures. The feasibility of using non-destructive methods to verify bonding in heat exchangers is reviewed.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

75

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Management of Non-Cooling Water Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the efficacy and cost of water management practices that can be used by power companies to address non-cooling water and stormwater release issues with respect to siting, design, and operation of facilities, including generating stations, substations, and rights-of-way in urban and rural settings. The report will be of value to environmental and generation managers within power companies, as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service Contracts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Evaluation Service Contracts on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

78

Federal Energy Management Program: 2011 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners on...

79

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Water Efficiency Best...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices on Facebook...

80

Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management plan. This section sets the specifications that must be met by local plans. The status of county water plans is shown...

82

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

84

GRR/Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Colorado Water Quality Control Act 5 CCR 1002-61 Colorado Discharge Permit System 5 CCR 1002-41 Basic Standards for Ground Water 5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COEGroundWaterDischargePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

85

Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003  

SciTech Connect

Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

GRR/Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-NV-b - Temporary Use of Ground Water for Exploration 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies NAC 534.444 Waiver to use water to explore for oil, gas or geothermal resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Nevada Division of Water Resources (NDWR) may grant a waiver of the

87

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill 5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill Tailings Site by using the selected alternative stated in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 1, 1997 EA-1155: Final Environmental Assessment Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site,

88

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Graphic of the eTraining logo Training Available Managing Water Assessment in Federal Facilities: Learn how to manage the Water Assessment process in Federal facilities by taking this FEMP eTraining course. Although two-thirds of the Earth's surface is water, less than one-half of one percent of that water is currently available for our use. As the U.S. population increases, so does our water use, making water resources increasingly scarce. Many regions feel the strain. The Federal Government uses an estimated 148 to 165 billion gallons of potable water annually. This is equal to the annual water use of a state the size of New Jersey or almost 8 million people1. This is, in part, because water requires significant energy input for treatment, pumping, heating, and process uses. Water is integral to the cooling of power plants that provide energy to Federal facilities.

89

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

90

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

GRR/Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-i - Determination of Nontributary Ground Water Status 19COIDeterminationOfNontributaryGroundWaterStatus.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 CRS 37-90-137 Permits to Construct Wells Outside of Designated Basins CRS 37-90-103 Underground Water Definitions CRS 37-82-101 Waters of Natural Surface Streams Subject to Appropriation CRS 37-92-102 Legislative Declaration - Basic Tenets of Colorado Water Law Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

92

A water utility industry conceptual asset management data warehouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timely decision making is critical in today’s competitive business world and in recent times, data warehousing has been employed by numerous companies to satisfy the needs of accurate and timely information. Data warehousing has traditionally been employed for financial and customer relationship analysis with current applications now moving to other domains, such as the medical and power industries. The asset management industry is one that has seen great strides in recent years due to improved technology, but data warehousing of asset management information has been lacking. A literature review was undertaken to determine data warehousing applications in the area of asset management, and with the lessons learned, a conceptual model of data warehousing for asset management is proposed. The water utility industry is chosen to provide a grounded example of an enterprise data warehouse model that integrates data from various local information systems. The particular issues faced in the asset management domain are highlighted, and several water utility applications are presented. KEY WORDS: data warehousing, asset management, water utility industry, design 1.

Avin Mathew; Sheng Zhang; Lin Ma; Doug Hargreaves

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Impaired Water as Cooling Water in Coal-Based Power Plants – Nalco Company Example of Pipe Scaling The overall objective of this project, conducted by Nalco Company in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, is to develop advanced-scale control technologies to enable coal-based power plants to use impaired water in recirculating cooling systems. The use of impaired water is currently challenged technically and economically due to additional physical and chemical treatment requirements to address scaling, corrosion, and biofouling. Nalco's research focuses on methods to economically manage scaling issues (see Figure 1). The overall approach uses synergistic

94

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

95

Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today...

96

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Oak Ridge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

97

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Corrine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Corrine Kegel, Jane A. Kipp, and Dale Reckley 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Corrine Kegel, Jane A....

98

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine Schultz 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine Schultz fewm13schultzhighres.pdf...

99

Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

102

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

103

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency Case Studies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Best Management Practices Analysis and Evaluation Case Studies Resources

104

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources on Water Resources on Water Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Best Management Practices Analysis and Evaluation Case Studies Resources

105

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running March 16, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. “WIPP is America’s only and the world’s best,” Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. "WIPP is America's only and the world's best," Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. CARLSBAD, N.M. - If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office

107

Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE/EA-1313: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (03/22/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1313 DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final March 2005 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Document Number U0069700 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Office of Legacy Management EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley Site March 2005 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ....................................................................................................... vii Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................

111

Federal Energy Management Program: Awards for Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards for Energy and Water Management to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Awards for Energy and Water Management on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

112

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics

113

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Carnegie Mellon University, in a joint effort with the University of Pittsburgh, is conducting a study of the use of treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup for coal fired power plants. This project builds upon a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled, "Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants," which showed that treated municipal wastewater is the most common and widespread source in the United States. Data analysis revealed that 81 percent of power plants proposed for construction by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) would have sufficient cooling water supply from one to two publicly owned treatment works (POTW) within a 10-mile radius, while 97 percent of the proposed power plants would be able to meet their cooling water needs with one to two POTWs within 25 miles of these plants. Thus, municipal wastewater will be the impaired water source most likely to be locally available in sufficient and reliable quantities for power plants. Results of initial studies indicate that it is feasible to use secondary treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup. The biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, and phosphorus in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, although current research is demonstrating that these problems can be controlled through aggressive chemical management. It is currently unclear whether tertiary treatment of municipal waste water prior to its re-use can be a cost-effective option to aggressive chemical management of the bulk cooling water volume.

114

Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the manner in which produced water is managed. This report presents an overview of produced water, summarizes the study, and presents results from the study at both the national level and the state level. Chapter 2 presents background information on produced water, describing its chemical and physical characteristics, where it is produced, and the potential impacts of produced water to the environment and to oil and gas operations. A review of relevant literature is also included. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to collect information, including outreach efforts to state oil and gas agencies and related federal programs. Because of the inconsistency in the level of detail provided by various state agencies, the approaches and assumptions used to extrapolate data values are also discussed. In Chapter 4, the data are presented, and national trends and observations are discussed. Chapter 5 presents detailed results for each state, while Chapter 6 presents results from federal sources for oil and gas production (i.e., offshore, onshore, and tribal lands). Chapter 7 summarizes the study and presents conclusions.

Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project was to advance the concept of real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin Basin by developing an application to drainage of seasonal wetlands in the Grassland Water District. Real-time water quality management is defined as the coordination of reservoir releases, return flows and river diversions to improve water quality conditions in the San Joaquin River and ensure compliance with State water quality objectives. Real-time water quality management is achieved through information exchange and cooperation between shakeholders who contribute or withdraw flow and salt load to or from the San Joaquin River. This project complements a larger scale project that was undertaken by members of the Water Quality Subcommittee of the San Joaquin River Management Program (SJRMP) and which produced forecasts of flow, salt load and San Joaquin River assimilative capacity between 1999 and 2003. These forecasts can help those entities exporting salt load to the River to develop salt load targets as a mechanism for improving compliance with salinity objectives. The mass balance model developed by this project is the decision support tool that helps to establish these salt load targets. A second important outcome of this project was the development and application of a methodology for assessing potential impacts of real-time wetland salinity management. Drawdown schedules are typically tied to weather conditions and are optimized in traditional practices to maximize food sources for over-wintering wildfowl as well as providing a biological control (through germination temperature) of undesirable weeds that compete with the more proteinaceous moist soil plants such as swamp timothy, watergrass and smartweed. This methodology combines high resolution remote sensing, ground-truthing vegetation surveys using established survey protocols and soil salinity mapping using rapid, automated electromagnetic sensor technology. This survey methodology could be complemented with biological surveys of bird use and invertebrates to produce a robust long-term monitoring strategy for habitat health and sustainability.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ground-Based FSSP and PVM Measurements of Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently published ground-based measurements of liquid water content (LWC) measured in fogs by two microphysical instruments, the FSSP-100 and PVM-100, are evaluated. These publications had suggested that the PVM-100 underestimated LWC ...

H. Gerber; Glendon Frick; Alfred R. Rodi

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

119

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit GRR/Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-e - Ground Water Discharge Permit 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Railroad Commission of Texas United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies 16 TAC 3.8 (Rule 8) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf 14TXEGroundWaterDischargePermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Pits are used in drilling operations to contain drilling related fluids and

120

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations...........................................................................................................v Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myths and Misconceptions to someone by E-mail Myths and Misconceptions to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Myths and Misconceptions on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements

122

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1981, 299 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radionuclide chemical contaminants. This report is one of a series prepared annually to document and evaluate the status of ground water at the Hanford Site. Two substances, tritium and nonradioactive nitrate, are easily transported in ground water; therefore, these substances are used as primary tracers to monitor the movement of contaminated ground water. Data collected during 1981 describe the movement of tritium and the nonradioactive nitrate plumes as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay. The gross beta (/sup 106/Ru) levels have become so low that it will no longer be considered a major radionuclide contaminant. The tritium plume continues to show increasing concentrations near the Columbia River. While it is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, its contribution to the river has not been distinguished from other sources at this time. This plume shows much the same configuration as in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980. The size of the nitrate plume appears stable. Concentrations of nitrate in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continue to be high as a result of past leaks from the evaporation facility. The overall quality of the ground water at the Hanford Site is generally comparable to that of other ground waters in eastern Washington. Any exceptions to this statement will be noted in this report.

Eddy, P.A.; Cline, C.S.; Prater, L.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Data Mining Applied to Irrigation Water Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses the application of data mining to obtain artificial neural network based models for the application in water management during crops irrigation. This problem is very important in the zone of the South-East of Spain, as there is an ...

Juan A. Botía; Antonio F. Gómez-Skarmeta; Mercedes Valdés; Antonio Padilla

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, D.M.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical or horizontal ground-coupling, an open groundwater loop, or a surface water loop. This paper discusses system performance characteristics, component selection procedures presently being used, improvements currently being considered and future possibilities for improved efficiency and reliability. Optimum designs require proper matching of the heat pump unit to the water circulation system, the building space heating/cooling load and water heating requirements. General trends resulting from system and component choices will be discussed. Water heating methods with these heat pumps will be considered.

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R317-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates discharges

129

Infiltration/ground water linkage in the southwest: Response of shallow ground water to interannual variations of precipitation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic gradients, residence times and the hydrochemistry of shallow ground water are linked to the episodic precipitation and recharge events characteristic of the arid southwest. In this region, the amount of precipitation, and corresponding biomass, is dependant upon altitude with greater frequency and duration in the montane highlands and less in the desert lowlands. Results from a four-year study at the Rio Calaveras research site in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico show a strong correlation between the physical and hydrochemical properties of shallow ground water and variations of seasonal precipitation and infiltration. For example, the water table shows a dramatic response to snowmelt infiltration during years of abundant snow pack (El Nifio) and diminished response during years of reduced snow pack (La Niiia). The chemical structure of shallow ground water is also affected by the precipitation regime, primarily by variations in the flux of reductants (organic carbon) and oxidants (dissolved oxygen) from the vadose zone to the water table. Generally, oxic conditions persist during spring snowmelt infiltration shifting to anoxic conditions as biotic and abiotic processes transform dissolved oxygen. Other redox-sensitive constituents (ferrous iron, manganese, sulfate, nitrate, and nitrite) show increasing and decreasing concentrations as redox fluctuates seasonally and year-to-year. The cycling of these redox sensitive solutes in the subsurface depends upon the character of the aquifer materials, the biomass at the surface, moisture and temperature regime of the vadose zone, and frequency of infiltration events.

Groffman, A. R. (Armand R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Water Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia) Water Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural...

131

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 7 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 8 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '05. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 589.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 30.8 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon : Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, numerous spring developments, fencing, 5 implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 12 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY06. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 355.4 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting 19.3 miles of riparian habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide project coordination and technical assistance to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality enhancement and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Enhancement Reserve Program (CREP) and other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Three of those four streams and one other major Sherman County stream are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Temperature in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has resulted in providing technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including over 50 WASCBs, several thousand feet of terraces, two implemented CREP contracts, and the development of 3 additional CREP projects slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY '04. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in reducing the backlog of conservation projects within Sherman County, while adhering to the objectives set forth for this grant.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ground Water Quality and Riparian Enhancement Projects in Sherman County, Oregon; Coordination and Technical Assistance, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish species including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including 119 WASCBs, 74,591 feet of terraces, 3 spring developments, 24,839 feet of riparian or pasture cross fencing, 1,072 acres of direct seed trials, 14 landowners implementing 34 CREP contracts, and the development of 5 additional CREP contracts slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY07. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 1898.3 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting approximately 52 miles of riparian or intermittent stream channel habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.

Faucera, Jason (Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, Sherman County, OR)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program Completes Work at Bethel Valley Burial Grounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) program recently completed upgrades and soil remediation work at the Bethel Valley Burial Grounds, using approximately $17.5 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.

136

Sustainability in Water Resources Management: Changes in Meaning and Perception  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability in Water Resources Management Changes inAbstract: The meaning of sustainability in the context ofwider water reuse, today sustainability must include a whole

Hermanowicz, S W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Bob Bellagh...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Bob Bellagh, Richard Eschenbach, Edward J. Hernaez, Kieran McInerney, and Laura Smolinski 2013 Federal Energy and Water...

138

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605:...

139

2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 0 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include: Program Manager's Award to a Small Group Multiple Category - Awards to Organizations Multiple Category - Awards to Small Groups Programs that Implement Efficient Energy, Water, and/or Fleet Management - Awards to Organizations Programs that Implement Efficient Energy, Water, and/or Fleet Management - Awards to Small Groups

140

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin fewm13morinhighres.pdf fewm13morin.pdf More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards October 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC...

142

DOE Announces 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards DOE Announces 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards October 22, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Awards for Energy Efficiency and...

143

Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

144

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal Guidance to someone by E-mail Goal Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Water Efficiency Goal Guidance Baseline & Annual Water Use Guidance Best Management Practices

145

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites AGENCY: U.S. DEP.4RTMENT OF ENERGY ACTIOK: FL&-DING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP-ACT (FONSI) SU$IM$RY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement ground lvater compliance strategies for two Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTR.4) Project sites near Slick Rock. Colorado. The purpose of the strategies is to comply with U.S. En\.ironmental Protection .Qency (EP.Aj ground n'ater standards defined in Title 40 Codr ~fF~d~w/ iieplutio?r.s (CFR) Part 192. and in so doing. protect human health and the en\.ironment. Ground water at the Slick Rock sites is contaminated with residual radioactive materials from hisTorica acti\,ities, associated with the processin of uranium ore, The planned action (~formeri>,.

146

Long-term fuzzy management of water resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present context of water resource scarcity, a complete approach for long-term storage/transfer/distribution system management is proposed. The main management objective of such a kind of system is to manage reserves and releases so as to minimize ... Keywords: fuzzy logic, modeling, optimization, water resource management

Roger Marcelin Faye; Salam Sawadogo; Claude Lishou; Félix Mora-Camino

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE CLEANING UP MILL TAILINGS AND GROUND WATER AT THE MOAB UMTRA PROJECT SITE August 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis A sheep’s foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. A sheep's foot roller compacts the tailings in the disposal cell. Moab, UT MILL TAILINGS REMOVAL Sixteen million tons of uranium mill tailings 80 feet high stood on the banks of the Colorado River near Moab in southeast Utah, as a legacy to the former ore-processing site that operated for nearly three decades beginning in the mid-1950s. That is until April 2009, when the U.S. Department of Energy began moving the tailings by rail to an engineered disposal cell constructed 30 miles north near Crescent Junction, Utah. The mill tailings,

148

Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GJO-2000-177-TAR GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site December 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0017-12-000 Document Number U0066302 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0066302 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Old Rifle, Colorado

149

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In geothermal fields, open faults and fractures often act as high permeability pathways bringing hydrothermal fluids to the surface from deep reservoirs. The Mount Princeton area, in south-central Colorado, is an area that has an active geothermal system related to faulting and is therefore a suitable natural laboratory to test geophysical methods. The Sawatch range-front normal fault bordering the half-graben of the Upper Arkansas

150

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:07pm Addthis Awards Criteria Webinar Offered On Demand A recording of the March 7, 2012, webinar covering criteria and guidelines for the 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards is now available for viewing on demand. The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include: Winners of 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards were chosen for the following categories:

152

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of uranium mining of ground water in Ambrosia Lake area, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal ore-bearing zone in the Ambrosia Lake area of the Grants uranium district is the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). This unit is also one of the major artesian aquifers in the region. Significant declines in the potentiometric lead within the aquifer have been recorded, although cones of depression do not appear to have spread laterally more than a few miles. Loss of potentiometric head in the Westwater Canyon Member has resulted in the interformational migration of ground water along fault zones from overlying aquifers of Cretaceous age. This migration has produced local deterioration in chemical quality of the ground water.

Kelly, T.E.; Link, R.L.; Schipper, M.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication illustrations the effects of vegetation management on water availability.

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

N /A

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Hot Water Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

159

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heating Technologies to someone by E-mail Water Heating Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Water Heating Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Technology Deployment List Solid-State Lighting

160

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quick guide to increasing Federal office building water efficiency, water management planning, performing a water audit, calculating a water balance, and best management practices.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 1: Executive Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of a three-phase research project investigating sustainable water management. The report will be of value to all parties interested in the water aspects of sustainable development. As it contains information at various scales of water management, the report will be of interest for those involved with green building projects, the public water supply, stormwater management, wastewater treatment and the electric power sector. In addition, the report provides valuable insi...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources October 8, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis Many Federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternate water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water. Overview On-site alternative water sources are most economic if included in the original design. Common uses for these sources include landscape irrigation, ornamental pond and fountain filling, cooling tower make-up, and toilet and urinal flushing. Municipal-Supplied Reclaimed Water Municipal supplied reclaimed water has been treated and recycled for

164

2009 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 9 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2009 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:19pm Addthis The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2009 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include: Water Conservation Awards to Organizations Water Conservation Awards to Small Groups Water Conservation Award to an Individual Renewable Energy Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Award to a Small Group Sustainable Design/High Performance Buildings Awards to Organizations Sustainable Design/High Performance Buildings Awards to Small Groups

165

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:34pm Addthis Water Management Awards to Organizations Water Management Awards to Small Groups Mobility Energy Efficiency Awards to Organizations Mobility Energy Efficiency Awards to Individuals Alternative Financing Awards to Organizations Alternative Financing Awards to Small Groups Alternative Financing Awards to Individuals Renewable Energy Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Awards to Small Groups Renewable Energy Awards to Individuals Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Organizations Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Individuals Innovative/New Technology Awards to Small Groups

171

2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 8 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:21pm Addthis The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include: Water Conservation Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Award to an Organization Renewable Energy Award to Small Groups Sustainable Design/High Performance Buildings Award to an Organization Sustainable Design/High Performance Buildings Award to a Small Group Vehicle Fleet Management Award to an Organization

172

2005 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 5 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2005 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:28pm Addthis Water Conservation Award to an Organization Water Conservation Awards to Small Groups Renewable Energy Awards to Small Groups Energy Security and Reliability Award to a Small Group Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Organizations Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Small Groups Exceptional Service Awards to Individuals Water Conservation Award to an Organization United States Marine Corps Marine Corps Base Hawaii Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii 808-257-2171 x255 During FY 2004, Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) implemented a number of best management practices to reduce water consumption on the Base using tools such as energy savings performance contracts, sustainable building

173

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:05pm Addthis 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for the outstanding use of energy- and water-efficiency technologies at Federal facilities. Awards to Individuals: Exceptional Service Image of the poster for Jeff Allen Download the poster: Low resolution High resolution Jeff Allen U.S. Marine Corps Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California Since 2000, Jeff Allen has managed the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (MCBCP) energy program. During his tenure, MCBCP has reduced its energy intensity by 20.2% and lowered its water intensity by 48.8%. These savings

174

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements

175

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Covered Product Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on AddThis.com...

176

The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act aims to protect, preserve,

177

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management

178

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

182

Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Best Water Efficiency Best Management Practices Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices October 7, 2013 - 2:54pm Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program originally developed Federal Water Efficiency Best Management Practices (BMPs) in response to Executive Order (E.O.) 13123 requirements, which required Federal agencies to reduce water use through cost-effective water efficiency improvements. E.O. 13423 supersedes E.O. 13123. To account for the superseded requirement changes, water use patterns, and advancing technologies, the Environmental Protection Agency's WaterSense Office updated the original BMPs. E.O. 13514 expands the water efficiency requirements of E.O. 13423 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. E.O. 13514 does not supersede

183

2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Water Management Awards to Organizations Mobility Energy Awards to Organizations Mobility Energy Awards to Small Groups Alternative Financing Awards to Organizations Alternative Financing Awards to Small Groups Alternative Financing Awards to Individuals Renewable Energy Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Organizations Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Small Groups Innovative/New Technology Awards to Organizations Innovative/New Technology Awards to Small Groups Effective Program Implementation and Management Awards to Organizations Effective Program Implementation and Management Awards to Small

184

2003 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 3 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2003 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis Water Conservation Awards to Organizations Water Conservation Award to a Small Group Water Conservation Award to an Individuals Mobility Energy Efficiency Awards to Organizations Alternative Financing Awards to Organizations Alternative Financing Awards to Small Groups Alternative Financing Awards to Individuals Renewable Energy Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Organizations Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Individuals Innovative/New Technology Awards to an Organization Innovative/New Technology Awards to an Individual

185

Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Thermal Discharge Retrievals with Ground Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at a mid-latitude cold-water site along the Atlantic coast near Plymouth, MA. In contrast to the relative uniformity of the sea-surface temperature in the open ocean the water temperature near Pilgrim exhibits strong spatial gradients and temporal variability. This made it critical that all images be accurately registered in order to extract temperature values at the six buoy locations. Sixteen images during a one-year period from August 2000 to July 2001 were selected for the study. The RMS error of Pilgrim water temperature is about 3.5 C for the 4 buoys located in open water. The RMS error of the combined temperatures from 3 of the open-water buoys is 2.8 C. The RMS error includes errors in the ground truth. The magnitude of this error is estimated to range between 0.8 and 2.3 C. The two main components of this error are warm-layer effect and spatial variability. The actual error in the MTI retrievals for Pilgrim daytime conditions is estimated to be between 2.7 and 3.4 C for individual buoys and between 1.7 and 2.7 C for the combined open-water buoys.

Kurzeja, R.J.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 8): Libby Ground Water Contamination Site, Libby, Montana, September 1986. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned wood-treating operations on the mill property are the source of ground-water contamination at the Libby Ground Water Contamination site in the northwest corner of Montana. In 1979, shortly after installation of private wells, some homeowners detected the presence of a creosote odor, and EPA monitoring in 1981 confirmed ground-water contamination. Based on 1984 well sample results, Champion International Corporation implemented the Buy Water Plan. Under this program, individuals with contaminated ground water wells agree to cease using their wells and use water from the public water system operated by the City of Libby. The program, indefinite in term, would be terminated upon the elimination of the threat of contamination, if the well owner provides a written termination notice, or if other alternatives become available. The primary contaminants of concern include: VOCs, PAHs, PCP, organics, inorganics, heavy metals, and creosote. Selected remedies are proposed and included in the report.

Not Available

1986-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

An update on the SRP burial ground area water balance and hydrology  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the burial ground area prepared by Hubbard and Emslie concluded that about 15 inches, almost one-third of the average annual precipitation, normally infiltrates the land surface and recharges the groundwater. Also, evapotranspiration was estimated to average 30 inches annually, and runoff from the land surface was estimated as 1 to 3 inches. More information has become available recently from lysimeter studies, climatic stations, groundwater studies, and stream discharge measurements. These additional data generally support the conclusions above with some modifications. The type of vegetation cover on the land surface affects the site hydrology and water budget components of evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The lysimeter studies indicate that about 12 inches more water is lost annually to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration with deep-rooted pine trees present than in areas where bare soil or shallow-rooted grass cover occur. Therefore, recharge in the burial ground area may differ from that with similar soils in forested areas of the Savannah River Plant. Study of the hydrologic properties of soils in the burial ground area indicates that infiltration rates for the soils generally are relatively high, exceeding one inch per hour. Runoff as overland flow tends to occur only with intense rainfall events of 1 inch or more. The soil-water characteristic curves are representative of relatively coarse-textured soils.

Wells, D.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site; Cook, J.W.

1986-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winners Kate Anderson, Scott Clark, Matthew Ellis, Vincent Guthrie, Mark Hunsickler Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson, Scott Clark, Matthew Ellis,...

189

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Sea Systems Command 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems Command fewm13nswcphiladelphiahighres.pdf fewm13nswcphiladelphia.pdf More...

190

Methods of Managing Water in Oil Shale Development - Energy ...  

This invention is a system and method of providing water management and utilization during the process of dewatering and retorting of oil shale. More ...

191

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Frank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frank Cope, Bethany Mills, William Nelligan, Jodie Petersen, and Scott Thomas 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Frank Cope, Bethany Mills, William Nelligan,...

192

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Jeff Allen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winner Jeff Allen 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Jeff Allen fewm13usmcallenhighres.pdf fewm13usmcallen.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Energy...

193

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego fewm13usmcmcdepotsandiegohighres.pdf...

194

A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water monitoring procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring is the primary method used to protect our ground-water resources. The primary objectives of monitoring programs are to detect, to attribute, and to mitigate any changes in-water quality or quantity. Previous monitoring programs have had numerous problems including the failure to produce usable information and the failure to balance the competing factors of cost-effectiveness and environmental protection. A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water procedure was designed which consists of eight steps and two feedback loops. The reason for monitoring must first be determined before clear monitoring goals can be set. Characterization of the site allows proper design of the monitoring network. Data is then collected and analyzed creating usable information. Applying this new information to the information expansion loop permits a better understanding of the initial site characterization. Finally evaluating the entire routine to determine the effectiveness of the program allows the optimization loop to modify the system for greater efficiency. The value of this procedure was tested at selected sites in the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas. The mine, which is currently in compliance with state regulations, is not operating an efficient monitoring program. The problems included over-monitoring of metals in and around reclaimed mine blocks, over-monitoring by monitoring wells in the same aquifer, and the failure to attribute changes in a monitoring well near a dewatering well. The feedback loops helped to optimize the entire program by recognizing problems in the stratigraphic column and modifying the monitoring program to lower monitoring costs. Three major benefits are gained by using this procedure: the ground-water monitoring routine can be made more cost-effective, environmental protection will be increased, and environmental liability will be decreased.

Doucette, Richard Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BMP). U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex: BMP 1 - Water Management Planning: A water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge,...

196

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

197

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 March 2013. (12) Water Conservation Master Plan; East Baywww.ebmud.com/for-customers/water-conservation- rebates-and-services/water-conservation-master-plan, accessed 15

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the “Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures ” page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blockage of the cooling water intake structure (CWIS) occurs frequently at nuclear and fossil power facilities worldwide, regardless of fuel type or cooling water body source. The loss of cooling water impacts facility safety and reliabilityprincipally at nuclear facilitiesand results in a loss of revenue. This Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages presents a review of debris management at existing facilities and provides procedural and operation and maintenance (...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

2004 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 4 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2004 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Water Conservation Award to an Individual Renewable Energy Award to Organization Renewable Energy Award to an Individual Mobility Energy Efficiency Awards to Organizations Energy Security and Reliability Award to a Small Group Energy Security and Reliability Award to an Individual Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Organizations Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Management Awards to an Individual Exceptional Service Awards to Individuals ENERGY STAR® Building Award for Superior Performance Louis R. Harris, Jr. Award Water Conservation Award to an Individual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2007 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 7 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2007 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:24pm Addthis Highest Achievement Awards Water Conservation Awards to Organizations Water Conservation Awards to Small Groups Renewable Energy Awards to Organizations Renewable Energy Award to a Small Group Renewable Energy Awards to Individuals Energy Security and Reliability Award to a Small Group Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Organization Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Small Groups Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Individuals Exceptional Service Awards to Individuals Highest Achievement Awards Three special awards were presented to exemplary projects that rose above

202

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Incentives in Water Management Reform: Assessing the Effect on Water Use, Production and Poverty in the Yellow River Basin Speaker(s): Jinixia Wang Date: May 22, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The purpose of this presentation is to better understand water management reform in China's rural communities, focusing on the effect of incentives to water managers on the nation's water resources and the welfare of the rural population. Based on a survey study in the Yellow River Basin, our findings show that Water User Associations and contracting have begun to systematically replace traditional forms of collective management. The analysis demonstrates, however, that it is not a nominal implementation of the reform that matters, but rather it is a creation of new management

203

2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:09pm Addthis The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include: Contracting (Individual) Exceptional Service (Individual) Program (Team) Project (Team) Contracting (Individual) Ronda Ford U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville, Maryland Ronda Ford introduced new and innovative contracting methods to the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) that saved millions of dollars. She led

204

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water plants. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Lifepublication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management Winterizing the Water Garden Lynnette Swanson Traci Gilland, Extension Agent, Portsmouth Water gardens require maintenance throughout the year

Liskiewicz, Maciej

205

U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

2006 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 6 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2006 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners October 7, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Water Conservation Award to an Individual Renewable Energy Award to an Organization Renewable Energy Awards to Small Groups Renewable Energy Award to an Individual Energy Security and Reliability Award to a Small Group Energy Efficiency/Energy Program Management Awards to Small Groups Exceptional Service Awards to Individuals Water Conservation Award to an Individual Kyle Sato Department of the Interior United States Geological Survey Western Fisheries Research Center Seattle, Washington 206-526-6282 Ext. 330 Kyle Sato, Facilities Manager and Mechanical Engineer, leads the Western Fisheries Research Center facilities organization in their goal to

209

Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners across the federal government as recipients of the 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These annual awards highlight federal agencies' commitments to lead the nation in implementing efficiency measures to improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet management that save taxpayer money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through their innovative efforts, winners, including staff serving the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy; the Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Homeland Security, Interior, and Veterans Affairs; and the General Services Administration, saved a total of 1.9 trillion Btu of energy,

210

Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy and Water Management Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners across the federal government as recipients of the 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. These annual awards highlight federal agencies' commitments to lead the nation in implementing efficiency measures to improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet management that save taxpayer money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through their innovative efforts, winners, including staff serving the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy; the Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Homeland Security, Interior, and Veterans Affairs; and the General Services Administration, saved a total of 1.9 trillion Btu of energy,

211

Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Irrigation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irrigation Irrigation Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Irrigation October 7, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Water efficiency must be considered from the initial irrigation system design phase through installation to ensure optimal performance. Consistent management and maintenance is also essential. Failure to do so can result in losing more than 50% of irrigation water due to evaporation, wind, poor management, and/or improper system design, installation, or maintenance. With the irrigation system hardware operating efficiently, it is important to consider the irrigation schedule, which dictates the amount and timing of the water applied. Water changes with the seasons as should your irrigation schedule. Many landscapes are watered at the same level all year, adding unnecessary water for months at a time. Over-watering can

212

Storm Water Management Plan Program (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storm Water Management Plan Program (Nebraska) Storm Water Management Plan Program (Nebraska) Storm Water Management Plan Program (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Grant Program Provider Natural Resources This legislation implements the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination

213

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Economic Opportunity

214

Best Management Practice: Other Water Intensive Processes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Other Water Intensive Processes Best Management Practice: Other Water Intensive Processes Best Management Practice: Other Water Intensive Processes October 8, 2013 - 9:48am Addthis Many water using processes beyond the previously covered best management practices (BMPs) are found at Federal facilities, including vehicle wash systems, maintenance services, cleaning/laundry services, single pass air conditioners, water softening systems, and others. Identify and analyze all water intensive processes for potential efficiency improvements. Overview Laundry facilities are often found at Federal facilities. The laundry facility may be a self-serve laundry where residents and personnel wash their own clothing, a commercial-type laundry service where residents drop off laundry to be washed or dry cleaned, or an industrial laundry facility

215

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas Gas Technology Institute (GTI) will develop a membrane separation technology to recover water...

217

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities - EPRI The objective of this project is evaluation and development of the use of produced water...

218

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 2: Green Building Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates how well green building rating systems address sustainable water management practices at the community level by applying three widely used rating systems to three diverse commercial green building projects. The case studies provide insight into the efficacy of green building water management practices and the relative strengths and limitations of rating systems with respect to achieving water sustainability at the community level. The intended audience for this report includes decis...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Water Utility Demand Management and the Financial, Social and Environmental Drivers Speaker(s): Allan J. Dietemann Date: February 19, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Camilla Whitehead At Seattle Public Utilities, Al Dietemann leads a team of 11 persons with a budget of $5 million a year implementing cost-effective resource conservation measures. In 2003, the Seattle area used less water than was used in 1950 on an annual basis. Seattle's demand management programs have been successful in holding total regional water use constant in our service area, despite an annual growth in population served. During this seminar he will speak to the following issues: 1) Water utility demand management and the financial, social and environmental drivers. 2)

224

DOE/EA-1388: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site (September 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388 388 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site Final September 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 This Page Intentionally Blank DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Site September 2001 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ vii Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... ix 1.0 Introduction .............................................................................................................................1

225

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity “hotspots,” yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Extraction From Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion...

228

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would otherwise be evaporated from the stack. This water would then be available for power plant operations such as cooling tower or flue gas desulfurization make-up water. An...

229

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Storm Water Management Fact Sheet Employee Training DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-house employee training programs are established to teach employees about storm water management, potential sources of contaminants, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). Employee training programs should instill all personnel with a thorough understanding of their Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), including BMPs, processes and materials they are working with, safety hazards, practices for preventing discharges, and procedures for responding quickly and properly to toxic and hazardous material incidents. APPLICABILITY Typically, most industrial facilities have employee training programs. Usually these address such areas as health and safety training and fire protection. Training on storm water management and BMPs can be incorporated into these programs. Employees can be taught through 1) posters, employee meetings, courses, and bulletin boards about storm water management, potential contaminant sources, and prevention of contamination in surface water runoff, and 2) field training programs that show areas of potential storm water contamination and associated pollutants, followed by a discussion of site-specific BMPs by trained personnel. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES The program can be standardized and repeated as necessary, both to train new employees and to keep its objectives fresh in the minds of more senior employees. A training program is also flexible and can be adapted as a facility’s storm water management needs change over time. Obstacles to an employee training program include: C Lack of commitment from senior management.

United States

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Site design for urban water management in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the world becomes aware of the scarcity of water resources and cities struggle to meet a growing demand, we face the challenge of finding more efficient ways to manage this vital resource. Cities in developing countries ...

Rivera, José Pablo (Rivera De la Mora), 1967-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

67   3.2.3 Temperature-gradient (heat-pipe)water management ( e.g . , heat-pipe effect), examination ofsubstantially due to this heat-pipe effect. Due to the

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ground-state ammonia and water in absorption towards Sgr B2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Odin submillimetre-wave satellite telescope to observe the ground state transitions of ortho-ammonia and ortho-water, including their 15N, 18O, and 17O isotopologues, towards Sgr B2. The extensive simultaneous velocity coverage of the observations, >500 km/s, ensures that we can probe the conditions of both the warm, dense gas of the molecular cloud Sgr B2 near the Galactic centre, and the more diffuse gas in the Galactic disk clouds along the line-of-sight. We present ground-state NH3 absorption in seven distinct velocity features along the line-of-sight towards Sgr B2. We find a nearly linear correlation between the column densities of NH3 and CS, and a square-root relation to N2H+. The ammonia abundance in these diffuse Galactic disk clouds is estimated to be about (0.5-1)e-8, similar to that observed for diffuse clouds in the outer Galaxy. On the basis of the detection of H218O absorption in the 3 kpc arm, and the absence of such a feature in the H217O spectrum, we conclude that the water...

Wirström, E S; Black, J H; Hjalmarson, Ĺ; Larsson, B; Olofsson, A O H; Encrenaz, P J; Falgarone, E; Frisk, U; Olberg, M; Sandqvist, Aa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

240

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Drexel University is conducting research with the overall objective of developing technologies to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. The goal of this research is to develop a scale-prevention technology based on a novel filtration method and an integrated system of physical water treatment in an effort to reduce the amount of water needed for cooling tower blowdown. This objective is being pursued under two coordinated, National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research and development projects. In both projects, pulsed electrical fields are employed to promote the precipitation and removal of mineral deposits from power plant cooling water, thereby allowing the water to be recirculated for longer periods of time before fresh makeup water has to be introduced into the cooling water system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Water and Wastewater Industries: Characteristics and Energy Management Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for increased service and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs may consist of technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. This report provides electric utility planning, marketing, and customer service staff with a practical tool to better understand the water and wastewater industries and t...

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a study on the use of nanofiltration (NF) treatment options to enable use of non-traditional water sources as an alternative to freshwater make-up for thermoelectric power plants. The project includes a technical and economic evaluation of NF for two types of water that contain moderate to high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS): (1) cooling tower recirculating water and (2) produced waters from oil & gas extraction operations. Reverse osmosis (RO) is the most mature and commonly considered option for high TDS water treatment. However, RO is generally considered to be too expensive to make treatment of produced waters for power plant use a feasible application. Therefore, SNL is investigating the use of NF, which could be a more cost effective treatment option than RO. Similar to RO, NF is a membrane-based process. Although NF is not as effective as RO for the removal of TDS (typical salt rejection is ~85 percent, compared to >95 percent for RO), its performance should be sufficient for typical power plant applications. In addition to its lower capital cost, an NF system should have lower operating costs because it requires less pressure to achieve an equivalent flux of product water.

243

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

244

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the...

245

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: assessment of the availability and proximity of impaired waters at twelve power plant locations spanning the major geographic regions of the continental 48 states;...

246

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Cooling Towers GE Global Research will develop treatment technologies to enable power plant use of non-traditional waters. Using effective treatment methods to make...

247

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was to identify cost saving alternatives to the current coal- fired power plant cooling process using non-traditional water sources such as coal mine discharges....

248

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgrades, and different water sources (desalination).Desalination and sewage treatment upgrades were found tolater in this chapter. Desalination proved to have 2-18

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Electrical load management for the California water system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet its water needs California has developed an extensive system for transporting water from areas with high water runoff to areas with high water demand. This system annually consumes more than 6 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity for pumping water and produces more than 12 billion kWh/year of hydroelectric power. From the point of view of energy conservation, the optimum operation of the California water supply system would require that pumping be done at night and generation be done during the day. Night pumping would reduce electric power peak load demand and permit the pumps to be supplied with electricity from ''base load'' generating plants. Daytime hydro power generation would augment peak load power generation by fossil-fuel power plants and save fuel. The technical and institutional aspects of this type of electric power load management for water projects are examined for the purpose of explaining some of the actions which might be pursued and to develop recommendations for the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (ERCDC). The California water supply system is described. A brief description is given of various energy conservation methods, other than load management, that can be used in the management of water resources. An analysis of load management is presented. Three actions for the ERCDC are recommended: the Commission should monitor upcoming power contract negotiations between the utilities and the water projects; it should determine the applicability of the power-pooling provisions of the proposed National Energy Act to water systems; and it should encourage and support detailed studies of load management methods for specific water projects.

Krieg, B.; Lasater, I.; Blumstein, C.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Lehigh University will conduct pilot-scale testing of a condensing heat exchanger to recover water from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Testing will include using a slipstream of flue gas from a natural gas-fired boiler with sulfur trioxide injection and slipstreams of flue gas from two coal-fired boilers. The project continues the development of condensing heat exchanger technology for coal-fired boilers initially started under the U.S. Department of Energy's Project DE-FC26-06NT42727 (Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas). In particular, Lehigh researchers will: (1) expand the database on water

251

Computer simulation models relevant to ground water contamination from EOR or other fluids - state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect

Ground water contamination is a serious national problem. The use of computers to simulate the behavior of fluids in the subsurface has proliferated extensively over the last decade. Numerical models are being used to solve water supply problems, various kinds of enertgy production problems, and ground water contamination problems. Modeling techniques have progressed to the point that their accuracy is only limited by the modeller's ability to describe the reservoir in question and the heterogeneities therein. Pursuant to the Task and Milestone Update of Project BE3A, this report summarizes the state of the art of computer simulation models relevant to contamination of ground water by enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemicals and/or waste fluids. 150 refs., 6 tabs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. The project team demonstrates the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Most water consumption in coal-fired power plants occurs due to evaporative water losses. For example, a 500-megawatt (MW) power plant will loose approximately 5,000 - 6,000 gallons per minute (gpm) to evaporation and 500 gpm in the wet FGD system. Installation of regenerative reheat on FGD systems is expected to reduce water consumption to one half of water consumption using conventional FGD technology. Electrostatic Precipitator Researchers are conducting pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assessing the resulting impact on air pollution control (APC) systems. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc. as the prime contractor, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The team is conducting an analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs. The tests are intended to determine the impact of operation at cooler flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate removal (see Figure 1), SO3 removal, and Hg removal. Additionally, tests are conducted to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger.

253

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

254

Water Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) Water Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting A water management plan is required for all surface coal mining operations. This plan must be submitted to the State Engineer of the State Water Commission at the same time a surface mining permit is submitted to the

255

Small Water System Management Program: 100 K Area  

SciTech Connect

Purposes of this document are: to provide an overview of the service and potable water system presently in service at the Hanford Site`s 100 K Area; to provide future system forecasts based on anticipated DOE activities and programs; to delineate performance, design, and operations criteria; and to describe planned improvements. The objective of the small water system management program is to assure the water system is properly and reliably managed and operated, and continues to exist as a functional and viable entity in accordance with WAC 246-290-410.

Hunacek, G.S. Jr. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection A person may not construct, or cause to be constructed, a project that

257

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintenance includes having effective drift eliminators, periodically cleaning the system if appropriate, minimization of process leads into the cooling system that provide nutrients for bacteria, maintenance management plan shall describe how the system will be returned to normal microbial control following an upset

258

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometric Observations of Precipitable Water Vapor: A Comparison with Ground Truth from Two Radiosonde Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-channel microwave radiometric measurements of precipitable water vapor are compared with values determined from two types of radiosondes. The first type is used in conventional soundings taken by the National Weather Service. The second is ...

Ed R. Westwater; Michael J. Falls; Ingrid A. Popa Fotino

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOEIAL162350-65

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California. Summary report, 1993--1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents results from the ground-water investigation at the Penn Mine by the US Geological Survey from October 1991 to April 1995. The specific objectives of the investigation were to evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of ground water flowing toward Camanche Reservoir from the Penn Mine area; (2) the ground-water transport of metals, sulfate, and acidity between Mine Run and Camanche Reservoirs; and (3) the hydrologic interactions between the flooded mine workings and other ground water and surface water in the vicinity.

Alpers, C.N.; Hamlin, S.N.; Hunerlach, M.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Water Budget Managers Report to Northwest Power Planning Council, 1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In addition to management of the Water Budget, the Water Budget Managers and FPC staff developed and directed the Smolt Monitoring and Water Budget Evaluation Programs of Section 304(d) of the Fish and Wildlife Program. The fishery agencies and tribes also authorized the Water Budget Managers to coordinate agency and tribal system operational requests throughout the year, including spill management for fish passage. This report summarizes Water Budget Manager activities in implementing program measures, including 1986 flow conditions, water budget usage and spill management, and the in-season management portion of the 1986 Smolt Monitoring Program including data management.

Karr, Malcolm; DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Landscaping | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landscaping Landscaping Best Management Practice: Water-Efficient Landscaping October 7, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis Traditional landscapes require supplemental water to thrive in most locations. Kentucky bluegrass, for example, is native to regions that receive in excess of 40 inches per year of precipitation, but it is commonly planted in areas across the country that receive much less precipitation. Overview Two facets exist for outdoor water use efficiency: Designing a landscape that requires minimal supplemental water. Designing, installing, and maintaining an irrigation system that applies the appropriate amount of supplemental water in an efficient manner (see BMP #5). This BMP addresses only water efficient landscaping. BMP #5 provides specific information on water efficient irrigation. Irrigation is

267

Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations provide procedures to propose a reclassification of State waters for permitting purposes. Requests must address the factual basis for reclassification, including the size, depth, surface area covered, volume, direction and rate of flow, stream gradient and temperature of the water; character of the district bordering said waters and its suitability for

268

Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water Introduction In the operation of a coal mine, water is an important resource, without which the mine cannot operate. Central Queensland coal mines collect rain water in dams and also have access to a water pipeline

McGuinness, Mark

269

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66: Regulation for Administration and 66: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water

272

Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

Dickson, B.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Critique of the Climatic Record of “Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground” in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water equivalent of snow on the ground (SWE) has been measured daily since 1952 at National Weather Service first-order stations whenever snow depth exceeded 5 cm (2 in). These data are used in snowmelt analyses, snow climatology, and snow ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 3: Case Studies on New Water Paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and evaluates the foundation and requirements for a sustainable water infrastructure at the community and watershed scales. The report will be of value not only to the public water supply, stormwater management, and wastewater treatment sectors, but also the electric power sector, given the strong interdependencies among the four sectors. In addition, the report will of value to government agencies involved in water regulations and policy.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Management competences, not tools and techniques: A grounded examination of software project management at WM-data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional software project management theory often focuses on desk-based development of software and algorithms, much in line with the traditions of the classical project management and software engineering. This can be described as a tools and techniques ... Keywords: Competence, Software engineering, Software project management

Jeremy Rose; Keld Pedersen; Jens Henrik Hosbond; Pernille Krímmergaard

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

280

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Proving Ground - VA 0-01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proving Ground - VA 0-01 Proving Ground - VA 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL PROVING GROUND (VA.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Dahlgren , Virginia VA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 VA.0-01-1 Site Operations: Site operations were not specified; this site was identified on the 1954 Accountable Station Lists. VA.0-01-1 VA.0-01-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL PROVING GROUND VA.0-01-1 - DOE Letter; Fiore to Schafer; Referral of DOD or Former

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Automated ground maintenance and health management for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated ground maintenance is a necessity for multi-UAV systems. Without such automation, these systems will become more of a burden than a benefit as human operators struggle to contend with maintenance operations for ...

Dale, Daniel R., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) show promise for reducing house energy consumption, and a desuperheater can potentially further reduce energy consumption where the heat pump from the space conditioning system creates hot water. Two unoccupied houses were instrumented to document the installed operational space conditioning and water heating efficiency of their GSHP systems. This paper discusses instrumentation methods and field operation characteristics of the GSHPs, compares manufacturers' values of the coefficients of performance calculated from field measured data for the two GSHPs, and compares the measured efficiency of the desuperheater system to other domestic hot water systems.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Considerations in the Design of Treatment Best Management Practices (BMPs) to Improve Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency=s peer and administrative review policies and approved for publiction. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or design procedures does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. ii Foreword The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the Nation’s land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the Agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. To meet this mandate, EPA’s research program is providing data and technical support for solving environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risks in the future. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is the Agency’s center for investigation of technological and management approaches for preventing and reducing risks from pollution that threaten human health and the environment. The focus of the Laboratory’s research program is on methods and their cost-effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; prevention and control of indoor air pollution; and restoration of ecosystems. NRMRL collaborates with both public and private sector partners to foster technologies that reduce the cost of compliance and to anticipate emerging problems. NRMRL’s research provides solutions to environmental problems by: developing and promoting technologies that protect and improve the environment; advancing

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: 5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These rules apply to all applications for a license or a permit to take, divert, appropriate or otherwise use the waters of the State, except applications for hydro-electric power projects. Applications are reviewed

285

DC WRRC Report No. 103 Background Study of the Ground Water in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow at outlet from tower: Water Spray Guns: Water quantity for conditioning: Water quantity by controlling the amount of water returned from the atomizing nozzles. The water, when sprayed into the tower around the outside of the tower, and connected to the spray headers by means of flexible hoses. Water

District of Columbia, University of the

286

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Morin, PE U.S. Air Force Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas As energy manager of Laughlin Air Force Base, David Morin led the base's energy program to achieve FY 2012 energy and water intensity reductions of 29 and 24 percent over the prior year and save $1.8 million in utility costs. Mr. Morin focused on three key areas: projects, maintenance, and individual conservation. In FY 2012 he implemented $1.3 million in projects, including a photovoltaic re-roofing project; lighting and plumbing fixture upgrades; base-wide leak detection and repair; and conversion of a domestic water fed pond into a bio-swale. Using new advanced metering, Mr. Morin worked with facility managers to identify and address anomaly power use and reduce base power outages by 29 percent. Mr. Morin also initiated

288

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Water Management of Noninsulating and Insulating Sheathings: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an increasing market in liquid (or fluid) applied water management barriers for residential applications that could be used in place of tapes and other self-adhering membranes if applied correctly, especially around penetrations in the enclosure. This report discusses current best practices, recommends ways in which the best practices can be improved, and looks at some current laboratory testing and testing standards.

Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Jeff Allen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Je Allen Je Allen U.S. Marine Corps Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California Since 2000, Je Allen has managed the energy program at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (MCBCP). During his tenure, MCBCP reduced energy intensity by 20.2 percent and water intensity by 48.8 percent. Savings were accomplished largely through Mr. Allen's e orts to develop, award, and execute 16 utility energy service contracts that included projects worth $95 million. Mr. Allen leveraged various funding mechanisms to install 60 PV systems totaling 7.8 megawatts. His e orts have helped establish a successful Resource Energy Manager Program; deploy an automated meter infrastructure; expand the base energy management control system; implement a retro-commissioning e ort covering

291

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Jeff Allen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jeff Jeff Allen U.S. Marine Corps Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California Since 2000, Jeff Allen has managed the energy program at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (MCBCP). During his tenure, MCBCP reduced energy intensity by 20.2 percent and water intensity by 48.8 percent. Savings were accomplished largely through Mr. Allen's efforts to develop, award, and execute 16 utility energy service contracts that included projects worth $95 million. Mr. Allen leveraged various funding mechanisms to install 60 PV systems totaling 7.8 megawatts. His efforts have helped establish a successful Resource Energy Manager Program; deploy an automated meter infrastructure; expand the base energy management control system; implement a retro-commissioning effort

292

Commentary by Jerry S. Szymanski and C.B. Archambeau regarding ``Spring deposits and late pleistocene ground-water levels in southern Nevada``, by J. Quade. Special report number 16, Contract number 94/96.0003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a critical analysis of a paper presented at the 5th Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management. The thrust of this paper was to determine the historic level of ground water in the vicinity of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. This author reviews conclusions reached by the former author and analyzes reference materials used to obtain his assessment of paleo-ground water levels. This author disagrees with the conclusions and analytical methods used. This author presents information relative to water table fluctuations as a result of intrusion of geothermal fluids and makes claim that such intrusion would jeopardize the integrity of the repository by flooding.

Szymanski, J.S.; Archambeau, C.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Driving Water and Wastewater Utilities to More Sustainable Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and industry leaders have identified the need for an energy roadmap to guide utilities of all sizes down the road to sustainable energy management through increased renewable energy production, energy conservation and focus on overall energy management. This roadmap leverages the framework developed in the electric power sector to move to smart grid technology: the smart grid maturity model (SGMM). The basis of this material originated at a workshop of water and power industry leaders convened by WEF in North Carolina, in March 2012. Case studies were analyzed from successful utilities in Austria, Holland, Australia, and the United States. High level, strategic best practices were identified and organized into topic areas, which define the level of progression (enable, integrate and optimize) towards achieving energy sustainability. The WEF energy roadmap is intended to guide utilities of all sizes as they progress towards becoming the treatment plants of the future. While it is not practical for all wastewater treatment plants to become energy positive or neutral, all can take steps towards increasing energy sustainability. Financial viability for energy management sustainability is crucial for success. Finding alternative financial models such as Energy Services Performance Contracts (ESPC) is a good option to accomplish energy management goals in a timely and financially responsible method.

Ferrel, L.; Liner, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

An automatic water management system for large-scale rice paddy fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic water management system for large-scale paddy fields has been developed. The purposes of that are to supply the paddy fields with water or drain water from that automatically, to decrease water consumption, and to have a good harvest. To ... Keywords: estimating mean water level, optimal water allocation, paddy field, predict field consumption, prediction of growth stages, water level control

Teruji Sekozawa

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Situated Learning and the Situated Knowledge Web: Exploring the Ground Beneath Knowledge Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge is now recognized as an important basis for competitive advantage and many firms are beginning to establish initiatives to leverage and manage organizational knowledge. These include efforts to codify knowledge in repositories as well as efforts ... Keywords: Ethnographic Methods, Knowledge Management, Organizational Change, Qualitative Research, Situated Knowledge, Web Situated Learning

Sarma R. Nidumolu; Mani Subramani; Alan Aldrich

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Length Design for Ground Source Heat Pumps. ” InternationalClosed-Loop/Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems Installationon Closed-Loop Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems. ” ASHRAE

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Using FRAMES to Manage Environmental and Water Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems FRAMES) is decision-support middleware that provides users the ability to design software solutions for complex problems. It is a software platform that provides seamless and transparent communication between modeling components by using a multi-thematic approach to provide a flexible and holistic understanding of how environmental factors potentially affect humans and the environment. It incorporates disparate components (e.g., models, databases, and other frameworks) that integrate across scientific disciplines, allowing for tailored solutions to specific activities. This paper discusses one example application of FRAMES, where several commercialoff-the-shelf (COTS) software products are seamlessly linked into a planning and decision-support tool that helps manage water-based emergency situations and sustainable response. Multiple COTS models, including three surface water models, and a number of databases are linked through FRAMES to assess the impact of three asymmetric and simultaneous events, two of which impact water resources. The asymmetric events include 1) an unconventional radioactive release into a large potable water body, 2) a conventional contaminant (oil) release into navigable waters, and 3) an instantaneous atmospheric radioactive release.

Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Alex J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Castleton, Karl J.

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

303

Results of Year-Round Remotely Sensed Integrated Water Vapor by Ground-Based Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years of measurements with a time resolution of 1 min, some climatological findings on precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid water (CLW) in central Europe are given. A weak diurnal cycle is apparent. The mean overall ...

J. Güldner; D. Spänkuch

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Middle Ground for Nuclear Waste Management: Social and Ethical Aspects of Shallow Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 terrorist attacks in the USA and the 2011 seismic events in Japan have brought into sharp relief the vulnerabilities involved in storing nuclear waste on the land's surface. Nuclear engineers and waste managers are deciding that disposing nuclear ... Keywords: Ethics, Inter-Generational Equity, Nuclear Waste, Shallow Storage, Waste Disposal

Alan Marshall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to a FY 2007 baseline), significantly reducing total Federal water consumption by FY 2020. View Federal water requirements at www.femp.energy.gov/program/waterefficiency_ requirements.html. Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency With less than one percent of Earth's water available for human use, the Federal Government is leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Federal laws and regulations require agencies to implement water efficiency efforts and reduce water consumption, making water an integral part of every comprehensive resource management program. Water Management Planning A comprehensive water management plan includes clear information on how a Federal facility uses water from

306

The Validation of AIRS Retrievals of Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor Using Measurements from a Network of Ground-Based GPS Receivers over the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust and easily implemented verification procedure based on the column-integrated precipitable water (IPW) vapor estimates derived from a network of ground-based global positioning system (GPS) receivers has been used to assess the quality of ...

M. K. Rama Varma Raja; Seth I. Gutman; James G. Yoe; Larry M. McMillin; Jiang Zhao

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Experimental Determination of Water Vapor Profiles from Ground-Based Radiometer Measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor profiles have been obtained from radiometer measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz and ground values of humidity, temperature and pressure. The inversion technique was based on minimum variance estimation, including constraints derived ...

B. G. Skoog; J. I. H. Askne; G. Elgered

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (< 100 C), water exists in both liquid and vapor phases. Furthermore, state-of-the-art membranes require the use of water to provide high conductivity and fast proton transport. Thus, there is a tradeoff between having enough water for proton conduction (ohmic losses), but not too much or else the buildup of liquid water will cause a situation in which the reactant-gas-transport pathways are flooded (mass-transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

On Managing Texas Rural Water Supply Systems: A Socioeconomic Analysis and Quality Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Objectives The study reported here is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of nonprofit, rural water supply corporations or water systems (hereafter referred to as RWSs) in Texas from a sociological perspective. Specifically, the study has attempted to: 1. Provide an overview of the organizational structure and functioning of RWSs, identifying their existing as well as emerging needs, problems, and suggested solutions. It explores socioeconomic characteristics and patterns of RWSs in Texas. It outlines a history of state and federal regulations and practices through which these systems are structured and actually function. 2. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the management of selected RWSs located in different geographical regions of Texas. The evaluation of effectiveness of systems is accomplished through a systematic set of procedures and techniques. These procedures are tested for reliability and validity through empirical data. In addition, the differential levels of program effectiveness of RWSs are elaborated upon by correlating them with relevant socioeconomic variables. 3. Indicate policy and research implications of data for dealing with the future of rural water systems. Expected Contributions The rural populations in the U.S. started experiencing steady increases during the 1970s and early 1980s (Goodwin et al., 1984). Although the rural population growth at the national level showed a few differential trends during mid to late 1980s (Figures 3 and 4 in Appendix A), the state of Texas registered a population influx in many nonmetropolitan areas during the last decade (U.S.D.A., 1990: 11). Overall, a significant portion of Texas' population still resides in rural areas (Texas Department of Water Resources, 1984: 7). However, it appears that a larger number of studies have focused on water-management related problems and issues for urban areas than those for rural communities in Texas (e.g., Knudson, 1986; Meier and Thorton, 1973; Murdock et al., 1988; Texas Department of Water Resources, 1985; Texas Water Development Board, 1990;1 and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1989). While rural water problems have been examined carefully in several parts of the country, we could not find a single study in Texas systematically examining water-related needs and issues confronting rural communities. The need to study rural water supply has become even more important now because of the challenge faced by small community systems in complying with the provisions of the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). These small systems, with their limited customer and revenue bases, will face formidable expense in installing new water treatment methods (Jensen, 1990; Long and Stukenberg, 1987: 38; Texas Water Development Board, 1990: 14). The present study is a timely probe into the phenomena of rural water supply. The study is aimed at developing and using a methodology to evaluate the program effectiveness of RWSs. In recent years, interest has mounted for employing the research techniques of social sciences in efforts to assess the effectiveness of public programs. The 1970s and 1980s, decades of rapid-paced growth of RWSs in Texas and elsewhere, were marked by the proliferation of public expenditures. The study uses a set of indicators to identify effectiveness and efficiency of rural water projects. Such measures for analysis and appraisal of these projects may contribute to more informed and intelligent planning for the future. The study is also expected to provide a critical probe and insight into an evaluation methodology that may be used in future studies investigating public programs. To this end, the research reported here is exploratory in nature and may set grounds for more critical studies in the area. The study, for example, develops a baseline against which to measure future changes and trend in rural water supplies in Texas as well as in other parts of the country. Organization of the Report The remaining three-section organ

Singh, R.N.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Water Vapor Flux Measurements from Ground-Based Vertically Pointed Water Vapor Differential Absorption and Doppler Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, two lidar systems were used to measure the vertical water vapor flux in a convective boundary layer by means of eddy correlation. This was achieved by combining a water vapor differential absorption lidar and a heterodyne wind ...

Andreas Giez; Gerhard Ehret; Ronald L. Schwiesow; Kenneth J. Davis; Donald H. Lenschow

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Order 13514 requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to Order 13514 requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to a FY 2007 baseline), significantly reducing total Federal water consumption by FY 2020. View Federal water requirements at www.femp.energy.gov/program/waterefficiency_ requirements.html. Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency With less than one percent of Earth's water available for human use, the Federal Government is leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Federal laws and regulations require agencies to implement water efficiency efforts and reduce water consumption, making water an integral part of every comprehensive resource management program. Water Management Planning A comprehensive water management plan includes clear information on

313

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Water Resources. Water Conservation in California. DWRUse ENERGY CONSERVATION Water Conservation Pump Efficienciescussion of load Water Conservation some of these measures in

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY OF NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON HYDROCLIMATE AND APPLICATION TO WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY OF NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON HYDROCLIMATE AND APPLICATION TO WATER of the North American Monsoon Hydroclimate and Application to Water Management in the Pecos River Basin written Variability of the North American Monsoon Hydroclimate and Application to Water Management in the Pecos River

315

Development of KM System for Intergrated Management of Water Resources and Environment in Zhangweinan Subbasin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge Management (KM) system for Integrated Management of Water Resources and Environment is developed in the paper, which includes spatial database, properties database, thematic database and met abase. The database can be used for integrated management ... Keywords: Zhangweinan Subbasin, knowledge management system(KM), database

Weidong Yu; Chunhui Li; Junxiang Jia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

Hall, L.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A spatial location-allocation GIS framework for managing water resources in a savanna nature reserve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry season. Ryan & Getz: GIS framework for managing waterpolygons ver 2.6 for ArcView GIS. Avenue script available atspatial location–allocation GIS framework for managing water

Ryan, Sadie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A spatial location-allocation GIS framework for managing water sources in a savanna nature reserve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry season. Ryan & Getz: GIS framework for managing waterpolygons ver 2.6 for ArcView GIS. Avenue script available atspatial location–allocation GIS framework for managing water

Ryan, Sadie J.; Getz, W M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low-Cost Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 Low Low - - Cost Cost Manufacturable Manufacturable Microchannel Systems for Passive Microchannel Systems for Passive PEM Water Management PEM Water Management IIPS Number 16910 IIPS Number 16910 Ward TeGrotenhuis, Susie Stenkamp, Curt Lavender Pacific Northwest National Laboratories Richland, WA HFCIT Kick Off Meeting February 2007 2 Project objective: Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system Project objective: Project objective: Create a low cost Create a low cost and passive PEM water management system and passive PEM water management system Specific Targets Addressed for 3.4.2 Automotive-Scale: 80 kWe Integrated Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Operating on Direct Hydrogen

320

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground—Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote ...

D. D. Turner; W. F. Feltz; R. A. Ferrare

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Risk management program for the 283-W water treatment facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Risk Management (RM) Program covers the 283-W Water Treatment Facility (283W Facility), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. A RM Program is necessary for this facility because it stores chlorine, a listed substance, in excess of or has the potential to exceed the threshold quantities defined in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 68 (EPA, 1998). The RM Program contains data that will be used to prepare a RM Plan, which is required by 40 CFR 68. The RM Plan is a summary of the RM Program information, contained within this document, and will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ultimately for distribution to the public. The RM Plan will be prepared and submitted separately from this document.

GREEN, W.E.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Understanding the role of trading in water quality management : based on U.S. experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research demonstrates an overview of the performance of water quality trading programs currently implemented within the U.S. The role of trading in water quality management is identified through systematical comparisons ...

Pharino, Chanathip

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

St. Johns River Water Management District 4049 Reid Street P.O. Box 1429 Palatka, FL 32178-1429  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ground or surface water and· water from public and private utilities. Additional information Irrigation withdrawn from ground or surface· water, from a private well or pump, or from a public or private utility or transient housing units, hotel and motel units, and public medians and rights-of-way. #12;St. Johns River

Watson, Craig A.

329

Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 1–2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy ...

Paul E. Racette; Ed R. Westwater; Yong Han; Albin J. Gasiewski; Marian Klein; Domenico Cimini; David C. Jones; Will Manning; Edward J. Kim; James R. Wang; Vladimir Leuski; Peter Kiedron

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Water Management Lessons for California from Statewide Hydro-economic Modeling Using the CALVIN Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model. The general approach taken dates back to Roman times, when Frontinus (97 AD) began his oversight of Rome’s water system with a systematic inventory and quantification of its water system. This approach has been formalized and expanded in the modern era as economists, planners, and engineers have sought to grapple with complex water management systems and problems. In California water supply and demands are inconvenient in space and time. Most water availability is in northern California from winter precipitation and spring snow-melt; whereas water demands are more in the south during the dry summer. Consequently, major floods and seasonal and multiyear droughts characterize water resources in California. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the major north-south hub for this water network. Population growth, climate change, a vulnerable Delta, and decentralized water governance pose opportunities and challenges to water management in California. Portfolios of water management activities, including diverse general policy tools, demand management, and operations and supply expansion options, are available to manage competing demands in complex situations. Exploring promising portfolios of actions is the main intent of the CALVIN model. The CALVIN model

Jay R. Lund; Richard E. Howitt; Josué Medellín-azuara; Marion W. Jenkins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Water Prism Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the design and implementation of Water Prism, a decision support system that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed or local levels. It considers surface, ground and impoundment waters, and all water using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power and the environment). This report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Study of the Reactions Controlling the Mobility of Uranium in Ground and Surface Water Systems in Contact with Apatite  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to define the mechanisms, equilibria, kinetics, and extent of sorption of aqueous uranium onto hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)) for a range of pH, ionic strength, aqueous uranium concentration, dissolved carbon/air CO{sub 2}, and mineral surface area. We conducted chemical modeling, batch and flow-through experiments, chemical analysis, x-ray absorption and diffraction measurement, and electron microscopy. Our motivation was the need to immobilize U in water and soil to prevent it's entry into water supplies and ultimately, biological systems. Applying hydroxyapatite to in-situ treatment of uranium-bearing ground water could be an effective, low cost technology. We found that hydroxyapatite quickly, effectively, and reversibly sorbed uranium at a high capacity by inner-sphere complexation over a wide range of conditions. Our results indicate that at aqueous uranium concentrations below 10-20 ppb: (1) equilibrium sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite occurs in hours, regardless of pH; (2) in ambient and CO{sub 2}-free atmospheres, over 98% of initial uranium is sorbed to hydroxyapatite, (3) in waters in equilibrium with higher air CO{sub 2} concentrations, sorption removed over 97% of aqueous uranium, except above pH 9, where aqueous uranium concentrations were reduced by less than 40%, and (4) at near-neutral pH, bicarbonate alkalinities in excess of 500 slightly retarded sorption of uranium to hydroxyapatite, relative to lower alkalinities. Uranium sorption and precipitation are reversible and are not appreciably affected by ionic strength. The reversibility of these reactions requires that in situ treatment be carefully monitored to avoid breakthrough and de-sorption of uranium unto ground water. At typical surface conditions, sorption is the only mode of uranium sequestration below 20-50 ppb U - above this range, precipitation of uranium phosphate minerals begins to dominate sequestration processes. We verified that one m{sup 2} of hydroxyapatite can sorb over 7.53 X 10{sup -6} moles or 1.8 mg of uranium in agreement with calculations based on phosphate and calcium oxide sites on the unit cell. Our work is significant because small masses of hydroxyapatite can sorb appreciable masses of uranium quickly over a wide range of chemistries. Preliminary work with ground water containing 260 ppb of uranium and cow bone char indicates that its sorptive capacity is appreciable less than pure hydroxyapatite. Pure crystalline hydroxyapatite sequestered 2.9 mg of uranium per m{sup 2} as opposed to 0.083 mg of uranium sequestered per m{sup 2} of cow bone char, or 27% versus 3.5% by surface area, respectively. Extended x-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy defined mono- and bidentate sorption of uranium to phosphate and calcium oxide groups on the hydroxyapatite surface. The EXAFS data indicate that up to several thousand parts U per million parts hydroxyapatite, surface complexation, and not precipitation, is the predominant process. Above this uranium: hydroxyapatite mass ratio, precipitation of meta-autunite (H{sub 2}(UO{sub 2})2(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 10H{sub 2}0) dominates the sequestration process.

Taffet, M

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project: Advanced Light-Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix (ALWR PWR DM) is an integral piece of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Materials Management Matrix (MMM) initiative for ALWR designs. The MMM provides a tool to assist the industry in proactive identification and consideration of materials issues and mitigation/management opportunities from the design phase through component fabrication and plant construction to operations and maintenance.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

180 The CEC conducts investigations of environmentalUSGS) conducts hydrogeological investigations, For morespecies Conduct hydro-geological investigations, monitor

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Determining an optimal sampling frequency for measuring bulk temporal changes in ground-water quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, statistical methods are used to determine an optimal sampling and analysis plan. When the DQO decision rule for instituting remedial actions is based on a critical change in water quality, the monitoring program design must ensure that this change can be detected and measured with a specified confidence. Usually the focus is on the change at a single monitoring location and the process is limited to addressing the uncertainty inherent in the analytical methods and the variability at that location. However, new strategies that permit ranking the waste sites and prioritizing remedial activities require the means for assessing overall changes for small regions over time, where both spatial and temporal variability exist and where the uncertainty associated with these variations far exceeds measurement error. Two new methods for assessing these overall changes have been developed and are demonstrated by application to a waste disposal site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These methods incorporate historical data where available and allow the user to either test the statistical significance of a linear trend or of an annual change compared to a baseline year for a group of water quality wells.

Moline, G.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards DOE Announces Winners of 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards October 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that more than 30 individuals, teams and organizations across the Federal Government were selected to receive Federal Energy and Water Management Awards for outstanding and innovative efforts to implement sustainable strategies that improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet efficiency. These awards demonstrate the commitment by Federal agencies to invest in efficiency measures that save money for taxpayers, reduce carbon pollution, and create a stronger economy for the American people. The 31 initiatives receiving awards today saved taxpayers almost $42 million in energy and water costs

339

DOE/EA-1312: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) (September 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site (Climax Uranium Millsite) Final September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site DOE Grand Junction Office Page ii Final September 1999 Contents Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Grand Junction UMTRA Project Site Location and Description.........................................1

340

Pesticides in ground water database: A compilation of monitoring studies, 1971-1991. Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report presents summary results on pesticide monitoring of ground water from 1971 to 1991. It is compiled from ground water monitoring projects performed primarily by federal agencies, state agencies and research institutions. The data is well and sample specific. The report is broken into a National Summary and 10 US EPA regional volumes. The information is presented as text, maps, graphs and tables on a national, EPA regional and state/county level. The Region 8 volume is comprised of data from Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Hoheisel, C.; Karrier, J.; Lees, S.; Davies-Hilliard, L.; Hannon, P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Section 6.1 Water Management: Greening Federal Facilities; Second...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resources, reduces the amount of energy and chemicals used for water and wastewater treatment, and, to the extent that the use of hot water is reduced, increases energy...

342

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Many helpful resources about water efficiency are available. Federal Resources Reverse Osmosis Optimization Technology Evaluation: -This FEMP technology evaluation...

343

Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Evaporative Concentration of 100x J13 Ground Water at 60% Relative Humidity and 90C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these experiments we studied the behavior of a synthetic concentrated J13 solution as it comes in contact with a Ni-Cr-Mo-alloy selected for waste canisters in the designated high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concentrated synthetic J13 solution was allowed to drip slowly onto heated test specimens (90 C, 60% relative humidity) where the water moved down the surface of the specimens, evaporated and minerals precipitated. Mineral separation or zoning along the evaporation path was not observed. We infer from solid analyses and geochemical modeling, that the most corrosive components (Ca, Mg, and F) are limited by mineral precipitation. Minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include thermonatrite, natrite, and trona, all sodium carbonate minerals, as well as kogarkoite (Na{sub 3}SO{sub 4}F), halite (NaCl), and niter (KNO{sub 3}). Calcite and a magnesium silicate precipitation are based on chemical analyses of the solids and geochemical modeling. The most significant finding of this study is that sulfate and fluoride concentrations are controlled by the solubility of kogarkoite. Kogarkoite thermodynamic data are needed in the Yucca Mountain Project database to predict the corrosiveness of carbonate brines and to establish the extent to which fluoride is removed from the brines as a solid.

Staggs, K; Maureen Alai,; Hailey, P; Carroll, S A; Sutton, M; Nguyen, Q A

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Domestic Water Conservation Technologies: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert (Booklet)  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13123 calls for the Federal government to conserve water as well as energy in its 500,000 facilities. To help set priorities among water-saving measures, the Federal Energy Management Program conducted a study of Federal water use in 1997. The study indicated that the government consumes more than 50% of its water in just three types of Federal facilities: housing, hospitals, and office buildings. These facilities have enough kitchens, rest rooms, and laundry areas to provide facility managers with many opportunities to begin reducing their water use (and utility costs) with appropriate water-saving fixtures and products. Therefore, this Federal Technology Alert focuses on domestic technologies, products, and appliances such as water-efficient faucets, showerheads, toilets, urinals, washing machines, and dishwashers. Conserving water also saves the energy needed to treat, pump, and heat that water in homes, businesses, and other buildings.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Guide for Transmission Line Grounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical utilities have a duty to provide effective grounding for managing steady-state and fault currents, whether near a large generating station or at a remote distribution pole ground. For transmission lines, this imperative is usually met with investment in overhead ground wires and grounding electrodes. Effective grounding at each tower improves reliability8212by providing low path impedance to lightning strokes8212and contributes to safety. However, the fundamental physical parameters in ground ...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe accident management. (authors)

Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S. [Directorate of Safety, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited Nabhikiya Urja Bhawan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai-400 094 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part I: Airborne to Ground-Based Lidar Systems and Comparisons with Chilled-Mirror Hygrometer Radiosondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water vapor data measured with airborne and ground-based lidar systems during the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002), which took place in the Southern Great Plains during 13 May–25 June 2002 were investigated. So far, the data collected ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Thorsten Schaberl; Paolo Di Girolamo; Donato Summa; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; David N. Whiteman; Belay B. Demoz; Edward V. Browell; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Susan Kooi; Junhong Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Federal Energy Management Program: 2001 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

350

Federal Energy Management Program: 2010 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

351

Federal Energy Management Program: 2002 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

352

Federal Energy Management Program: 2004 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

353

Federal Energy Management Program: 2003 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

354

Federal Energy Management Program: 2012 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

355

Federal Energy Management Program: 2009 Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

356

Short-Term Climate Predictions for Water Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short-term climate predictions (two weeks to two years) have many applications in operation of water supply and flood control facilities. They can influence use of water for irrigation, hydroelectric power production, flood control operation, ...

Charles A. McCullough

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Back to Top Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several...

358

Health assessment for Ossineke ground water (Ossineke Residential Wells), Ossineke, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980794440. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Ossineke Residential Wells are listed on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Alpena County, Michigan. In 1977, several residential wells were determined to be contaminated with components of gasoline, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol, and tetrachloroethylene. Possible contamination sources include leaking underground gas storage tanks, a lagoon used for waste disposal by a commercial laundromat, or an auto rustproofing operation. Ground water samples showed maximum concentrations detected in parts per billion (ppb): benzene, 21,000; toluene, 53,000; xylene, 11,000; and PCE, 7 ppb. Sampling of the residential wells in 1988 showed the following maximum concentrations in ppb: benzene, 6,590; toluene, 726; xylene, 2,500; tetrachloroethylene, 16; and phenol, 26. The site is of potential public-health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time. Human exposure to benzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and phenol may occur via the exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact.

Not Available

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency The following Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Executive Order 13423 Executive Order (E.O.) 13423 requires Federal agencies to reduce water consumption intensity (gallons per square foot) 2% annually through the end of fiscal year (FY) 2015 or 16% by the end of FY 2015 from a 2007 baseline. This requirement is to be achieved incrementally by fiscal year beginning in 2008. Fiscal Year Percentage Reduction 2008 2 2009 4 2010 6 2011 8 2012 10 2013 12 2014 14 2015 16 E.O. 13423 Mandated Facility Water Intensity Reductions by Fiscal Year E.O. 13423 also directs Federal facilities to conduct annual water audits of at least 10% of facility square footage and to conduct audits at least

360

2012 Criteria and Guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 2012 Criteria & Guidelines For the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2 1. OVERVIEW FEMP provides the services, tools, and expertise to Federal agencies to help them achieve their legislated and executive ordered energy, greenhouse gas, and water goals. FEMP, in conjunction with the Federal Interagency Energy Management Task Force, will present the 2012 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards (Federal Awards). The purpose of these awards is to recognize outstanding achievements in energy and water efficiency, renewable energy, and fleet management from within the Federal government. FEMP will give awards in six categories. The categories are: A. Project Awards for teams that are exemplary in their implementation of energy efficiency,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Early Adoption of Climate Information: Lessons Learned from South Florida Water Resource Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal climate forecasting skill has improved over the past decades, accompanied by expectations that these forecasts, along with other climate information, will be increasingly used by water managers in certain regions of the United States. ...

Jessica Bolson; Kenneth Broad

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Understanding the Climate-Sensitive Decisions and Information Needs of Fresh Water Resource Managers in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding how climate science can be useful in decisions about the management of fresh water resources requires knowledge of decision makers, their climate-sensitive decisions, and the context in which the decisions are being made. A mixed-...

Melissa L. Finucane; Rachel Miller; L. Kati Corlew; Victoria W. Keener; Maxine Burkett; Zena Grecni

363

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 4th Civil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winner 4th Civil Engineering Squadron 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 4th Civil Engineering Squadron fewm13seymourjohnsonhighres.pdf fewm13seymourjohnson.p...

365

Trading zones : cooperating for water resource and ecosystem management when stakeholders have apparently irreconcilable differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disputes over the management of water resources in the United States often seem irreconcilable because stakeholders' differences in values, beliefs, and identities are so hard to resolve. Yet, while many efforts to resolve ...

Fuller, Boyd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

UMTRA Ground Water Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

... 7 Figure 3. Uranium Distribution from April 2013 Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site...

367

Electricity Use and Management in the Municipal Water Supply and Wastewater Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for expanded service capacity and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs include technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. Appropriate options for a specific system will vary depending on the system characteristics, availability of electric utility programs to assist the water and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Water: New Technologies for Managing and Ensuring Future ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of water every day for all uses other than energy production. ... for petroleum- based products outstrips supply of sweet crude oil, producers and ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment… (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dam and the Thermalito pumped storage units in the north,This generation pumped storage, and recovery generation, (electricity demand. In a pumped-storage system, water is

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission...

372

Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

Ruiz, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Influence of Climate Science on Water Management in Western Australia: Lessons for Climate Scientists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water flow into dams that supply Perth in Western Australia (WA) has fallen by 50% since the mid-1970s, and this has severely tested water managers. Climate change scenarios available since the 1980s have suggested that global warming will reduce ...

Scott Power; Brian Sadler; Neville Nicholls

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Internals Aging Management Program Development Template (MRP-342)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has completed and published guidance for managing the effects of aging degradation in pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals. The initial version of this report, Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Internals Inspection and Evaluation Guidelines (MRP-227, Revision 0), was submitted to the staff of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

EPRI Substation Grounding Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been conducting research in the area of substation grounding and fault current management for several decades. This research has resulted in a large number of reports and other products. To help users locate the results of EPRI’s research in substation grounding and fault current management, an annual update is prepared containing brief descriptions of the products.ObjectiveThe objective of this report is ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DWR Bulletin 194. Hydroelectric Energy Potential inmore than 6 bil- of hydroelectric poweL of view of energyfrom peak demand Daytime hydroelectric Two wate:r age) would

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

380

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Managing Nicaraguan Water Resources Definition and Relative Importance of Information Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the results of the Vital the Nicaraguan Water Resources Management Initiative, Issues process as implemented for a collaborative effort between the Nicaraguan Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources and Sandia National Laboratories. This initiative is being developed to assist in the development of an efficient and sustainable water resources management system for Nicamgua. The Vital Issues process was used to provide information for developing a project that will develop and implement an advanced information system for managing Nicaragua's water resources. Three Vital Issues panel meetings were convened to 1) develop a mission statement and evaluation criteria for identifying and ranking the issues vital to water resources management in Nicaragua 2) define and rank the vital issues; and 3) identify a preliminary list of information needed to address the vital issues. The selection of panelists from the four basic institutional perspectives- government, industiy, academe, and citizens' groups (through nongovernmental organizations (NGOs))-ensured a high level of stakeholder representation on the panels. The already existing need for a water resource management information system has been magnified in the aftemnath of Hurricane Mitch. This information system would be beneficial for an early warning system in emergencies, and the modeling and simulation capabilities of the system would allow for advanced planning. Additionally, the outreach program will provide education to help Nicaraguan improve their water hygiene practices.

Engi, D.; Guillen, S.M.; Vammen, K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Principles of Integrated Urban Water Management James P. Heaney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations. 2. Management of growth through agriculture and natural resources preservation. 3. Comprehensive in the U.S. #12;2-5 and gas taxes cover only about 9 to 18% of the cost of transportation (Kunstler 1996 Regulations Southworth and Ben-Joseph (1995) present an overview of suburbia evolution since 1820. They trace

Pitt, Robert E.

383

Ground Truth Collections at the MTI Core Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) selected 13 sites across the continental US and one site in the western Pacific to serve as the primary or core site for collection of ground truth data for validation of MTI science algorithms. Imagery and ground truth data from several of these sites are presented in this paper. These sites are the Comanche Peak, Pilgrim and Turkey Point power plants, Ivanpah playas, Crater Lake, Stennis Space Center and the Tropical Western Pacific ARM site on the island of Nauru. Ground truth data includes water temperatures (bulk and skin), radiometric data, meteorological data and plant operating data. The organizations that manage these sites assist SRTC with its ground truth data collections and also give the MTI project a variety of ground truth measurements that they make for their own purposes. Collectively, the ground truth data from the 14 core sites constitute a comprehensive database for science algorithm validation.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Complex Adaptive Systems Simulation-Optimization Framework for Adaptive Urban Water Resources Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population growth, urbanization and climate change threaten urban water systems. The rise of demands caused by growing urban areas and the potential decrease of water availability caused by the increase of frequency and severity of droughts challenge the continued well-being of society. Due to increasing environmental and financial constraints, water management paradigms have shifted from supply augmentation to demand management, and water conservation initiatives may efficiently decrease water demands to more sustainable levels. To provide reliable assessment of the efficiencies of different demand management strategies, new modeling techniques are needed that can simulate decentralized decisions of consumers and their interactions with the water system. An integrated simulation-optimization framework, based on the paradigm of Complex Adaptive Systems, is developed here to model dynamic interactions and adaptations within social, built, and natural components of urban water systems. The framework goes beyond tradition engineering simulations by incorporating decentralized, heterogeneous and autonomous agents, and by simulating dynamic feedback loops among modeling components. The framework uses modeling techniques including System Dynamics, Cellular Automata, and Agent-based Modeling to simulate housing and population growth, a land use change, residential water consumption, the hydrologic cycle, reservoir operation, and a policy/decision maker. This research demonstrates the applicability of the proposed framework through a series of studies applied to a water supply system of a large metropolitan region that is located in a semi-arid region and suffers recurrently from severe droughts. A set of adaptive demand management strategies, that apply contingency restrictions, land use planning, and water conservation technologies, such as rainwater harvesting systems, are evaluated. A multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm is coupled with the CAS simulation framework to identify optimal strategies and explore conflicting objectives within a water system. The results demonstrate the benefits of adaptive management by updating management decisions to changing conditions. This research develops a new hydrologic sustainability metric, developed to quantify the stormwater impacts of urbanization. The Hydrologic Footprint Residence captures temporal and spatial hydrologic characteristics of a flood wave passing through a stream segment and is used to assess stormwater management scenarios, including Best Management Practices and Low Impact Development.

Giacomoni, Marcio

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Meteorological Applications of Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals from the Ground-Based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is a well-calibrated ground-based instrument that measures high-resolution atmospheric emitted radiances from the atmosphere. The spectral resolution of the instrument is better than one ...

Wayne F. Feltz; William L. Smith; Robert O. Knuteson; Henry E. Revercomb; Harold M. Woolf; H. Ben Howell

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Christine Hull  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

e ciency. e ciency. The Base energy savings success is attributed to the institutionalization of Ms. Hull's Energy STORM program which: Sustains facilities by developing energy e cient projects; Trains occupants in energy conservation practices; Operates facilities at peak e ciency; Renews facilities through retro-commissioning; and Measures and reports energy consumption. Ms. Hull recently refinanced an energy savings performance contract to gain $66 million in investments to improve controls and lighting power management, upgrade 12 central heating and cooling plants, and decrease monthly payments. She also drove the development of a Web-based application to manage and optimize work scheduling that resulted in a 4 percent increase in productivity in FY 2012 from the prior year.

387

Water Management Planning: A Case Study at Blue Grass Army Depot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Order 13123, Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management, mandates an aggressive policy for reducing potable water consumption at federal facilities. Implementation guid¬ance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set a requirement for each federal agency to “reduce potable water usage by implementing life cycle, cost-effective water efficiency programs that include a water management plan, and not less than four Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Best Manage¬ment Practices (BMPs).” The objective of this plan is to gain full compliance with Executive Order 13123 and associated DOE implementation guidance on behalf of Blue Grass Army Depot (BGAD), Richmond, Kentucky. In accordance with this plan, BGAD must: • Incorporate the plan as a component of the Installation energy conservation plan • Investigate the water savings potential and life-cycle cost effectiveness of the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and retrofit/replacement options associated with the ten FEMP BMPs • Put into practice all applicable O&M options • Identify retrofit/replacement options appropriate for implementation (based upon calculation of the simple payback periods) • Establish a schedule for implementation of applicable and cost-effective retrofit/replacement options.

Solana, Amy E.; McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2001 APRIL 15 AND 2005 JANUARY 20 GROUND-LEVEL ENHANCEMENTS BY THE MILAGRO WATER CERENKOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER CERENKOV DETECTOR BY Trevor Morgan B.S., University of New Hampshire (2004) DISSERTATION Submitted

California at Santa Cruz, University of

389

The role of science, stakeholder engagement, and decision making process design in advancing innovation around water management in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sustainable Water Management Initiative is a multi-stakeholder process that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs convened in early 2010 to seek advice on how to more sustainably manage ...

Corson-Rikert, Tyler Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine Schultz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

e ciency, and e ciency, and meet the Secretary of the Navy's energy goals through smart investments. Ms. Schultz approved and funded 147 energy and water projects implemented in FY 2012 that resulted in energy and water cost avoidance totaling more than $89.1 million. She also directed six energy third- party financed energy projects that are saving the Navy an additional $13.6 million annually. Ms. Schultz established innovative tools such as the Navy Shore Geospatial Energy Module, a geospatial solution designed to inform Navy Shore Energy investment decisions, and the Energy Return on Investments tool that analyzes all energy initiatives to ensure that accurate return-on-investments (ROI) data is used to inform investments of limited program resources.

392

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine Schultz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

efficiency, efficiency, and meet the Secretary of the Navy's energy goals through smart investments. Ms. Schultz approved and funded 147 energy and water projects implemented in FY 2012 that resulted in energy and water cost avoidance totaling more than $89.1 million. She also directed six energy third- party financed energy projects that are saving the Navy an additional $13.6 million annually. Ms. Schultz established innovative tools such as the Navy Shore Geospatial Energy Module, a geospatial solution designed to inform Navy Shore Energy investment decisions, and the Energy Return on Investments tool that analyzes all energy initiatives to ensure that accurate return-on-investments (ROI) data is used to inform investments of limited program resources.

393

Managing Forests for Water Yield: The Importance of Scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Examination of expected change in water yield for a large area where vegetation thinning has been proposed in the Sierra Mountains of California, indicates that the size of the area has an important bearing on annual runoff. Results indicate that average changes in annual runoff per unit area for large areas would typically be less than 0.4%. Such changes can only be quantified by extrapolation of paired watershed studies because direct measurement is not feasible.

Huff, D.D.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

394

Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) 25 November 2008 I. Background A. Authority Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) amends section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, by adding a new subsection (f) Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings (42 U.S.C. 8253(f); referred to as "the statute" in this guidance). The new subsection prescribes a framework for facility energy project management and benchmarking, including the following elements: * Designated "facility energy managers" for ensuring compliance of "covered facilities"

395

Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) 25 November 2008 I. Background A. Authority Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) amends section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, by adding a new subsection (f) Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings (42 U.S.C. 8253(f); referred to as "the statute" in this guidance). The new subsection prescribes a framework for facility energy project management and benchmarking, including the following elements: * Designated "facility energy managers" for ensuring compliance of "covered facilities"

396

Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

Mark K. Gee

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Social marketing, financial, and regulatory mechanisms for adoption of water conservation and stormwater management practices by single-family households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, water delivery and stormwater removal have been managed largely by engineering staff at water utilities, municipal departments and multi-jurisdiction authorities. In recent ...

Youngerman, Zach (Zach Reuben)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Deployment and Evaluation of a System for Ground-Based Measurement of Cloud Liquid Water Turbulent Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct interception of windblown cloud water by forests has been dubbed “occult deposition” because it represents a hydrological input that is hidden from rain gauges. Eddy correlation studies of this phenomenon have estimated cloud water fluxes ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Peter M. Anthoni; Richard J. Vong; Anthony C. Delany; Gordon D. Maclean

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

IIntegrated System Health Management for Ground OperationsAutomation for Vehicle and Habitat Operations 2009 Phase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV systems. Overall goal for this program is development of techniques that enable power system fault effective PHM techniques and fault tolerance for power system reliability and extended operation. Impact will provide reliability and health management tools for the state-of-the-art technologies, such as advanced

404

Resource Management Services, Part 608: Use and Protection of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Use and Protection of 8: Use and Protection of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 608: Use and Protection of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

405

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Issue Management Tables—Revision 2 (MRP-205)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ongoing issues related to the degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) components have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues and associated Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) and Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) requirements.

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Summary of Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Water Management Installations at U.S. Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an inventory of zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management systems currently operating at U.S. power generating stations. A total of 146 ZLD operations were identified and described. The report discusses the numerous treatment methods used at these ZLD facilities along with their merits and detractions of each method.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Putting humans in the loop: Social computing for Water Resources Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of online services, social networks, crowdsourcing, and serious Web games has promoted the emergence of a novel computation paradigm, where complex tasks are solved by exploiting the capacity of human beings and computer platforms in an integrated ... Keywords: Crowdsourcing, Games with a purpose, Human Computation, Social computation, Water resources planning and management

P. Fraternali; A. Castelletti; R. Soncini-Sessa; C. Vaca Ruiz; A. E. Rizzoli

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Review: The impact of agricultural activities on water quality: A case for collaborative catchment-scale management using integrated wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenge of improving water quality is a growing global concern, typified by the European Commission Water Framework Directive and the United States Clean Water Act. The main drivers of poor water quality are economics, poor water management, agricultural ... Keywords: Agricultural activities, Catchment, Collaborative, Water quality monitoring and management, Wireless sensor networks

Huma Zia, Nick R. Harris, Geoff V. Merrett, Mark Rivers, Neil Coles

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project: U.S.--Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Materials Management Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Advanced Nuclear Technology (ANT) Program has initiated a Materials Management Matrix (MMM) initiative to systematically assess new plant designs and identify gaps and opportunities that, if addressed at appropriate times in the life cycle of a plant, could significantly improve performance of the materials used in new plant designs. Products developed by this initiative are intended to be living reports that will be periodically updated through the licensin...

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… EEBA Water Management Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy codes and voluntary programs such as ENERGY STAR for Homes and energy codes and voluntary programs such as ENERGY STAR for Homes and the DOE Challenge Home continue transforming the housing industry to high performance, better insulated and air-sealed assemblies now have substantially reduced tolerance for drying. As a result, managing bulk water flow has become critical to durable construction. The DOE-sponsored Water Mangement Guide has proven to be a highly effective tool for disseminating much needed best practices. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program sponsored development of the Water Management Guide, written by Joe Lstiburek, a building scientist and principal with Building America research partner, Building Science Corporation. The guide gives builders practical guidance for minimizing

412

High Resolution DEM Generated from LiDAR Data for Water Respurce Management”, Monash university  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terrain patterns play an important role in determining the nature of water resources and related hydrological modelling. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), offering an efficient way to represent ground surface, allow automated direct extraction of hydrological features (Garbrecht and Martz, 1999), thus bringing advantages in terms of processing efficiency, cost effectiveness, and accuracy assessment, compared with traditional methods based on topographic maps, field surveys, or photographic interpretations. However, researchers have found that DEM quality and resolution affect the accuracy of any extracted hydrological features (Kenward et al., 2000). Therefore, DEM quality and resolution must be specified according to the nature

X. j. Peterson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improving Water Management: Applying ModelBuilder to site water impoundments using AEM survey data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ArcGIS ModelBuilder was used to create a GIS-based decision support model that incorporated digital elevation data and electromagnetic geophysical results gathered by helicopter to screen potential sites for water disposal impoundments produced from coal bed natural gas.

Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Harbert, W.P.; Ackman, T.E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impacts of Produced Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Grounding intentionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I argue that current attempts to ground intentionality face one of two challenges. Either the grounding feature of intentionality will be itself intentional or the grounding feature is disparate in nature from the representational capacity of an intentional mental state and therefore no connection between the two can be taken to exist. I examine two current accounts of intentionality and the features they utilize to ground it. I maintain that both views fall prey to one or both of the objections I raise. I conclude that any account of intentionality will need to meet both of these challenges in order to be counted successful.

Huizenga Steven R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Storm Water Best Management Practices Manual for Transmission Line Rights-of-Way Construction and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a general construction storm water permit that would require implementation of best management practices (BMPs) to meet a specific nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) and total suspended solids (TSS) limit as well as additional erosion and sediment control requirements from construction sites. These new requirements will provide unique challenges for those designing, constructing, and maintaining transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs). This techn...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

BWRVIP-167: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Boiling Water Reactor Issue Management Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ongoing issues related to degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure vessels, reactor internals, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 1 piping components have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues. This BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) report provides BWR Issue Management Tables that identify, rank, and describe R&D gaps.

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

BWRVIP-167NP, Rev. 3: Boiling Water Reactor Issue Management Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities continue to face a number of ongoing issues related to degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure vessels, reactor internals, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 1 piping components. These issues have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) gaps and BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) requirements. The BWR Issue Management Tables in the report are living documents that ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ground water management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

BWRVIP-167NP, Revision 2: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Boiling Water Reactor Issue Management Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities face numerous ongoing issues related to degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure vessels, reactor internals, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 1 piping components. These issues have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues and BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) requirements. The BWR Issue Management Tables (IMTs) in the report are living documents that summarize the st...

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Issue Management Tables - Revision 3 (MRP-205)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities continue to face a number of ongoing issues related to degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) components. These issues have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues and associated EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP) and Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) requirements.BackgroundA comprehensive, integrated ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Water Budget Managers Report to Northwest Power Planning Council, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a summary of the 1984 flow conditions, Water Budget management, and flow shaping to meet the needs of the smolt outmigration. In addition, a summary of activities conducted under the Smolt Monitoring Program is provided, as is preliminary data on the timing and duration of the smolt outmigration as required by Section 304(C)(3)(B). 6 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Water Budget Managers (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Water Budget Center, Portland, OR)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of river salt loads in a complex and highly regulated river basin such as the San Joaquin River Basin of California presents significant challenges for current Information Technology. Computer-based numerical models are used as a means of ... Keywords: Environmental decision support, Forecasting, Salt management, Sensor networks, Sensors, Water quality

Nigel W. T. Quinn; Ricardo Ortega; Patrick J. A. Rahilly; Caleb W. Royer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal dab was collected from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) measurement and covered the twenty-one year span 1970- 1990. The ESRD data was gathered from the Texas Department of Health Kidney Program ESRD Registry for the five-year span 1988-1992. This registry included more than 99% of incident ESRD cases over the same time period. The 1990 U.S. Census data was used to estimate county population by age, race and sex. Exposure was defined as residence in a county with ground water measurements that fell in the highest quartile for each metal (mercury 0.297ug/, arsenic 3.216ug/l, lead 4.685ug/l, cadmium 1.423ug/l, cumulative metal level 8.911ug/l). Outcome was defined as an incident case of ESRD between the years 1988-1992 and examined as five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Among 254 Texas counties, 52 had at least 7 years of metal measurements for lead and cadmium, 51 counties had at least 7 years of metal measurements for arsenic and mercury and 50 counties had 7 years of measurements for all four metals. Linear and logistic regression procedures were carried out to examine the relationship between heavy metal ground water levels and incidence of ESRD. None of the metals demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship with five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Counties with high levels of heavy metals did not indicate an increased odds of having a five-year ESRD incidence per 10,000 persons above the 1988-1992 state average. The percentage of Black or Hispanic persons in a county was a positive predictor of increased five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons.

Bishop, Scott Alan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the settlement of Texas and establishment of ranchers to produce cattle, there was an effort to maximize beef production. This caused serious overgrazing. In addition, there was a reduced incidence of fires across the landscape to clear out brush. These factors led to deterioration of the grazing lands and provided an opportunity for invasive intrusion by brush and other species onto the land and riparian zones. There has been a large-scale conversion from grasslands and savannahs to wildlands over the last 150 years (Scholes and Archer, 1997). The overall impacts are significantly impaired uplands and reduced percolation and surface flow of water from rainfall which caused changes and loss in basic aquatic and terrestrial habitat. The State of Texas adopted a program to study and implement brush management systems across the state to improve the water availability in streams, rivers, reservoirs and aquifers, as well as to improve the rangelands. The feasibility studies have shown great promise for improving ranchland and improving the water situation. However, there is less known about the aquatic and wildlife species response implications of brush management. Certainly, there are opportunities for improving the viability of an ecosystem through brush management strategies and continuing management practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in hydrology and biological diversity associated with brush management in two watersheds where significant data was already available. This study focused on assessing the aquatic and terrestrial species implications related to specified brush management strategies over time. This involved an integrated analysis including modeling of the landscape, assessing biological diversity and developing economic implications for the two watersheds (Twin Buttes and Edwards regions). Thus, this study is comprised of three parts: modeling of brush management strategies temporally, assessing biological diversity (aquatic and terrestrial) and estimating economic implications. This represents a complex analysis involving variable units and multiple disciplines. Previous feasibility studies of brush removal have been targeted at maximizing water runoff. This analysis is an extension that is designed to examine the implications of brush management under a more restrictive set of brush removal criteria that were chosen based upon wildlife considerations. To achieve the integration of hydrologic modeling, range ecology, and economic implications, there were three team meetings bringing together all components to review status and set priorities for the remainder of the work. In addition, scientists in the three basic groups of specialization interacted daily along with representatives of the Corps of Engineers to assure that each decision was reflected in other parts of the analyses. The major addition of this analysis to brush management feasibility studies being conducted as part of the Texas brush management plan is the consideration of wildlife and aquatic biota and assessing changes in biological diversity likely to result from alternative brush management scenarios.

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

GSFLOW--Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management of wastewater treatment plant effluent using percolation ponds, injection wells, or controlled capacity of percolation ponds (infiltration rate/day x area x days/month) and of injection wells (gpm are explained next. Details of the DAU assignments are provided in the file "Daulist.xls" (Software and Data

429

Water Prism, Volume 2: Prototype Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Prism is a decision support system (DSS) that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed, or local levels. It considers surface, ground, and impoundment waters and all water-using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power, and the environment). This technical update illustrates how Water Prism is used by applying it to two large watersheds: the Muskingum River Basin (Ohio) and the Green River Basin ...

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z