Sample records for ground visible band

  1. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, M.B.; Gardner, D.; Patrick, D.; Lewallen, T.A.; Nammath, S.R.; Painter, K.D.; Vadnais, K.G.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system is described embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals is produced by a single radio frequency source and provided to a transmit antenna for transmission to a target and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna. A phase modulator modulates those portions of the radio frequency signals to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal is combined in a mixer with the original radio frequency signal to produce a resultant signal which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals, the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform Unit 44 into frequency domain data wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target. 6 figs.

  2. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, Michael B. (Buellton, CA); Gardner, Duane (Santa Maria, CA); Patrick, Douglas (Santa Maria, CA); Lewallen, Tricia A. (Ventura, CA); Nammath, Sharyn R. (Santa Barbara, CA); Painter, Kelly D. (Goleta, CA); Vadnais, Kenneth G. (Alexandria, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system (10) embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals (60) is produced by a single radio frequency source (16) and provided to a transmit antenna (26) for transmission to a target (54) and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna (28). A phase modulator (18) modulates those portion of the radio frequency signals (62) to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal (62) is combined in a mixer (34) with the original radio frequency signal (60) to produce a resultant signal (53) which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals (66) the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot (68) which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform unit 44 into frequency domain data (70) wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target (54) and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target (54).

  3. Category:Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Ultrathin metal-semiconductor-metal resonator for angle invariant visible band transmission filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Yong Lee, Jae; Jay Guo, L., E-mail: guo@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present transmission visible wavelength filters based on strong interference behaviors in an ultrathin semiconductor material between two metal layers. The proposed devices were fabricated on 2?cm?×?2?cm glass substrate, and the transmission characteristics show good agreement with the design. Due to a significantly reduced light propagation phase change associated with the ultrathin semiconductor layer and the compensation in phase shift of light reflecting from the metal surface, the filters show an angle insensitive performance up to ±70°, thus, addressing one of the key challenges facing the previously reported photonic and plasmonic color filters. This principle, described in this paper, can have potential for diverse applications ranging from color display devices to the image sensors.

  6. Electric-field-dependent electroreflectance spectra of visible-band-gap (InAlGa)P quantum-well structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, I.J.; Blum, O.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Howard, A.J.; Follstaedt, D.M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States))

    1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the first studies of electric-field effects on optical transitions in visible-band-gap InGaP/InAlGaP multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures. These structures, grown at 775 [degree]C by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on (100) GaAs substrates misoriented 6[degree] towards P(111)[r angle][l angle]111[r angle]A, consist of nominally undoped MQWs surrounded by doped In[sub 0.49]Al[sub 0.51]P cladding layers to form [ital p]-[ital i]-[ital n] diodes. The Stark shifts of various allowed and forbidden quantum-well transitions were observed in bias-dependent electroreflectance spectra of In[sub 0.49]Ga[sub 0.51]P/In[sub 0.49](Al[sub 0.5]Ga[sub 0.5])[sub 0.51]P MQW samples with 10-nm-thick layers. We find the magnitude of these shifts to depend on the details of the Mg doping profile, confirming the importance of Mg diffusion and unintentional background doping in these materials. Our results show that (InAlGa)P materials are promising for visible-wavelength electro-optic modulator applications.

  7. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  8. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  9. Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

  10. Study of Gravitational Lens Chromaticity from Ground-based Narrow Band Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosquera, Ana M; Mediavilla, Evencio; Kochanek, Christopher S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of wavelength-dependent flux ratios for 4 gravitational lens systems (SDSS~J1650+4251, HE~0435$-$1223, FBQ 0951+2635, and Q~0142$-$100) obtained with the Nordic Optical telescope (NOT). The use of narrow band photometry, as well as the excellent seeing conditions during the observations, allow us to set good baselines to study their chromatic behavior. For SDSS~J1650+4251 we determine the extinction curve of the dust in the $z_L=0.58$ lens galaxy, and find that the 2175 \\AA \\ feature is absent. In the case of HE~0435$-$1223 we clearly detect chromatic microlensing. This allows us to estimate the wavelength dependent size of the accretion disk. We found an R-band disk size of $r^{R}_s=13\\pm5$ light days for a linear prior on $r^{R}_s$ and of $r^{R}_s=7\\pm6$ light days for a logarithmic prior. For a power law size-wavelength scaling of $r_s\\propto\\lambda^{p}$, we were able to constrain the value of the exponent to $p=1.3\\pm0.3$ for both $r^{R}_s$ priors, which is in agreement with the te...

  11. Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas II. Spin states, screening and band structure effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1083 Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas II. Spin states, incorporant la condensation de Bose des paires électron-trou. Nous étudions en détail la limite diluée, et incorporates Bose condensation of bound electron-hole pairs. We discuss in detail the low density limit

  12. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

  13. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    City - May 19, 2010 * Project Title - "Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow...

  14. Introduction Dust aerosols affect visibility, perturb the radiative energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Sunphotometer and air temperature from ground observations. Model Flow Chart GOES-8 06/28/00 1145 UTC -90 -80Introduction Dust aerosols affect visibility, perturb the radiative energy balance of the earth

  15. The visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

    . Then a sweeping algorithm that can build the complex in O(mlog(n)) where n is the size of the visibility graph when a line becomes tangent to three objects. This is shown in the video. The complex is build usingThe visibility complex made visibly simple an introduction to 2D structures of visibility Fr

  16. ARM - Measurement - Visibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM DatagovMeasurementsVisibility ARM Data

  17. Visible light photocatalytic activity in nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanobelts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Nyago Tafen; Lewis, James P. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Wang Jin; Wu Nianqiang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the electronic properties and photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} nanobelts. UV-visible spectra show enhanced absorption in the visible light range for nitrogen-doped nanobelts compared to the pristine sample. The nitrogen-doped nanobelts exhibit improved photocatalytic activity compared to the pristine sample upon visible light irradiation. Furthermore, the incorporation of nitrogen introduces localized states in the band gap.

  18. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  19. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Liangdong [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Liu, Weimin [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750?nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ?12?cm{sup ?1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627?cm{sup ?1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  20. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  1. Bosonic condensation in a flat energy band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baboux, F; Jacqmin, T; Biondi, M; Lemaître, A; Gratiet, L Le; Sagnes, I; Schmidt, S; Türeci, H E; Amo, A; Bloch, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat bands are non-dispersive energy bands made of fully degenerate quantum states. Such bands are expected to support emergent phenomena with extraordinary spatial and temporal structures, as they strongly enhance the effect of any perturbation induced by disorder, dissipation or interactions. However, flat bands usually appear at energies above the ground state, preventing their study in systems in thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we use cavity polaritons to circumvent this issue. We engineer a flat band in a frustrated lattice of micro-pillar optical cavities. By taking advantage of the non-hermiticity of our system, we achieve for the first time bosonic condensation in a flat band. This allows revealing the peculiar effect of disorder in such band: The condensate fragments into highly localized modes, reflecting the elementary eigenstates produced by geometric frustration. This non-hermitian engineering of a bosonic flat band condensate offers a novel approach to studying coherent phases of light and matte...

  2. Sustained water cleavage by visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgarello, E.; Kiwi, J.; Pelizzetti, E.; Visca, M.; Graetzel, M.

    1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustained cleavage of water by 4 quanta of visible light is achieved in aqueous solutions by using a bifunctional redox catalyst composed of Pt and RuO/sub 2/ cosupported by colloidal TiO/sub 2/ particles. A photochemical model system containing Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ as a sensitizer and methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) as an electron relay is used to test the effect of catalyst composition, sensitizer concentration, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of light-induced water decomposition. Electron relay free systems also exhibit high photoactivity. Direct band gap irradiation by uv light leads to efficient water cleavage in the absence of sensitizer and relay.

  3. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  4. 3D Visibility made visibly simple: an introduction to the Visibility Skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

    .g. lighting sim­ ulation), the limits of umbra and penumbra, etc. Previ­ ous approaches have used coarse visible from a vertex of the scene and the limits of umbra and penumbra between two polygons. 1 are the limits of umbra and penumbra together with back­ projections which encode the topological aspect

  5. Evidence for hybrid surface metallic band in (4?×?4) silicene on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoutsou, D., E-mail: dtsoutsou@ims.demokritos.gr; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Tsipas, P.; Dimoulas, A. [National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310 Athens (Greece)] [National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic band structure of monolayer (4?×?4) silicene on Ag(111) is imaged by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A dominant hybrid surface metallic band is observed to be located near the bulk Ag sp-band which is also faintly visible. The two-dimensional character of the hybrid band has been distinguished against the bulk character of the Ag(111) sp-band by means of photon energy dependence experiments. The surface band exhibits a steep linear dispersion around the K{sup ¯}{sub Ag} point and has a saddle point near the M{sup ¯}{sub Ag} point of Ag(111) resembling the ?-band dispersion in graphene.

  6. Smoke and Visible Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes controls on smoke and visible emissions from certain sources.  This rule is not intended to preempt any more stringent controls on smoke and visible emissions provided in any...

  7. Development of SiGe arrays for visible-near IR imaging applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based focal plane arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- near-infrared focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based foal plane ...

  8. Development of low dark current SiGe-detector arrays for visible-NIR imaging sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based Focal Plane Arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- NIR focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based IRFPA's will take ...

  9. Characterization of sige-detector arrays for visible-NIR imaging sensor applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sood, Ashok K.

    SiGe based focal plane arrays offer a low cost alternative for developing visible- near-infrared focal plane arrays that will cover the spectral band from 0.4 to 1.6 microns. The attractive features of SiGe based foal plane ...

  10. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  11. Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations of ultrafast photodissociation dynamics associated with the Chappuis band of ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    with the Chappuis band of ozone Victor S. Batista and William H. Millera) Department of Chemistry, University A ) of ozone following photoexcitation of the molecule in the gas phase with visible light. Our algorithm and recurrence events, as well as an interpretation of experimental studies of the Chappuis band of ozone

  12. Visible Light Communications: Recent Activities in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    The Graduate School of System Design and Management, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan Smart Spaces: A Smart, visible light LEDs are beginning to be used in every home and office, which makes visible light LEDs ideal, and the market share of LED lighting will be more than 30 percent of total lighting market in 2016. Prediction

  13. Ground Control | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground Control Ground Control Released: April 22, 2015 EMSL scientists develop new methods to dig deeper into soil organic matter International Year of the Soils Under our feet...

  14. Visible spectrometer utilizing organic thin film absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiefenbruck, Laura C. (Laura Christine)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I modeled and developed a spectrometer for the visible wavelength spectrum, based on absorption characteristics of organic thin films. The device uses fundamental principles of linear algebra to reconstruct ...

  15. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

  16. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    More, R.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1761 EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS ByDE-AC52-07NA27344. HI FAN Emission of Visible Light by HotABSTRACT We consider the emission of visible light by hot

  17. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the...

  18. The Pennsylvania State University Marching Blue Band Blue Band Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    The Pennsylvania State University Marching Blue Band Press Kit Blue Band Office 101 Blue Band Director vcc2@psu.edu orb1@psu.edu gad157@psu.edu (814) 865 - 3982 #12;History of the Blue Band The Marching Blue Band numbers 310 members which includes: 260 instrumentalists, 34 silks, 14 Touch of Blue

  19. Relating productivity to visibility and lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of determining the appropriate light levels for visual tasks is a cost-benefit problem. Existing light level recommendations seriously underweight the importance of economic factors. Furthermore, the relative importance of the visibility factors in determining the optimal light levels appears inconsistent with the importance of these factors in determining visibility and visual performance. It is shown that calculations based on acuities give a lower limit of 100 to 200 lux for cost-effective light levels for office tasks. Upper limits are calculated from correlations of task performance to visibility levels. Visibility levels become progressively insensitive to luminance as luminance increases. Average power densities above 100 watts/m/sup 2/ are cost-effective only when visibility is very low. However, there is a 3-to-10 times larger increase in benefits from improving contrast or contrast sensitivity than from using more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. Contrast or contrast sensitivity can be improved by using forms with larger print, using xerographic copy instead of carbon or mimeo, making sure office workers have the right eyeglasses, or even by transferring workers with visual problems to less visually demanding tasks. Once these changes are made it is no longer cost-effective to use more than 10 watts/m/sup 2/. This conclusion raises serious questions about recommendations that lead to greater than about 10 watts/m/sup 2/ of installed lighting for general office work.

  20. Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients: 8 ounces egg noodles, uncooked 1 pound ground turkey 1 onion. Meanwhile, brown ground turkey and onions in non stick skillet until meat is no longer pink and onions cup of egg noodles on plate, top with 1/2 cup of turkey mixture. Equipment: Knife Cutting board

  1. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Highfield, James, E-mail: James_Highfield@ices.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Pehkonen, Simo O. [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)] [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pichat, Pierre [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)] [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Schreyer, Martin K. [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of nanoscale titanate and anatase titania phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst displays high activity in degrading phenol under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanisms for the sensitization to visible light are considered.

  2. Cooking with Ground Pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    to thaw. Even when cooked, pork that has been thawed at room temperature can make you sick. Cooking ground pork safely For dishes that contain ground pork, cook the pork before mixing it with other ingredients. How to store cooked ground pork Leftover... dishes made with ground pork should be stored in a covered dish in the refrigerator right away to prevent spoilage. Use it within 3 days. Reheat foods with ground pork until they are steaming hot, bubbling, or at 165 degrees. Other uses Use cooked...

  3. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  4. Broad Band Photon Harvesting Biomolecules for Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meredith; B. J. Powell; J. Riesz; R. Vogel; D. Blake; I. Kartini; G. Will; S. Subianto

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the key principles of artificial photosynthesis for photovoltaic energy conversion. We demonstrate these principles by examining the operation of the so-called "dye sensitized solar cell" (DSSC) - a photoelectrochemical device which simulates the charge separation process across a nano-structured membrane that is characteristic of natural systems. These type of devices have great potential to challenge silicon semiconductor technology in the low cost, medium efficiency segment of the PV market. Ruthenium charge transfer complexes are currently used as the photon harvesting components in DSSCs. They produce a relatively broad band UV and visible response, but have long term stability problems and are expensive to manufacture. We suggest that a class of biological macromolecules called the melanins may be suitable replacements for the ruthenium complexes. They have strong, broad band absorption, are chemically and photochemically very stable, can be cheaply and easily synthesized, and are also bio-available and bio-compatible. We demonstrate a melanin-based regenerative solar cell, and discuss the key properties that are necessary for an effective broad band photon harvesting system.

  5. Cooking with Ground Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of ground beef, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  6. Predaceous Ground Beetles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Predaceous ground beetles can be a nuisance to homeowners, especially when they are numerous. This publication describes the beetles and discusses ways to prevent and treat them....

  7. The visible Smith-Purcell radiation search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Ulc, S. Wang, X.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here the results of an experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to search for the production of visible radiation from the Smith-Purcell effect using a 3 MeV electron beam. After running the experiment under a variety of conditions we were unable to isolate a definite signal from Smith-Parcell effect. Any Smith-Purcell signal present in the measured radiation was less than 10% of the background signal.

  8. State visibility in Q-bit space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Kracklauer

    2007-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study by comparison the structure of singlet type states in Q-bit space in the light of quantum and classical paradigms. It is shown that only the classical paradigm implies a variation in the visibility of correlation coefficients, that has been observed in fact in experiments. We conclude that Q-bit space in not a appropriate venue for an EPR test of quantum completeness.

  9. Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a novel ground state quantum computation approach that requires no unitary evolution of qubits in time: the qubits are fixed in stationary states of the Hamiltonian. This formulation supplies a completely time-independent approach to realizing quantum computers. We give a concrete suggestion for a ground state quantum computer involving linked quantum dots.

  10. GROUND-BASED CLOUD IMAGES AND SKY RADIANCES IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED REGION FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Janet

    the atmospheric heating rates as well as the amount of solar radiation including biologically effective UV preliminary comparisons with model calculations and cloud cover data both from another type of sky imager data are of specific importance to study the role of clouds on the radiation balance of the earth

  11. Seeing solar on campus : a visible photovoltaic installation on campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guarda, Daniel Jair Alves

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a methodology for selecting a site on the MIT campus for a visible solar photovoltaic installation. Visibility, solar exposure, advertising potential, aesthetics, interactivity and direct or important ...

  12. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  14. Visible light photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol using vanadium and nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, R.; Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Patel, N.; Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, I-38123 Povo ( Trento) (Italy)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Vanadium and Nitrogen were codoped in TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst by Sol-gel method to utilize visible light more efficiently for photocatalytic reactions. A noticeable shift of absorption edge to visible light region was obtained for the singly-doped namely V-TiO{sub 2}, N-TiO{sub 2} and codoped V-N-TiO{sub 2} samples in comparison with undoped TiO{sub 2}, with smallest band gap obtained with codoped-TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalytic activities for all TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were tested by 4-chlorophenol (organic pollutant) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that codoped TiO{sub 2} exhibits the best photocatalytic activity, which could be attributed to the synergistic effect produced by V and N dopants.

  15. A Model of Visible QCD Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukuda, Hajime; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We pursue a class of visible axion models where the axion mass is enhanced by strong dynamics in a mirrored copy of the Standard Model in the line of the idea put forward by Rubakov. In particular, we examine the consistency of the models with laboratory, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. As a result, viable parameter regions are found, where the mass of the axion is of $O(100)$ MeV or above while the Peccei-Quinn breaking scale is at around $10^{3\\mbox{-}5}$ GeV.

  16. February 8th 2011 Visible light communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    400 350 300 250 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 700 500 400 200 150100 150 200 150 150 200 x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m x y 0 LED Lamp 5 m x y 0 5 m 2.5 800 600 exchange RF Wireless channel PC or portable terminal Visible optical link LED solid state lighting unit #12

  17. A Model of Visible QCD Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Fukuda; Keisuke Harigaya; Masahiro Ibe; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We pursue a class of visible axion models where the axion mass is enhanced by strong dynamics in a mirrored copy of the Standard Model in the line of the idea put forward by Rubakov. In particular, we examine the consistency of the models with laboratory, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. As a result, viable parameter regions are found, where the mass of the axion is of $O(100)$ MeV or above while the Peccei-Quinn breaking scale is at around $10^{3\\mbox{-}5}$ GeV.

  18. Visible Light Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillage ofInformationVineyardEnergyViridasVishVisible

  19. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  20. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer is disclosed for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the waveguide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the waveguide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis. 16 figs.

  1. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldman, Don S. (Folsom, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  2. IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

  3. Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

  4. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Jewell, Jack L. (Bridgewater, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  5. Resonant Visible Light Modulation with Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Renwen; de Abajo, F Javier Garcia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast modulation and switching of light at visible and near-infrared (vis-NIR) frequencies is of utmost importance for optical signal processing and sensing technologies. No fundamental limit appears to prevent us from designing wavelength-sized devices capable of controlling the light phase and intensity at gigaherts (and even terahertz) speeds in those spectral ranges. However, this problem remains largely unsolved, despite recent advances in the use of quantum wells and phase-change materials for that purpose. Here, we explore an alternative solution based upon the remarkable electro-optical properties of graphene. In particular, we predict unity-order changes in the transmission and absorption of vis-NIR light produced upon electrical doping of graphene sheets coupled to realistically engineered optical cavities. The light intensity is enhanced at the graphene plane, and so is its absorption, which can be switched and modulated via Pauli blocking through varying the level of doping. Specifically, we explor...

  6. Capturing All the Light: Panchromatic Visible Absorption for...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Capturing All the Light: Panchromatic Visible Absorption for Solar Photoconversion Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES...

  7. Packet loss visibility and packet prioritization in digital videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanumuri, Sandeep

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance comparison for videos with apparent compres-Prioritization in Digital Videos A Dissertation submitted inloss visibility,” Packet Video Workshop, Irvine, December

  8. The effect of electronegative difference on the electronic structure and visible light photocatalytic activity of N-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} by first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Dongqiu; Huang Xiaowei; Tian Baoli; Zhou Shaomin; Li Yuncai; Du Zuliang [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of electronegative difference between nitrogen and oxygen on electronic properties of N-doped anatase TiO{sub 2} has been studied using first-principles calculations. The results indicate that the valence band maximum (VBM) shifts to high energy by 0.27 eV and the band gap states composed of N 2p, O 2p, and Ti 3d states are formed through the three states entering into the gap after N doping. The interactions of three states widen and delocalize the band gap states. The raised VBM and the wide band gap states can improve the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  9. Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India Punarjit representative micro data from India. I ...nd that a decrease in the level of visible inequality, ceteris paribus in one's social status due to parallel action of others. From a policy perspective, my ...ndings

  10. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the terms of the above referenced grant, the following summary serves as the Final Report for that grant. The grant relates to work performed at two separate sites, the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site south of Gillette, Wyoming, and the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Site near Rock Springs, Wyoming. The primary concern to the State of Wyoming at each site is ground water contamination (the primary contaminants of concern are benzene and related compounds), and the purpose of the grant has been to provide tiding for a Geohydrologist at the appropriate State agency, specifically the Land Quality Division (LQD) of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. The LQD Geohydrologist has been responsible for providing technical and regulatory support to DOE for ground water remediation and subsequent surface reclamation. Substantial progress has been made toward remediation of the sites, and continuation of LQD involvement in the remediation and reclamation efforts is addressed.

  11. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  12. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  13. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹??Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Almond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹??Dy, using the ¹??Nd(¹²C,4n)¹??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively.more »This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. The crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.« less

  14. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹??Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartley, D. J. [US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Riedinger, L. L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sharpey-Schafer, J. F. [Univ. of Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Almond, J. M. [Univ. of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Beausang, C. [Univ. of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Carpenter, M. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chiara, C. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, N. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Curien, D. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gall, B. J. P. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Garrett, P. E. [Univ. of Guelph, ON (Canada); Janssens, R. V. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kulp, W. D. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lauritsen, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McCutchan, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miller, D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Piot, J. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Redon, N. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Riley, M. A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Simpson, J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Stefanescu, I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Werner, V. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Wang, X. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wood, J. L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Majola, S. N. T. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, Somerset-West (South Africa); Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Zhu, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹??Dy, using the ¹??Nd(¹²C,4n)¹??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively. This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. The crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.

  15. Ground-Based Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Based Microwave

  16. UV-modulated one-dimensional photonic-crystal resonator for visible lights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S. Y.; Yang, P. H.; Liao, C. D.; Chieh, J. J.; Chen, Y. P.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nan-kai Institute of Technology, Nantou County 542, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional photonic-crystal (A/SiO{sub 2}){sub 6}/ZnO/(SiO{sub 2}/A){sub 6} resonators at visible lights are fabricated and characterized, where A may be ZnO or indium tin oxide. Owing to the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light by the ZnO layers, the refractive index of ZnO layers is changed temporally. This fact led to a temporary shifting of the forbidden band and the resonant mode of the resonator under UV irradiation. Besides, via adjusting the thickness of the ZnO defect layer, the resonant wavelength is manipulated. These experimental data show good consistence with simulated results.

  17. Tailoring Metallodielectric Structures for Super Resolution and Superguiding Applications in the Visible and Near IR Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Ceglia, D; Cappeddu, M G; Centini, M; Akozbek, N; DOrazio, A; Haus, J W; Bloemer, M J; Scalora, M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss propagation effects in realistic, transparent, metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structures in the context of negative refraction and super-resolution in the visible and near infrared ranges. In the resonance tunneling regime, we find that for transverse-magnetic incident polarization, field localization effects contribute to a waveguiding phenomenon that makes it possible for the light to remain confined within a small fraction of a wavelength, without any transverse boundaries, due to the suppression of diffraction. This effect is related to negative refraction of the Poynting vector inside each metal layer, balanced by normal refraction inside the adjacent dielectric layer: The degree of field localization and material dispersion together determine the total momentum that resides within any given layer, and thus the direction of energy flow. We find that the transport of evanescent wave vectors is mediated by the excitation of quasi-stationary, low group velocity surface waves responsible for...

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 062512 (2011) XUV frequency-comb metrology on the ground state of helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 062512 (2011) XUV frequency-comb metrology on the ground state of helium in a scheme of direct-frequency-comb excitation of helium atoms from the ground state to the 1s4p and 1s5p 1 P with a modulation contrast of up to 55%. Analysis of the visibility of this comb structure, thereby using the helium

  19. Surface photoelectric and visible light driven photocatalytic properties of zinc antimonate-based photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Shaojun; Li, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yang [Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials of Henan Province and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute of Physics for Microsystems, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhang, Weifeng, E-mail: wfzhang@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials of Henan Province and School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute of Physics for Microsystems, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? N-doped and pristine ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} photocatalysts were synthesized by a facile method. ? N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows a significant enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. ? The N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows the reduced surface photovoltage signals. - Abstract: The N-doped and pristine ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} photocatalysts were synthesized by a facile method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activities of the prepared samples were evaluated from the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under full arc and visible light irradiation of Xe lamp. The XRD and UV–vis results indicated that the N-doping did not change the crystal structure, but decrease the band gap in comparison with the pristine one. The N-doped ZnSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} shows the reduced surface photovoltage signals and the significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity under two irradiation conditions.

  20. Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

  1. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  2. Analysis of the Energy Spectra of Ground States of Deformed Nuclei in rare-earth region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdurahim A. Okhunov; G. I. Turaeva; M. U. Khandaker; Noora B. Rosli

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 62Sm, 64Gd, 64Dy, 70Y b, 72Hf and 74W nuclei are classified as deformed nuclei. Low-lying bands are one of the most fundamental excitation modes in the energy spectra of deformed nuclei. In this paper a theoretical analysis of the experimental data within the phenomenological model is presented. The energy spectra of ground states are calculated. It is found the low-lying spectra of ground band states are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  4. CHARACTERISTIC SIZE OF FLARE KERNELS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to estimate the formation height of visible and near-infrared emission of an X10 flare. The sizes of flare emission cores in three wavelengths are accurately measured during the peak of the flare. The source size is the largest in the G band at 4308 A and shrinks toward longer wavelengths, namely the green continuum at 5200 A and NIR at 15600 A, where the emission is believed to originate from the deeper atmosphere. This size-wavelength variation is likely explained by the direct heating model as electrons need to move along converging field lines from the corona to the photosphere. Therefore, one can observe the smallest source, which in our case is 0.''65 {+-} 0.''02 in the bottom layer (represented by NIR), and observe relatively larger kernels in upper layers of 1.''03 {+-} 0.''14 and 1.''96 {+-} 0.''27, using the green continuum and G band, respectively. We then compare the source sizes with a simple magnetic geometry to derive the formation height of the white-light sources and magnetic pressure in different layers inside the flare loop.

  5. Engineering integrated pure narrow-band photon sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Pomarico; Bruno Sanguinetti; Clara I. Osorio; Harald Herrmann; Rob Thew

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering and controlling well defined states of light for quantum information applications is of increasing importance as the complexity of quantum systems grows. For example, in quantum networks high multi-photon interference visibility requires properly devised single mode sources. In this paper we propose a spontaneous parametric down conversion source based on an integrated cavity-waveguide, where single narrow-band, possibly distinct, spectral modes for the idler and the signal fields can be generated. This mode selection takes advantage of the clustering effect, due to the intrinsic dispersion of the nonlinear material. In combination with a CW laser and fast detection, our approach provides a means to engineer a source that can efficiently generate pure photons, without filtering, that is compatible with long distance quantum communication. Furthermore, it is extremely flexible and could easily be adapted to a wide variety of wavelengths and applications.

  6. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  7. Exploring Visible-Light-Responsive Photocatalysts for Water Splitting Based on Novel Band-gap Engineering Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jikai

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B 4.3 C before and after photocatalysis reaction (top) and BC 2 before and after photocatalysis reaction (bottom). PageB 4.3 C before and after photocatalysis reaction (top) and B

  8. Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups brown rice, medium- grain, making 3 cups cooked 1 pound ground turkey 4 zucchini 1 onion 1 green pepper 1/4 teaspoon pepper Directions 1. Cook brown rice turkey in skillet and use a spatula to break beef into small pieces as it browns. Keep on stirring

  9. Electrochemically synthesized visible light absorbing vertically aligned N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube array films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antony, Rajini P. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Mathews, Tom, E-mail: dr.tom.mathews@gmail.com [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Ajikumar, P.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Krishna, D. Nandagopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Single step electrochemical synthesis of N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube array films. ? Effective substitutional N-doping achieved. ? Different N-concentrations were achieved by varying the N-precursor concentration in the electrolyte. ? Visible light absorption observed at high N-doping. -- Abstract: Visible light absorbing vertically aligned N-doped anatase nanotube array thin films were synthesized by anodizing Ti foils in ethylene glycol + NH{sub 4}F + water mixture containing urea as nitrogen source. Different nitrogen concentrations were achieved by varying the urea content in the electrolyte. The structure, morphology, composition and optical band gap of the nanotube arrays were determined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. The substitution of O{sup 2?} ions by N{sup 3?} ions in the anion sublattice as well as the formulae of the doped samples was confirmed from the results of XPS. The optical band gap of the nanotube arrays was found to decrease with N-concentration. The sample with the highest concentration corresponding to the formula TiO{sub 1.83}N{sub 0.14} showed two regions in the Tauc's plot indicating the presence of interband states.

  10. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  11. Enhanced visible-light absorption of mesoporous TiO2 by co-doping with transition-metal/nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathis, John [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium (IV) oxide, TiO2, has been the object of intense scrutiny for energy applications. TiO2 is inexpensive, non-toxic, and has excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to electrolytes. A major drawback preventing the widespread use TiO2 for photolysis is its relatively large band gap of ~3eV. Only light with wavelengths shorter than 400 nm, which is in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, has sufficient energy to be absorbed. Less than 14 percent of the solar irradiation reaching the earth s surface has energy exceeding this band gap. Adding dopants such as transition metals has long been used to reduce the gap and increase photocatalytic activity by accessing the visible part of the solar spectrum. The degree to which the band gap is reduced using transition metals depends in part on the overlap of the d-orbitals of the transition metals with the oxygen p-orbitals. Therefore, doping with anions such as nitrogen to modify the cation-anion orbital overlap is another approach to reduce the gap. Recent studies suggest that using a combination of transition metals and nitrogen as dopants is more effective at introducing intermediate states within the band gap, effectively narrowing it. Here we report the synthesis of mesoporous TiO2 spheres, co-doped with transition metals and nitrogen that exhibit a nearly flat absorbance response across the visible spectrum extending into the near infrared.

  12. Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

  13. Non-Mimetic Simulation Games: Teaching Team Coordination from a Grounding in Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugas Toups, Zachary Oliver

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation, the goal is to re-create the world as faithfully as possible, as this has clear value for teaching skills. Non-mimetic simulations capture abstract, human-centered aspects of a work environment from a grounding in practice. They provide.... Design Principles for Engaging Cooperative Play . . . . . . 76 1. Information Distribution [Game Mechanics] . . . . . . 76 2. Modulating Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3. Information Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 4...

  14. Evolution and future of the Lusi mud eruption inferred from ground deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Evolution and future of the Lusi mud eruption inferred from ground deformation M. L. Rudolph,1,2 M] The ongoing eruption of the Lusi mud volcano in East Java, Indonesia offers the unprecedented opportunity deformation obtained from multitemporal interferometric analysis of L-band synthetic aperture radar data

  15. NLS ground states on graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Adami; Enrico Serra; Paolo Tilli

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the existence of ground states for the subcritical NLS energy on metric graphs. In particular, we find out a topological assumption that guarantees the nonexistence of ground states, and give an example in which the assumption is not fulfilled and ground states actually exist. In order to obtain the result, we introduce a new rearrangement technique, adapted to the graph where it applies. Owing to such a technique, the energy level of the rearranged function is improved by conveniently mixing the symmetric and monotone rearrangement procedures.

  16. Band alignment of epitaxial ZnS/Zn3P2 heterojunctions Jeffrey P. Bosco, Steven B. Demers, Gregory M. Kimball, Nathan S. Lewis, and Harry A. Atwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Gregory

    ) Determination of the deep donor-like interface state density distribution in metal/Al2O3/n-GaN structures from phosphide (a- Zn3P2) has a nearly optimal, direct band gap of 1.50 eV and a high visible-light absorption

  17. Visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance of nitrogen-doped Ti{sub 1?x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} solid solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Bifen, E-mail: bfgao@hqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China); Luo, Xiuzhen [Zhangzhou Health Vocational College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)] [Zhangzhou Health Vocational College, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fu, Hao; Lin, Bizhou; Chen, Yilin [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China)] [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gu, Zhanjun [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Dual modifications on the energy band of TiO{sub 2} are achieved by N and Zr co-doping. ? Nitrogen and zirconium dopants have different doping positions in the catalyst. ? A synergic impact of nitrogen and zirconium on photocatalytic activity is observed. ? A mechanism for the high performance of nitrogen-doped Ti{sub 1?x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} solid solution is proposed. -- Abstract: Nitrogen-doped Ti{sub 1?x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} solid solutions have been synthesized by a multi-step sol–gel process followed by hydrothermal treatment in ammonia solution. XRD, XPS and UV–vis diffuse reflectance analyses indicated that nitrogen was doped in the surface layer of catalyst, introducing surface states located close to valence band. However, Zr{sup 4+} was successfully incorporated into the bulk lattice of TiO{sub 2} so as to induce the up-shift of conduction band. Compared to pristine TiO{sub 2} and nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2}, nitrogen-doped Ti{sub 1?x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} exhibited much higher efficiency for the degradation of Acid Red 88 solution and gaseous benzene under visible light irradiation, attributed to the synergetic effect of nitrogen and zirconium on the energy band. Specifically, the presence of surface states in the band gap enabled the extended visible light response and the up-shift of conduction band facilitated the excited electron interfacial transfer and hence suppressed efficiently the recombination of charge carriers.

  18. Interactive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Categories and Subject Descriptors: I.3.5 [Com- puter Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object ModelingInteractive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches Naga K. Govindaraju culling in complex 3D environments. An occlusion- switch consists of two GPUs (graphics processing units

  19. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  20. GLAO IN THE VISIBLE: THE SAM EXPERIENCE Andrei Tokovinina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    -common-path errors were avoided. SAM can feed corrected images to its internal CCD detector, SAMI (4K×4K CCDGLAO IN THE VISIBLE: THE SAM EXPERIENCE Andrei Tokovinina Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile Abstract. The SOAR adaptive module (SAM) is going through science

  1. Accepted Manuscript Visible Models for Interactive Pattern Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    in interactive visual classification. The visible model of an object to be recognized is an abstraction classification, faster than unaided human classification, and that both machine and human performance improve Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 USA. He is now with the National Library of Medicine, Bldg. 38A, Rm. 10S

  2. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Visibility Preprocessing with Occluder Fusion for Urban Walkthroughs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the umbra (shadow volume) with respect to a given area light source. In contrast to occlusion from a point: · The umbra with respect to a polygonal area light source is not only bounded by planes, but also by reguli, i. For visibility from a point, the joint umbra of many occluders is the union of the umbrae of the individual

  4. Ground Penetrating Radar, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    John Peterson

    This is 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar collected along the AB Line in Intensive Site 1 beginning in October 2012 and collected along L2 in Intensive Site 0 beginning in September 2011. Both continue to the present.

  5. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  6. MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MUHAMMAD HAIDER KHAN AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.............................................. 1 1

  7. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  8. Copper(II) imidazolate frameworks as highly efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingtian; Luo, Deliang; Yang, Chengju; He, Shiman; Chen, Shangchao; Lin, Jiawei; Zhu, Li; Li, Xin, E-mail: xinliscau@yahoo.com

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were synthesized by a hydrothermal (or precipitation) reaction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG). Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activities of the samples for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol and degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation were also investigated. The results show that the as-prepared samples exhibit better photocatalytic activities for the reduction of carbon dioxide into methanol with water and degradation of MB under visible light irradiation. The orthorhombic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap of 2.49 eV and green (G) color has the best photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol, 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h, which is about three times as large as that of monoclinic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap 2.70 eV and blue (J) color. The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts fitted well to the apparent first-order rate equation and the apparent rate constants for the degradation of MB over G, J and P (with pink color) are 0.0038, 0.0013 and 0.0016 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The synergistic effects of smallest band gap and orthorhombic crystal phase structure are the critical factors for the better photocatalytic activities of G. Moreover, three frameworks can also be stable up to 250 °C. The investigation of Cu-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks maybe provide a design strategy for a new class of photocatalysts applied in degradation of contaminations, reduction of CO{sub 2}, and even water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light. - Graphical abstract: Carbon dioxide was reduced into methanol with water over copper(II) imidazolate frameworks under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were first applied in the photo-reduction of CO{sub 2}. • The photocatalytic activities of the frameworks depend on their band gap and phase structures. • The photocatalytic activity of orthorhombic frameworks is 3 times that of monoclinic frameworks. • The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts followed the first-order rate equation. • The largest yield for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol on green framworks was 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h.

  9. Phase Angle Effects on 3-micron Absorption Band on Ceres: Implications for Dawn Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takir, Driss; Sanchez, Juan A; Corre, Lucille Le; Hardersen, Paul S; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA's Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in March 2015. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25-5.0 microns. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 microns due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals (e.g. Lebofsky et al. 1981, Rivkin et al. 2003). We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3-micron absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9-4.2 microns) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.7o to 22o. We found that the band...

  10. Poisson statistics for random deformed band matrices with power law band width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Pchelin

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show Poisson statistics for random band matrices which diagonal entries have Gaussian components. These components are possibly as small as $n^{-\\varepsilon}$. Particularly, our result is applicable for a band matrix cut from the GUE with the band width satisfying $w^{3.5}density of states (DOS) is obtained for complex deformed Gaussian band matrices with arbitrary $w$. A lower estimate of the DOS is also proven for arbitrary $w$ in a certain class of band matrices.

  11. Multipath Reflections Analysis on Indoor Visible Light Positioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Wenjun; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible light communication (VLC) has become a promising research topic in recent years, and finds its wide applications in indoor environments. Particularly, for location based services (LBS), visible light also provides a practical solution for indoor positioning. Multipath-induced dispersion is one of the major concerns for complex indoor environments. It affects not only the communication performance but also the positioning accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of multipath reflections on the positioning accuracy of indoor VLC positioning systems. Combined Deterministic and Modified Monte Carlo (CDMMC) approach is applied to estimate the channel impulse response considering multipath reflections. Since the received signal strength (RSS) information is used for the positioning algorithm, the power distribution from one transmitter in a typical room configuration is first calculated. Then, the positioning accuracy in terms of root mean square error is obtained and analyzed.

  12. Hydrogen generation under visible light using nitrogen doped titania anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, H.; Rumaiz, A.; Schulz, M.; Huang, C.P.; Sha, S. I.

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is among several energy sources that will be needed to replace the quickly diminishing fossil fuels. Free hydrogen is not available naturally on earth and the current processes require a fossil fuel, methane, to generate hydrogen. Electrochemical splitting of water on titania proposed by Fujishima suffers from low efficiency. The efficiency could be enhanced if full sun spectrum can be utilized. Using pulsed laser deposition technique we synthesized nitrogen doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}) thin films with improved visible light sensitivity. The photoactivity was found to be N concentration dependent. Hydrogen evolution was observed under visible light irradiation (wavelength > 390 nm) without the presence of any organic electron donor.

  13. Interference Visibility as a Witness of Entanglement and Quantum Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin Zhang; Arun Kumar Pati; Junde Wu

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum information and communication one looks for the non-classical features like interference and quantum correlations to harness the true power of composite systems. We show how the concept akin to interference is, in fact, intertwined in a quantitative manner to entanglement and quantum correlation. In particular, we prove that the difference in the squared visibility for a density operator before and after a complete measurement, averaged over all unitary evolutions, is directly related to the quantum correlation measure based on the measurement disturbance. For pure and mixed bipartite states the unitary average of the squared visibility is related to entanglement measure. This may constitute direct detection of entanglement and quantum correlations with quantum interference setups. Furthermore, we prove that for a fixed purity of the subsystem state, there is a complementarity relation between the linear entanglement of formation and the measurement disturbance. This brings out a quantitative difference between two kinds of quantum correlations.

  14. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  15. Reflection beamshifts of visible light due to graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermosa, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present theoretical calculations of reflection beamshifts, Goos-H\\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts, due to the presence of a monolayer graphene on a dielectric media when using a beam with wavelength in the visible range. Specifically, I look at beamshifts for different polarization states (p, s, $45^0$, $\\sigma^+$). The Goos-H\\"anchen shifts I calculated are in good agreement with results of a recent experiment. I will discuss other possible experimental routes to determine beamshifts in graphene.

  16. Visible light photon counters optimization for quantum information applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.; Estrada, J.; Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the studies of the main parameters needed for optimal operation of Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) when used in quantum information systems. The isolation of the single photon signal is analyzed through the definition of a contamination parameter. A compromise in the minimization of this parameter for temperature, bias voltage and dark count variation must be achieved and this depends on the experimental conditions.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of Longitudinal Ground Vehicle Traction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Steven W.

    asphalt b) Wet asphalt c) Gravel d) Packed Snow Nonlinear Dynamics of Longitudinal Ground Vehicle Traction

  18. Frequency Conversion: Side-band cooling, state-swapping, and coherent control of mechanical resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs; Hendra I. Nurdin; Frederick W. Strauch; Matthew James

    2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sideband cooling is a technique that potentially allows mechanical resonators to be prepared in their ground states, important for future applications in quantum technologies. Tian has recently shown that side-band cooling can be implemented by modulating the coupling between a nano-resonator and a superconducting oscillator, a process of frequency conversion [L. Tian, PRB 79, 193407 (2009)]. While side-band cooling is usually treated in the steady-state regime, the effective resonant coupling will also generate near perfect state-swapping from the superconductor to the mechanical resonator. We perform numerical simulations of this system, examining the ground-state cooling achieved by the state-swapping. Further, we show that the superconducting oscillator can be used to control the amplitude and phase of the resonator, while simultaneously cooling it, and thus act as a coherent "quantum feedback controller".

  19. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  20. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 141, 22D524 (2014) Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference surface to the proteins' active sites, or through the protein core across a membrane, in di- rectional

  1. Observation of two visible Dicke-superradiant transitions in atomic europium (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-123 Observation of two visible Dicke-superradiant transitions in atomic europium (*) C visible pour les raies de l'europium à 03BB = 557,7 nm et 03BB = 545,3 nm. Le caractère superradiant de report the first experimental evidence of visible superradiance for the europium lines at 03BB = 557.7 nm

  2. Possible chiral bands in {sup 194}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiteng, P. L.; Ramashidzha, T. M.; Maliage, S. M.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Vymers, P. A. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); Kau, J.; Komati, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the North West, Private Bag X2046, 2735 Mafikeng (South Africa); Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Matamba, I. [University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Mutshena, P. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Zhang, Y. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Private Bag, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 194}Tl, excited through the {sup 181}Ta({sup 18}O,5n) fusion evaporation reaction, were studied using the AFRODITE array at iThemba LABS. Candidate chiral bands built on the {pi}h{sub 9/2} x {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup 1} configuration were found. Furthermore these bands were observed through a band crossing caused by the excitation of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} pair. Above the band crossing the excitation energies remain close, suggesting that chirality may persist for the four quasiparticle configuration too.

  3. Visible Y -junction diode laser with mixed coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Poel, C.J.; Opschoor, J.; Valster, A.; Drenten, R.R. (Philips Research Laboratories, P. O. Box 80 000, 5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)); Andre, J.P. (Laboratoires d'Electronique et de Physique Applique, 3 Avenue Descartes, 94450 Limeil-Brevannes (France))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study and theoretical analysis of a phase-locked, visible, {lambda}=670 nm, 2-3 {ital Y}-junction semiconductor laser array are presented. In a ridgetype 2-3 {ital Y}-junction, AlInGaP/InGaP array, both in-phase and anti-phase array modes are observed to lase simultaneously. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model based on the beam propagation method. The influence of the presence of both interferometric and evanescent coupling on the array modes is analyzed.

  4. Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    ,aswellasuncertaintiesin data, validation by means of the independent in situ airborne and ground-based measurements that are co. Liou Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles the measured ice particle morphology. We demonstrate that laboratory scat- tering and reflectance data for thin

  5. Nondestructive spectroscopic characterisation of visible resonant cavity light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sandip

    .Hosea@surrey.ac.uk IEE Proc.-Optoelectron.,Vol. 148,No.1, February 2001 current density, where leakage and self-heating, which does not need direct electrical contacts, is used as an easy way of confirming the QW ground state

  6. In-Ground Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically oriented radiation detectors may not provide sufficient screening in rail or aviation applications. Railcars can be heavily shielded on the sides, reducing the sensitivity of vertically mounted monitors. For aviation, the distance required for wingspan clearance reduces a vertical detector’s coverage of the fuselage. To surmount these, and other, challenging operational and sensitivity issues, we have investigated the use of in-ground radiation detectors. (PIET-43741-TM-605).

  7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  8. Fiber optic interferometry: Statistics of visibility and closure phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Tatulli; A. Chelli

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometric observations with three telescopes or more provide two observables: closure phase information together with visibilities measurements. When using single-mode interferometers, both observables have to be redefined in the light of the coupling phenomenon betwe en the incoming wavefront and the fiber. We introduce in this paper the estimator of both so-called modal visibility and modal closure phase. Then, we compute the statistics of the two observables in presence of partial correction by Adaptive Optics. From this theoretical analysis, data reduction process using classical least square minimization is investigated. In the framework of the AMBER instrument, the three beams recombiner of the VLTI, we simulate the observation of a single Gaussian source and we study the performances of the interferometer in terms of diameter measurements. We show that the observation is optimized, i.e. that the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the diameter is maximal, when the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the source is roughly 1/2 of the mean resolution of the interferometer. We finally point out that in the case of an observation with 3 telescopes, neglecting the correlation between the measurements leads to overestimate the SNR by a factor of $\\sqrt{2}$. We infer that in any cases, this value is an upper limit.

  9. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  10. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  11. Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

  12. Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

  13. North Village Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview: Installation of Ground Source Heat Pumps. Replacement of Aging Heat Pumps. Alignment with Furmans Sustainability Goals.

  14. Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients: 1 onion 1/2 pound ground turkey 1 cup ketchup, low, brown ground turkey and onion together over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes or until turkey is no longer. Return turkey to skillet. 3. Add ketchup to skillet; cover and simmer over medium-low heat 10 minutes. 4

  15. Case Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    , or the lack thereof, of ground water flow systems driven by similar hydrogeologic and economic conditionsCase Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and Application to the North China Plain of a ground water flow system in the North China Plain (NCP) subject to severe overexploitation and rapid

  16. Maximum Likelihood Sub-band Weighting for Robust Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , bins of log filter-band energy (FBE) in each sub-band are multiplied with a weighting factor depending on the reliability of the sub-band. For each sub-band, zero padding is performed on the log FBE vector lengthening. For the DCT has the size of full-band FBE vector, the feature vector consists of the correlations across

  17. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  18. PROSPECTING IN LATE-TYPE DWARFS: A CALIBRATION OF INFRARED AND VISIBLE SPECTROSCOPIC METALLICITIES OF LATE K AND M DWARFS SPANNING 1.5 dex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Dr, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Brewer, John M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawai'i, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of late K and M dwarf metallicities can be used to guide planet searches and constrain planet formation models. However, the determination of metallicities of late-type stars is difficult because visible wavelength spectra of their cool atmospheres contain many overlapping absorption lines, preventing the measurement of equivalent widths. We present new methods, and improved calibrations of existing methods, to determine metallicities of late K and M dwarfs from moderate resolution (1300 < R < 2000) visible and infrared spectra. We select a sample of 112 wide binary systems that contain a late-type companion to a solar-type primary star. Our sample includes 62 primary stars with previously published metallicities, as well as 50 stars with metallicities determined from our own observations. We use our sample to empirically determine which features in the spectrum of the companion are best correlated with the metallicity of the primary. We find {approx_equal}120 features in K and M dwarf spectra that are useful for predicting metallicity. We derive metallicity calibrations for different wavelength ranges, and show that it is possible to get metallicities reliable to <0.10 dex using either visible, J-, H-, or K-band spectra. We find that the most accurate metallicities derived from visible spectra requires the use of different calibrations for early-type (K5.5-M2) and late-type (M2-M6) dwarfs. Our calibrations are applicable to dwarfs with metallicities of -1.04 < [Fe/H] <+0.56 and spectral types from K7 to M5. Lastly, we use our sample of wide binaries to test and refine existing calibrations to determine M dwarf metallicities. We find that the {zeta} parameter, which measures the ratio of TiO can CaH bands, is correlated with [Fe/H] for super-solar metallicities, and {zeta} does not always correctly identify metal-poor M dwarfs. We also find that existing calibrations in the K and H bands are quite reliable for stars with [Fe/H] >-0.5, but are less useful for more metal-poor stars.

  19. Temperature dependence of the threshold current for InGaAlP visible laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Shiozawa, H.; Itaya, K.; Hatakoshi, G.; Uematsu, Y. (Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corp., Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 210 (JP))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of the threshold current for InGaAlP visible light laser diodes is investigated from the aspect of gain-current characteristics. The cavity length dependence of light output power versus current characteristic was evaluated for a 40 {mu}m width InGaP-InBaAlP broad-stripe laser in the temperature range between {minus} 70 and 90{degrees} C, which had about a 670 nm oscillation wavelength at room temperature. The threshold-current density dependence on the cavity length shows that a linear-gain approximation is suitable for this system. A minimum threshold-current density at 860 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved at room temperature with a cavity length of 1160 {mu}m, which is the lowest value ever reported for this material. The linear-gain parameters {beta} and {ital J}{sub 0} depended on the temperature with the characteristic temperature of about 200 K, which is considered to be the intrinsic characteristic temperature of the threshold current for this active-layer material. The internal quantum efficiency, derived from the cavity length dependence of the differential quantum efficiency, decreased in the temperature range higher than {minus}10{degrees} C, which affected the excess threshold-current increase and the decrease in the characteristic temperature at this temperature range. The theoretical calculation, considering a one-dimensional band structure model, showed that this excess increase of the threshold current was found to be attributed to the electron overflow current into the p-type cladding layer.

  20. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Msezane, B. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Belleville 7535 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  3. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Synchronous, Focally Modulated -Band Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graybiel, Ann M.

    , primarily synchronous -band voltage oscillations occur in the sensorimotor and frontal cortex of humansBehavioral/Systems/Cognitive Synchronous, Focally Modulated -Band Oscillations Characterize Local oscillations in the -frequency band ( 15­30Hz

  4. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz-6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  5. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  6. Synthesis of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@ee.tut.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 °C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 °C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 °C against time. Highlights: • Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. • Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. • Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. • Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. • Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  7. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with uncertainty, that attracted international NM experts to recommend this qualitative risk assessment approach for NM. However, since their CB recommendation was only in theory, we took on the challenge of developing a working toolkit, the CB Nanotool (see Zalk et al. 2009 and Paik et al. 2008), as a means to perform a risk assessment and protect researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. While it's been acknowledged that engineered NM have potentially endless benefits for society, it became clear to us that the very properties that make nanotechnology so useful to industry could also make them dangerous to humans and the environment. Among the uncertainties and unknowns with NM are: the contribution of their physical structure to their toxicity, significant differences in their deposition and clearance in the lungs when compared to their parent material (PM), a lack of agreement on the appropriate indices for exposure to NM, and very little background information on exposure scenarios or populations at risk. Part of this lack of background information can be traced to the lack of risk assessments historically performed in the industry, with a recent survey indicating that 65% of companies working with NM are not doing any kind of NM-specific risk assessment as they focus on traditional PM methods for IH (Helland et al. 2009). The good news is that the amount of peer-reviewed publications that address environmental, health and safety aspects of NM has been increasing over the last few years; however, the percentage of these that address practical methods to reduce exposure and protect workers is orders of magnitude lower. Our intent in developing the CB Nanotool was to create a simplified approach that would protect workers while unraveling the mysteries of NM for experts and non-experts alike. Since such a large part of the toxicological effects of both the physical and chemical properties of NM were unknown, not to mention changing logarithmically as new NM research continues growing, we needed to account for this lack of information as part of the CB Nano

  8. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Abstract: Structure and electronic properties of...

  9. Ground Penetrating Radar in Hydrogeophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Lambot, S.; Binley, A.; Slob, E.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the needs of a growing population and to provide us with a higher quality of life, increasing pressures are being placed on our environment through the development of agriculture, industry, and infrastructures. Soil erosion, groundwater depletion, salinization, and pollution have been recognized for decades as major threats to ecosystems and human health. More recently, the progressive substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels for energy production and climate change have been recognized as potential threats to our water resources and sustained agricultural productivity. The vadose zone mediates many of the processes that govern water resources and quality, such as the partition of precipitation into infiltration and runoff , groundwater recharge, contaminant transport, plant growth, evaporation, and energy exchanges between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. It also determines soil organic carbon sequestration and carbon-cycle feedbacks, which could substantially impact climate change. The vadose zone's inherent spatial variability and inaccessibility precludes direct observation of the important subsurface processes. In a societal context where the development of sustainable and optimal environmental management strategies has become a priority, there is a strong prerequisite for the development of noninvasive characterization and monitoring techniques of the vadose zone. In particular, hydrogeophysical approaches applied at relevant scales are required to appraise dynamic subsurface phenomena and to develop optimal sustainability, exploitation, and remediation strategies. Among existing geophysical techniques, ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology is of particular interest for providing high-resolution subsurface images and specifically addressing water-related questions. Ground penetrating radar is based on the transmission and reception of VHF-UHF (30-3000 MHz) electromagnetic waves into the ground, whose propagation is determined by the soil electromagnetic properties and their spatial distribution. As the dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity of other soil components, the presence of water in the soil principally governs GPR wave propagation. Therefore, GPR-derived dielectric permittivity is usually used as surrogate measure for soil water content. In the areas of unsaturated zone hydrology and water resources, GPR has been used to identify soil stratigraphy, to locate water tables, to follow wetting front movement, to estimate soil water content, to assist in subsurface hydraulic parameter identification, to assess soil salinity, and to support the monitoring of contaminants. The purpose of this special section of the Vadose Zone Journal is to present recent research advances and applications of GPR in hydrogeophysics, with a particular emphasis on vadose zone investigations. This special section includes contributions presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006 (EGU 2006, Vienna, Austria) and the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR 2006, Columbus, OH). The studies presented here deal with a wide range of surface and borehole GPR applications, including GPR sensitivity to contaminant plumes, new methods for soil water content determination, three-dimensional imaging of the subsurface, time-lapse monitoring of hydrodynamic events and inversion techniques for soil hydraulic properties estimation, and joint interpretation of GPR and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) data.

  10. Remote grounding device for subterranean power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.P.

    1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote grounding device is described for subterranean power cable of an insulated conducting cable which comprises: a grounding module and a grounding mechanism; the grounding module is an assembly of a power buss, an insulation sheath, a reducing tap plug and an insulating receptacle cap. The power buss is intimately connected to the conducting cable by a means of an attachment. The reducing tap plug fits concentrically over the power buss and has a tubular probe path void contiguous and in-line to the power buss and a lip around the outer periphery of the reducing tap plug. The insulating receptacle cap covers the tubular void. The insulating sheath covers and holds reducing tap plug and power cable by a multiplicity of locking means and a grounding mechanism assembly of a frame, a probe, a power drive means, a grounding means, a handle means.

  11. Natural restoration of ground water in UCG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humenick, M.J.; Britton, L.N.; Mattox, C.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contamination from underground coal gasification (UCG) has been documented at several field tests in Texas and Wyoming. However, monitoring data following the termination of gasification operations has shown that contaminant concentrations decrease with time, apparently because of natural processes. This research evaluates the probable natural mechanisms for the reduction of organic contaminant concentrations in ground water. Results indicated that biological degradation and adsorption could be a significant mechanism for removal of organics from ground waters. 12 refs.

  12. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  13. A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin, to assess an efficient path planner for a manikin for access and visibility task under ergonomic constraints a way to explore areas such as maintenance or ergonomics of the product that were traditionally ignored

  14. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  15. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  16. Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight reflection and long-wave infrared (LWIR) thermal emission. During a 4-week period in summer 2011

  17. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Aqueous Organic Contaminants by Semiconductors using Visible Light Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Photocatalytic Oxidation of Aqueous Organic Contaminants by Semiconductors using Visible Light semiconductor, InVO4, mechanically alloyed to TiO2, to shift photo-initiation into the visible range. 3, the ratio of semiconductors had no significant impact on the reaction rate. Long term goal - develop

  18. Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

  19. System-level, Unified In-band and Out-of-band Dynamic Thermal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the decrease in computation capacity. Less studied are out-of-band techniques (e.g. CPU cooling fans [10]) that operate completely outside the critical performance path of an application. Out-of-band techniques cool system slowdowns or shutdowns. Techniques such as dynamically scaling down the voltage of the CPUs

  20. Energy Band Model Based on Effective Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method of deriving an isotropic energy band model using a one-dimensional definition of the effective mass and experimentally observed dependence of mass on energy. We extend the effective mass definition to anti-particles and particles with zero rest mass. We assume an often observed linear dependence of mass on energy and derive a generalized non-parabolic energy-momentum relation. The resulting non-parabolicity leads to velocity saturation at high particle energies. We apply the energy band model to free relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials and obtain commonly used dispersion relations and experimentally confirmed effective masses. We apply the model to zero rest mass particles in graphene and propose using the effective mass for photons. Therefore, it appears that the new energy band model based on the effective mass can be applied to relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials.

  1. Triaxial shape coexistence and new aligned band in {sup 178}Os

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Govil, I. M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Dhal, A.; Chaturvedi, L. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-220115, Uttar Pradesh (India); Praharaj, C. R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneshwar-751005 (India); Rath, A. K. [Department of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, Sambalpur-768019, Orissa (India); Kumar, G. Kiran [Department of Physics, Maharaja Sayajirao University, Vadodara, Baroda 390002 (India); Basu, S. K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta-700064 (India); Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pattabiraman, N. S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Calcutta Centre, Sector III LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700098 (India)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 178}Os were studied by means of {sup 165}Ho({sup 20}Ne,p6n){sup 178}Os fusion evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 150 MeV, using a clover detector array. Several new transitions belonging to {sup 178}Os were placed in a level scheme and a new aligned rotational band was observed in addition to earlier known bands. Spin-parity assignments for most of the proposed levels were made using the deduced directional correlation orientation and polarization measurements for the de-exciting transitions. Experimental results are compared with the projected angular momentum deformed Hartree-Fock model calculations and cranked Woods-Saxon model calculations. This nucleus is predicted to be prolate deformed in the ground state but the {gamma}-softness at higher excitation is revealed by the cranked Woods-Saxon model and the geometrical asymmetric model calculations.

  2. H-band thermal emission from the 0.79-day period planet WASP-19b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, D R; Maxted, P F L; Barman, T S; Cameron, A Collier; Hellier, C; Queloz, D; Smalley, B; Triaud, A H M J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first ground-based detection of thermal emission from an exoplanet in the H-band. Using HAWK-I on the VLT, we observed an occultation of WASP-19b by its G8V-type host star. WASP-19b is a Jupiter-mass planet with an orbital period of only 0.79 d, and thus, being highly irradiated, is expected to be hot. We measure an H-band occultation depth of (0.259 +0.046 -0.044) %. A cloud-free model of the planet's atmosphere, with no redistribution of energy from day-side to night-side, under-predicts the planet/star flux density ratio by a factor of two. As the stellar parameters, and thus the level of planetary irradiation, are well-constrained by measurement, it is likely that our model of the planet's atmosphere is too simple.

  3. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunets, Vas. P., E-mail: vkunets@uark.edu; Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Mortazavi, M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71601 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  4. Evaluation of analytical methods to interpret ground deformations due to soft ground tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zymnis, Despina M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in depth study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of analytical solutions in describing ground movements induced by soft ground tunneling. The analytical solutions that were examined consider both isotropic ...

  5. Special Section on Ground Water Research in China Featured in This Issue of Ground Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of Ground Water by Xun Zhou1, Jiu J. Jiao2, and Mary P. Anderson3 Contained in this issue of Ground Water, Groundwater Resources and the Related Environ- Hydrogeologic Problems in China, Beijing: Seismological Press

  6. UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION BANDS: PAHs or MAONs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Kwok; Yong Zhang, E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands is an amorphous carbonaceous solid with mixed aromatic/aliphatic structures, rather than free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. Through spectral fittings of the astronomical spectra of the UIE bands, we show that a significant amount of the energy is emitted by the aliphatic component, implying that aliphatic groups are an essential part of the chemical structure. Arguments in favor of an amorphous, solid-state structure rather than a gas-phase molecule as a carrier of the UIE are also presented.

  7. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vadnais, Kenneth G. (Ojai, CA); Bashforth, Michael B. (Buellton, CA); Lewallen, Tricia S. (Ventura, CA); Nammath, Sharyn R. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  8. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  9. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  10. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  11. Effect of silver incorporation in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly Bose, R.; Kumar, R. Vinod; Sudheer, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P. [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Reddy, V. R.; Ganesan, V. [UGC - DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017, Madhyapradesh (India)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver incorporated tungsten oxide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of silver incorporation in micro structure evolution, phase enhancement, band gap tuning and other optical properties are investigated using techniques such as x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Effect of silver addition in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films are investigated. It is found that the texturing and phase formation improves with enhancement in silver content. It is also found that as the silver incorporation enhances the thickness of the films increases at the same time the strain in the film decreases. Even without annealing the desired phase can be achieved by doping with silver. A broad band centered at the wavelength 437 nm is observed in the absorption spectra of tungsten oxide films of higher silver incorporation and this can be attributed to surface plasmon resonance of silver atoms present in the tungsten oxide matrix. The transmittance of the films is decreased with increase in silver content which can be due to increase in film thickness, enhancement of scattering, and absorption of light caused by the increase of grain size, surface roughness and porosity of films and enhanced absorption due to surface plasmon resonance of silver. It is found that silver can act as the seed for the growth of tungsten oxide grains and found that the grain size increases with silver content which in turn decreases the band gap of tungsten oxide from 3.14 eV to 2.70 eV.

  12. Optical-fiber source of polarization-entangled photon pairs in the 1550nm telecom band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Li; Paul L. Voss; Jay E. Sharping; Prem Kumar

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1550nm band of standard fiber-optic telecommunications. Polarization entanglement is created by pumping a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer with two time-delayed orthogonally-polarized pump pulses and subsequently removing the time distinguishability by passing the parametrically scattered signal-idler photon pairs through a piece of birefringent fiber. Coincidence detection of the signal-idler photons yields biphoton interference with visibility greater than 90%, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons. All four Bell states can be prepared with our setup and we demonstrate violations of CHSH form of Bell's inequalities by up to 10 standard deviations of measurement uncertainty.

  13. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities.

  14. Carbon Monoxide bands in M dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakiv V. Pavlenko; Hugh R. A. Jones

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the observational and theoretical spectra of the $\\Delta v$ = 2 CO bands in a range of M dwarfs. We investigate the dependence of theoretical spectra on effective temperatures as well as carbon abundance. In general we find that the synthetic CO bands fit the observed data extremely well and are excellent diagnostics. In particular the synthetic spectra reasonably match observations and the best fit temperatures are similar to those found by empirical methods. We also examine the \\CDC isotopic ratio. We find that fundamental $^{13}$CO bands around 2.345 and 2.375 $\\mu$m are good discriminators for the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. The 2.375 $\\mu$m is more useful because it doesn't suffer such serious contamination by water vapour transitions. Our current dataset does not quite have the wavelength coverage to perform a reliable determination of the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. For this we recommend observing the region 2.31--2.40 $\\mu$m at a resolution of better than 1000. Alternatively the observational problems of contamination by water vapour at 2.345 $\\mu$m maybe solved by observing at resolutions of around 50000. We also investigated the possibility of using the $\\Delta v$ = 1 CO bands around 4.5 $\\mu$m. We find that the contamination due to water vapour is even more of a problem at these wavelengths.

  15. Shear banding in soft glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzanne M. Fielding

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many soft materials, including foams, dense emulsions, micro gel bead suspensions, star polymers, dense packing of surfactant onion micelles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic "glassy" features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike.

  16. Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a , Martin Seibt b , Eckart Uhlmann b , S.K. Saha c. Tel.: +91 11 2659 1135; fax: +91 11 2658 2053. E-mail address: saha@mech.iitd.ernet.in (S.K. Saha

  17. Identification of carbon sensitization for the visible-light photocatalytic titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. J.; Jhan, G. Y.; Cai, G. L.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, M. S.; Ke, S.-C.; Lo, H. H.; Cheng, C. L.; Shyue, J.-J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan and Graduate Institute of Optoelectronics Engineering, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors successfully synthesized titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanopowder with visible-light photocatalytic ability by low-pressure flat-flame metal organic chemical vapor condensation method. In order to confirm that carbon doping is a viable mechanism for the visible-light absorption of the powder prepared by this method, they modify the process by total exclusion of nitrogen usage to eliminate the nitrogen doping possibility. Since nitrogen is avoided in the process, the visible-light absorption cannot be due to nitrogen doping. They also found that the nanopowder formed has a single phase of anatase. Thus the nanopowder does not have anatase/rutile interface, and the authors can eliminate the possibility of visible-light absorption by the anatase/rutile interface. The visible-light absorption should thus be resort to the carbon doping. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies show the presence of several carbon related bonds except Ti-C bond. This suggests that the carbon does not incorporate into the TiO{sub 2} crystal and should locate on the surface of the nanopowder. Thus the carbon species act as a visible-light sensitizer for the TiO{sub 2} as a photocatalyst. Among all carbon bonds the C-C bond is believed to be responsible for the light absorption, since all other carbon related bonds are not chromophores. The visible-light TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis induced by carbon doping is confirmed and explained.

  18. Facile preparation of sphere-like copper ferrite nanostructures and their enhanced visible-light-induced photocatalytic conversion of benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yu, E-mail: shenyuqing0322@gmail.com [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yanbo; Xu, Hongfeng; Fu, Jie [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hou, Yang [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were successfully synthesized via a facile method. • CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres showed high photocatalytic activity toward benzene. • Ethyl acetate, carboxylic acid and aldehyde were the intermediate products. - Abstract: Spinel copper ferrite nanospheres with diameters of about 116 nm were synthesized in high yield via a facile solvothermal route. The prepared nanospheres had cubic spinel structure and exhibited good size uniformity and regularity. The band-gap energy of CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was calculated to be about 1.69 eV, indicating their potential visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity. The dramatically enhanced photocatalytic activity of the CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was evaluated via the photocatalytic conversion of benzene under Xe lamp irradiation. By using the in situ FTIR technique, ethyl acetate, carboxylic acid and aldehyde could be regarded as the intermediate products, and CO{sub 2} was produced as the final product during the reaction process. This study provided new insight into the design and preparation of functional nanomaterials with sphere structure in high yield, and the as-grown architectures demonstrated an excellent ability to remove organic pollutants in the atmosphere.

  19. Scaling Considerations in Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    2000-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study design challenges associated with realizing a ground state quantum computer. In such a computer, the energy gap between the ground state and first excited state must be sufficiently large to prevent disruptive excitations. Here, an estimate is provided of this gap as a function of computer size. We then address the problem of detecting the output of a ground state quantum computer. It is shown that the exponential detection difficulties that appear to be present at first can be overcome in a straightforward manner by small design changes.

  20. Using the visibility complex for radiosity computation Rachel Orti Fredo Durand Stephane Rivi`ere Claude Puech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to be strictly recomputed. In computational geometry, a data structure called the visibility complex has recentlyUsing the visibility complex for radiosity computation Rachel Orti Fr´edo Durand St´ephane Rivi in those calculations. We propose the use of the visibility complex for radiosity calculations

  1. Proceedings of the National Groundwater National Ground Water Association Southwest focused ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA, June 3-4, pp:87-90.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA

  2. Origin of photoactivity of oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2} under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, H.-H.; Gopal, Neeruganti O.; Ke, S.-C. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Research Center, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 974-01, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As it is now well established that oxygen vacancies are spontaneously introduced during nitrogen doping of anatase TiO{sub 2}, there is a lively debate on whether nitrogen dopant or oxygen vacancy contributes to the visible light photoactivity of the doped catalyst. We showed that the coordinately unsaturated Ti site is integral to the visible light photoactivity in anatase oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2} catalyst. Accordingly, oxygen vacancies may contribute to the visible light photoactivities in N-doped TiO{sub 2} and other nonmetallic ion-doped TiO{sub 2} as well. A redox active visible light photocatalyst has been developed based on oxygen-deficient structure in anatase TiO{sub 2}.

  3. Graviweak Unification in the Visible and Invisible Universe and Inflation from the Higgs Field False Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Das; L. V. Laperashvili

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we develop the self-consistent $Spin(4,4)$-invariant model of the unification of gravity with weak $SU(2)$ interactions in the assumption of the existence of visible and invisible sectors of the Universe. It was shown that the consequences of the multiple point principle predicting two degenerate vacua in the Standard Model (SM) suggest a theory of Inflation, in which the inflaton field $\\sigma$ starts trapped in a cold coherent state in the "false vacuum" of the Universe at the value of the Higgs field's VEV $v\\sim 10^{18}$ GeV (in the visible world). Then the inflations of the two Higgs doublet fields, visible $\\phi$ and mirror $\\phi'$, lead to the emergence of the SM vacua at the Electroweak scales with the Higgs boson VEVs $v_1\\approx 246$ GeV and $v'_1=\\zeta v_1$ (with $\\zeta \\sim 100$) in the visible and invisible worlds, respectively.

  4. Creating supply chain visibility : a case study on extending Intel's Unit Level Traceability to customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Annie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to enable supply chain visibility for Intel products, the Customer Unit Level Traceability (ULT) Program was formed to help extend Intel's ULT capability to the customer level. Increased traceability of Intel ...

  5. Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description of a simplified model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1069 Exciton Bose condensation : the ground state of an electron-hole gas I. Mean field description dégénérées. Nous étudions la condensation de Bose de ce système en fonction de la densité, négligeant dans-hole gas in a simple model semiconductor, with direct gap and isotropic, non degenerate bands. We study

  6. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  7. Permanent magnet focused X-band photoinjector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Rosenzweig, James (Los Angeles, CA)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high energy photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injection and the linac. High electron beam brightness is achieved by accelerating a tightly focused electron beam in an integrated, multi-cell, X-band rf linear accelerator (linac). The photoelectron linac employs a Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, easing manufacturing tolerances and costs.

  8. The Zeeman effect in the G band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Uitenbroek; E. Miller-Ricci; A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of measuring magnetic field strength in G-band bright points through the analysis of Zeeman polarization in molecular CH lines. To this end we solve the equations of polarized radiative transfer in the G band through a standard plane-parallel model of the solar atmosphere with an imposed magnetic field, and through a more realistic snapshot from a simulation of solar magneto-convection. This region of the spectrum is crowded with many atomic and molecular lines. Nevertheless, we find several instances of isolated groups of CH lines that are predicted to produce a measurable Stokes V signal in the presence of magnetic fields. In part this is possible because the effective Land\\'{e} factors of lines in the stronger main branch of the CH A$^{2}\\Delta$--X$^{2}\\Pi$ transition tend to zero rather quickly for increasing total angular momentum $J$, resulting in a Stokes $V$ spectrum of the G band that is less crowded than the corresponding Stokes $I$ spectrum. We indicate that, by contrast, the effective Land\\'{e} factors of the $R$ and $P$ satellite sub-branches of this transition tend to $\\pm 1$ for increasing $J$. However, these lines are in general considerably weaker, and do not contribute significantly to the polarization signal. In one wavelength location near 430.4 nm the overlap of several magnetically sensitive and non-sensitive CH lines is predicted to result in a single-lobed Stokes $V$ profile, raising the possibility of high spatial-resolution narrow-band polarimetric imaging. In the magneto-convection snapshot we find circular polarization signals of the order of 1% prompting us to conclude that measuring magnetic field strength in small-scale elements through the Zeeman effect in CH lines is a realistic prospect.

  9. Grounding linguistic analysis in control applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of grounding linguistic analysis in control applications, such as automated maintenance of computers and game playing. We assume access to natural language documents that describe the ...

  10. Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/AST_Inspection_Form.pdf #12;

  11. Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive provisions and funding mechanisms to the extent that funds are available to enable the state to take corrective action at...

  12. Building an entanglement measure on physical ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Teresi; A. Napoli; A. Messina

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce on physical grounds a new measure of multipartite entanglement for pure states. The function we define is discriminant and monotone under LOCC and moreover can be expressed in terms of observables of the system.

  13. International Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    International Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia by Todd Jarvis1,2, Mark Giordano3 of Geosciences, 104 Wilkinson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 2Corresponding author: todd.jarvis@oregonstate.edu 3

  14. Commonality of ground systems in launch operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Shawn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NASA is examining the utility of requiring a certain degree of commonality in both flight and ground systems in the Constellation Program. While the benefits of commonality seem obvious in terms of minimizing upfront ...

  15. Ground rubber: Reactive permeable barrier sorption media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kershaw, D.S.; Pamukcu, S. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to examine the feasibility of using ground tire rubber as a sorbent media in reactive permeable barrier systems. Previous research by the current authors has demonstrated that tire rubber can sorb significant quantities of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and O-xylene from aqueous solutions. The current research was run to examine the usage rate of ground rubber in a packed bed reactor under specific contact times. In addition, desorption and repetitive sorption tests were run to determine the reversibility of the sorption process for ground tire rubber. These tests were run to determine the regeneration capacity of ground tire rubber. Results of the study show that the usage rates are greater than 50% with an empty bed contact times of 37 minutes, and minimal amounts of energy are needed to regenerate the tire rubber after use.

  16. A note on classical ground state energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael K. -H. Kiessling

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The pair-specific ground state energy of Newtonian N-body systems grows monotonically in N. This furnishes a whole family of simple new tests for minimality of putative ground state energies obtained through computer experiments. Inspection of several publically available lists of such computer-experimentally obtained putative ground state energies has yielded several dozen instances which failed (at least) one of these tests. Although the correct ground state energy is not revealed by this method, it does yield a better upper bound on it than the experimentally found value whenever the latter fails a monotonicity test. The surveyed N-body systems include in particular N point charges with 2- or 3-dimensional Coulomb pair interactions, placed either on the unit 2-sphere or on a 2-torus (a.k.a. Thomson, Fekete, or Riesz problems).

  17. The effects of air pollution on visibility at Edwards AFB, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tongue, Jeffrey Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1987 Major Subject: Meteorology THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON VISIBILITY AT EDWARDS AFB, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JEFFREY SCOTT TONGUE Approved as to style and content by: Walter K. Henry (Chairman of Committee) Kenneth C. Brundidge...

  18. Using Visible and Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy to Characterize and Classify Soil Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Katrina Margarette

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    USING VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis by KATRINA MARGARETTE WILKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Soil Science USING VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis...

  19. MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS Thesis Approved by: Dr.................................................................................................................... 16 MODELING OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS

  20. Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning, M. I. (2013, August 19). Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials.1037/a0034098 #12;Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials: A Study

  1. Ground water protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

  2. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Intermediate Band Solar Cells W. Walukiewicz 1 , K. M.single-junction intermediate band solar cells. Figure 5:conversion efficiency for a solar cell fabricated from a Zn

  3. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to...

  4. Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhaohong

    Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped n-type Ge is observed through photoluminescence measurements by determining the spectrum peak shift. A linear relationship between the direct band gap emission and carrier concentration ...

  5. FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Dylan

    FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT DYLAN P. THURSTON Dedicated to the memory-print, and surely has mistakes; please give comments! , elastic networks (rubber bands) at equilibrium within

  6. Transformation Optics with Photonic Band Gap Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a class of optical media based on adiabatically modulated, dielectric-only, and potentially extremely low-loss, photonic crystals. The media we describe represent a generalization of the eikonal limit of transformation optics (TO). The foundation of the concept is the possibility to fit frequency isosurfaces in the k-space of photonic crystals with elliptic surfaces, allowing them to mimic the dispersion relation of light in anisotropic effective media. Photonic crystal cloaks and other TO devices operating at visible wavelengths can be constructed from optically transparent substances like glasses, whose attenuation coefficient can be as small as 10 dB/km, suggesting the TO design methodology can be applied to the development of optical devices not limited by the losses inherent to metal-based, passive metamaterials.

  7. A model of ATL ground motion for storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Walker, Nicholas J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS A. WolskiMODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS* A. Wolski # ,

  8. Department of Veterans Affairs, FONSI - Ground mounted solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ground mounted solar photovoltaic power at San Joaquin National Cemetery Department of Veterans Affairs, FONSI - Ground mounted solar photovoltaic power at San Joaquin National...

  9. Data Analysis from Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis from Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects Data Analysis from Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects Comparison of building energy use before and after...

  10. Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications...

  11. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal System with Support from Recovery Act Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal...

  12. GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is WIUUTEO GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPCOn August 27, 1980, an insulation failure occurred dt-ringby a failure uf ground plane insulation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The

  13. Quebec Recovery of White-Fronted Goose Banded in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. H. Hewitt Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  19 Issue:  3 (July) Section:  General Notes Year:  1948 Pages:  124

  14. Arctic Tern Banded in Greenland, Recovered in Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Shortt Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  20 Issue:  1 (January) Section:  General Notes Year:  1949 Pages:  50

  15. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  16. FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Dylan

    FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT DYLAN P. THURSTON Dedicated to the memory and conformal surfaces with boundary, that let us on the one hand tell when one rubber band network is looser a circle of ideas, relating: , elastic networks (rubber bands) at equilibrium within a graph, , extremal

  17. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    pinning in multi-band superconductors 2 1. Introduction The multi-band nature of superconductivity in iron the anisotropy of superconducting parameters in the iron-based superconductors. In particular, Kidzun et al. [23Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski

  18. absorption band profiles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption band profiles First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Band profiles and band...

  19. A dual polarized x-band pulse radar for ground based electromagnetic scattering experiment / by Allen William White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Allen William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Report II. THE XBR SCATTEROMETER DESIGN Summary Design Objectives XBR Scatterometer Design: Phase I XBR Scatterometer Design: Phase II XBR Scatterometer Design: Phase III III. THE XBR SCATTEROMETER ANTENNAS Summary The Microwave Antenna Antenna... SCATTEROMETER ANTENNA POWER RADIATION PATTERNS APPENDIX C ? XBR SCATTEROMETER AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT P~ae 156 163 165 167 171 173 175 179 187 208 LIST OF TABLES Table II-1 II I-1 IV-1 IV-2 Scatterometer Design Characteristics...

  20. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(2):221227, 2007 NESTING BIOLOGY OF THE BANDED GROUND-CUCKOO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karubian, Jordan

    documented two nesting attempts in the Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve, Esmeraldas Province, northwest

  1. 614 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 47, NO. 5, MAY 1999 -Band Finite Ground Coplanar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papapolymerou, Ioannis "John"

    -contacted diodes have very low parasitics, but they are difficult to handle, can have problems with thermal cycling. Katehi are with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2122 USA. F. Brauchler was with the Department of Electrical

  2. Visible-light photoconductivity of Zn1-xCoxO and its dependence...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Co2+ concentration. Abstract: Many metal oxides investigated for solar photocatalysis or photoelectrochemistry have band gaps that are too wide to absorb a sufficient...

  3. Semiconductor heterojunction band offsets and charge neutrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chomsik

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = 33&Pb = 3 3&PAB = 35 1 . aI M 0 A 0. ? 1 2. 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. 0 0. ? 1 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. Figure 4. 4. Local density of states, parameters for this case are s, = ? 7, s?= 1, s, = l&sp 7~Pa = 4~A = 4)DAB ? .35. -12. 0. Energy(eV) 0... Signature of APS Member Roland E. Allen Department of Physics'- Texas A&M University ' College Station, TX 77843 s p ~ CX3 SEMICONDUCTOR HETEROJUNCTION BAND OFFSETS AND CHARGE NEUTRALITY A Thesis by CHOMSIK LEE Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate...

  4. Universal EUV in-band intensity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet light is detected using a universal in-band detector for detecting extreme ultraviolet radiation that includes: (a) an EUV sensitive photodiode having a diode active area that generates a current responsive to EUV radiation; (b) one or more mirrors that reflects EUV radiation having a defined wavelength(s) to the diode active area; and (c) a mask defining a pinhole that is positioned above the diode active area, wherein EUV radiation passing through the pinhole is restricted substantially to illuminating the diode active area.

  5. Hybrid Band effects program (Lockheed Martin shared vision CRADA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, L. D.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Band{trademark} (H-band) is a Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (LMMFC) designation for a specific RF modulation that causes disruption of select electronic components and circuits. H-Band enables conventional high-power microwave (HPM) effects (with a center frequency of 1 to 2 GHz, for example) using a higher frequency carrier signal. The primary technical objective of this project was to understand the fundamental physics of Hybrid Band{trademark} Radio Frequency effects on electronic systems. The follow-on objective was to develop and validate a Hybrid Band{trademark} effects analysis process.

  6. Module Grounding Module grounding still continues to be an issue with many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    by leaps and bounds. New module and inverter manufacturers are entering the market, and the number of PV that will be used with transformerless inverters, and those systems will not have a grounded PV DC conductor. (See so, as PV installers attempt to reduce the time and materials required to ground modules

  7. Mimicking Time Evolution within a Quantum Ground State: Ground-State Quantum Computation, Cloning, and Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

  8. The ground state energy at unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two-component fermions on the lattice in the unitarity limit. This is an idealized limit of attractive fermions where the range of the interaction is zero and the scattering length is infinite. Using Euclidean time projection, we compute the ground state energy using four computationally different but physically identical auxiliary-field methods. The best performance is obtained using a bounded continuous auxiliary field and a non-local updating algorithm called hybrid Monte Carlo. With this method we calculate results for 10 and 14 fermions at lattice volumes 4^3, 5^3, 6^3, 7^3, 8^3 and extrapolate to the continuum limit. For 10 fermions in a periodic cube, the ground state energy is 0.292(12) times the ground state energy for non-interacting fermions. For 14 fermions the ratio is 0.329(5).

  9. Puzzling Phenomenon of Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Wszolek

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the first diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) dates back to the pioneering years of stellar spectroscopy. Today, we know about 300 absorption structures of this kind. There exists a great variety of the profiles and intensities of DIBs, so they can not be readily described, classified or characterized. To the present day no reliable identification of the DIBs' carriers has been found. Many carriers of DIBs have been proposed over the years. They ranged from dust grains to free molecules of different kinds, and to more exotic specimens, like hydrogen negative ion. Unfortunately, none of them is responsible for observed DIBs. Furthermore, it was shown that a single carrier cannot be responsible for all known DIBs. It is hard to estimate how many carriers can participate in producing these bands. The problem is further complicated by the fact that to this day it is still impossible to find any laboratory spectrum of any substance which would match the astrophysical spectra. Here, a historical outline concerning DIBs is followed by a brief description of their whole population. Then, a special attention is focused on the procedures trying to extract spectroscopic families within the set of all known DIBs.

  10. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Taniguchi, Yoshi [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Treister, Ezequiel [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Cobb, Bethany E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Murayama, Takashi [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Saito, Tomoki [Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sumikawa, Kentaro, E-mail: carolin.cardamone@astro.yale.ed [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  11. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the stability of the openings. No credit or account was given for the initial ground support in modeling the final ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts in this analysis.

  12. High angular resolution N-band observation of the silicate carbon star IRAS08002-3803 with the VLTI/MIDI instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiichi Ohnaka; T. Driebe; K. -H. Hofmann; Ch. Leinert; S. Morel; F. Paresce; Th. Preibisch; A. Richichi; D. Schertl; M. Schoeller; L. B. F. M. Waters; G. Weigelt; M. Wittkowski

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of N-band spectro-interferometric observations of the silicate carbon star IRAS08002-3803 with the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The observations were carried out using two unit telescopes (UT2 and UT3) with projected baseline lengths ranging from 39 to 47 m. Our observations of IRAS08002-3803 have spatially resolved the dusty environment of a silicate carbon star for the first time and revealed an unexpected wavelength dependence of the angular size in the N band: the uniform-disk diameter is found to be constant and ~36 mas (72 Rstar) between 8 and 10 micron, while it steeply increases longward of 10 micron to reach ~53 mas (106 Rstar) at 13 micron. Model calculations with our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code show that neither spherical shell models nor axisymmetric disk models consisting of silicate grains alone can simultaneously explain the observed wavelength dependence of the visibility and the spectral energy distribution (SED). We propose that the circumstellar environment of IRAS08002-3803 may consist of two grain species coexisting in the disk: silicate and a second grain species, for which we consider amorphous carbon, large silicate grains, and metallic iron grains. Comparison of the observed visibilities and SED with our models shows that such disk models can fairly -- though not entirely satisfactorily -- reproduce the observed SED and N-band visibilities. Our MIDI observations and the radiative transfer calculations lend support to the picture where oxygen-rich material around IRAS08002-3803 is stored in a circumbinary disk surrounding the carbon-rich primary star and its putative low-luminosity companion.

  13. Red Band Needle Blight Programme Red Band Needle Blight of Pine Programme Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and that the private 1 | Paper 1 - Minutes | Debbie Erskine | 23/01/2009 #12;Red Band Needle Blight Programme Group Group England Working Group Wales Working Group RBNB Operational GB Working Group (including private Groups would only meet on an ad hoc basis and the structure was agreed. Action: Jim/Roddie to re

  14. Standard practice for visible penetrant testing using the Water-Washable process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice describes procedures for visible liquid penetrant examination utilizing the water-washable process. It is a nondestructive practice for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. This practice can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics, and certain nonporous plastics, and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides the following references: 1.2.1 A reference by which visible penetrant examination procedures using the water-washable process can be reviewed to ascertain their applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the visible, water-washable liquid penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreement between the u...

  15. Standard practice for visible penetrant testing using Solvent-Removable process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for visible penetrant examination utilizing the solvent-removable process. It is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics and certain nonporous plastics and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a visible penetrant examination method using the solvent-removable process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the visible, solvent-removable liquid penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreeme...

  16. Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO: An efficient visible-light-sensitized composite with its application in photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China) [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Wang, Mingliang, E-mail: wangmlchem@263.net [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Xu, Chunxiang [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Chen, Shifu, E-mail: chshifu@chnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Fu, Xianliang [School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Material Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The free OH radicals generated in the VB of ZnO play the primary role in the visible-light photocatalytic degradation of RhB in Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO system. The accumulated electrons in the CB of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} can be transferred to O{sub 2} adsorbed on the surface of the composite semiconductors and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reacts with electrons in succession to produce active ·OH to some extent. Display Omitted Highlights: ? Efficient visible-light-sensitized Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO composites were successfully prepared. ? Effect of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} content on the catalytic activity of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO is studied in detail. ? Rate constant of RhB degradation over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}(3.0 wt.%)/ZnO is 3 times that of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. ? The active species in RhB degradation are examined by adding a series of scavengers. ? Visible light degradation mechanism of RhB over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO is systematically studied. -- Abstract: The efficient visible-light-sensitized Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO composites with various weight percents of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were prepared by a facile ball milling method. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, DRS, SEM, EDS, XPS, and BET specific area. The ·OH radicals produced during the photocatalytic reaction was detected by the TA–PL technique. The photocatalytic property of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. Significantly, the results revealed that the photocatalytic activity of the composites was much higher than that of pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and ZnO. The rate constant of RhB degradation over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}(3.0 wt.%)/ZnO is 3 times that of single-phase Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The optimal percentage of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the composite is 3.0 wt.%. It is proposed that the ·OH radicals produced in the valence band of ZnO play the leading role in the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B by Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/ZnO systems under visible light irradiation.

  17. Photocatalytic activity of nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Songwang [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Gao Lian [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: liangaoc@online.sh.cn

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work provides the design and synthesis of nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles working as efficient photocatalysts under visible light irradiation. Nitrogen doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are synthesized through the surface nitridation of rutile nanoparticles, which have been prepared in advance. The experimental results show that the nitrogen element is easily doped into the lattice of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and its doping amount increases with the decrease of nanocrystallite size. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles under visible light irradiation is correlated not only with the amount of doped nitrogen element but also with the morphology and crystallinity of nanoparticles.

  18. Atomic Entanglement vs Photonic Visibility for Quantum Criticality of Hybrid System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. X. Huo; Ying Li; Z. Song; C. P. Sun

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize the novel quantum phase transition for a hybrid system consisting of an array of coupled cavities and two-level atoms doped in each cavity, we study the atomic entanglement and photonic visibility in comparison with the quantum fluctuation of total excitations. Analytical and numerical simulation results show the happen of quantum critical phenomenon similar to the Mott insulator to superfluid transition. Here, the contour lines respectively representing the atomic entanglement, photonic visibility and excitation variance in the phase diagram are consistent in the vicinity of the non-analytic locus of atomic concurrences.

  19. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, usable with a photovoltaic (PV) assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending from the central portion. Each arm has first and second outer portions with frame surface-disrupting element at the outer portions.

  20. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeppesen, D.; Trellue, R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective utilization of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) in a theater reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and kill assessment environment requires that a human operator be able to interpret, and collectively assess, the significance of real time data obtained from UGS emplacements over large geographical regions of interest. The products of this UGS data interpretation and assessment activity can then be used in the decision support process for command level evaluation of appropriate courses of action. Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical real time situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule-based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all-source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  1. GROUND-BASED FACILITIES REVIEW CONSULTATIVE DOCUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    has been withdrawal from the AAO and significant reduction in the running costs at ING and JAC the benefits of joining ESO. Initially the UK decided to enter the 8-metre era by joining the Gemini wavebands, and needing both space and ground-based facilities to achieve new science goals. It also stresses

  2. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  3. Band terminations in density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Afanasjev

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the terminating bands has been performed in the relativistic mean field framework. It was shown that nuclear magnetism provides an additional binding to the energies of the specific configuration and this additional binding increases with spin and has its {\\it maximum} exactly at the terminating state. This suggests that the terminating states can be an interesting probe of the time-odd mean fields {\\it provided that other effects can be reliably isolated.} Unfortunately, a reliable isolation of these effects is not that simple: many terms of the density functional theories contribute into the energies of the terminating states and the deficiencies in the description of those terms affect the result. The recent suggestion \\cite{ZSW.05} that the relative energies of the terminating states in the $N \

  4. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  5. ETA CARINAE ACROSS THE 2003.5 MINIMUM: ANALYSIS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Weis, K.; Bomans, D. J. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Gull, T. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stahl, O. [ZAH, Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Koenigstuhl, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: krister.nielsen@nasa.gov

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the visible through near-infrared spectrum of Eta Carinae ({eta} Car) and its ejecta obtained during the '{eta} Car Campaign with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT)'. This is a part of larger effort to present a complete {eta} Car spectrum, and extends the previously presented analyses with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) in the UV (1240-3159 A) to 10,430 A. The spectrum in the mid- and near-UV is characterized by the ejecta absorption. At longer wavelengths, stellar wind features from the central source and narrow-emission lines from the Weigelt condensations dominate the spectrum. However, narrow absorption lines from the circumstellar shells are present. This paper provides a description of the spectrum between 3060 and 10,430 A, including line identifications of the ejecta absorption spectrum, the emission spectrum from the Weigelt condensations and the P Cygni stellar wind features. The high spectral resolving power of VLT/UVES enables equivalent width measurements of atomic and molecular absorption lines for elements with no transitions at the shorter wavelengths. However, the ground-based seeing and contributions of nebular-scattered radiation prevent direct comparison of measured equivalent widths in the VLT/UVES and HST/STIS spectra. Fortunately, HST/STIS and VLT/UVES have a small overlap in wavelength coverage which allows us to compare and adjust for the difference in scattered radiation entering the instruments' apertures. This paper provides a complete online VLT/UVES spectrum with line identifications and a spectral comparison between HST/STIS and VLT/UVES between 3060 and 3160 A.

  6. Simultaneous description of low-lying positive and negative parity bands in heavy even-even nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. G. Ganev

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-lying spectra including the first few excited positive and negative parity bands of some heavy even-even nuclei from the rare earth and actinide mass regions are investigated within the framework of the symplectic Interacting Vector Boson Model with Sp(12,$R$) dynamical symmetry group. Symplectic dynamical symmetries allow the change of the number of excitation quanta or phonons building the collective states providing for larger representation spaces and richer subalgebraic structures to incorporate more complex nuclear spectra. The theoretical predictions for the energy levels and the electromagnetic transitions between the collective states of the ground state band and $K^{\\pi}=0^{-}$ band are compared with experiment and some other collective models incorporating octupole and/or dipole degrees of freedom. The energy staggering which is a sensitive indicator of the octupole correlations in the even-even nuclei is also calculated and compared with experiment. The results obtained for the energy levels, energy staggering and transition strengths reveal the relevance of the used dynamical symmetry of the model for the simultaneous description of both positive and negative parity low-lying collective bands.

  7. Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 sequestration; In Salah; geomechanics; ground surfaceCO 2 injection, geomechanics, and ground surface

  8. Band gap engineering at a semiconductor - crystalline oxide interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moghadam, Jahangir-Moghadam; Shen, Xuan; Chrysler, Matthew; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Su, Dong; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO? and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We presentmore »structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO?-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.« less

  9. Band gap engineering of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} by alloying with Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlon, David O., E-mail: d.scanlon@ucl.ac.uk [Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Regoutz, Anna; Egdell, Russell G. [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Morgan, David J. [Cardiff Catalysis Institute (CCI), School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom)] [Cardiff Catalysis Institute (CCI), School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Watson, Graeme W. [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient modulation of the bandgap of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} will open up a route to improved electronic properties. We demonstrate using ab initio calculations that Tl incorporation into In{sub 2}O{sub 3} reduces the band gap and confirm that narrowing of the gap is observed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy on ceramic surfaces. Incorporation of Tl does not break the symmetry of the allowed optical transitions, meaning that the doped thin films should retain optical transparency in the visible region, in combination with a lowering of the conduction band effective mass. We propose that Tl-doping may be an efficient way to increase the dopability and carrier mobility of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  10. Evidence for a Supernova in the Ic Band Light Curve of the Optical Transient of GRB 970508

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sokolov

    2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Unique data on $BVRI$ brightness curves of the OT of GRB 970508 obtained with the 6-m telescope have been interpreted in the framework of the GRB-SN (supernovae) connection. The effect must be maximal in the I_c band as OT GRB 970228. The peak absolute (M_B) magnitude of the suggested SN must be around -19.5 for the OT of GRB 970508. If all or the main part of long GRBs are associated with SNe, the GRB host galaxies (for ground-based observations, at least) must be dimmer than the peak magnitude of the SN.

  11. acoustic band gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 2 Acoustic band gap...

  12. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic...

  13. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  14. Temporary Housing Mission Overview Temporary Housing is a highly visible mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Temporary Housing Mission Overview · Temporary Housing is a highly visible mission. · Success requires teamwork (FEMA/COE/State/Local) and advanced planning. · FEMA's steps to providing housing relief assistance (home repair limits, rental limits, self-help Manufactured Housing Units (MHU) on private sites

  15. Enhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Venki

    determined by x-ray crystallography except at very high resolution. The scattering of neutrons by hydrogenEnhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin Fong and structurally, direct visu- alization of them by using crystallography is difficult. Neutron crys- tallography

  16. Gain dispersion in Visible Light Photon Counters as a function of counting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.; Estrada, J.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of light signals using Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC), that indicate an increase in gain dispersion as the counting rate increases. We show that this dispersion can be understood on the basis of a recent observation of localized field reduction in VLPCs at high input rates.

  17. A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery; published 30 January 2004. [1] Solar radiation assessment by satellite is constrained by physical Composition and Structure: Transmission and scattering of radiation; KEYWORDS: solar radiation, satellite

  18. Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr microwave methods. The method should be useful for long-term monitoring of the melt area of the Greenland of MODIS retrievals of the western portion of the Greenland ice sheet over the period 2000 to 2006

  19. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

  20. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  1. Thermal ground state and nonthermal probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandou, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euclidean formulation of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics admits periodic, (anti)selfdual solutions to the fundamental, classical equation of motion which possess one unit of topological charge: (anti)calorons. A spatial coarse graining over the central region in a pair of such localised field configurations with trivial holonomy generates an inert adjoint scalar field $\\phi$, effectively describing the pure quantum part of the thermal ground state in the induced quantum field theory. The latter's local vertices are mediated by just-not-resolved (anti)caloron centers of action $\\hbar$. This is the basic reason for a rapid convergence of the loop expansion of thermodynamical quantities, polarization tensors, etc., their effective loop momenta being severely constrained in entirely fixed and physical unitary-Coulomb gauge. Here we show for the limit of zero holonomy how (anti)calorons associate a temperature independent electric permittivity and magnetic permeability to the thermal ground state of SU(2)$_{\\t...

  2. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  3. Compression of ground-motion data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.W.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground motion data has been recorded for many years at Nevada Test Site and is now stored on thousands of digital tapes. The recording format is very inefficient in terms of space on tape. This report outlines a method to compress the data onto a few hundred tapes while maintaining the accuracy of the recording and allowing restoration of any file to the original format for future use. For future digitizing a more efficient format is described and suggested.

  4. Ground motion: An introduction for accelerator builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this seminar we will review some of the characteristics of the major classes of ground motion in order to determine whether their effects must be considered or place fundamental limits on the sitting and/or design of modern storage rings and linear colliders. The classes discussed range in frequency content from tidal deformation and tectonic motions through earthquakes and microseisms. Countermeasures currently available are briefly discussed.

  5. Visible and Infra-red Light Emission in Boron-Doped Wurtzite Silicon Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabbri, Filippo

    Silicon, the mainstay semiconductor in microelectronic circuitry, is considered unsuitable for optoelectronic applications owing to its indirect electronic band gap, which limits its efficiency as a light emitter. Here we ...

  6. Diffuse interstellar bands in M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Keith T; Evans, Christopher J; Cox, Nick L J; Sarre, Peter J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first sample of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the nearby galaxy M33. Studying DIBs in other galaxies allows the behaviour of the carriers to be examined under interstellar conditions which can be quite different from those of the Milky Way, and to determine which DIB properties can be used as reliable probes of extragalactic interstellar media. Multi-object spectroscopy of 43 stars in M33 has been performed using Keck/DEIMOS. The stellar spectral types were determined and combined with literature photometry to determine the M33 reddenings E(B-V)_M33. Equivalent widths or upper limits have been measured for the {\\lambda}5780 DIB towards each star. DIBs were detected towards 20 stars, demonstrating that their carriers are abundant in M33. The relationship with reddening is found to be at the upper end of the range observed in the Milky Way. The line of sight towards one star has an unusually strong ratio of DIB equivalent width to E(B-V)_M33, and a total of seven DIBs were detected towards...

  7. Dye Surface Coating Enables Visible Light Activation of TiO2 Nanoparticles Leading to Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Eric

    Dye Surface Coating Enables Visible Light Activation of TiO2 Nanoparticles Leading to Degradation that an alizarin red S ~ARS! dye coating on TiO2 nanoparticles enables visible light activation coatings on TiO2 nanoparticles can serve to enhance imaging, by clearly showing that dye coatings on TiO2

  8. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd. Lewis, R. Arnone, and R. Brewin (2013), Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans

  9. Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Marcel

    Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance, J. The algorithms are found to be valid both in coastal and oceanic waters, and largely insensitive to regional

  10. Comparison and detection of total and available soil carbon fractions using visible/near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    . With the advent of visible/near-infrared-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR-DRS) to infer on soil C fractionsComparison and detection of total and available soil carbon fractions using visible/near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy D.V. Sarkhot a,1,2 , S. Grunwald a, , Y. Ge b,3 , C.L.S. Morgan c,4

  11. Response of continuous pipelines to tunnel induced ground deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ieronymaki, Evangelia S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops analytical solutions for estimating the bending moments and axial loads in a buried pipeline due to ground movements caused by tunnel construction in soft ground. The solutions combine closed-form, ...

  12. Optimal Design for a Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z.; Yuan, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction from the ground. The paper presented has shown that the heat rejection of the GLHEs and the system energy consumption are approached to discuss the ground heat balance with different design procedures and control strategies though the system...

  13. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an overview of ground loops for space-conditioning heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration in residential and commercial applications. In Louisiana, a chain of hamburger drive-ins uses total ground...

  14. The Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, J. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-coupled heat pumps are being installed in increasing numbers due to proven performance and economy. The overall thermal resistance between the ground coupling fluid and a given type of surrounding soil is affected by pipe material, wall...

  15. The Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, J. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-coupled heat pumps are being installed in increasing numbers due to proven performance and economy. The overall thermal resistance between the ground coupling fluid and a given type of surrounding soil is affected by pipe material, wall...

  16. Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Annie S.

    Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms Ayse S. Yilmaz 1 and Brian N the sensing capabilities of a sensor suite. This work focuses on unattended ground sensor networks consisting

  17. Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Annie S.

    Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms Ayse S. Yilmaz1 and Brian N of a sensor suite. This work focuses on unattended ground sensor networks consisting of teams of small

  18. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  19. Talking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to become a popular medium for social interaction. Traditional chat environments, however, are limitedTalking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment Roy Rodenstein, a multimodal audioconferencing environment whose novel design emphasizes spatial grounding with the aim

  20. aircraft ground operations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a Tilt Rotor Aircraft Wake in Ground Effect, (May 19B2) Michael Louis Frey III, B. S. , Texas A... Frey, Michael Louis 2012-06-07 22 Aircraft Ground Traffic Optimization...

  1. Slotted Ground Structures and Their Applications to Various Microwave Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Dong

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses microstrip circuits and components with a slotted area on the ground plane. In recent years, various slot geometries have been placed on the ground plane with the purpose of reducing harmonics, producing frequency pass...

  2. Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}: A highly efficient and stable composite photocatalyst for degradation of organic contaminants under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Jing, E-mail: caojing@mail.ipc.ac.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Yijie; Lin, Haili; Xu, Benyan [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China); Chen, Shifu, E-mail: chshifu@chnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000, Anhui (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activities on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light. The improved photocatalytic performance and stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} originated from the synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. ·O{sub 2}?, one of the reactive species, was responsible for the photodegradation of MO compared to H+ and ·OH. - Highlights: • Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was reported. • Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} had novel energy band combination between AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Synergetic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and metallic Ag nanoparticles. • Electron trapping role of metallic Ag dominated the stability of Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: Novel Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts were constructed via deposition–precipitation method and extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Under visible light (? > 420 nm), Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} composite photocatalysts displayed much higher photocatalytic activities than those of Ag/AgBr and g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for degradation of methyl orange (MO). 50% Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} presented the best photocatalytic performance, which was mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface and the in situ metallic Ag nanoparticles for efficiently separating electron–hole pairs. Furthermore, Ag/AgBr/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} remained good photocatalytic activity through 5 times of cycle experiments. Additionally, the radical scavengers experiment indicated that ·O{sub 2}{sup ?} was the main reactive species for the MO degradation under visible light.

  3. Intermediate Band Properties of Femtosecond-Laser Hyperdoped Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    . The high concentration of dopants forms an intermediate band (IB), instead of discrete energy levels exhibits broad-band light absorption to wavelengths deep below the corresponding bandgap energy of silicon) using secondary ion mass spectrometry. By varying the pressure of SF6, we find that the surface adsorbed

  4. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  5. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  6. A multi-band phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Samuel Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to switch to different bands of operation. The multi-band PLL frequency synthesizer is implemented in a standard 1.2[]m CMOS technology using a 2.7V supply. The frequency synthesizer has a measured frequency range of 111 to 290MHz with phase noise up to -96d...

  7. V Concurs de Bandes de la UPF BASES GENERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    V Concurs de Bandes de la UPF BASES GENERALS requisits generals: Podran participar-hi tots els comunitat universitària de la UPF. inscripció: Les bandes que es presentin a concurs lliuraran al Punt d i la política de privacitat, de manera que exoneren la UPF de qualsevol responsabilitat derivada d

  8. K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN Shannon Curry1 , Michael Ahlers University of Michigan 2455 Hayward St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA cruf@umich.edu 2 DTU Space Technical resolution. A K-Band airborne version has been built and flown across southeast Michigan. A kurtosis detector

  9. SEMIEMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    SEMI­EMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS Tahir Cagin Research and Development Center, Materials Labarotory, Polymer Branch, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 geometries and energy band gaps of conjugated polymers. In this study, we used a modified version of semi

  10. absorption band substructure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption band substructure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 THE ABSORPTION BAND EDGE...

  11. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  12. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  13. Ground Versus Unground Grain for Lactating Dairy Cows. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darnell, A. L. (Albert Laurie); Copeland, O. C. (Orlin Cephas)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY, A & hf COLLEGE, CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIFkECTOR COLLE~E STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 530 SEPTEMBER, 193 6 DIVISION OF DAIRY HUSBANDRY Ground Versus Unground Grain far Lactating...- bandry in cooperation with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. The double reversal method of feeding lactating dairy cows was used in comparing whole versus ground shelled corn, whole versus ground threshed oats, whole versus ground threshed...

  14. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will ex examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV-Visible spectroscopy studies. The use of TRLFS to examine Cm and U will provide data to evaluate lifetime, peak location, and peak ratios (mainly for U). The bases for the spectroscopic techniques have been investigated, providing fundamental evidence for the application’s utility.

  15. Regional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    )over long periods of time when the potential change in ground water storage becomes negligible compared storage other than discharge to streams. One such loss term is evapotranspiration (ET) from ground waterRegional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska by Jozsef Szilagyi1m2,F. Edwin

  16. Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation Steven W. Schlosser to ground motion sim- ulations, in which ground model datasets are fully materi- alized into octress stored as a service techniques in which scientific computation and storage services become more tightly intertwined. 1

  17. DEVELOPMENTS IN GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY : AN OVERVIEW C. P. Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    . Surface water storage and ground water withdrawal are traditional engineering approaches which of storage and circulation as ground water. The large alluvial tract extending over 2000 km in length from which allows ground water storage in the weathered residium and its circulation in the underlying

  18. Introduction Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to drilling of bore- holes for vertical ground heat exchangers (GHX), or excavation for horizontal GHX heating and cooling loads and their distribution over the year, as well as ground thermal properties, undisturbed ground temperature, and GHX design, as well as other factors. For low energy buildings the greatly

  19. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  20. ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By ANDREW D. CHIASSON Bachelor of Applied 1999 #12;ii ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser..............................................................................................................1 1.1. Overview of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems ..............................................1 1

  1. APPLICATIONS OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPLICATIONS OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS TO BUILDINGS AND BRIDGE DECKS. By MAHADEVAN Chapter Page 1. Introduction 1.1. Overview of hybrid ground source heat pump systems 1.2. Literature review 1.3. Thesis objective and scope 2. Optimal sizing of hybrid ground source heat pump system

  2. DESIGN OF AN EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY FOR HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF AN EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY FOR HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By SHAWN ALEX HERN.1 HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM DESIGN........................................2-3 2.1.1 Design...............................................................................2-5 2.2 HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION................................2-9 3

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  4. On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems Dieter Hofbauer 1 Universit¨at GH@theory.informatik.uni­kassel.de Abstract. It is shown that for terminating ground term rewrite systems the length of derivations a suitable interpretation into the natural numbers. Terminating ground systems are not necessarily

  5. Flare Ribbons Observed with G-band and FeI 6302A Filters of the Solar Optical Telescope on Board Hinode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Isobe; M. Kubo; T. Minoshima; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; T. D. Tarbell; S. Tsuneta; T. E. Berger; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; A. Title

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode satellite observed an X3.4 class flare on 2006 December 13. Typical two-ribbon structure was observed, not only in the chromospheric CaII H line but also in G-band and FeI 6302A line. The high-resolution, seeing-free images achieved by SOT revealed, for the first time, the sub-arcsec fine structures of the "white light" flare. The G-band flare ribbons on sunspot umbrae showed a sharp leading edge followed by a diffuse inside, as well as previously known core-halo structure. The underlying structures such as umbral dots, penumbral filaments and granules were visible in the flare ribbons. Assuming that the sharp leading edge was directly heated by particle beam and the diffuse parts were heated by radiative back-warming, we estimate the depth of the diffuse flare emission using the intensity profile of the flare ribbon. We found that the depth of the diffuse emission is about 100 km or less from the height of the source of radiative back-warming. The flare ribbons were also visible in the Stokes-V images of FeI 6302A, as a transient polarity reversal. This is probably related to "magnetic transient" reported in the literature. The intensity increase in Stokes-I images indicates that the FeI 6302A line was significantly deformed by the flare, which may cause such a magnetic transient.

  6. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Streams: An Evaluation of Spent Fuel Solutions via Raman, Visible, and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Peterson, James M.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of using optical spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman and Visible/Near Infrared (Vis/NIR), for on-line process control and special nuclear materials accountability applications at a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility was evaluated. Availability of on-line real-time techniques that directly measure process concentrations of nuclear materials will enhance performance and proliferation resistance of the solvent extraction processes. Further, on-line monitoring of radiochemical streams will also improve reprocessing plant operation and safety. This report reviews current state of development of the spectroscopic on-line monitoring techniques for such solutions. To further examine applicability of optical spectroscopy for monitoring reprocessing solutions, segments of a spent nuclear fuel, with approximate burn-up values of 70 MWd/kgM, were dissolved in concentrated nitric acid and adjusted to varying final concentrations of HNO3. The resulting spent fuel solutions were batch-contacted with tributyl phosphate/dodecane organic solvent. The feed and equilibrium aqueous and loaded organic solutions were subjected to optical measurements. The obtained spectra showed the presence of the quantifiable Raman bands due to NO3- and UO22+ and Vis/NIR bands due to multiple species of Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(V), the Np(V)-U(VI) cation-cation complex, and Nd(III) in fuel solutions, justifying spectroscopic techniques as a promising methodology for monitoring spent fuel processing solutions in real-time. Quantitative evaluation of the fuel solution was performed based on spectroscopic measurements and compared to ICP-MS analysis.

  7. Coal mine ground control. 3rd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The third edition not only completely revises and updates the original subject areas, but also is broadened to include a number of new topics such as high horizontal stresses, computer modeling, and highwall stability. The subject areas covered in this book define the current field of coal mine ground control, except for the recently emerging topic of mine seals and some conventional subjects such as coal/rock cutting and impoundment dams. It contains 1,134 references from all published sources, and archived since 1876.

  8. Geometric renormalization below the ground state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smith

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The caloric gauge was introduced by Tao with studying large data energy critical wave maps mapping from $\\mathbf{R}^{2+1}$ to hyperbolic space $\\mathbf{H}^m$ in view. In \\cite{BIKT} Bejenaru, Ionescu, Kenig, and Tataru adapted the caloric gauge to the setting of Schr\\"odinger maps from $\\mathbf{R}^{d + 1}$ to the standard sphere $S^2 \\hookrightarrow \\mathbf{R}^3$ with initial data small in the critical Sobolev norm. Here we develop the caloric gauge in a bounded geometry setting with a construction valid up to the ground state energy.

  9. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, for use with a photovoltaic assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending generally perpendicular to the central portion. Each arm has an outer portion with each outer portion having an outer end. At least one frame surface-disrupting element is at each outer end. The central portion defines a plane with the frame surface-disrupting elements pointing towards the plane. In some examples each arm extends from the central portion at an acute angle to the plane.

  10. Best Possible Strategy for Finding Ground States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, Astrid; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz; Salamon, Peter

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding the ground state of a system with a complex energy landscape is important for many physical problems including protein folding, spin glasses, chemical clusters, and neural networks. Such problems are usually solved by heuristic search methods whose efficacy is judged by empirical performance on selected examples. We present a proof that, within the large class of algorithms that simulate a random walk on the landscape, threshold accepting is the best possible strategy. In particular, it can perform better than simulated annealing and Tsallis statistics. Our proof is the first example of a provably optimal strategy in this area.

  11. Tritium Ground Water Issues | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTedRegion | Department of Energy TribesNorthernGround

  12. Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Based

  13. Ground Source Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods | OpenInformationMagnetics Jump to:Ground

  14. Visibility of cold atomic gases in optical lattices for finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Alexander [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig Maximilian Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany); Pelster, Axel [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nearly all experiments with ultracold atoms time-of-flight pictures are the only data available. In this paper we present an analytical strong-coupling calculation for those time-of-flight pictures of bosons in a three-dimensional optical lattice in the Mott phase. This allows us to determine the visibility, which quantifies the contrast of peaks in the time-of-flight pictures, and we suggest how to use it as a thermometer.

  15. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  16. Hanford Site ground-water surveillance for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Bates, D.J.; Kemner, M.L.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of ground-water surveillance activities provides discussions and listings of results for ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site during 1989. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assesses the impacts of Hanford operations on the environment for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The impact Hanford operations has on ground water is evaluated through the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance program. Five hundred and sixty-seven wells were sampled during 1989 for Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. This report contains a listing of analytical results for calendar year (CY) 1989 for species of importance as potential contaminants. 30 refs., 29 figs,. 4 tabs.

  17. The role of high-level calculations in the assignment of the Q-band spectra of chlorophyll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R. [School of Physics and Materials Science, The University of Technology, Sydney NSW (Australia); Cai, Zheng-Li [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD4001 (Australia); Kobayashi, Rika [Australian National University Supercomputer Facility, Mills Rd, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Rätsep, Margus [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Freiberg, Arvi [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu, Estonia and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia); Krausz, Elmars [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601 (Australia)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently established a novel assignment of the visible absorption spectrum of chlorophyll-a that sees the two components Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} of the low-energy Q band as being intrinsically mixed by non-adiabatic coupling. This ended 50 years debate as to the nature of the Q bands, with prior discussion poised only in the language of the Born-Oppenheimer and Condon approximations. The new assignment presents significant ramifications for exciton transport and quantum coherence effects in photosystems. Results from state of the art electronic structure calculations have always been used to justify assignments, but quantitative inaccuracies and systematic failures have historically limited usefulness. We examine the role of CAM-B3LYP time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) calculations in first showing that all previous assignments were untenable, in justifying the new assignment, in making some extraordinary predictions that were vindicated by the new assignment, and in then identifying small but significant anomalies in the extensive experimental data record.

  18. Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doll, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phillips, B.E. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

  19. First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutton, Robert W.

    First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets out to investigate the scaling trends of band offsets at model silicon/zirconium silicate interfaces. Owing to the d character of zirconium silicate conduction bands, the band gap and band offset are shown

  20. Thermal ground state and nonthermal probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Grandou; Ralf Hofmann

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euclidean formulation of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics admits periodic, (anti)selfdual solutions to the fundamental, classical equation of motion which possess one unit of topological charge: (anti)calorons. A spatial coarse graining over the central region in a pair of such localised field configurations with trivial holonomy generates an inert adjoint scalar field $\\phi$, effectively describing the pure quantum part of the thermal ground state in the induced quantum field theory. The latter's local vertices are mediated by just-not-resolved (anti)caloron centers of action $\\hbar$. This is the basic reason for a rapid convergence of the loop expansion of thermodynamical quantities, polarization tensors, etc., their effective loop momenta being severely constrained in entirely fixed and physical unitary-Coulomb gauge. Here we show for the limit of zero holonomy how (anti)calorons associate a temperature independent electric permittivity and magnetic permeability to the thermal ground state of SU(2)$_{\\tiny\\mbox{CMB}}$, the Yang-Mills theory conjectured to underlie photon propagation.

  1. Observation of excitonic and band-to-band behavior in ordered InGaP{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.D.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, H.; Nelson, J.S.; Schneider, R.P. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alonso, R.G.; Horner, G.S.; Machol, J.; Mascarenhas, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescence measurements on ordered InGaP{sub 2} were studied as a function of temperature, laser power density, and magnetic field. The temperature varied between 1.4 and 300 K, the laser power densities ranged from 10 nW/cm{sup 2} to 20 W/cm{sup 2}, and the maximum magnetic field was 13.6 T. The data show both excitonic and band-to-band behavior, depending upon the incident laser power density. A consistent interpretation of all data leads to a type-II valence-band offset between the ordered domains.

  2. angstrom extinction band: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Galactic extinction curve, which implies that the properties of dust in the extragalactic enviroment are similar to those of the Milky Way. The ratio of the total V band extinction...

  3. Feasibility of band gap engineering of pyrite FeS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ruoshi

    We use first-principles computations to investigate whether the band gap of pyrite FeS? can be increased by alloying in order to make it a more effective photovoltaic material. In addition to the isostructural compounds ...

  4. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Fenggong, E-mail: fenggong@sas.upenn.edu; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M., E-mail: rappe@sas.upenn.edu [The Makineni Theoretical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104–6323 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2?eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics.

  5. Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  6. Substrate-induced band gap opening in epitaxial graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H.A. Electronic states of graphene nanoribbons studied withS.G. Louie. Energy gaps in graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.band-gap engineering of graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.

  7. Direct observation of a dispersionless impurity band in hydrogenated graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberer, D.

    We show with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy that a new energy band appears in the electronic structure of electron-doped hydrogenated monolayer graphene (H-graphene). Its occupation can be controlled with the ...

  8. Multi-band OFDM UWB receiver with narrowband interference suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelleci, Burak

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) compatible ultra wideband (UWB) receiver with narrowband interference (NBI) suppression capability is presented. The average transmit power of UWB system ...

  9. New description of the doublet bands in doubly odd nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganev, H. G.; Georgieva, A. I. [Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Brant, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ventura, A. [Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, I-40129 Bologna and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimentally observed {delta}I=1 doublet bands in some odd-odd nuclei are analyzed within the orthosymplectic extension of the interacting vector boson model (IVBM). A new, purely collective interpretation of these bands is given on the basis of the obtained boson-fermion dynamical symmetry of the model. It is illustrated by its application to three odd-odd nuclei from the A{approx}130 region, namely {sup 126}Pr, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 132}La. The theoretical predictions for the energy levels of the doublet bands as well as E2 and M1 transition probabilities between the states of the yrast band in the last two nuclei are compared with experiment and the results of other theoretical approaches. The obtained results reveal the applicability of the orthosymplectic extension of the IVBM.

  10. Photovoltaic ground fault and blind spot electrical simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground faults in photovoltaic (PV) systems pose a fire and shock hazard. To mitigate these risks, AC-isolated, DC grounded PV systems in the United States use Ground Fault Protection Devices (GFPDs), e.g., fuses, to de-energize the PV system when there is a ground fault. Recently the effectiveness of these protection devices has come under question because multiple fires have started when ground faults went undetected. In order to understand the limitations of fuse-based ground fault protection in PV systems, analytical and numerical simulations of different ground faults were performed. The numerical simulations were conducted with Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) using a circuit model of the PV system which included the modules, wiring, switchgear, grounded or ungrounded components, and the inverter. The derivation of the SPICE model and the results of parametric fault current studies are provided with varying array topologies, fuse sizes, and fault impedances. Closed-form analytical approximations for GFPD currents from faults to the grounded current carrying conductor-known as %E2%80%9Cblind spot%E2%80%9D ground faults-are derived to provide greater understanding of the influence of array impedances on fault currents. The behavior of the array during various ground faults is studied for a range of ground fault fuse sizes to determine if reducing the size of the fuse improves ground fault detection sensitivity. The results of the simulations show that reducing the amperage rating of the protective fuse does increase fault current detection sensitivity without increasing the likelihood of nuisance trips to a degree. Unfortunately, this benefit reaches a limit as fuses become smaller and their internal resistance increases to the point of becoming a major element in the fault current circuit.

  11. Comparative cytotaxonomy in the tribe Bovini studied by banding techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Donna Carol

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. James E. Womack Chromosomes of eight species of the tribe Bovini were studied by G ? banding, C ? banding and silver staining techniques. The results of this comparative cytogenetic study support the theory that Robertsonian fusion... in the tribe Bovini whose species appear to differ by a series of centromeric fusions. The phylogenetic tree derived from the cytogenetic data of this study is not consistent with morphological and behavioral trees previously described for the tribe Bovini...

  12. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  13. Direct comparison of EUV and visible-light interferometries Kenneth A. Goldberg*a, Patrick Naulleaua, SangHun Leea,b, Chang Changa,b, Cynthia Bresloffc,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct comparison of EUV and visible-light interferometries Kenneth A. Goldberg*a, PatrickÃ? EUV imaging systems provide the first direct comparisons of visible-light and at-wavelength EUV-coated Schwarzschild objectives are discussed. Favorable agreement has been achieved between EUV and visible-light

  14. A Study of the Process of Commissioning New Music for the Concert Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, James

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the process of commissioning a new composition for the concert band. Composer Brian Balmages was commissioned to write a piece for concert band that had standard band instrumentation and was of Grade IV difficulty. The Temple...

  15. Shear band dynamics from a mesoscopic modeling of plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Jagla

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ubiquitous appearance of regions of localized deformation (shear bands) in different kinds of disordered materials under shear is studied in the context of a mesoscopic model of plasticity. The model may or may not include relaxational (aging) effects. In the absence of relaxational effects the model displays a monotonously increasing dependence of stress on strain-rate, and stationary shear bands do not occur. However, in start up experiments transient (although long lived) shear bands occur, that widen without bound in time. I investigate this transient effect in detail, reproducing and explaining a t^1/2 law for the thickness increase of the shear band that has been obtained in atomistic numerical simulations. Relaxation produces a negative sloped region in the stress vs. strain-rate curve that stabilizes the formation of shear bands of a well defined width, which is a function of strain-rate. Simulations at very low strain-rates reveal a non-trivial stick-slip dynamics of very thin shear bands that has relevance in the study of seismic phenomena. In addition, other non-stationary processes, such as stop-and-go, or strain-rate inversion situations display a phenomenology that matches very well the results of recent experimental studies.

  16. Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Re-direct Destination: This plan outlines the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians' comprehensive energy...

  17. Scent marking in wild banded mongooses: 2. Intrasexual overmarking and competition between males

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüedi, Peter

    Scent marking in wild banded mongooses: 2. Intrasexual overmarking and competition between males on wild banded mongooses, Mungos mungo, suggests that overmarking may primarily affect behavioural mating

  18. Sun--Grounding Social Sciences in Cognitive Sciences I Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ron

    G Sun--Grounding Social Sciences in Cognitive Sciences I Introduction Sun_8928_001_main.indd 1 1/10/2012 6:35:15 PM #12;G Sun--Grounding Social Sciences in Cognitive Sciences Sun_8928_001_main.indd 2 1/10/2012 6:35:15 PM #12;G Sun--Grounding Social Sciences in Cognitive Sciences 1 Prolegomenato

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

  20. Cleanup Verification Package for the118-F-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron and K. A. Anselm

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground. This burial ground, formerly called Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 1, was the original solid waste disposal site for the 100-F Area. Eight trenches contained miscellaneous solid waste from the 105-F Reactor and one trench contained solid waste from the biology facilities.

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings.

  2. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomanowski, B. A., E-mail: b.a.lomanowski@durham.ac.uk; Sharples, R. M. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium D?, D?, D? line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Nanosecond-scale timing jitter in transition edge sensors at telecom and visible wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antia Lamas-Linares; Brice Calkins; Nathan A. Tomlin; Thomas Gerrits; Adriana E. Lita; Joern Beyer; Richard P. Mirin; Sae Woo Nam

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have the highest reported efficiencies (>98%) for detection of single photons in the visible and near infrared. Experiments in quantum information and foundations of physics that rely critically on this efficiency have started incorporating these detectors into con- ventional quantum optics setups. However, their range of applicability has been hindered by slow operation both in recovery time and timing jitter. We show here how a conventional tungsten-TES can be operated with jitter times of < 4 ns, well within the timing resolution necessary for MHz clocking of experiments, and providing an important practical simplification for experiments that rely on the simultaneous closing of both efficiency and locality loopholes.

  4. Critical Evaluation of the ISCCP Simulator Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, G G; Houser, S; Benson, S; Klein, S A; Min, Q

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the known shortcomings in representing clouds in Global Climate Models (GCM) comparisons with observations are critical. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) diagnostic products provide global descriptions of cloud top pressure and column optical depth that extends over multiple decades. The necessary limitations of the ISCCP retrieval algorithm require that before comparisons can be made between model output and ISCCP results the model output must be modified to simulate what ISCCP would diagnose under the simulated circumstances. We evaluate one component of the so-called ISCCP simulator in this study by comparing ISCCP and a similar algorithm with various long-term statistics derived from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility ground-based remote sensors. We find that were a model to simulate the cloud radiative profile with the same accuracy as can be derived from the ARM data, then the likelihood of that occurrence being placed in the same cloud top pressure and optical depth bin as ISCCP of the 9 bins that have become standard ranges from 30% to 70% depending on optical depth. While the ISCCP simulator improved the agreement of cloud-top pressure between ground-based remote sensors and satellite observations, we find minor discrepancies due to the parameterization of cloud top pressure in the ISCCP simulator. The primary source of error seems to be related to discrepancies in visible optical depth that are not accounted for in the ISCCP simulator. We show that the optical depth discrepancies are largest when the assumptions necessary for plane parallel radiative transfer optical depths retrievals are violated.

  5. Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity “hotspots,” yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

  6. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application Forms Webpage Abstract Provides a list of permit...

  7. EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control Program) webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's...

  8. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Kora, Angela R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Yuma Proving Ground, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  10. Ground Electromagnetic Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    horizontally on the ground. Interpretation of the data was made using an inversion computer program and the primary magnetic field was estimated directly from the data rather...

  11. alkaline ground waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydraulic Rhode Island, University of 28 Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water University of California eScholarship Repository Summary:...

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not...

  13. artificial ground freezing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moorman, Brian 6 Ground state lost but degeneracy found: the effective thermodynamics of artificial spin ice Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We analyze the rotational...

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  15. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Gravity surveys were conducted to gain a better...

  17. Ground Magnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Magnetic surveys were conducted to gain a better...

  18. Monitoring SERC Technologies —Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Project Leader Dave Peterson about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor its installation.

  19. Optimal Ground-Source Heat Pump System Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ground-Source Heat Pump System Design May 19, 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review ENVIRON International PI : Metin Ozbek Track : GSHP Demonstration Projects This...

  20. Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia,...

  1. african ground water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has Rossi, Vivien 10 Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management & Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Integrated Water...

  2. Can a many-nucleon structure be visible in bremsstrahlung emission during $\\alpha$ decay?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P; Zou, Li-Ping

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze if the nucleon structure of the $\\alpha$ decaying nucleus can be visible in the experimental bremsstrahlung spectra of the emitted photons which accompany such a decay. We develop a new formalism of the bremsstrahlung model taking into account distribution of nucleons in the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclear system. We conclude the following: (1) After inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model the calculated bremsstrahlung spectrum is changed very slowly for a majority of the $\\alpha$ decaying nuclei. However, we have observed that visible changes really exist for the $^{106}{\\rm Te}$ nucleus ($Q_{\\alpha}=4.29$ MeV, $T_{1/2}$=70 mks) even for the energy of the emitted photons up to 1 MeV. This nucleus is a good candidate for future experimental study of this task. (2) Inclusion of the nucleon structure into the model increases the bremsstrahlung probability of the emitted photons. (3) We find the following tendencies for obtaining the nuclei, which have bremsstrahlung spectra more sensitive to the ...

  3. Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

  4. Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C. J., E-mail: lasnier@LLNL.gov; Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Crabtree, K. [College of Optics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

  5. The ground state construction of bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Giuliani; Ian Jauslin

    2015-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of half-filled bilayer graphene, in which the three dominant Slonczewski-Weiss-McClure hopping parameters are retained, in the presence of short range interactions. Under a smallness assumption on the interaction strength $U$ as well as on the inter-layer hopping $\\epsilon$, we construct the ground state in the thermodynamic limit, and prove its analyticity in $U$, uniformly in $\\epsilon$. The interacting Fermi surface is degenerate, and consists of eight Fermi points, two of which are protected by symmetries, while the locations of the other six are renormalized by the interaction, and the effective dispersion relation at the Fermi points is conical. The construction reveals the presence of different energy regimes, where the effective behavior of correlation functions changes qualitatively. The analysis of the crossover between regimes plays an important role in the proof of analyticity and in the uniform control of the radius of convergence. The proof is based on a rigorous implementation of fermionic renormalization group methods, including determinant estimates for the renormalized expansion.

  6. Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas Todd Caldwell Bridget Scanlon Di Long Michael Young Texas drought and beyond 22-23 October 2012 #12;Ground-based soil moisture Why do we need-limited TRANSPIRATION Water-limited Carbon storage ECOHYDROLOGY Stress, mortality, fire Oxygen limitations MICROBIAL

  7. British Columbia's Exploring perspectives and seeking common ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    and seeking common ground Matt Horne · Ekaterina Petropavlova P.J. Partington June 2012 Energy and Materials economics, energy efficiency and conservation, renewable energy, and environmental governance. For moreBritish Columbia's Carbon Tax Exploring perspectives and seeking common ground Matt Horne

  8. Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    ................................................ 352 4.4.4 Pack Ice Motion................................................... 355 4.5 Changes4 Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground Coordinating Lead Authors: Peter Lemke. Kaser, P. Mote, R.H. Thomas and T. Zhang, 2007: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground. In

  9. DC WRRC Report No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    DRILLING AND FIELD OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE GROUP A WELLS D.C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER University No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WELL DRILLING AND FIELDDC WRRC Report No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WELL

  10. Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, K.M.

    1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

  11. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in all seasons. A loop sizing procedure for mul- tiple units on a common ground loop was given by Braud (1). See also Bose et al. (2) and Partin (3). APPLICATIONS OF GROUND-COUPLED HEAT PUMPS COLD SUPPLY +-fi- ;-"" WATER TANK A recent development...

  12. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  13. Train-the-Trainer As ground source heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Train-the-Trainer As ground source heat pumps capture more of the HVAC market, the need will also receive a copy of the Closed-Loop/ Ground- Source Heat Pump Systems Installation Guide · Soils and Rock Identification · Pump and Fluid Selection Registration information You must be an IGSHPA

  14. Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Cold Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Cold Climates The Current State of the Alaska Industry, a Review-Source Heat Pumps in Cold Climates The Current State of the Alaska Industry, a Review of the Literature and contributions from individuals and organizations involved in ground-source heat pump installation around Alaska

  15. Marketing Ground Source Heat Pump Advanced Applications that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marketing Ground Source Heat Pump Advanced Applications that Deliver Competitive Advantage Al is the fastest growing market with the available capital and need for the benefits of ground source heat pumps Heating ... and Cooling n Comfort & Indoor Air Quality n Homes have domestic hot water - DHW n Less

  16. SIMULATION AND OPTIMAL CONTROL OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIMULATION AND OPTIMAL CONTROL OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By XIAOWEI XU Bachelor #12;ii SIMULATION AND OPTIMAL CONTROL OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Dissertation Approved as co- advisor of this research project. His many years of building system simulation experience

  17. Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ag chemical best management practices 7. soil testing 8. voluntary or mandatory educational programs regulate ground water development (well spacing regulations, well drilling prohibitions) and ground water by implementing the above GMA regulations, well drilling may be halted or conditioned. NRD permits are required

  18. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, R.E.; Robinson, S.C.; Thompson, W.F.; Couture, S.A.; Sutton, B.J.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices is described that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator. 8 figures.

  19. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, Roy E. (Maryville, TN); Robinson, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN); Thompson, William F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Couture, Scott A. (Knoxville, TN); Sutton, Bill J. (Powell, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator.

  20. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of photoactive CoO/SrTiO{sub 3} and CoO/TiO{sub 2} on Si(001) for visible light driven photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, Thong Q.; Hoang, Son; McDaniel, Martin D.; Buddie Mullins, C.; Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Posadas, Agham; Seo, Hosung; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Utess, Dirk; Triyoso, Dina H. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden, Wilschdorfer Landstrasse 101, Dresden DE-01109 (Germany)] [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden, Wilschdorfer Landstrasse 101, Dresden DE-01109 (Germany)

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt oxide (CoO) films are grown epitaxially on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a thin (1.6 nm) buffer layer of strontium titanate (STO) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The ALD growth of CoO films is done at low temperature (170–180 °C), using cobalt bis(diisopropylacetamidinate) and water as co-reactants. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy are performed to characterize the crystalline structure of the films. The CoO films are found to be crystalline as-deposited even at the low growth temperature with no evidence of Co diffusion into Si. The STO-buffered Si (001) is used as a template for ALD growth of relatively thicker epitaxial STO and TiO{sub 2} films. Epitaxial and polycrystalline CoO films are then grown by ALD on the STO and TiO{sub 2} layers, respectively, creating thin-film heterostructures for photoelectrochemical testing. Both types of heterostructures, CoO/STO/Si and CoO/TiO{sub 2}/STO/Si, demonstrate water photooxidation activity under visible light illumination. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to measure the band alignment of the two heterojunctions, CoO/STO and CoO/TiO{sub 2}. The experimental band alignment is compared to electronic structure calculations using density functional theory.

  2. Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

  3. Electronic band structure of magnetic bilayer graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, C. Huy; Nguyen, T. Thuong [Theoretical and Computational Physics Department, Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh Distr., Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); SISSA/International School for Advanced Study, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Nguyen, V. Lien, E-mail: nvlien@iop.vast.ac.vn [Theoretical and Computational Physics Department, Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh Distr., Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Institute for Bio-Medical Physics, 109A Pasteur, 1st Distr., Hochiminh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with ?-function magnetic barriers and zero average magnetic flux is studied within the four-band continuum model, using the transfer matrix method. The periodic magnetic potential effects on the zero-energy touching point between the lowest conduction and the highest valence minibands of pristine bilayer graphene are exactly analyzed. Magnetic potential is shown also to generate the finite-energy touching points between higher minibands at the edges of Brillouin zone. The positions of these points and the related dispersions are determined in the case of symmetric potentials.

  4. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  5. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  6. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  7. Energy distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by intense short pulses of light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altybaev, G. S.; Kumekov, S. E., E-mail: skumekov@mail.ru; Mahmudov, A. A. [Satpaev Kazakh National Technical University (Kazakhstan)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deviation from the Fermi distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and distribution of 'hot' optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by picosecond pulses of light are calculated.

  8. Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

  9. Shear bands in a bulk metallic glass after large plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, D.D.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Shen, J. (Harbin); (Sydney)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission electron microscopy investigation is conducted to trace shear bands in a Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 18.7}Ni{sub 12}Al{sub 16.3} bulk metallic glass after experiencing 4% plastic deformation. Shear band initiation, secondary shear band interactions, mature shear band broadening and the interactions of shear bands with shear-induced nanocrystals are captured. Results suggest that the plasticity of the bulk metallic glass is enhanced by complex shear bands and their interactions which accommodate large plastic strain and prevent catastrophic shear band propagation.

  10. Investigation of the photoactivity of pristine and mixed phase N-doped titania under visible and solar irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Barnali [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Nair, Ranjith G. [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology-Silchar, Silchar, Assam 788010 (India); Rajbongshi, Bijumani [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India); Samdarshi, S.K., E-mail: drsksamdarshi@rediffmail.com [Solar and Energy Materials Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen doped titania nano-particles were synthesized by sol–gel method with an aim to investigate the impact of doping in titanium matrix and the titania phases on their photocatalytic activity under visible and solar irradiation. The structural, optical and chemical characterization of the prepared materials were done using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, UV–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The samples were calcined at different temperatures (200 °C–600 °C) to obtain different phases. All the samples showed red-shift in the visible region attributable to the doping of nitrogen in the titania matrix. The samples calcined at low temperatures showed high photocatalytic activity compared to the high temperature samples. The enhancement in the visible light activity may be attributed to the large amount of nitrogen present in the surface region of the catalyst and reduced carrier recombination. Among the high temperature samples the high activity may be due to the presence of mixed phase as well. - Highlights: • Pristine and mixed phases of N doped titania synthesized at different temperatures. • High visible light photoactivity exhibited by pristine rutile phase and mixed phase. • Role of surface N in rutile and matrix embedded N in other samples corroborated.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of substitutional and interstitial nitrogen-doped titanium dioxides with visible light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Feng [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)], E-mail: cefpeng@scut.edu.cn; Cai Lingfeng; Yu Hao; Wang Hongjuan; Yang Jian [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Both substitutional and interstitial nitrogen-doped titanium dioxides (N-TiO{sub 2}) were prepared. Their surface states were clarified by XPS spectra of N 1s, O 1s and Ti 2p. The results of photocatalysis show that both substitutional and interstitial N impurities greatly enhance the photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} in visible light. Moreover, the visible light activity of interstitial N-doped TiO{sub 2} is higher than that of substitutional N-doped TiO{sub 2}. The microwave synthesis presented in this paper is a promising and practical method to produce interstitial nitrogen-doped photocatalysts with high visible light activity. - Graphical abstract: Both substitutional and interstitial N impurities can enhance the photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} in visible light; moreover, the visible light activity of interstitial N-doped TiO{sub 2} is higher than that of substitutional N-doped TiO{sub 2}.

  12. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  13. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  14. Visible Photoluminescence from Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide Microdisks Coupled to High Quality Whispering Gallery Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Radulaski; Thomas M. Babinec; Kai Müller; Konstantinos G. Lagoudakis; Jingyuan Linda Zhang; Sonia Buckley; Yousif A. Kelaita; Kassem Alassaad; Gabriel Ferro; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of cubic (3C) silicon carbide microdisk resonators with high quality factor modes at visible and near infrared wavelengths (600 - 950 nm). Whispering gallery modes with quality factors as high as 2,300 and corresponding mode volumes V ~ 2 ({\\lambda}/n)^3 are measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy at room temperature. We obtain excellent correspondence between transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarized resonances simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and those observed in experiment. These structures based on ensembles of optically active impurities in 3C-SiC resonators could play an important role in diverse applications of nonlinear and quantum photonics, including low power optical switching and quantum memories.

  15. Bright and fast voltage reporters across the visible spectrum via electrochromic FRET (eFRET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Peng; Douglass, Adam D; Hochbaum, Daniel R; Brinks, Daan; Werley, Christopher A; Harrison, D Jed; Campbell, Robert E; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a palette of brightly fluorescent genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) with excitation and emission peaks spanning the visible spectrum, sensitivities from 6 - 10% Delta F/F per 100 mV, and half-maximal response times from 1 - 7 ms. A fluorescent protein is fused to an Archaerhodopsin-derived voltage sensor. Voltage-induced shifts in the absorption spectrum of the rhodopsin lead to voltage-dependent nonradiative quenching of the appended fluorescent protein. Through a library screen, we identified linkers and fluorescent protein combinations which reported neuronal action potentials in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with a single-trial signal-to-noise ratio from 6.6 to 11.6 in a 1 kHz imaging bandwidth at modest illumination intensity. The freedom to choose a voltage indicator from an array of colors facilitates multicolor voltage imaging, as well as combination with other optical reporters and optogenetic actuators.

  16. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are provided for enhancing the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium such as tissue, water and smoke. Examples of such an object include a vein located below the skin, a mine located below the surface of the sea and a human in a location covered by smoke. The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the utilization of structured illumination. In the specific application of this invention to image the veins in the arm or other part of the body, the issue of how to control the intensity of the image of a metal object (such as a needle) that must be inserted into the vein is also addressed.

  17. Single-photon detection timing jitter in a visible light photon counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burm Baek; Kyle S. McKay; Martin J. Stevens; Jungsang Kim; Henry H. Hogue; Sae Woo Nam

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) offer many attractive features as photon detectors, such as high quantum efficiency and photon number resolution. We report measurements of the single-photon timing jitter in a VLPC, a critical performance factor in a time-correlated single-photon counting measurement, in a fiber-coupled closed-cycle cryocooler. The measured timing jitter is 240 ps full-width-at-half-maximum at a wavelength of 550 nm, with a dark count rate of 25 000 counts per second. The timing jitter increases modestly at longer wavelengths to 300 ps at 1000 nm, and increases substantially at lower bias voltages as the quantum efficiency is reduced.

  18. A holographic bound on the total number of computations in the visible Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice H. P. M. van Putten

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Information and encoding are central to holographic imaging of matter and fields within a two-surface. We consider the probability of detection of particles inside star-like holographic screens defined by their propagators. Imaging a point particle of mass m hereby requires I = 2 pi mr in log2 bits on a spherical screen or radius r. Encoding the three hairs of mass, charge, angular momentum and radiation requires a minimum of four bits. This formulation leads directly to Reissner-Nordstrom black holes and extremal Kerr black holes for minimal screens, that envelope event horizons. Applied to the cosmological event horizon, the total number of computations in the visible Universe is found to be bounded by 10e121.

  19. A new list of thorium and argon spectral lines in the visible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lovis; F. Pepe

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. We present a new list of thorium and argon emission lines in the visible obtained by analyzing high-resolution (R=110,000) spectra of a ThAr hollow cathode lamp. The aim of this new line list is to allow significant improvements in the quality of wavelength calibration for medium- to high-resolution astronomical spectrographs. Methods. We use a series of ThAr lamp exposures obtained with the HARPS instrument (High Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher) to detect previously unknown lines, perform a systematic search for blended lines and correct individual wavelengths by determining the systematic offset of each line relative to the average wavelength solution. Results. We give updated wavelengths for more than 8400 lines over the spectral range 3785-6915 A. The typical internal uncertainty on the line positions is estimated to be ~10 m/s (3.3 parts in 10^8 or 0.18 mA), which is a factor of 2-10 better than the widely used Los Alamos Atlas of the Thorium Spectrum (Palmer & Engleman 1983). The absolute accuracy of the global wavelength scale is the same as in the Los Alamos Atlas. Using this new line list on HARPS ThAr spectra, we are able to obtain a global wavelength calibration which is precise at the 20 cm/s level (6.7 parts in 10^10 or 0.0037 mA). Conclusions. Several research fields in astronomy requiring high-precision wavelength calibration in the visible (e.g. radial velocity planet searches, variability of fundamental constants) should benefit from using the new line list.

  20. ON THE SIMULATION OF KINK BANDS IN FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE SIMULATION OF KINK BANDS IN FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES Kim D. Sørensen , Lars P. Mikkelsen reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared in fiber reinforced composites has been the subject of a number of recent investigations. It has been found

  1. On complex perturbations of infinite band Schrodinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Golinskii; S. Kupin

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a complex perturbation of a self-adjoint infinite band Schrodinger operator (defined in the form sense), and obtain the Lieb--Thirring type inequalities for the rate of convergence of the discrete spectrum of the perturbed operator to the joint essential spectrum of both operators.

  2. Amplitude modulation free, wide band frequency modulated oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Dick Frank

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /g sCIRIE/90 " --j/s~P&CI, 5 (5) The value of thc capacitance produced across the tank circuit is C = qgRICI. he c!er'vation gust nade is only good for the case where a si~mal is nodulated over a narrow band of two or t'. ~e per- cent deviation...

  3. Spatial dependence of banded chorus intensity near the magnetic equator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a provides a new boundary condition for consideration in current and future chorus generation models electrons with energies of 10 to 100 keV during and after geomagnetic storms can result in energy diffusion, using CRRES measurements, for both upper and lower band chorus as a function of L-shell and MLT

  4. CIRCULARLY POLARIZED ANTENNA ON SOI FOR THE 60 GHZ BAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the primary criteria for evaluating the quality of the antenna; Improper feed, higher order band radiation integrated on SOI. In the first part, we describe the spiral antenna theory in order to have good radiation. The feeding structure is composed of a transition between radiofrequency coplanar waveguide feed, coplanar

  5. Bird Banding Fall 2014 The Arboretum at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    -Central Rail Trail in Big Hollow, approximately 0.5 mile NW of the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens. Banding is forest edge of brush growth, primarily 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 9-Sep 11-Sep 13-Sep 15-Sep 17-Sep

  6. Band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We report optically-pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with direct gap emission near 1600 nm at room temperature. The Ge-on-Si material was band-engineered by tensile strain and n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between ...

  7. Degenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forward energy fluxes S of the two media defines the coupling efficiency ¼ S2=S1. For PBG materialsDegenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple grating: efficient coupling to slow light), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia 2 CUDOS, School

  8. Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves J.M. Aza¨is1, S. Bercu2, J, load curve. 1 Introduction In curve prediction, one is generally interested in deriving simultaneous this technique in the numerical context of load curve pre- diction: power producers like EDF, the electrical

  9. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski of the critical current density in iron-based superconductors is evaluated using a phenomenological approach collective pinning limit, and the strong pinning limit relevant for iron-based superconductors at low

  10. Structure and evolution of a convective band MCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdes-Manzanilla, Arturo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Mesoscale Convective Complex apparently aided in the formation of new lines of convection behind the primary convective line of the system. This process was repeated twice in the storm life cycle and led to multiple bands of convection...

  11. Safety Analysis for Packaging Steel Banded Wooden Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRELL, P.C.

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the steel banded wooden shipping containers, which are certified as Type AF packagings. The authorized payload for these containers is unirradiated, slightly enriched, uranium ingots, billets, extrusions, and scrap materials. The amount of uranium in the containers will not exceed the LSA-II material requirements as defined in 49 CFR 173.403.

  12. absorption bands observed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption bands observed First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AKARI observations of ice...

  13. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  14. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  15. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  16. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua, E-mail: caomh@bit.edu.cn; Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. • The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. • The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  17. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  18. Single-band and Dual-band Beam Switching Systems and Offset-fed Beam Scanning Reflectarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jungkyu

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for multi-band applications. A modified Butler matrix is used to reduce a size and a sidelobe level. The bandwidth of the microstrip antenna is inherently small. A broadband circularly polarized microstrip antenna with dual-offset feedlines is introduced...

  19. Taxonomy of Clifford Cl_{3,0} subgroups: Choir and band groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirino M. Sugon Jr.; Daniel J. McNamara

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We list the subgroups of the basis set of Cl_{3,0} and classify them according to three criteria for construction of universal Clifford algebras: (1) each generator squares to +1 or -1, (2) the generators within the group anticommute, and (3) the order of the resulting group is 2^{n+1}, where n is the number of nontrivial generators. Obedient groups we call choirs; disobedient groups, bands. We classify choirs by modes and bands by rhythms, based on canonical equality. Each band generator has a transposition (number of other generators it commutes with). The band's transposition signature is the band's chord. The sum of transpositions divided by twice the number of generator pair combinations is the band's beat. The band's order deviation is the band's disorder. For n less than or equal 3, we show that the Cl_{3,0} basis set has 21 non-isomorphic subgroups consisting of 9 choirs and 12 bands.

  20. Making the margin visible : out-of -school literacy practices among Mexican heritage English learners in an English-only district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows-Goodwill, Shivani Linda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    living room three distinct shelving areas were dedicated towas occupied by built-in shelving, filled with books andtwo bedrooms consists of shelving. The more visible shelving

  1. The Ground State Energy of a Dilute Bose Gas \\Lambday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12; 1 Introduction Recent progress in the trapping and cooling of atoms has made the ground state are important, e.g., for the considerations of inhomogeneous systems in [4]. To define E 0 (N; L) precisely one

  2. area burial ground: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Medicine Campus Yoshida-South Campus (Clock Tower Takada, Shoji 83 AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEO-FLUID WITHDRAWAL University of California eScholarship Repository...

  3. area burial grounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Medicine Campus Yoshida-South Campus (Clock Tower Takada, Shoji 83 AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEO-FLUID WITHDRAWAL University of California eScholarship Repository...

  4. EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in...

  5. Control and waypoint navigation of an autonomous ground vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, James Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the initial development of the Texas A&M Autonomous Ground Vehicle test platform and waypoint following software, including the associated controller design. The original goal of the team responsible for the development...

  6. Effect of anisotropy in ground movements caused by tunnelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zymnis, Despina Maria

    This paper presents closed-form analytical solutions for estimating far-field ground deformations caused by shallow tunnelling in a linear elastic soil mass with cross-anisotropic stiffness properties. The solutions describe ...

  7. Ground Versus Unground Grain for Lactating Dairy Cows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darnell, A. L. (Albert Laurie); Copeland, O. C. (Orlin Cephas)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Table 10. Effects of Feeding Ground versus Whole Grain on High versus Low Producing Cows. Productive Values of Whole Grains Experiment Numbers Corn Experiment No. 1.. .... .... Corn Experiment No. 2.. ..... Oat Experiment No. 1.. Oat Experiment hTo...

  8. Effect of existing building on tunneling-induced ground movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Law, Rachel Hoi-chee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to assess the influence of an existing structure on tunneling-induced ground movements. This is accomplished through 2D numerical simulations that are compared with similar prior studies reported ...

  9. Combined permeable pavement and ground source heat pump systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowiecki, Piotr

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PhD thesis focuses on the performance assessment of permeable pavement systems incorporating ground source heat pumps (GSHP). The relatively high variability of temperature in these systems allows for the survival of pathogenic organisms within...

  10. Optimal Design for a Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z.; Yuan, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the advantages of ground-source heat pumps over their conventional alternatives make these systems a very attractive choice for air conditioning, not only for residential buildings but increasingly also for institutional and commercial...

  11. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  12. ammotheidae arthropod ground: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Cheli et al. The ground-dwelling arthropod community of Pennsula Valds in Patagonia, Argentina CiteSeer Summary: This is the first study based on a planned and...

  13. arthropod ground pattern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Cheli et al. The ground-dwelling arthropod community of Pennsula Valds in Patagonia, Argentina CiteSeer Summary: This is the first study based on a planned and...

  14. Control and waypoint navigation of an autonomous ground vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, James Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the initial development of the Texas A&M Autonomous Ground Vehicle test platform and waypoint following software, including the associated controller design. The original goal of the team responsible for the development...

  15. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  16. Design for manufacturing analysis on the Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ada (Ada Cheuk Ying)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iRobot is responsible for delivering the Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle (SUGV) as part of the U.S. Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS) initiative. With increasing external competition and pressures, iRobot must deliver an ...

  17. A spatial display for Ground-Penetrating Radar change detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quimby, Paul W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) enables the exploration and mapping of subterranean volumes for applications such as construction, humanitarian demining, archeology, and environmental science. In each of these applications, ...

  18. Ground state energy fluctuations in the Nuclear Shell Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Velazquez; Jorge G. Hirsch; Alejandro Frank; Jose Barea; Andres P. Zuker

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states.

  19. Renewable Energy Opportunties at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Kora, Angela R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Horner, Jacob A.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Nesse, Ronald J.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Dugway Proving Ground, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment.

  20. Ground state hyperfine structure in muonic lithium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Martynenko; A. A. Ulybin

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of perturbation theory in fine structure constant alpha and the ratio of electron to muon masses we calculate one-loop vacuum polarization, electron vertex corrections, nuclear structure and recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting of the ground state in muonic lithium ions $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^6_3Li)^+$ and $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^7_3Li)^+$. We obtain total results for the ground state small hyperfine splittings in $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^6_3Li)^+$ $\\Delta\

  1. Nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete structures subjected to ground motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Moises Alberto

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NONLINEAR BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO GROUND MOTION A Thesis by MOISES ALBERTO ABRAHAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A 5 M U ni vers i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement I...' or the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering NONLINEAR BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO GROUND MOTION A Thesis by MOISES ALBERTO ABRAHAM Approved as to style and content by: James . organ (Chair...

  2. Ground state hyperfine structure in muonic lithium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Martynenko; A. A. Ulybin

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of perturbation theory in fine structure constant alpha and the ratio of electron to muon masses we calculate one-loop vacuum polarization, electron vertex corrections, nuclear structure and recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting of the ground state in muonic lithium ions $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^6_3Li)^+$ and $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^7_3Li)^+$. We obtain total results for the ground state small hyperfine splittings in $(\\mu\\ e\\ ^6_3Li)^+$ $\\Delta\

  3. On the effects of atmospheric refraction on radar ground patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Lalovee Glendale

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    according to size and location of anomalous echoes. Refractivity profiles for SAT, ACF, and LCH are prepared from radiosonde data for selected cases of anomalous propagation. A profile for CLL is estimated, based on surface weather observations taken... about the time of occurrence of nonstandard ground patterns. Correlations are made between the echo patterns, their refrac- tivity profiles, and the terrain, Anomalous ground-return echoes are related directly to topography, except when caused...

  4. Chiral Ground States in a Frustrated Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frustration is an important phenomenon in condensed matter physics because it can introduce a new order parameter such as chirality. Towards understanding a mechanism of the frustration in strongly correlated systems, we study a holographic superconductor model with three scalar fields and an interband Josephson coupling, which is important for the frustration. We analyze free energy of solutions of the model to determine ground states. We find chiral ground states, which have nonzero chirality.

  5. Chiral Ground States in a Frustrated Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuhiro Nishida

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Frustration is an important phenomenon in condensed matter physics because it can introduce a new order parameter such as chirality. Towards understanding a mechanism of the frustration in strongly correlated systems, we study a holographic superconductor model with three scalar fields and an interband Josephson coupling, which is important for the frustration. We analyze free energy of solutions of the model to determine ground states. We find chiral ground states, which have nonzero chirality.

  6. Improved Torsion Pendulum for Ground Testing of LISA Displacement Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new torsion pendulum design for ground testing of prototype LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) displacement sensors. This new design is directly sensitive to net forces and therefore provides a more representative test of the noisy forces and parasitic stiffnesses acting on the test mass as compared to previous ground-based experiments. We also discuss a specific application to the measurement of thermal gradient effects.

  7. A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly, building owners are turning to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems to improve energy efficiency. Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems with a vertical closed ground loop heat exchanger are one of the more widely used systems. Over...

  8. Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report

  9. Application analysis of ground source heat pumps in building space conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Hua

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for ground-source heat pumps. in ASHRAE Summer Meeting.savings of ground source heat pump systems in Europe: Afor ground-source heat pumps: A literature review,

  10. PPPL3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL­3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC­426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium regions during operation and infrared measurement of the surface temperature of the first wall structures

  11. PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PPPL-3301, Preprint: May 1998, UC-426 Design Study of a Visible/Infrared Periscope for Intense projected heating of the reflective optics themselves to several hundred degrees Celsius. Tests of beryllium regions during operation and infrared measurement of the surface temperature of the first wall structures

  12. Self-heating in a GaN based heterostructure field effect transistor: Ultraviolet and visible Raman measurements and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    Self-heating in a GaN based heterostructure field effect transistor: Ultraviolet and visible Raman online 8 December 2006 We report direct self-heating measurements for AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field density can be commensurately high, collisional energy loss from electrons to the crystal leads to self-heating

  13. Design and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification of Specific Proteins in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    for selective enrichment of tag peptides. Another cysteine peptide enrichment and isotope tagging scheme hasDesign and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification spectrometry is most useful when quantitative data is also obtained. We recently introduced isotope

  14. Optical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi-Ho Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    and encoded with audio or data signal. Hence, an LED indicator lamp or traffic light can become an information for incandescent lamps [3,4]. This advancement has led to the production of large- area full-color LED displaysOptical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi

  15. Distribution of unresolvable anisotropic microstructures revealed in visibility-contrast images using x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashiro, Wataru; Harasse, Sebastien; Kawabata, Katsuyuki; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Momose, Atsushi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Talbot interferometry has been widely used as a technique for x-ray phase imaging and tomography. We propose a method using this interferometry for mapping distribution of parameters characterizing anisotropic microstructures, which are typically of the order of {mu}m in size and cannot be resolved by the imaging system, in a sample. The method uses reduction in fringe visibility, which is caused by such unresolvable microstructures, in moire images obtained using an interferometer. We applied the method to a chloroprene rubber sponge sample, which exhibited uniaxial anisotropy of reduced visibility. We measured the dependencies of reduced visibility on both the Talbot order and the orientation of the sample and obtained maps of three parameters and their anisotropies that characterize the unresolvable anisotropic microstructures in the sample. The maps indicated that the anisotropy of the sample's visibility contrast mainly originated from the anisotropy of the microstructure elements' average size. Our method directly provides structural information on unresolvable microstructures in real space, which is only accessible through the ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering measurements in reciprocal space, and is expected to be broadly applied to material, biological, and medical sciences.

  16. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (400­1000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  17. Bringing Visibility to Rural Users in Cote d'Ivoire Mariya Zheleva, Paul Schmitt, Morgan Vigil and Elizabeth Belding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belding-Royer, Elizabeth M.

    from Cote d'Ivoire with an emphasis on understanding how population density impacts the use of cellularBringing Visibility to Rural Users in Cote d'Ivoire Mariya Zheleva, Paul Schmitt, Morgan Vigil a cellular traffic dataset provided by Orange in Cote d'Ivoire with the goal of identifying distinctions

  18. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Department of Radiology, University of Montreal Hospital (CHUM), Quebec H2L 2M1 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Roy, David [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in concordance with the literature for vascular and abdominal tissues. Conclusions: The mimicked abdominal tissues, AAA wall, and surrounding thrombus were developed to match imaging features of in vivo MR, CT, and ultrasound examinations. This phantom should be of value for image calibration, segmentation, and testing of endovascular devices for AAA endovascular repair.

  19. High peak power test of S-band waveguide switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Grelick, A.; Kustom, R.L.; White, M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 2856-MHz S-band electron-positron linear accelerator (linac) which produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. To improve the linac rf system availability, an additional modulator-klystron subsystem is being constructed to provide a switchable hot spare unit for each of the five existing S-band transmitters. The switching of the transmitters will require the use of SF6-pressurized waveguide switches at a peak operating power of 35 MW. A test stand was set up at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron-Microwave laboratory to conduct tests characterizing the power handling capability of these waveguide switches. Test results are presented.

  20. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, G; Pei, S; Xiao, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  1. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Shu; F. Zhao; S. Pei; O. Xiao

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  2. The Broad Band Spectral Energy Distributions of SDSS Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Huaizhen; Jiang, Yunguo; Yi, Tingfeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled the radio, optical, and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broad band spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat-spectral radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacs objects. On the other hand, the broad band spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects (LBLs) objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs) have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme also is revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameter.

  3. Majorana Flat Bands in s-Wave Gapless Topological Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shusa Deng; Gerardo Ortiz; Amrit Poudel; Lorenza Viola

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate how the non-trivial interplay between spin-orbit coupling and nodeless $s$-wave superconductivity can drive a fully gapped two-band topological insulator into a time-reversal invariant gapless topological superconductor supporting symmetry-protected Majorana flat bands. We characterize topological phase diagrams by a ${\\mathbb Z}_2 \\times{\\mathbb Z}_2$ partial Berry-phase invariant, and show that, despite the trivial crystal geometry, no unique bulk-boundary correspondence exists. We trace this behavior to the anisotropic quasiparticle bulk gap closing, linear vs. quadratic, and argue that this provides a unifying principle for gapless topological superconductivity. Experimental implications for tunneling conductance measurements are addressed, relevant for lead chalcogenide materials.

  4. Dissipationless Directed Transport in Rocked Single-Band Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangbin Gong; Dario Poletti; Peter Hanggi

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using matter waves that are trapped in a deep optical lattice, dissipationless directed transport is demonstrated to occur if the single-band quantum dynamics is periodically tilted on one half of the lattice by a monochromatic field. Most importantly, the directed transport can exist for almost all system parameters, even after averaged over a broad range of single-band initial states. The directed transport is theoretically explained within ac-scattering theory. Total reflection phenomena associated with the matter waves travelling from a tilting-free region to a tilted region are emphasized. The results are of relevance to ultracold physics and solid-state physics, and may lead to powerful means of selective, coherent, and directed transport of cold particles in optical lattices.

  5. Chiral CP^2 skyrmions in three-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Garaud; Johan Carlstrom; Egor Babaev; Martin Speight

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that under certain conditions, three-component superconductors (and in particular three-band systems) allow stable topological defects different from vortices. We demonstrate the existence of these excitations, characterized by a $CP^2$ topological invariant, in models for three-component superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry. We term these topological defects "chiral $GL^{(3)}$ skyrmions", where "chiral" refers to the fact that due to broken time reversal symmetry, these defects come in inequivalent left- and right-handed versions. In certain cases these objects are energetically cheaper than vortices and should be induced by an applied magnetic field. In other situations these skyrmions are metastable states, which can be produced by a quench. Observation of these defects can signal broken time reversal symmetry in three-band superconductors or in Josephson-coupled bilayers of $s_\\pm$ and s-wave superconductors.

  6. Utilization of Recently Enhanced Simulation Tools and Empirical Ground Motion Databases to Improve Ground Motion Prediction Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodavirdi, Khatereh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Irikura, H.K. Thio, P.G. Somerville, Y. Fukushima, and Y.Fukushima. “Attenuation relations of strong ground motion incatastrophic damage at the Fukushima nuclear power plant,

  7. Band Tunneling through Double Barrier in Bilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan A. Alshehab; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full four band energy spectrum, we calculate the transmission probability and conductance of electrons across symmetric and asymmetric double potential barrier with a confined interlayer potential difference in bilayer graphene. For energies less than the interlayer coupling \\gamma_{1}, E \\gamma_{1}, we obtain four possible ways for transmission resulting from the two propagating modes. We compute the associated transmission probabilities as well as their contribution to the conductance, study the effect of the double barrier geometry.

  8. TECHNICAL PAPER Micromachined W-band polymeric tunable iris filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    -variable electrical length. Tunable filters with 3.8% tuning range at 20 GHz and a minimum insertion loss of 3.6 dTECHNICAL PAPER Micromachined W-band polymeric tunable iris filter Firas Sammoura · Liwei Lin.79 GHz and a minimum insertion loss of 2.37 dB with return loss better than 15 dB. As a tunable filter

  9. A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, K.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a capital cost comparison of commercial ground source heat pump systems. The study includes groundwater systems, ground-coupled systems and hybrid systems.

  10. Petra Nova Project Breaks Ground on World's Largest Post-Combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Petra Nova Project Breaks Ground on World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Petra Nova Project Breaks Ground on World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture...

  11. SciTech Connect: 2012 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2012 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2012 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based...

  12. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  13. Transport band gap opening at metal–organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidu, Francisc, E-mail: francisc.haidu@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Salvan, Georgeta; Zahn, Dietrich R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Smykalla, Lars; Hietschold, Michael [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Knupfer, Martin [Electronic and Optical Properties Department, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface formation between copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and two representative metal substrates, i.e., Au and Co, was investigated by the combination of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals and thus the transport band gap of CuPc are highly influenced by film thickness, i.e., molecule substrate distance. Due to the image charge potential given by the metallic substrates the transport band gap of CuPc “opens” from (1.4?±?0.3) eV for 1?nm thickness to (2.2?±?0.3) eV, and saturates at this value above 10?nm CuPc thickness. The interface dipoles with values of 1.2?eV and 1.0?eV for Au and Co substrates, respectively, predominantly depend on the metal substrate work functions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements using synchrotron radiation provide detailed information on the interaction between CuPc and the two metal substrates. While charge transfer from the Au or Co substrate to the Cu metal center is present only at sub-monolayer coverages, the authors observe a net charge transfer from the molecule to the Co substrate for films in the nm range. Consequently, the Fermi level is shifted as in the case of a p-type doping of the molecule. This is, however, a competing phenomenon to the energy band shifts due to the image charge potential.

  14. Soot scattering measurements in the visible and near-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHU,JINYU; CHOI,MUN YOUNG; MULHOLLAND,GEORGE W.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering to extinction cross-section ratios, {rho}{sub se} were measured using the NIST Large Agglomerate Optics Facility for soot produced from ethene and acetylene laminar diffusion flames. Measurements were performed using light sources at 543.5 nm, 632.8 nm and 856 nm. The average scattering to extinction cross-section ratios for these wavelengths are equal to 0.246, 0.196, and 0.196 for ethene and 0.316, 0.230, and 0.239 for acetylene. The 856 nm measurements represent the longest wavelength for which accurate scattering measurements have been performed for soot. The size distribution and fractal properties of the two soots were determined to assess the effects of limited acceptance angle range, finite size of the sensor, and departure from cosine response on the uncertainty in the measurement of {rho}{sub se} The expanded relative uncertainty (95% confidence level) was found to be {+-}6% at the two visible wavelengths and {+-}8% at 856 nm. Both the magnitude and wavelength dependence of {rho}{sub se} for the present experiments are significantly different from those reported by Krishnan et al. for overfire soot produced using a turbulent flame. The results are compared with the predictions of fractal optics.

  15. A Multiple-Channel Sub-Band Transient Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Smith

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel sub-band transient detection system to record transient electromagnetic signals in carrier-dominated radio environments; the system has been used to make unique observations of weak, transient HF signals. The detection system has made these observations possible through improved sensitivity compared to conventional broadband transient detection systems; the sensitivity improvement is estimated to be at least 20 dB. The increase in sensitivity has been achieved through subdivision of the band of interest (an 18 MHz tunable bandwidth) into eight sub-band independent detection channels, each with a 400 kHz bandwidth and its own criteria. The system generates a system trigger signal when a predetermined number of channels (typically five) trigger within a predetermined window of time (typically 100 ~s). Events are recorded with a broadband data acquisition system sampling at 50 or 100 Msample/s, so despite the fact that the detection system operates on portions of the signal confined to narrow bands, data acquisition is broadband. Between May and September of 1994, the system was used to detect and record over six thousand transient events in the frequency band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual durations of 2 to 10 ps and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 ps. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events SubIonospheric Pulse Pairs (SIPPS) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPS resemble observations of TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackboard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most of the recorded SIPP events do not exhibit frequency dispersion, implying propagation along a line-of-sight (groundwave) path; but seven of the pairs exhibit dispersion characteristic of skywave propagation via refraction from the ionosphere. The maximum line-of-sight observation range for radio propagation extends as far as 300 km for a source at an altitude of 5 km, and 520 km for a source at 15 km. Refraction from the ionosphere, however, may allow HF radiation to propagate around the globe. Information about the times and locations of sources, in conjunction with regional, weather maps and computer models of ionospheric propagation, suggest that some SIPP events originate in the vicinity of large-scale thunderstorm complexes.

  16. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution.Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  17. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J; Last, George V; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution. Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  18. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  19. Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO Micro-rods. Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO Micro-rods. Abstract: The pressure behavior of...

  20. Evaluation of the Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC at cryogenic temperature using a visible hybrid H2RG focal plane array in 32 channel readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    Evaluation of the Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC at cryogenic temperature using a visible hybrid H2RG focal, Hilo, HI 96720, USA ABSTRACT Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) has developed a new CMOS device known of FPA drive electronics to operate visible and infrared imaging detectors with a fully digital interface

  1. Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er 3+ /Yb 3. 8 (2011) 087804 Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er3 State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA (Received 24 May 2011) An optical temperature

  2. REPRODUCING VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF LUNAR ROCKS DIRECTLY FROM THEIR END-MEMBER SPECTRA: IMPORTANCE OF ILMENITE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    REPRODUCING VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF LUNAR ROCKS DIRECTLY FROM THEIR END as a solid foundation for lunar science and explo- ration. The visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, 15555, 70017, and 70035 have been prepared for analysis. Bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.28- 2.6 µm

  3. Grand Traverse Band Renewable Energy Feasibility Study in Wind, Biomass and Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne McSawby, Project Director

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for wind, biomass, solar on the Grand Traverse Band tribal lands from 2005 - 2008

  4. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  5. Dark resonances for ground state transfer of molecular quantum gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfred J. Mark; Johann G. Danzl; Elmar Haller; Mattias Gustavsson; Nadia Bouloufa; Olivier Dulieu; Houssam Salami; Tom Bergeman; Helmut Ritsch; Russell Hart; Hanns-Christoph Nägerl

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible way to produce ultracold, high-phase-space-density quantum gases of molecules in the rovibronic ground state is given by molecule association from quantum-degenerate atomic gases on a Feshbach resonance and subsequent coherent optical multi-photon transfer into the rovibronic ground state. In ultracold samples of Cs_2 molecules, we observe two-photon dark resonances that connect the intermediate rovibrational level |v=73,J=2> with the rovibrational ground state |v=0,J=0> of the singlet $X^1\\Sigma_g^+$ ground state potential. For precise dark resonance spectroscopy we exploit the fact that it is possible to efficiently populate the level |v=73,J=2> by two-photon transfer from the dissociation threshold with the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique. We find that at least one of the two-photon resonances is sufficiently strong to allow future implementation of coherent STIRAP transfer of a molecular quantum gas to the rovibrational ground state |v=0,J=0>.

  6. Diffuse Interstellar Band at 5850 as a Member of 5797 Spectroscopic Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Bryndal; Bogdan Wszo?ek

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The carriers of diffuse interstellar bands are still mysterious species. There exist many arguments that diffuse bands at 5797 and 5850 angstroms have the same carrier. Using high-resolution spectra of few dozens of reddened stars we have searched mutual correlation between intensities of considered bands. Results of our analysis indicate that 5797 and 5850 really tend to have the same carrier.

  7. The PortevinLe Chatelier (PLC) effect and shear band formation in an AA5754 alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    The Portevin­Le Chatelier (PLC) effect and shear band formation in an AA5754 alloy Herdawandi Halim in order to observe Portevin­Le Chatelier (PLC) band behaviour during tensile deformation of AA5754 sheet and subsequently to measure the level of incre- mental plastic strain carried within the bands. In addition, PLC

  8. Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Matthew J.

    Note Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys MATTHEW J. BUTLER,1,2 Department wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) captured in Texas and Kansas, USA, 2000­2009. We examined 187 recaptured or harvested radiotagged wild turkeys to determine band retention and modeled band

  9. Ground-based near-IR observations of the secondary eclipse of CoRoT-2b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, R; Kabath, P; Rabus, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a ground-based search for the secondary eclipse of the 3.3 Mjup transiting planet CoRoT-2b. We performed near infrared photometry using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope, in the H and K_s filters. We monitored the star around two expected secondary eclipses in two nights under very good observing conditions. For the depth of the secondary eclipse we find in H-band a 3 sigma upper limit of 0.17%, whereas we detected a tentative eclipse with a depth of 0.16+-0.09% in the K_s-band. These depths can be translated into brightness temperatures of T_H<2250 K and T_{K_s} = 1890(+260-350) K, which indicate an inefficient re-distribution of the incident stellar flux from the planet's dayside to its nightside. Our results are in agreement with the CoRoT optical measurement (Alonso et al. 09) and with Spitzer 4.5 and 8 micron results (Gillon et al. 09c).

  10. Sideband Cooling Micromechanical Motion to the Quantum Ground State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teufel, J D; Li, Dale; Harlow, J H; Allman, M S; Cicak, K; Sirois, A J; Whittaker, J D; Lehnert, K W; Simmonds, R W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of laser cooling techniques revolutionized the study of many atomic-scale systems. This has fueled progress towards quantum computers by preparing trapped ions in their motional ground state, and generating new states of matter by achieving Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic vapors. Analogous cooling techniques provide a general and flexible method for preparing macroscopic objects in their motional ground state, bringing the powerful technology of micromechanics into the quantum regime. Cavity opto- or electro-mechanical systems achieve sideband cooling through the strong interaction between light and motion. However, entering the quantum regime, less than a single quantum of motion, has been elusive because sideband cooling has not sufficiently overwhelmed the coupling of mechanical systems to their hot environments. Here, we demonstrate sideband cooling of the motion of a micromechanical oscillator to the quantum ground state. Entering the quantum regime requires a large electromechanical inte...

  11. Ground-State Electromagnetic Moments of Calcium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, R F Garcia; Blaum, K; Frommgen, N; Hammen, M; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Menendez, J; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nortershauser, W; Nowacki, F; Papuga, J; Poves, A; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Yordanov, D T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy was used to measure the optical hyperfine spectra of the $^{43-51}$Ca isotopes. The ground state magnetic moments of $^{49,51}$Ca and quadrupole moments of $^{47,49,51}$Ca were measured for the first time, and the $^{51}$Ca ground state spin $I=3/2$ was determined in a model-independent way. Our results provide a critical test of modern nuclear theories based on shell-model calculations using phenomenological as well as microscopic interactions. The results for the neutron-rich isotopes are in excellent agreement with predictions using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon forces, while lighter isotopes illustrate the presence of particle-hole excitations of the $^{40}$Ca core in their ground state.

  12. 618-10 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendling, M.

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 11 through February 17 and March 30, 1993 over the 618-10 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-10 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-10 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil.

  13. 618-11 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 4 through February 10, 1993 over the 618-11 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-11 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-11 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil.

  14. Ground-State Electromagnetic Moments of Calcium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Garcia Ruiz; M. L. Bissell; K. Blaum; N. Frommgen; M. Hammen; J. D. Holt; M. Kowalska; K. Kreim; J. Menendez; R. Neugart; G. Neyens; W. Nortershauser; F. Nowacki; J. Papuga; A. Poves; A. Schwenk; J. Simonis; D. T. Yordanov

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy was used to measure the optical hyperfine spectra of the $^{43-51}$Ca isotopes. The ground state magnetic moments of $^{49,51}$Ca and quadrupole moments of $^{47,49,51}$Ca were measured for the first time, and the $^{51}$Ca ground state spin $I=3/2$ was determined in a model-independent way. Our results provide a critical test of modern nuclear theories based on shell-model calculations using phenomenological as well as microscopic interactions. The results for the neutron-rich isotopes are in excellent agreement with predictions using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon forces, while lighter isotopes illustrate the presence of particle-hole excitations of the $^{40}$Ca core in their ground state.

  15. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} and GaP{sub 1-x}N{sub x} with x {approx}< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also occurs between localized states and the valence band states. Soft x-ray fluorescence experiments provide direct evidence of the BAC interaction in these systems. In the final chapter of the thesis, I describe and summarize my studies of optical properties of wurtzite InN and related alloys. Early studies performed on InN films grown by sputtering techniques suggested a direct bandgap of {approx}1.9 eV for this semiconductor. Very recently, high-quality InN films with much higher mobility have become available by using the molecular beam epitaxy growth method. Optical experiments carried out on these samples reveal a narrow bandgap for InN of 0.77 eV, much lower than the previously accepted value. Optical properties of InGaN and InAlN ternaries on the In rich side have also been characterized and are found to be consistent with the narrow bandgap of InN. The bandgap bowing parameters in these alloys were determined. In the context of these findings, the bandgap energies of InGaN and InAlN were found to cover a wide spectral range from the infrared for InN to the ultraviolet for GaN and deep ultraviolet for AlN. The significance of this work is rooted in many important applications of nitride semiconductors in optoelectronics and solar energy conversion devices.

  16. History and Evolution of Control Banding: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Nelson, D

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents often encountered in the workplace. The original CB model was developed within the pharmaceutical industry; however, the modern movement involves models developed for non-experts to input hazard and exposure potential information for bulk chemical processes, receiving control advice as a result. The CB approach utilizes these models for the dissemination of qualitative and semi-quantitative risk assessment tools being developed to complement the traditional industrial hygiene model of air sampling and analysis. It is being applied and tested in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) within developed countries and industrially developing countries; however, large enterprises (LEs) have also incorporated these strategies within chemical safety programs. Existing research of the components of the most available CB model, the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials, has shown that exposure bands do not always provide adequate margins of safety, that there is a high rate of under-control errors, that it works better with dusts than with vapors, that there is an inherent inaccuracy in estimating variability, and that when taken together the outcomes of this model may lead to potentially inappropriate workplace confidence in chemical exposure reduction in some operations. Alternatively, large-scale comparisons of industry exposure data to this CB model's outcomes have indicated more promising results with a high correlation seen internationally. With the accuracy of the toxicological ratings and hazard band classification currently in question, their proper reevaluation will be of great benefit to the reliability of existing and future CB models. The need for a more complete analysis of CB model components and, most importantly, a more comprehensive prospective research process remains and will be important in understanding implications of the model's overall effectiveness. Since the CB approach is now being used worldwide with an even broader implementation in progress, further research toward understanding its strengths and weaknesses will assist in its further refinement and confidence in its ongoing utility.

  17. ZnO/Sn:In2O3 and ZnO/CdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . Abstract: Band...

  18. Ground-level ozone in the 21st century: future trends,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground-level ozone in the 21st century: future trends, impacts and policy implications October 2008. Courtesy of Dr Mhairi Coyle, CEH Edinburgh. #12;Ground-level ozone in the 21st century: future trends Limited #12;Ground-level ozone in the 21st century I October 2008 I iiiThe Royal Society Ground

  19. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Isidoro E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  20. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.