Sample records for ground detectors deployed

  1. Progress Towards Deployable Antineutrino Detectors for Reactor Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Keefer, G; Reyna, D; Cabrera-Palmer, B; Kiff, S

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission reactors emit large numbers of antineutrinos and this flux may be useful for the measurement of two quantities of interest for reactor safeguards: the reactor's power and plutonium inventory throughout its cycle. The high antineutrino flux and relatively low background rates means that simple cubic meter scale detectors at tens of meters standoff can record hundreds or thousands of antineutrino events per day. Such antineutrino detectors would add online, quasi-real-time bulk material accountancy to the set of reactor monitoring tools available to the IAEA and other safeguards agencies with minimal impact on reactor operations. Between 2003 and 2008, our LLNL/SNL collaboration successfully deployed several prototype safeguards detectors at a commercial reactor in order to test both the method and the practicality of its implementation in the field. Partially on the strength of the results obtained from these deployments, an Experts Meeting was convened by the IAEA Novel Technologies Group in 2008 to assess current antineutrino detection technology and examine how it might be incorporated into the safeguards regime. Here we present a summary of our previous deployments and discuss current work that seeks to provide expanded capabilities suggested by the Experts Panel, in particular aboveground detector operation.

  2. Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

  3. Advances Towards Readily Deployable Antineutrino Detectors for Reactor Monitoring and Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N S; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Lund, J; Reyna, D; Sadler, L; Svoboda, R

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our LLNL/SNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial PWR. With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. Recently, we have investigated several technology paths that could allow such devices to be more readily deployed in the field. In particular, we have developed and fielded two new detectors; a low cost, non- flammable water based design; and a robust solid-state design based upon plastic scintillator. Here we will describe the tradeoffs inherent in these designs, and present results from their field deployments.

  4. Technical Feasibility Study for Deployment of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems: Portsmouth Naval Shipyard -- Kittery, Maine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNSY) is a United States Navy facility located on a series of conjoined islands in the Piscataqua River between Kittery, ME and Portsmouth, NH. EPA engaged NREL to conduct a study to determine technical feasibility of deploying ground-source heat pump systems to help PNSY achieve energy reduction goals.

  5. Synergy between ground and space based gravitational wave detectors for estimation of binary coalescence parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Remya; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the advantage of the co-existence of future ground and space based gravitational wave detectors, in estimating the parameters of a binary coalescence. Using the post-Newtonian waveform for the inspiral of non-spinning neutron star-black hole pairs in circular orbits, we study how the estimates for chirp mass, symmetric mass ratio, and time and phase at coalescence are improved by combining the data from different space-ground detector pairs. Since the gravitational waves produced by binary coalescence also provide a suitable domain where we can study strong field gravity, we also study the deviations from general relativity using the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework. As an example, focusing on the Einstein telescope and DECIGO pair, we demonstrate that there exists a sweet spot range of sensitivity in the pre-DECIGO phase where the best enhancement due to the synergy effect can be obtained for the estimates of the post-Newtonian waveform parameters as well as the modification parameters to ge...

  6. Detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  7. Deployable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández Merchan, Carlos Henrique

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has the purpose of describing the meaning and applications of deployable structures (making emphasis in the scissor-hinged and sliding mechanisms.) and the development of new geometries, details, and mechanisms ...

  8. Non-Destructive Measurements of the Characteristics of Radioactive Contamination of Near Surface Layers of Concrete and Ground with Collimated Spectrometric Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potapov, V.N.; Danilovich, A.S.; Ignatov, S.M.; Volkovich, A.G.; Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Volkov, V.G. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, 1 Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remote radiometric method for estimation of the characteristics of concrete and ground contamination by gamma nuclides was investigated. The studies were carried out for possible realization of a method with two types of spectrometric detectors: 1) scintillator + PMT and 2) scintillator + photo diode. The measurements of Cs-137 contamination were considered, as most widespread gamma-contaminant. The mathematical model of the radiometric device was developed for studying of a method, optimization of device's parameters and search of all dependences necessary for method realization. The collimated radiometer with volume of the detector 20 cm{sup 3} has the limiting sensitivity - MMA = 0.5 {mu}Ci/m{sup 2} (19 kBq/m{sup 2}) at thickness of contaminated concrete layer 5 cm. The method can be realized for measurement of contamination of concrete and ground by other gamma radiating nuclides also. (authors)

  9. Deployment of Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the FUPWG Deployment of Emerging Technologies. Presented by Brad Gustafson, Department of Energy, held on November 1, 2006.

  10. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment and Alignment Central Station Antenna Crew Deployment Description Leveling, Alignment, and Pointing Radioisotope

  11. Technology Deployment List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Technology Deployment Technology Deployment List Technology Deployment List The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Technology Deployment List features...

  12. Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

  13. Sensitivity Comparison of Searches for Binary Black Hole Coalescences with Ground-based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satya Mohapatra; Laura Cadonati; Sarah Caudill; James Clark; Chad Hanna; Sergey Klimenko; Chris Pankow; Ruslan Vaulin; Gabriele Vedovato; Salvatore Vitale

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for gravitational-wave transients from binary black hole coalescences typically rely on one of two approaches: matched filtering with templates and morphology-independent excess power searches. Multiple algorithmic implementations in the analysis of data from the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave interferometers have used different strategies for the suppression of non-Gaussian noise transients, and targeted different regions of the binary black hole parameter space. In this paper we compare the sensitivity of three such algorithms: matched filtering with full coalescence templates, matched filtering with ringdown templates and a morphology-independent excess power search. The comparison is performed at a fixed false alarm rate and relies on Monte-carlo simulations of binary black hole coalescences for spinning, non-precessing systems with total mass 25-350 solar mass, which covers the parameter space of stellar mass and intermediate mass black hole binaries. We find that in the mass range of 25 -100 solar mass the sensitive distance of the search, marginalized over source parameters, is best with matched filtering to full waveform templates, to within 10 percent at a false alarm rate of 3 events per year. In the mass range of 100-350 solar mass, the same comparison favors the morphology-independent excess power search to within 20 percent. The dependence on mass and spin is also explored.

  14. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  15. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  16. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  17. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  18. NREL: Technology Deployment - Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCostBuildingModels andProjectDeployment

  19. Technology Deployment List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Deployment List Technology Deployment List Spreadsheet details new and underutilized technologies ranked for Federal deployment by the Federal Energy Management Program....

  20. WINDExchange: Deployment Activities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout Printable Version BookmarkDeployment

  1. In-Ground Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2006-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically oriented radiation detectors may not provide sufficient screening in rail or aviation applications. Railcars can be heavily shielded on the sides, reducing the sensitivity of vertically mounted monitors. For aviation, the distance required for wingspan clearance reduces a vertical detector’s coverage of the fuselage. To surmount these, and other, challenging operational and sensitivity issues, we have investigated the use of in-ground radiation detectors. (PIET-43741-TM-605).

  2. Economics of ALMR deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  3. Accelerating Combined Heat & Power Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reduced electric grid congestion Pollution reduction Most institutionalregulatorybusiness models do not incentivize CHP deployment in a manner that helps optimize energy...

  4. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyna, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lund, J.; Kiff, S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Keefer, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino detectors that were deployed. Finally, some preliminary results of our aboveground test will be shown. (authors)

  5. Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Statistics Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Statistics Database Oak Ridge National Laboratory direction. In addition, through the ITS Deployment Tracking web site, the database supports other users in 2010. Users can also download the entire 2010 deployment tracking database through the website

  6. Deploying Emerging Technologies in ESPC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses emerging technologies and how to deploy them using an energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  7. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars Community Renewable Energy Deployment Webinars Watch these previously recorded webinars to learn about successful community renewable...

  8. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy...

  9. Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 The United...

  10. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  11. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  12. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  13. School Cosmic Ray Outreach Detector (SCROD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Anchordoqui; J. Cook; M. Gabour; N. Kirsch; J. MacLeod; T. P. McCauley; Y. Musienko; T. C. Paul; S. Reucroft; J. D. Swain; R. Terry

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our studies of applying novel detector technologies developed for LHC-era experiments to cosmic ray detection. In particular, we are investigating usage of scintillating tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers and avalanche photodiode readout as part of a robust, inexpensive cosmic air shower detector. In the near future, we are planning to deploy detector stations based on this technology at area high schools and colleges as part of an outreach and education effort, known as SCROD.

  14. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  15. NREL: Technology Deployment - Solar Deployment and Market Transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCostBuildingModels andProjectDeployment and

  16. Deploying

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3

  17. Request for Information: Demonstration and Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regarding bioenergy technology validation to accelerate the deployment of advanced biofuel, bioproducts, and biopower technologies. BETO is specifically interested in...

  18. Nuclear Power - Deployment, Operation and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tsvetkov p. cm. ISBN 978-953-307-474-0 free online editions of InTech Books and Journals can be found at www.intechopen.com Contents Preface IX Part 1 Nuclear Power Deployment 1 Chapter 1 Nuclear Naval Propulsion 3 Magdi... to successful development, deployment and operation of nuclear power systems worldwide: Nuclear Power Deployment 1. Nuclear Naval Propulsion 2. Deployment Scenarios for New Technologies 3. The Investment Evaluation of Third-Generation Nuclear Power - from...

  19. Optimal Deployment of Impromptu Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    Optimal Deployment of Impromptu Wireless Sensor Networks Prasenjit Mondal, K. P. Naveen and Anurag to deploy sensors (such as motion sensors, or even imaging sensors) and a wireless interconnection network an impromptu deploy- ment of a wireless sensor network in a building. Fig. 2. Problem studied in this paper

  20. antares detector sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Escoffier, S 2007-01-01 9 Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the ANTARES detector CERN Preprints Summary: ANTARES is a submarine neutrino telescope deployed in the...

  1. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  2. Passive Neutron Non-Destructive Assay for Remediation of Radiological Waste at Hanford Burial Grounds- 13189

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.; Pitts, M. [Pajarito Scientific Corporation, 2976 Rodeo Park Drive East, Santa Fe, NM 87505 (United States)] [Pajarito Scientific Corporation, 2976 Rodeo Park Drive East, Santa Fe, NM 87505 (United States); Ludowise, J.D.; Valentinelli, P. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Grando, C.J. [ELR Consulting, Inc., 15247 Wilbur Rd., La Conner, WA 98257 (United States)] [ELR Consulting, Inc., 15247 Wilbur Rd., La Conner, WA 98257 (United States); Haggard, D.L. [WorleyParsons Polestar, 601 Williams Blvd., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [WorleyParsons Polestar, 601 Williams Blvd., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford burial grounds contains a broad spectrum of low activity radioactive wastes, transuranic (TRU) wastes, and hazardous wastes including fission products, byproduct material (thorium and uranium), plutonium and laboratory chemicals. A passive neutron non-destructive assay technique has been developed for characterization of shielded concreted drums exhumed from the burial grounds. This method facilitates the separation of low activity radiological waste containers from TRU waste containers exhumed from the burial grounds. Two identical total neutron counting systems have been deployed, each consisting of He-3 detectors surrounded by a polyethylene moderator. The counts are processed through a statistical filter that removes outliers in order to suppress cosmic spallation events and electronic noise. Upon completion of processing, a 'GO / NO GO' signal is provided to the operator based on a threshold level equivalent to 0.5 grams of weapons grade plutonium in the container being evaluated. This approach allows instantaneous decisions to be made on how to proceed with the waste. The counting systems have been set up using initial on-site measurements (neutron emitting standards loaded into surrogate waste containers) combined with Monte Carlo modeling techniques. The benefit of this approach is to allow the systems to extend their measurement ranges, in terms of applicable matrix types and container sizes, with minimal interruption to the operations at the burial grounds. (authors)

  3. Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment Overview - 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office's Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs....

  4. Featured Publications on Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information on the analysis and technical assistance conducted through the integrated deployment effort to help various locations around the world address specific energy challenges. Includes case...

  5. Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia AgencyCompany Organization: Natural...

  6. High Penetration Solar Deployment Funding Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the High Penetration Solar Deployment program, DOE is funding solar projects that are accelerating the placement of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems into existing and newly designed...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: increase PV deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PV deployment ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: high PV deployment level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deployment level ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid...

  9. Buildings Technologies Deployment | Clean energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are successfully deployed to the fullest extent possible. ORNL helps optimize the energy performance of buildings and industrial processes by moving technologies to full use...

  10. Hydraulic Hybrid Parcel Delivery Truck Deployment, Testing & Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallo, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although hydraulic hybrid systems have shown promise over the last few years, commercial deployment of these systems has primarily been limited to Class 8 refuse trucks. In 2005, the Hybrid Truck Users Forum initiated the Parcel Delivery Working Group including the largest parcel delivery fleets in North America. The goal of the working group was to evaluate and accelerate commercialization of hydraulic hybrid technology for parcel delivery vehicles. FedEx Ground, Purolator and United Parcel Service (UPS) took delivery of the world’s first commercially available hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery trucks in early 2012. The vehicle chassis includes a Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid drive system, integrated and assembled by Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., with a body installed by Morgan Olson. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, CALSTART and its project partners assessed the performance, reliability, maintainability and fleet acceptance of three pre-production Class 6 hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery vehicles using information and data from in-use data collection and on-road testing. This document reports on the deployment of these vehicles operated by FedEx Ground, Purolator and UPS. The results presented provide a comprehensive overview of the performance of commercial hydraulic hybrid vehicles in parcel delivery applications. This project also informs fleets and manufacturers on the overall performance of hydraulic hybrid vehicles, provides insights on how the technology can be both improved and more effectively used. The key findings and recommendations of this project fall into four major categories: ? Performance, ? Fleet deployment, ? Maintenance, ? Business case. Hydraulic hybrid technology is relatively new to the market, as commercial vehicles have been introduced only in the past few years in refuse and parcel delivery applications. Successful demonstration could pave the way for additional purchases of hydraulic hybrid vehicles throughout the trucking industry. By providing unbiased, third-party assessment of this “hybrid without batteries” technology, this report offers relevant, timely and valuable information to the industry.

  11. PMU Deployment for Optimal State Estimation Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Sumit

    the observability of candidate deployments at each step and improves the convergence speed of the search. In [5PMU Deployment for Optimal State Estimation Performance Yue Yang, Student Member IEEE, and Sumit electronic devices (IED), that sense the grid state variables so as to support enhanced, real-time monitoring

  12. DEPLOYING TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS FOR CHARACTERIZING THE VADOSE ZONE IN SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBERLEIN SJ; SYDNOR HA; DA MYERS

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As much as one million gallons of waste is believed to have leaked from tanks, pipelines or other equipment in the single-shell tank farm waste management areas (WMAs) within the 200 East and West areas of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although some contamination has reached groundwater, most contamination still resides in the vadose zone. The magnitude ofthis problem requires new approaches for soil characterization if we are to understand the nature and extent of the contamination and take action to protect the enviromnent. Because of the complexity and expense of drilling traditional boreholes in contaminated soil, direct push characterization using a hydraulic hammer has been extensively employed. Direct push probe holes <3-inch diameter have been pushed to a maximum depth of 240 feet below ground surface in 200 East area. Previously gross gamma and moisture logging of these narrow probe holes was perfonned to identify the location of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) (which has limited mobility in Hanford soil) and moisture peaks. Recently a bismuth germinate detector has been deployed for detecting and quantifying the spectrum of cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co) (a more mobile contaminant), which provides additional information. The direct push system is configured to allow the collection ofmultiple soil core samples throughout the depth ofthe probe hole. The direct push unit has been used to place individual electrodes at a variety of depths as the probe hole is being decommissioned. These deep electrodes enable the use of soil resistivity measurement methods between surface and deep electrodes as-well-as between sets of deep electrodes. Initial testing of surface-to-deep electrode resistivity measurements in WMA C demonstrated significant improvement in defining the three dimensional extent of a contamination plume. A multiple-electrode string is presently being developed to further enhance the resolution of resistivity data. The combined use of direct push logging/sampling and soil resistivity measurement allows more extensive characterization of the large tank farm WMAs with less cost and time commitment than required by traditional methods. An additional tool is in the laboratory testing stage to support these investigations. A beta detection tool is being evaluated to determine if it might be deployed with the direct push unit to identify technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) contamination. {sup 99}Tc is a mobile, long-lived contaminant that is the major risk driver from tank waste contamination. A screening tool to locate {sup 99}Tc contamination is anticipated to further increase the cost-effectiveness ofvadose zone characterization efforts.

  13. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Analysis of deployable strut roof structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Maxwell H. (Maxwell Henry)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployable structures are structures that can change shape from a compact to an expanded form. Thus, their advantage over conventional structures is adaptability, whether in the sense of adapting to changing environmental ...

  15. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  16. Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process Control Networks Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process Control Networks In recent years,...

  17. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 This report...

  18. Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid...

  19. A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic Energy Deployment System Chris Marnay a , Michael Stadler a, b , SamStochastic Energy Deployment System 1 Chris Marnay a) , Michael Stadler a),b) , Sam

  20. Electric Vehicle Deployment: Policy Questions and Impacts to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vehicle Deployment: Policy Questions and Impacts to the U.S. Electric Grid - EAC Recommendations (November 2011) Electric Vehicle Deployment: Policy Questions and Impacts to the...

  1. Energy Department Selects 11 Tribal Communities to Deploy Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Selects 11 Tribal Communities to Deploy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies Energy Department Selects 11 Tribal Communities to Deploy Energy Efficiency and...

  2. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest...

  3. New DOE-NASCAR Partnership Revs Deployment of Pollution Reducing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New DOE-NASCAR Partnership Revs Deployment of Pollution Reducing Technologies New DOE-NASCAR Partnership Revs Deployment of Pollution Reducing Technologies September 11, 2013 -...

  4. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues This presentation by...

  5. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment on Public Property by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment on Public Property by State and Local Governments Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment on Public Property by State and Local...

  6. Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Federal Technology Deployment Pilot: Exterior Solid State Lighting Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal...

  7. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM); Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos, NM); Atencio, Leroy G. (Espanola, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  8. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  9. Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA); November 2011 Composite Data Products - Deployment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is about the Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA). November 2011 Composite Data Products - Deployment November 30, 2011.

  10. Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA); Quarter 1 2012 Composite Data Products - Deployment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is about the Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA). Quarter 1 2012 Composite Data Products - Deployment March 8, 2012.

  11. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  12. Data fusion with distributed mobile detectors in a highly variable background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, K. Mani

    -area radiation detection system to evaluate data fusion algorithms for distributed radiation detectors. Our deployment and operation. These are the characteristics that make radiation detection with high sensitivity Material Radiation detection systems, including radiation portal monitors and nonintrusive inspection

  13. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  14. Status of the AMANDA South Pole Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial deployment of optical modules near 1 and 2 kilometer depth indicate that deep polar ice is the most transparent known natural solid. Experience with early data has revealed that a detector, conceived to measure muons tracks, can also measure energy of high energy neutrinos as well as bursts of MeV neutrinos, e.g. produced by supernovae and gamma ray bursts. We plan to complete AMANDA this austral summer to form a detector of 11 deep strings instrumented over 400 meters height with 300 optical modules. We will argue that ice is the ideal medium to deploy a future kilometer-scale detector and discuss the first deployment of 10 strings of kilometer length.

  15. Deploying Darter A Cray XC30 System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, Mark R [ORNL] [ORNL; Budiardja, Reuben D [ORNL] [ORNL; Crosby, Lonnie D [ORNL] [ORNL; McNally, Stephen T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TheUniversityofTennessee,KnoxvilleacquiredaCrayXC30 supercomputer, called Darter, with a peak performance of 248.9 Ter- aflops. Darter was deployed in late March of 2013 with a very aggressive production timeline - the system was deployed, accepted, and placed into production in only 2 weeks. The Spring Experiment for the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) largely drove the accelerated timeline, as the experiment was scheduled to start in mid-April. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) project also needed access and was able to meet their tight deadlines on the newly acquired XC30. Darter s accelerated deployment and op- erations schedule resulted in substantial scientific impacts within the re- search community as well as immediate real-world impacts such as early severe tornado warnings

  16. Reliable Process for Security Policy Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preda, Stere; Cuppens, Frederic; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin; Toutain, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We focus in this paper on the problem of configuring and managing network security devices, such as Firewalls, Virtual Private Network (VPN) tunnels, and Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs). Our proposal is the following. First, we formally specify the security requirements of a given system by using an expressive access control model. As a result, we obtain an abstract security policy, which is free of ambiguities, redundancies or unnecessary details. Second, we deploy such an abstract policy through a set of automatic compilations into the security devices of the system. This proposed deployment process not only simplifies the security administrator's job, but also guarantees a resulting configuration free of anomalies and/or inconsistencies.

  17. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Tritium Technology Deployments Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFee, J.; Blauvelt, D.; Stallings, E.; Willms, S.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the organization, planning and initial implementation of a DOE OST program to deploy proven, cost effective technologies into D&D programs throughout the complex. The primary intent is to accelerate closure of the projects thereby saving considerable funds and at the same time being protective of worker health and the environment. Most of the technologies in the ''toolkit'' for this program have been demonstrated at a DOE site as part of a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP). The Mound Tritium D&D LSDDP served as the base program for the technologies being deployed in this project but other LSDDP demonstrated technologies or ready-for-use commercial technologies will also be considered. The project team will evaluate needs provided by site D&D project managers, match technologies against those needs and rank deployments using a criteria listing. After selecting deployments the project will purchase the equipment and provide a deployment engineer to facilitate the technology implementation. Other cost associated with the use of the technology will be borne by the site including operating staff, safety and health reviews etc. A cost and performance report will be prepared following the deployment to document the results.

  19. Optimal Deployment of Large Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toumpis, Stavros

    1 Optimal Deployment of Large Wireless Sensor Networks S. Toumpis, Member, IEEE, and Leandros, Sensor networks. I. INTRODUCTION A. Wireless Sensor Networks Wireless sensor networks are comprised of sensors that are equipped with wireless transceivers and so are able to form a wireless network [3

  20. Programming, Composing, Deploying for the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Programming, Composing, Deploying for the Grid Laurent Baduel, Fran¸coise Baude, Denis Caromel FirstName.LastName@sophia.inria.fr Abstract. Grids raise new challenges in the following way: heterogene objects and components. We especially target Grid computing, but our approach also applies to application

  1. Microwave detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meldner, Heiner W. (Moss Beach, CA); Cusson, Ronald Y. (Chapel Hill, NC); Johnson, Ray M. (San Ramon, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  2. Microwave detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  3. BF3 Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world; thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and detection capabilities are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the efficiency of BF3 tubes at a pressure of 800 torr. These measurements were made partially to validate models of the RPM system that have been modified to simulate the performance of BF3-filled tubes. While BF3 could be a potential replacement for 3He, there are limitations to its use in deployed systems.

  4. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  5. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

  6. Ground Control | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground Control Ground Control Released: April 22, 2015 EMSL scientists develop new methods to dig deeper into soil organic matter International Year of the Soils Under our feet...

  7. ARM - News From the Azores Deployement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMF Deployment,

  8. Neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephan, Andrew C. (Knoxville, TN); Jardret; Vincent D. (Powell, TN)

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  9. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  10. Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research www Photovoltaics Environmental Research Center Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;2 Source: PV Market Outlook

  11. Growth in metals production for rapid photovoltaics deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavlak, Goksin

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. We quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of annual metals production. If a ...

  12. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Record 13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) This record from the...

  13. World's First Fuel Cell Cargo Trucks Deployed at Memphis International...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World's First Fuel Cell Cargo Trucks Deployed at Memphis International Airport World's First Fuel Cell Cargo Trucks Deployed at Memphis International Airport June 25, 2015 - 1:57pm...

  14. Dynamic instabilities imparted by CubeSat deployable solar panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Eric David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, multibody dynamics simulation was used to investigate the effects of solar panel deployment on CubeSat attitude dynamics. Nominal and partial/asymmetric deployments were simulated for four different solar ...

  15. Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am...

  16. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009: Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) This program record from the U.S....

  17. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14010: Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14010: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks This program record from the U.S....

  18. Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Invests Over 7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean Energy Projects Energy Department Invests Over 7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean Energy Projects November 14, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis...

  19. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  20. Renewables and CHP Deployment in the UK January 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Renewables and CHP Deployment in the UK to 2020 Jim Watson January 2002 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 21 #12;Renewables and CHP Deployment in the UK to 2020 Jim Watson Energy....................................................................................................6 3. The Deployment of Renewables and CHP to 2020

  1. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  2. Ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  3. A Cherenkov Detector for Monitoring ATLAS Luminosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbrizzi, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) is the monitor of the luminosity delivered by the LHC accelerator to the ATLAS experiment. The detector is made of two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. Each arm consists of an aluminum vessel containing 20 tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, and a Cherenkov gaseous radiator (C4F10) at about 1.1 bar absolute. The light generated by charged particles above the Cherenkov threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. Thanks to an intrinsically fast response and to its custom readout electronics, LUCID estimates the number of interactions per LHC bunch crossing and provides an interaction trigger to the ATLAS experiment. The relevant details of the detector design and the expexted performance based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, together with the first results obtained with pp collisions produced by LHC.

  4. ARM - News : AMF Deployment, Shouxian, China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMF Deployment, Shouxian, China

  5. ARM - News from the Cape Cod Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMF Deployment,Media ContactNews

  6. ARM - News from the Gan Island Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMF Deployment,Media

  7. Property:DeploymentSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump to:DeploymentSector Jump to: navigation,

  8. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  9. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  10. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  11. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution.Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  12. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J; Last, George V; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution. Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  13. Design of a Helicopter Deployable Ground Robotic System for Hazardous Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochersberger, Kevin

    /terrain interaction model to compute the cost of path traversal. In the CONOPS, the terrain model is generated real

  14. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  15. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  16. Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients: 8 ounces egg noodles, uncooked 1 pound ground turkey 1 onion. Meanwhile, brown ground turkey and onions in non stick skillet until meat is no longer pink and onions cup of egg noodles on plate, top with 1/2 cup of turkey mixture. Equipment: Knife Cutting board

  17. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of automated fault de4tection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction, and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: 1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, 2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and 3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations.

  18. SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS - AN INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulding, F.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    infrinfc primely owned dtfiw. SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS - ANi) LBL-7282 I. History Semiconductor detectors appeared onof alpha particles by semiconductor diodes several years

  19. Strategies to Finance Large-Scale Deployment of Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strategies to Finance Large-Scale Deployment of Renewable Energy Projects: An Economic Development and Infrastructure Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

  20. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SRC Woody Crop Header Re-direct Destination: Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short...

  1. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Andrew Held, Senior Director of Feedstock Development, Virent, Inc.

  2. ARM - AMF Deployment, Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Deployment Operations Baseline Instruments and Data Plots at the Archive Science Plan (PDF, 1.7MB) Horizon Spirit: Tracking the Transit Experiment Planning MAGIC Full...

  3. Evaluation of Imagers in a Biological Sensing Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    monitoring sensors, and solar panel. Main componentsTherefore, we have utilized solar panels to power the entiresensors - Battery - Solar panel Node Deployment Wireless/

  4. An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation,...

  5. Nationwide: Slashing Red Tape To Speed Solar Deployment for Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Slashing Red Tape To Speed Solar Deployment for Homes and Businesses While solar panels, inverters and other hardware are more affordable than ever before (the average cost of...

  6. Evaluation of Stationary Fuel Cell Deployments, Costs, and Fuels (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.; Saur, G.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes NREL's technology validation of stationary fuel cell systems and presents data on number of deployments, system costs, and fuel types.

  7. DOE Report Describes Progress in the Deployment of Synchrophasor...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report Describes Progress in the Deployment of Synchrophasor Technologies for Improved Grid Operations Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  8. Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative U.S. Department of Energy...

  9. Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANL-1309 Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for Backup Power under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Systems Division About Argonne National...

  10. Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" RejectionRecycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Geothermal Project Jump to:...

  11. Polynomial continuation in the design of deployable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viquerat, Andrew David

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    (De Focatiis & Guest, 2002). Some of the most interesting applications are to be found in satellite design, in which deployable booms, masts, antennae, radars and solar arrays are commonplace. These deployable structures are launched in the stowed... -Gru??bler-Kutzbach criterion. An example of the deployment of such an overconstrained mechanism is given in Figure 1.7. De- ployable frames have been proposed for use in space applications (Chen & You, 2006a,b) (in particular panel and antenna deployment (Pellegrino et al...

  12. Evaluation of Imagers in a Biological Sensing Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Therefore, we have utilized solar panels to power the entiremonitoring sensors, and solar panel. Main componentssensors - Battery - Solar panel Node Deployment Wireless/

  13. Credit Enhancements and Capital Markets to Fund Solar Deployment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Credit Enhancements and Capital Markets to Fund Solar Deployment: Leveraging Public Funds to Open Private Sector Investment Michael Mendelsohn and Marley Urdanick National...

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14010 ? Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 (Rev. 1) Date: 08122014 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks Originators: Pete Devlin, Kristian Kiuru Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: 08...

  15. Cooking with Ground Pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    to thaw. Even when cooked, pork that has been thawed at room temperature can make you sick. Cooking ground pork safely For dishes that contain ground pork, cook the pork before mixing it with other ingredients. How to store cooked ground pork Leftover... dishes made with ground pork should be stored in a covered dish in the refrigerator right away to prevent spoilage. Use it within 3 days. Reheat foods with ground pork until they are steaming hot, bubbling, or at 165 degrees. Other uses Use cooked...

  16. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  17. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2014 December

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George K. Arterburn

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of key Technology Deployment activities and achievements for 2014, including intellectual property, granted copyrights, royalties, license agreements, CRADAs, WFOs and Technology-Based Economic Development. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In our multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational instiutitons throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Deployment. However, the accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  18. Robustness improvement of polyhedral mesh method for airbag deployment simulations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Robustness improvement of polyhedral mesh method for airbag deployment simulations. TU Delft to simulate the deployment of airbags. The solution is approximated using Euler's equations d dt qd + S (q the boundary of the object immersed in the flow, the airbag. The geometry of the airbag is preserved

  19. Strictly Localized Sensor Self-Deployment for Optimal Focused Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    resume. We prove that they both yield a connected network with maximized hole-free area coverage. To our on convergence time, energy consumption, and node collision. Index Terms--Coverage, self-deployment, localized-deployment decision independently, using k-hop neighborhood information for a constant k. In the case of k ¼ 1, we

  20. ZIGBEE WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK NODES DEPLOYMENT STRATEGY FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZIGBEE WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK NODES DEPLOYMENT STRATEGY FOR DIGITAL AGRICULTURAL DATA ACQUISITIONBee-based wireless sensor network for digital agricultural data acquisition is one of the best ways to build the system. In this paper, based on ZigBee wireless sensor network deployment planning principles

  1. Dynamic Cooperative Coevolutionary Sensor Deployment via Localized Fitness Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    Dynamic Cooperative Coevolutionary Sensor Deployment via Localized Fitness Evaluation Xingyan Jiang used to evaluate the quality of sensor placement. The first one is sensing coverage, which is the area interest in autonomous sensor deployment, where a sensor can only communicate with those within a limited

  2. Deployment and coverage maintenance in mobile sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaeyong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment of mobile nodes in a region of interest is a critical issue in building a mobile sensor network because it affects cost and detection capabilities of the system. The deployment of mobile sensors in essence is the movement of sensors from...

  3. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  4. Cooking with Ground Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of ground beef, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  5. Predaceous Ground Beetles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Predaceous ground beetles can be a nuisance to homeowners, especially when they are numerous. This publication describes the beetles and discusses ways to prevent and treat them....

  6. Technology Deployment Annual Report 2013 December

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees also work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further develop emerging technologies. In a multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Deployment. However, the accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  7. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  8. Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a novel ground state quantum computation approach that requires no unitary evolution of qubits in time: the qubits are fixed in stationary states of the Hamiltonian. This formulation supplies a completely time-independent approach to realizing quantum computers. We give a concrete suggestion for a ground state quantum computer involving linked quantum dots.

  9. Feasibility study of the observation of the neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 to the 0+(1) excited state of Se-76 using segmented germanium detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kroeninger; L. Pandola; V. Tretyak

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 can populate the ground state and the excited states of Se-76. While the decay to the ground state has been observed with a half-life of 1.74 +0.18 -0.16 10^21 years, decays to the excited states have not yet been observed. Nuclear matrix elements depend on details of the nuclear transitions. A measurement of the half-life of the transition considered here could help to reduce the uncertainties of the calculations of the nuclear matrix element for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. This parameter relates the half-life of the process to the effective Majorana neutrino mass. The results of a feasibility study to detect the neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 to the excited states of Se-76 are presented in this paper. Segmented germanium detectors were assumed in this study. Such detectors, enriched in Ge-76 to a level of about 86%, will be deployed in the GERDA experiment located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is shown that the decay of Ge-76 to the 1122 keV 0+ level of Se-76 can be observed in GERDA provided that the half-life of the process is in the range favoured by the present calculations which is 7.5 10^21 y to 3.1 10^23 y.

  10. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  11. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  12. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6560E Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research. #12; #12;Abstract This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response

  13. Robustness improvement of polyhedral mesh method for airbag deployment simulations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Robustness improvement of polyhedral mesh method for airbag deployment simulations. TU Delft Description Airbag flexible membrane. Modeled by equations of elasticity, solved numerically using FEM Flow and Problem Description Airbag triangulation intersects in arbitrary way the Cartesian Mesh. Cartesian cells

  14. Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uselton, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC Andrewcenter was equipped with the server-side I/O monitoringfor observing and recording server-side per- formance

  15. Creating a Comprehensive Solar Water Heating Deployment Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of a research conducted in 1998 and 1999 and outlines a marketing deployment plan designed for businesses interested in marketing solar water heaters in the new home industry.

  16. Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Arunas Chesonis, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, Sweetwater Energy

  17. Deployment algorithms for multi-agent exploration and patrolling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkov, Mikhail, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration and patrolling are central themes in distributed robotics. These deployment scenarios have deep fundamental importance in robotics, beyond the most obvious direct applications, as they can be used to model a ...

  18. Game Theory and Femtocell Communications: Making Network Deployment Feasible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    deployed and controlled by end-users who desire better indoor signal transmission and reception' homes without the need of additional expensive cellular towers. At the same time, FBSs offload traffic

  19. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009 ? Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 (Rev. 1) Date: 08122014 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) Originators: Pete Devlin, Kristian Kiuru Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: 08...

  20. Regulatory Instruments for Deployment of Clean Energy Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez-Arriaga, Ignacio J.

    Answering to the formidable challenge of climate change calls for a quick transition to a future economy with a drastic reduction in GHG emissions. And this in turn requires the development and massive deployment of new ...

  1. Strictly Localized Sensor Self-Deployment for Optimal Focused Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoro, Nicola

    on convergence time, energy consumption, and node collision. Index Terms--Coverage, Self-deployment, Localized and Telecommunications, FTN, University of Novi Sad, Serbia. Email: stojmenovic@gmail.com their degree of danger. Another

  2. Energy Results of ISO 50001 Deployment by Program Administrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, K.; Gilless, C.; Milward, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early Results of ISO 50001 Deployment by Utility Programs CHAD GILLESS PRACTICE LEAD, STRATEGIC ENERGY MANAGEMENT ENERNOC PORTLAND, OREGON KIM BROWN ASSOCIATE ENERNOC PORTLAND, OREGON DRESDEN SKEES- GREGORY SUSTAINABLE... Solutions Portland, OR Portland, OR Walnut Creek, CA ESL-IE-13-05-12 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 2 Presentation Objectives ? Overview of current status ISO deployments...

  3. LET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /kWh, depending on its location as well as on the size and type of PV system used (EPIA Report, 2011). InvestmentLET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY Anna CRETI Jérôme JOAUG Cahier n:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00751743,version1-14Nov2012 #12;Let the sun shine: optimal deployment of photovoltaics in Germany

  4. Radiative Processes of the DeWitt-Takagi Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Diaz; J. Stephany

    2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the excitation of a uniformly accelerated DeWitt-Takagi detector coupled quadratically to a Majorana-Dirac field. We obtain the transition probability from the ground state of the detector and the vacuum state of the field to an excited state with the emission of a Minkowski pair of quanta, in terms of elementary processes of absorption and scattering of Rindler quanta from the Fulling-Davies-Unruh thermal bath in the co-accelerated frame.

  5. Building Diagnostic Market Deployment - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, S.; Gayeski, N.

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational faults are pervasive across the commercial buildings sector, wasting energy and increasing energy costs by up to about 30% (Mills 2009, Liu et al. 2003, Claridge et al. 2000, Katipamula and Brambley 2008, and Brambley and Katipamula 2009). Automated fault detection and diagnostic (AFDD) tools provide capabilities essential for detecting and correcting these problems and eliminating the associated energy waste and costs. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technology Program (BTP) has previously invested in developing and testing of such diagnostic tools for whole-building (and major system) energy use, air handlers, chillers, cooling towers, chilled-water distribution systems, and boilers. These diagnostic processes can be used to make the commercial buildings more energy efficient. The work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and KGS Building LLC (KGS). PNNL and KGS both believe that the widespread adoption of AFDD tools will result in significant reduction to energy and peak energy consumption. The report provides an introduction and summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA. The CRADA project had three major focus areas: (1) Technical Assistance for Whole Building Energy Diagnostician (WBE) Commercialization, (2) Market Transfer of the Outdoor Air/Economizer Diagnostician (OAE), and (3) Development and Deployment of Automated Diagnostics to Improve Large Commercial Building Operations. PNNL has previously developed two diagnostic tools: (1) whole building energy (WBE) diagnostician and (2) outdoor air/economizer (OAE) diagnostician. WBE diagnostician is currently licensed non-exclusively to one company. As part of this CRADA, PNNL developed implementation documentation and provided technical support to KGS to implement the tool into their software suite, Clockworks. PNNL also provided validation data sets and the WBE software tool to validate the KGS implementation. OAE diagnostician automatically detects and diagnoses problems with outdoor air ventilation and economizer operation for air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings using data available from building automation systems (BASs). As part of this CRADA, PNNL developed implementation documentation and provided technical support to KGS to implement the tool into their software suite. PNNL also provided validation data sets and the OAE software tool to validate the KGS implementation. Finally, as part of this CRADA project, PNNL developed new processes to automate parts of the re-tuning process and transfer those process to KGS for integration into their software product. The transfer of DOE-funded technologies will transform the commercial buildings sector by making buildings more energy efficient and also reducing the carbon footprint from the buildings. As part of the CRADA with PNNL, KGS implemented the whole building energy diagnostician, a portion of outdoor air economizer diagnostician and a number of measures that automate the identification of re-tuning measures.

  6. Information Analysis Methodology for Border Security Deployment Prioritization and Post Deployment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Paul M.; Maple, Scott A.

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to international commerce, cross-border conflicts, and corruption, a holistic, information driven, approach to border security is required to best understand how resources should be applied to affect sustainable improvements in border security. The ability to transport goods and people by land, sea, and air across international borders with relative ease for legitimate commercial purposes creates a challenging environment to detect illicit smuggling activities that destabilize national level border security. Smuggling activities operated for profit or smuggling operations driven by cross border conflicts where militant or terrorist organizations facilitate the transport of materials and or extremists to advance a cause add complexity to smuggling interdiction efforts. Border security efforts are further hampered when corruption thwarts interdiction efforts or reduces the effectiveness of technology deployed to enhance border security. These issues necessitate the implementation of a holistic approach to border security that leverages all available data. Large amounts of information found in hundreds of thousands of documents can be compiled to assess national or regional borders to identify variables that influence border security. Location data associated with border topics of interest may be extracted and plotted to better characterize the current border security environment for a given country or region. This baseline assessment enables further analysis, but also documents the initial state of border security that can be used to evaluate progress after border security improvements are made. Then, border security threats are prioritized via a systems analysis approach. Mitigation factors to address risks can be developed and evaluated against inhibiting factor such as corruption. This holistic approach to border security helps address the dynamic smuggling interdiction environment where illicit activities divert to a new location that provides less resistance to smuggling activities after training or technology is deployed at a given location. This paper will present an approach to holistic border security information analysis.

  7. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  8. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  9. Parameter estimation for compact binary coalescence signals with the first generation gravitational-wave detector network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    Compact binary systems with neutron stars or black holes are one of the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Gravitational radiation encodes rich information about source physics; thus ...

  10. Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

  11. Field Deployment of Prototype Antenna Tiles for the Mileura Widefield Array--Low Frequency Demonstrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judd D. Bowman; David G. Barnes; Frank H. Briggs; Brian E. Corey; Merv J. Lynch; N. D. Ramesh Bhat; Roger J. Cappallo; Sheperd S. Doeleman; Brian J. Fanous; David Herne; Jacqueline N. Hewitt; Chris Johnston; Justin C. Kasper; Jonathon Kocz; Eric Kratzenberg; Colin J. Lonsdale; Miguel F. Morales; Divya Oberoi; Joseph E. Salah; Bruce Stansby; Jamie Stevens; Glen Torr; Randall Wayth; Rachel L. Webster; J. Stuart B. Wyithe

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were performed with prototype antenna tiles for the Mileura Widefield Array--Low Frequency Demonstrator (MWA-LFD) to better understand the widefield, wideband properties of their design and to characterize the radio frequency interference (RFI) between 80 and 300 MHz at the site in Western Australia. Observations acquired during the six month deployment confirmed the predicted sensitivity of the antennas, sky-noise dominated system temperatures, and phase-coherent interferometric measurements. The radio spectrum is remarkably free of strong terrestrial signals, with the exception of two narrow frequency bands allocated to satellite downlinks and rare bursts due to ground-based transmissions being scattered from aircraft and meteor trails. Results indicate the potential of the MWA-LFD to make significant achievements in its three key science objectives: epoch of reionziation science, heliospheric science, and radio transient detection.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  13. Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiina Suomijarvi for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water Cherenkov tanks sampling ground particles of air showers produced by energetic cosmic rays. The arrival times are obtained from GPS and power is provided by solar panels. The construction of the array is nearly completed and a large number of detectors has been operational for more than three years. In this paper the performance of different components of the detectors are discussed. The accuracy of the signal measurement and the trigger stability are presented. The performance of the solar power system and other hardware, as well as the water purity and its long-term stability are discussed.

  14. IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

  15. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Diehl, Roland; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R.Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  16. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas von Kienlin; Elisabetta Bissaldi; Giselher G. Lichti; Helmut Steinle; Michael Krumrey; Martin Gerlach; Gerald J. Fishman; Charles Meegan; Narayana Bhat; Michael S. Briggs; Roland Diehl; Valerie Connaughton; Jochen Greiner; R. Marc Kippen; Chryssa Kouveliotou; William Paciesas; Robert Preece; Colleen Wilson-Hodge

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  17. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Darryl D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Elliott, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  18. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  19. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  20. Boron-Lined Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL-18938 Revision Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a newly designed boron-lined proportional counter option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of two successive prototypes of a system manufactured by GE Reuter Stokes.

  1. Lithium Loaded Glass Fiber Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of the lithium-loaded glass fibers option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a small system manufactured by Nucsafe (Oak Ridge, TN).

  2. Boron-Lined Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a newly designed boron-lined proportional counter option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Reuter Stokes.

  3. Detectors (4/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  4. Detectors (5/5)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  5. Scaling up and deployment of FGD in the US (1960s-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3 DEPLOYMENT UNDER EMISSIONS TRADING: THE 1990S AND 2000S ..................18 4 INTERACTION WITH OTHER

  6. Hydrogen Deployment System Modeling Environment (HyDS ME) Documentation: Milestone Report FY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks. K.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report introduces the Hydrogen Deployment System Modeling Environment model, assumptions, and basic operations.

  7. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  8. Detector Systems at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Simon

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thin vertex detector with high resolution and fast time-stamping, hadronic calorimetry using tungsten absorbers, and event reconstruction techniques related to particle flow algorithms and beam background suppression.

  9. ALFA Detector Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  10. ALFA Detector Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  11. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  12. Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes key efforts and projects that are part of the DOE/NREL Integrated Deployment effort to integrated energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in cities, states, island locations, and communities around the world. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing an aggressive, scalable, and replicable strategy to accelerate market adoption of clean energy solutions to power homes, businesses, and vehicles. Using the comprehensive Integrated Deployment approach developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), DOE partners with communities, cities, states, federal agencies, and territories to identify and implement a variety of efficiency and renewable energy technology solutions.

  13. A prototype station for ARIANNA: a detector for cosmic neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisa Gerhardt; Spencer R. Klein; Thorsten Stezelberger; Steve Barwick; Kamlesh Dookayka; Jordan Hanson; Ryan Nichol

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Antarctic Ross Iceshelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a proposed detector for ultra-high energy astrophysical neutrinos. It will detect coherent radio Cherenkov emission from the particle showers produced by neutrinos with energies above about 10^17 eV. ARIANNA will be built on the Ross Ice Shelf just off the coast of Antarctica, where it will eventually cover about 900 km^2 in surface area. There, the ice-water interface below the shelf reflects radio waves, giving ARIANNA sensitivity to downward going neutrinos and improving its sensitivity to horizontally incident neutrinos. ARIANNA detector stations will each contain 4-8 antennas which search for brief pulses of 50 MHz to 1 GHz radio emission from neutrino interactions. We describe a prototype station for ARIANNA which was deployed in Moore's Bay on the Ross Ice Shelf in December 2009, discuss the design and deployment, and present some initial figures on performance. The ice shelf thickness was measured to be 572 +/- 6 m at the deployment site.

  14. A prototype station for ARIANNA: a detector for cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.; Stezelberger, T.; Barwick, S.; Dookayka, K.; Hanson, J.; Nichol, R.

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Antarctic Ross Iceshelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a proposed detector for ultra-high energy astrophysical neutrinos. It will detect coherent radio Cherenkov emission from the particle showers produced by neutrinos with energies above about 1017 eV. ARIANNA will be built on the Ross Ice Shelf just off the coast of Antarctica, where it will eventually cover about 900 km2 in surface area. There, the ice-water interface below the shelf reflects radio waves, giving ARIANNA sensitivity to downward going neutrinos and improving its sensitivity to horizontally incident neutrinos. ARIANNA detector stations will each contain 4-8 antennas which search for brief pulses of 50 MHz to 1 GHz radio emission from neutrino interactions. We describe a prototype station for ARIANNA which was deployed in Moore's Bay on the Ross Ice Shelf in December 2009, discuss the design and deployment, and present some initial figures on performance. The ice shelf thickness was measured to be 572 +- 6 m at the deployment site.

  15. The TESLA Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Moenig

    2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For the superconducting linear collider TESLA a multi purpose detector has been designed. This detector is optimised for the important physics processes expected at a next generation linear collider up to around 1 TeV and is designed for the specific environment of a superconducting collider.

  16. Alkali ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrizo, John (Monroeville, PA); Bauerle, James E. (Plum Borough, PA); Witkowski, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  17. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  18. Portable nuclear material detector and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofstetter, Kenneth J (Aiken, SC); Fulghum, Charles K (Aiken, SC); Harpring, Lawrence J (North Augusta, SC); Huffman, Russell K (Augusta, GA); Varble, Donald L (Evans, GA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, hand held, multi-sensor radiation detector is disclosed. The detection apparatus has a plurality of spaced sensor locations which are contained within a flexible housing. The detection apparatus, when suspended from an elevation, will readily assume a substantially straight, vertical orientation and may be used to monitor radiation levels from shipping containers. The flexible detection array can also assume a variety of other orientations to facilitate any unique container shapes or to conform to various physical requirements with respect to deployment of the detection array. The output of each sensor within the array is processed by at least one CPU which provides information in a usable form to a user interface. The user interface is used to provide the power requirements and operating instructions to the operational components within the detection array.

  19. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  20. FROGi: Fractal components deployment over OSGi Mikael Desertot1 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donsez, Didier

    FROGi: Fractal components deployment over OSGi Mikael Desertot1 3 , Humberto Cervantes2 and Didier, a proposal to support continuous de- ployment activities inside Fractal, a hierarchical component model of Fractal components. With FROGi, it is possible to automate the assembly of a Fractal component application

  1. Development and Deployment at Facebook Dror G. Feitelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Development and Deployment at Facebook Dror G. Feitelson Hebrew University Eitan Frachtenberg Facebook Kent L. Beck Facebook Abstract More than one billion users log in to Facebook at least once-end. Information on Facebook's architecture and other software components is available elsewhere. Keywords D.2.10.i

  2. Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Werner, M.; Spikes, A.; Komomua, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility. In anticipation of the opening of the ESIF, NREL held the workshop August 21-23, 2012 and invited participants from utilities, government, industry, and academia to discuss renewable integration challenges and discover new ways to meet them by taking advantage of the ESIF's capabilities.

  3. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  4. Model-driven Security Policy Deployment: Property Oriented Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    and managing the access control rules of an information system are some of the major concerns of security systems. We formally prove the process of de- ploying a security policy related to an information system the deployment of access control security policies. We show how the use of a formal ex- pression of the security

  5. Deployment of Broadband Infrastructure in the Region of Western Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Deployment of Broadband Infrastructure in the Region of Western Greece Antonios Alexiou1, Patras, Greece 3 University of Ioannina, Greece 4 University of Aegean, Greece {alexiua, bouras, igglesis that is taking place in the Region of Western Greece in order to develop state-of-the- art broadband

  6. Enforcing Architecture and Deployment Constraints of Distributed Component-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .kadri@alkante.com In the component-based software development process, the formalisation of architectural choices makes possible Introduction Architectural choices should be preserved throughout the software lifecycle soEnforcing Architecture and Deployment Constraints of Distributed Component-based Software Chouki

  7. Design Considerations for Deploying Underwater Sensor Networks Raja Jurdak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopes, Cristina Videira

    integration have yielded smaller and more powerful processors that are capable of efficiently running acoustic for specialized com- munication hardware and reduces system cost, facili- tating the dense deployment of motes to form under- water acoustic sensor networks. The use of low power generic acoustic hardware and software

  8. China's rapid deployment of SO2 scrubbers Robert H. Williamsb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at coal power plants in 2006 and 2007. Scrubbers were installed in each of these years at plants with more emissions control at coal power plants. This paper describes and seeks to understand China's recent rapid deployment of SO2 scrubbers at coal power plants. For perspective this activity in China is compared

  9. Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celentano, Augusto

    Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments Augusto Celentano and Fabio for in- teractive services in complex physical environments using a knowl- edge based approach to define the relations between the environ- ment and the services, and a visual interface to check the associated

  10. A Model-driven Environment for Component Deployment* Petr Hntynka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the paper also shows that a plain MDA approach (the one used in the OMG Deployment and Configuration interconnections of their interfaces. 1.1. MDA Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) [19] is the latest approach of OMG these systems, rather it is an approach to software development using models. According to MDA concepts, systems

  11. Space Systems Finland 1 Deployment in the Space Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    © Space Systems Finland 1 Deployment in the Space Sector #12;© Space Systems Finland 2 SW Constraints Design Requirements User Requirements SW Requirements #12;© Space Systems Finland 3 The space, but there is no viable alternative · Many requirements are not testable #12;© Space Systems Finland 4 SSF OBJECTIVES

  12. DEPLOYMENT OF JAVA-BASED COMPONENTS IN EMBEDDED ENVIRONMENT*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which have to be adapted, are the deployment process and the runtime environment. The rest different capabilities like different user input and output methods, different provided API, etc of the paper is as follows. The rest of this Section briefly describes the SOFA 2.0 (for short, SOFA in further

  13. Scenarios for a Worldwide Deployment of Nuclear Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the transition to sustainable 4th generation nuclear reactors. We show that at least one comprehensive of sustainable, intensive nuclear power generation. Introduction The worldwide demand for primary energy, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex, FRANCE Intensive worldwide deployment of nuclear power could prove necessary

  14. Poster Abstract: Community Sensor Grids Deployment and Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Amiya

    and Informatics Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287 partha@asu.edu Amiya Bhattacharya Department of Computer Science New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003 amiya@nmsu.edu Meddage S. Fernando Department is that individuals or small community agencies may deploy sensors to cover their own property, but also make them

  15. Evaluation of Future Energy Technology Deployment Scenarios for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subtask 2.1 Report By the University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and EarthEvaluation of Future Energy Technology Deployment Scenarios for the Big Island Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847

  16. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the terms of the above referenced grant, the following summary serves as the Final Report for that grant. The grant relates to work performed at two separate sites, the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site south of Gillette, Wyoming, and the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Site near Rock Springs, Wyoming. The primary concern to the State of Wyoming at each site is ground water contamination (the primary contaminants of concern are benzene and related compounds), and the purpose of the grant has been to provide tiding for a Geohydrologist at the appropriate State agency, specifically the Land Quality Division (LQD) of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. The LQD Geohydrologist has been responsible for providing technical and regulatory support to DOE for ground water remediation and subsequent surface reclamation. Substantial progress has been made toward remediation of the sites, and continuation of LQD involvement in the remediation and reclamation efforts is addressed.

  17. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  18. Sustainability of Very Large Photovoltaic DeploymentSustainability of Very Large Photovoltaic Deployment email: vmf5@columbia.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 Sustainability of Very Large Photovoltaic DeploymentSustainability of Very Large Photovoltaic for Life Cycle Analysis Columbia University and National Photovoltaics Environmental Research Center, 2006 - Fthenakis & Alsema, Progress in Photovoltaics, 14, 275, 2006 #12;9 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200

  19. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  20. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

  1. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  2. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  3. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  4. Modular optical detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  5. Gaseous dark matter detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martoff, C. J.

    Dark matter (DM) detectors with directional sensitivity have the potential of yielding an unambiguous positive observation of WIMPs as well as discriminating between galactic DM halo models. In this paper, we introduce the ...

  6. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  7. Gaseous leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E. (Aurora, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  8. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  9. Ground-Based Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Based Microwave

  10. Clean coal technology deployment: From today into the next millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papay, L.T.; Trocki, L.K.; McKinsey, R.R. [Bechtel Technology and Consulting, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s clean coal technology (CCT) program succeeded in developing more efficient, cleaner, coal-fired electricity options. The Department and its private partners succeeded in the demonstration of CCT -- a major feat that required more than a decade of commitment between them. As with many large-scale capital developments and changes, the market can shift dramatically over the course of the development process. The CCT program was undertaken in an era of unstable oil and gas prices, concern over acid rain, and guaranteed markets for power suppliers. Regulations, fuel prices, emergency of competing technologies, and institutional factors are all affecting the outlook for CCT deployment. The authors identify the major barriers to CCT deployment and then introduce some possible means to surmount the barriers.

  11. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment by Federal Government Agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Coggeshall, C.; Coughlin, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this report is to examine how federal agencies can finance on-site PV projects. It explains state-level cash incentives available, the importance of solar renewable energy certificate revenues (in certain markets), existing financing structures, as well as innovative financing structures being used by federal agencies to deploy on-site PV. Specific examples from the DOD, DOE, and other federal agencies are highlighted to explain federal project financing in detail.

  12. Cost and Performance Report Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. S. Morris

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Industrial Sites Project Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) source group has limited budget and is constantly searching for new technologies to reduce programmatic costs. Partnering with the DOE Office of Science and Technology Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) reduces NNSA/NV programmatic risk and encourages accelerated deployment of potentially beneficial technologies to the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  13. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Integrated Deployment Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL is spearheadingIntegrated Deployment Workshop

  14. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will evaluate these detector systems on the bench top and eventually in RASA systems to insure reliable and practical operation.

  15. Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong...

  16. A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume...

  17. Rice University WARPnet: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice University WARPnet: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless Networks by Siddharth Gupta: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless Networks by Siddharth Gupta There has been a recent paradigm

  18. U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth January 8, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

  19. Commercialization and Deployment at NREL: Advancing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency at Speed and Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A White Paper overview of NREL's commercialization and deployment activities, requested by the chair of the State Energy Advisory Board.

  20. DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment Webinar-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar DOE Building Energy Asset Score: Overview and Deployment, presented in March 2015.

  1. A Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor for Deployment at Remote Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J .J.; Smith, M.A.; Mosseytsev, A.V.; Yang, W.S.; Wade, D.C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a small secure transportable autonomous lead-cooled fast reactor for deployment at remote sites.

  2. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GSA's Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies.

  3. Rigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    with the design of low-cost rigid-panel deployable solar arrays with self- locking tape-spring hinges. The reportRigid Deployable Solar Array A.M. Watt and S. Pellegrino CUED/D-STRUCT/TR214 Department on the deployment of a solar array wing are evaluated experimentally. #12;#12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Layout

  4. Random vs. Deterministic Deployment of Sensors in the Presence of Failures and Placement Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    Random vs. Deterministic Deployment of Sensors in the Presence of Failures and Placement Errors, and evaluation of various algorithms (e.g., sleep-wakeup), it has often been considered too expensive as compared to optimal deterministic deployment patterns when deploying sensors in real-life. Roughly speaking, a factor

  5. Minefield reconnaissance and detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, Millard T. (Albuquerque, NM); Cave, Steven P. (Albuquerque, NM); Creager, James D. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Charles M. (Albuquerque, NM); Mathes, John B. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Kirk J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-sensor system (10) for detecting the presence of objects on the surface of the ground or buried just under the surface, such as anti-personnel or anti-tank mines or the like. A remote sensor platform (12) has a plurality of metal detector sensors (22) and a plurality of short pulse radar sensors (24). The remote sensor platform (12) is remotely controlled from a processing and control unit (14) and signals from the remote sensor platform (12) are sent to the processing and control unit (14) where they are individually evaluated in separate data analysis subprocess steps (34, 36) to obtain a probability "score" for each of the pluralities of sensors (22, 24). These probability scores are combined in a fusion subprocess step (38) by comparing score sets to a probability table (130) which is derived based upon the historical incidence of object present conditions given that score set. A decision making rule is applied to provide an output which is optionally provided to a marker subprocess (40) for controlling a marker device (76) to mark the location of found objects.

  6. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  7. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  8. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  9. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  10. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  11. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D. (Los Alamos, NM); Littlewood, Peter B. (Cambridge, GB); Blagoev, Krastan B. (Arlington, VA); Swinhoe, Martyn T. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Sullivan, Clair J. (Los Alamos, NM); Alexandrov, Boian S. (Los Alamos, NM); Lashley, Jason Charles (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  12. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  13. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  14. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (3055 Trinity, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  15. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  16. Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bernstein; N. S. Bowden; A. Misner; T. Palmer

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

  17. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U./Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco deQuito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS; ,

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  18. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  19. Operational Impacts of Large Deployments of Offshore Wind (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Heaney, M.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential operational impact of deploying 54 GW of offshore wind in the United States was examined. The capacity was not evenly distributed; instead, it was concentrated in regions with better wind quality and close to load centers (Table 1). A statistical analysis of offshore wind power time series was used to assess the effect on the power system. The behavior of offshore wind resembled that of onshore wind, despite the former presenting higher capacity factors, more consistent power output across seasons, and higher variability levels. Thus, methods developed to manage onshore wind variability can be extended and applied to offshore wind.

  20. Bio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in the Home Heating

  1. SRNL Deploys Innovative Radiation Mapping Device | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913|| DepartmentPro FormaSRNL Deploys

  2. PNNL Technology Planning and Deployment Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesourceOvertonPEPCOPERIPNNL)Deployment

  3. Deployment of a New Shortwave Spectroradiometer (SWS) at the SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalTo helpUniversitiesofDepartmentalDeployment of a

  4. Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps, Detector Descriptions in GODL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays. In addition to three built-in detector configurations, detector descriptions can also be read from files in the new GODL file format.

  5. Directional gamma detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  6. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  7. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  8. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  9. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  10. Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups brown rice, medium- grain, making 3 cups cooked 1 pound ground turkey 4 zucchini 1 onion 1 green pepper 1/4 teaspoon pepper Directions 1. Cook brown rice turkey in skillet and use a spatula to break beef into small pieces as it browns. Keep on stirring

  11. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, DEPLOYMENT AND EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy C. Herndon

    2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC21-95EW55101) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Florida State University's Institute for International Cooperative Environmental Research (IICER) was designed to facilitate a number of joint programmatic goals of both the DOE and the IICER related to international technology identification, development, demonstration and deployment using a variety of mechanisms to accomplish these goals. These mechanisms included: laboratory and field research; technology demonstrations; international training and technical exchanges; data collection, synthesis and evaluation; the conduct of conferences, symposia and high-level meetings; and other appropriate and effective approaches. The DOE utilized the expertise and facilities of the IICER at Florida State University to accomplish its goals related to this cooperative agreement. The IICER has unique and demonstrated capabilities that have been utilized to conduct the tasks for this cooperative agreement. The IICER conducted activities related to technology identification, development, evaluation, demonstration and deployment through its joint centers which link the capabilities at Florida State University with collaborating academic and leading research institutions in the major countries of Central and Eastern Europe (e.g., Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland) and Russia. The activities and accomplishments for this five-year cooperative agreement are summarized in this Final Technical Report.

  12. Economics of ALMR deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high-level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons-grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high-level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  13. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  14. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by for Milagro collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    collaboration 1 Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA Abstract Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma

  15. Thin-film superconducting resonator tunable to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of 87Rb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, Luis A.

    Thin-film superconducting resonator tunable to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of 87Rb Z. Kim. Related Articles Surface loss simulations of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators Appl. Phys, 063503 (2011) Superconducting a-WxSi1x nanowire single-photon detector with saturated internal quantum

  16. 618-10 Burial Ground VPU Nonintrusive Characterization Process and Data Collection Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khabir

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the nonintrusive characterization measurement results for the 618-10 Burial Ground and provides a general assessment of the estimated dose, isotopic concentrations, and bounding transuranic radionuclide inventories for the 618-10 vertical pipe units and trenches, based on interpretation of data from a system of in situ radiological multi-detector probes.

  17. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  18. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  19. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  20. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  1. The LUCID detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from 2015 LHC is performing a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side-A-side-C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  2. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  3. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  4. The LUCID detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from 2015 LHC will perform a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side A–side C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  5. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  6. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  7. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig (late of Albuquerque, NM); Rowland, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  8. Biological detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  9. NLS ground states on graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Adami; Enrico Serra; Paolo Tilli

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the existence of ground states for the subcritical NLS energy on metric graphs. In particular, we find out a topological assumption that guarantees the nonexistence of ground states, and give an example in which the assumption is not fulfilled and ground states actually exist. In order to obtain the result, we introduce a new rearrangement technique, adapted to the graph where it applies. Owing to such a technique, the energy level of the rearranged function is improved by conveniently mixing the symmetric and monotone rearrangement procedures.

  10. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  11. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  12. Nanowire-based detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

  13. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Llope; J. Zhou; T. Nussbaum; G. W. Hoffmann; K. Asselta; J. D. Brandenburg; J. Butterworth; T. Camarda; W. Christie; H. J. Crawford; X. Dong; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; F. Geurts; J. Hammond; E. Judd; D. L. McDonald; C. Perkins; L. Ruan; J. Scheblein; J. J. Schambach; R. Soja; K. Xin; C. Yang

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2x3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2x19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  14. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.

  15. Deployment of a dispatchable photovoltaic system: Technical and economic results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Wang, Y.D.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Bottenberg, W. [Delaware Solar Electric Power, Newark, DE (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the incorporation of PV as a demand-side management (DSM) tool. The valuation of the benefits provided by PV in a DSM role indicates that it is much closer to commercial viability than was thought from economic analyses focusing exclusively on this technology as a supply-side option. However, in order to realize PV`s potential, this technology must be deployed in high-value DSM applications; in particular, applications that promise dispatchable peak-shaving capability. This analysis of the performance of a prototype system installed by Delmarva Power, indicates that small-scale, commercial customer-sited DSM systems incorporating this technology are approaching competitive cost levels.

  16. Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Castonguay

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

  17. Ground Penetrating Radar, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    John Peterson

    This is 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar collected along the AB Line in Intensive Site 1 beginning in October 2012 and collected along L2 in Intensive Site 0 beginning in September 2011. Both continue to the present.

  18. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  19. Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Integrated Deployment model to accelerate market adoption of alternative energy solutions to power homes, businesses, and vehicles through a comprehensive and aggressive approach.

  20. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14010: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about fuel cell powered lift trucks deployed by industry.

  1. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about fuel cell backup power deployed by industry.

  2. Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Describes the DOE Community Renewable Energy Deployment program, which used funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to promote investment in clean energy solutions and...

  3. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment  of  Thermal  Energy   Storage  under  Diverse  Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  4. President Obama Announces Commitments and Executive Actions to Advance Solar Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, President Obama announced more than 300 private and public sector commitments to create jobs and cut carbon pollution by advancing solar deployment and energy efficiency. The commitments...

  5. Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments for use in Coastal Environmental Assessment in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensing Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments forGaurav S. Sukhatme 1 Robotic Embedded Systems Laboratory,~4 wks) Collaborative robotic sensing Slow moving (<1km/hr)

  6. SunShot Catalyst Innovators Take on Software Challenges to Deploy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SunShot Catalyst Innovators Take on Software Challenges to Deploy Solar Technology Across America Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266)...

  7. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report -- October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Technology Workshop, held October 28, 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

  8. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Technologies at Multiple Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet overviewing Verso Paper Corp. project that will deploy industrial technologies to recover and reuse water and steam at pulp and paper facilities.

  9. MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MUHAMMAD HAIDER KHAN AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.............................................. 1 1

  10. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  11. Deploying in situ bioremediation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, M.J.; Johnson, C.D.; Newcomer, D.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Hooker, B.S.; Peyton, B.M.; Skeen, R.S.; Chilakapati, A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative in-situ bioremediation technology was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to destroy nitrate and carbon tetrachloride (CC1{sub 4}) in the Hanford ground water. The goal of this in-situ treatment process is to stimulate native microorganisms to degrade nitrate and CCl{sub 4}. Nutrient solutions are distributed in the contaminated aquifer to create a biological treatment zone. This technology is being demonstrated at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site to provide the design, operating, and cost information needed to assess its effectiveness in contaminated ground water. The process design and field operations for demonstration of this technology are influenced by the physical, chemical, and microbiological properties observed at the site. A description of the technology is presented including the well network design, nutrient injection equipment, and means for controlling the hydraulics and microbial reactions of the treatment process.

  12. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivers, M. (UC)

    2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  13. SOIKID, SOI pixel detector combined with superconducting detector KID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishino, Hirokazu; Kida, Yosuke; Yamada, Yousuke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the development status of the SOIKID, a detector combining the SOI pixel detector and the superconducting detector KID (Kinetic Inductance Detector). The aim of the SOIKID is to measure X-ray photon energy with the resolution better than that of the semiconductor detector. The silicon substrate is used as the X-ray photon absorber. The recoiled electron creates athermal phonons as well as the ionizing electron-hole pairs. The KID formed at one side of the substrate surface detects the phonons to measure the total energy deposited, while the SOI pixel detector formed on the other side of the substrate detects the ionized carries to measure the position. Combining the position and energy measurements, it is in principle possible to have the extremely high energy resolution.

  14. Balanced homodyne detectors and Casimir energy densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Marecki

    2008-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We recall and generalize the analysis of the output of the so-called balanced homodyne detectors. The most important feature of these detectors is their ability to quantify the vacuum fluctuations of the electric field, that is expectation values of products of (quantum-) electric-field operators. More precisely, the output of BHDs provides information on the one- and two-point functions of arbitrary states of quantum fields. We generalize the analysis of the response of BHDs to the case of quantum fields under influence of static external conditions such as cavities or polarizable media. By recalling the expressions for two-point functions of quantum fields in Casimir geometries we show, that a rich, position- and frequency-dependent pattern of BHD responses is predicted for ground states. This points to a potentially new characterization of quantum fields in Casimir setups which would not only complement the current global methods (Casimir forces), but also improve understanding of sub-vacuum energy densities present in some regions in these geometries.

  15. Boron-Lined Straw-Tube Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Stromswold, David C.

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of a boron-lined proportional counter design variation. In the testing described here, the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Proportional Technologies, Inc, was tested.

  16. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  17. Improved ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  18. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  19. Pyroelectric demodulating detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A pyroelectric demodulating detector (also termed a pyroelectric demodulator) is disclosed which utilizes an electrical resistor stacked upon a pyroelectric element to demodulate an rf or microwave electrical input signal which is amplitude-modulated (AM). The pyroelectric demodulator, which can be formed as a hybrid or a monolithic device, has applications for use in AM radio receivers. Demodulation is performed by feeding the AM input signal into the resistor and converting the AM input signal into an AM heat signal which is conducted through the pyroelectric element and used to generate an electrical output signal containing AM information from the AM input signal.

  20. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Orler, Edward B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  1. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new detector electronics have been designed, built and tested at KSU. In addition, a project meeting was held at KSU and a detector evaluation plan has been initiated between INL and KSU. Once NEET program evaluations are completed, the final MPFD will be deployed in MTR irradiations, enabling DOE-NE programs evaluating the performance of candidate new fuels and materials to better characterize irradiation test conditions.

  2. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101106 Studies of Signal Waveforms From the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    develop higher and have more muons than showers started by primary protons of the same total energy. Gamma-rays the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory P.S. Allison, H. Bui-Duc, J. Chye, S. Dagoret The ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors

  3. Efficiencies of Quantum Optical Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Hogg; Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

  4. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  5. Structuring Measurements for Modeling and the Deployment of Industrial Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilic, Zeljko

    . Replacing wired units with wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes offers more flexibility, and ultimately coverage during its deployment. Wireless networking devices are inherently power-limited, which limits1 Structuring Measurements for Modeling and the Deployment of Industrial Wireless Networks Rong

  6. Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Harvesting Clean Energy How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects Harvesting Clean Energy: How California Can Deploy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects on Appropriate acres of impaired lands in the Westlands Water District in the Central Valley may soon have

  7. Outage Detection in Power Distribution Networks with Optimally-Deployed Power Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yue

    Outage Detection in Power Distribution Networks with Optimally-Deployed Power Flow Sensors Yue Zhao deployed real-time power flow sensors and that of load estimates via Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI of Naval Research, under Grant N00014-12-1-0767. where supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA

  8. Deployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kind of motion mechanisms, is often used to stretch out solar panels or antennas in spacecraftDeployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton Chao.com.cn Keywords: Deployment mechanism, Motion skeleton, Behavioral modeling, Feasibility analysis Abstract

  9. The deployment of urban logistics solutions from research, development and pilot results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The deployment of urban logistics solutions from research, development and pilot results Lessons logistics solutions is one of the main pending questions in the field of urban goods transport research demonstration project, this paper presents the main issues related to the deployment of urban logistics

  10. Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments in a Global Context by Matthew Johnston. All rights reserved. #12;#12;Evaluating the Potential for Large-Scale Biodiesel Deployments on the subject of biodiesel, but I can only hope she takes comfort knowing now much I appreciate everything she

  11. Quality Control, Testing, and Deployment Results in the NIF ICCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, J P; Casavant, D; Cline, B D; Gorvad, M R

    2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The strategy used to develop the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) calls for incremental cycles of construction and formal test to deliver a total of 1 million lines of code. Each incremental release takes four to six months to implement specific functionality and culminates when offline tests conducted in the ICCS Integration and Test Facility verify functional, performance, and interface requirements. Tests are then repeated on line to confirm integrated operation in dedicated laser laboratories or ultimately in the NIF. Test incidents along with other change requests are recorded and tracked to closure by the software change control board (SCCB). Annual independent audits advise management on software process improvements. Extensive experience has been gained by integrating controls in the prototype laser preamplifier laboratory. The control system installed in the preamplifier lab contains five of the ten planned supervisory subsystems and seven of sixteen planned front-end processors (FEPs). Beam alignment, timing, diagnosis and laser pulse amplification up to 20 joules was tested through an automated series of shots. Other laboratories have provided integrated testing of six additional FEPs. Process measurements including earned-value, product size, and defect densities provide software project controls and generate confidence that the control system will be successfully deployed.

  12. Deployment Scenario of Heavy Water Cooled Thorium Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardiansah, Deby; Takaki, Naoyuki [Course of Applied Science, School of Engineering, Tokai University (Japan)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment scenario of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor has been studied. We have assumed to use plutonium and thorium oxide fuel in water cooled reactor to produce {sup 233}U which will be used in thorium breeder reactor. The objective is to analysis the potential of water cooled Th-Pu reactor for replacing all of current LWRs especially in Japan. In this paper, the standard Pressurize Water Reactor (PWR) has been designed to produce 3423 MWt; (i) Th-Pu PWR, (ii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR = 1.0) and (iii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR 1.2). The properties and performance of the core were investigated by using cell and core calculation code. Th-Pu PWR or HWR produces {sup 233}U to introduce thorium breeder reactor. The result showed that to replace all (60 GWe) LWR by thorium breeder reactor within a period of one century, Th-Pu oxide fueled PWR has insufficient capability to produce necessary amount of {sup 233}U and Th-Pu oxide fueled HWR has almost enough potential to produce {sup 233}U but shows positive void reactivity coefficient.

  13. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  14. A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) is building a new long-range (to 2050) forecasting model for use in budgetary and management applications called the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS), which explicitly incorporates uncertainty through its development within the Analytica(R) platform of Lumina Decision Systems. SEDS is designed to be a fast running (a few minutes), user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual programming interface. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is responsible for implementing the SEDS Buildings Module. The initial Lite version of the module is complete and integrated with a shared code library for modeling demand-side technology choice developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lumina. The module covers both commercial and residential buildings at the U.S. national level using an econometric forecast of floorspace requirement and a model of building stock turnover as the basis for forecasting overall demand for building services. Although the module is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies, it differs from standard energy forecasting models by including considerations of passive building systems, interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains), and on-site power generation.

  15. A Search for GeV-TeV Emission from GRBs Using the Milagro Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    with known redshift is reported. Keywords: -ray, -ray bursts, -ray telescope PACS: 95.85.Pw 98.70.Rz 95.55.Ka INTRODUCTION Milagro is ground-based gamma-ray observatory located in the Jemez mountains (2630 m a to search for >1 GeV emission from these bursts. Milagro is a water Cerenkov detector designed primarily

  16. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV have been detected by Milagrito, a prototype of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory. While particle acceleration beyond 1 GeV at the Sun is well established, few data exist for protons or ions beyond 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma ray sources, can also be used to study the Sun. Milagrito, which operated for approximately one year in 1997/98, was sensitive to solar proton and neutron fluxes above ~5- 10 GeV. Milagrito operated in a scaler mode, which was primarily sensitive to muons, low energy photons, and electrons, and the detector operated in a mode sensitive to showers and high zenith angle muons. In its scaler mode, Milagrito registered a rate increase coincident with the 6 November 1997 ground level event observed by Climax and other neutron monitors. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of >...

  17. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV have been detected by Milagrito, a prototype of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory. While particle acceleration beyond 1 GeV at the Sun is well established, few data exist for protons or ions beyond 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma ray sources, can also be used to study the Sun. Milagrito, which operated for approximately one year in 1997/98, was sensitive to solar proton and neutron fluxes above ~5- 10 GeV. Milagrito operated in a scaler mode, which was primarily sensitive to muons, low energy photons, and electrons, and the detector operated in a mode sensitive to showers and high zenith angle muons. In its scaler mode, Milagrito registered a rate increase coincident with the 6 November 1997 ground level event observed by Climax and other neutron monitors. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of >10 GeV particles.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics of Longitudinal Ground Vehicle Traction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Steven W.

    asphalt b) Wet asphalt c) Gravel d) Packed Snow Nonlinear Dynamics of Longitudinal Ground Vehicle Traction

  19. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

  20. Laser pulse detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  1. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  2. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  3. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  4. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  5. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  6. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles.

  7. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  8. Advances in Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buzulutskov

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) are referred to as a new class of noble-gas detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures with electron avalanching performed directly in the detection medium, the latter being in gaseous, liquid or two-phase (liquid-gas) state. Electron avalanching is provided by Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) multipliers, in particular GEMs and THGEMs, operated at cryogenic temperatures in dense noble gases. The final goal for this kind of detectors is the development of large-volume detectors of ultimate sensitivity for rare-event experiments and medical applications, such as coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, direct dark matter search, astrophysical (solar and supernova) neutrino detection experiments and Positron Emission Tomography technique. This review is the first attempt to summarize the results on CRAD performances obtained by different groups. A brief overview of the available CRAD concepts is also given and the most remarkable CRAD physics effects are discussed.

  9. Air cooling for Vertex Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arantza Oyanguren

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertex detectors are crucial detectors for future linear e+e- colliders since they must give the most accurate location of any outgoing charged particles originating from the interaction point. The DEPFET collaboration is developing a new type of pixel sensors which provide very low noise and high spatial resolution. In order to precisely determine the track and vertex positions, multiple scattering in the detector has to be reduced by minimizing the material in the sensors, cooling, and support structures. A new method of cooling by blowing air over the sensors has been developed and tested. It is applied in the design and construction of the Belle-II detector and may be used in the new generation of vertex detectors for linear colliders.

  10. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  11. Microsoft Word - Red Detector Tests _3_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red Detector Tests May 5 ed -2006 1. Black Body @ 900F, Comparison between red and blue detectors: Table 1: Detector's signal with and without filters -BB at 900F Filter(micron)...

  12. Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Heimiller, D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriers and the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the United States, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentially developable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.

  13. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornat, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  14. Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The products recovered from both the ALD and other processes were water-white (even those from the low temperature, low residence time (high space velocity), low conversion runs). These results indicate that highly upgraded recycle lube oils can be produced using ALD-deposited active metal catalysts. The use of H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR for the characterization of the treated lube oils has been shown to be effective.

  15. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  16. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, John G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ruddy, Frank H. (Monroeville, PA); Brandt, Charles D. (Mount Lebanon, PA); Dulloo, Abdul R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lott, Randy G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sirianni, Ernest (Monroeville, PA); Wilson, Randall O. (Greensburg, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

  17. The IPNS resonance detector spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, R.K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the resonance detector method of neutron spectroscopy, a foil is placed in the scattered neutron beam and scattered neutrons having the resonance energy are detected by detecting the capture gammas resulting from the resonance absorption of the neutrons. A prototype resonance detector spectrometer called the Electron Volt Spectrometer (EVS) has been built and operated. The instrument is described, the current understanding of the background of the instrument is discussed, software developed to simulate the detector efficiency is described and compared with experimental results, and a test of the use of foil-thickness difference techniques to improve resolution is presented. (LEW)

  18. Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  19. Fourth IEEE Workshop on Applications of Computer Vision, October 1998, Princeton, New Jersey, USA Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumm, John

    Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment John Krumm and Greg Kirk Intelligent Systems & Robotics Center Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Abstract When an airbag deploys on a rear-facing infant seat, it can injure or kill the infant. When an airbag deploys on an empty seat, the airbag

  20. Solid state neutron detector and method for use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick (Livermore, CA); Zwieback, Ilya (New Milford, NJ); Ruderman, Warren (Demarest, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of lithium tetraborate or alpha-barium borate had been found to be neutron detecting materials. The crystals are prepared using known crystal growing techniques, wherein the process does not include the common practice of using a fluxing agent, such as sodium oxide or sodium fluoride, to reduce the melting temperature of the crystalline compound. Crystals prepared by this method can be sliced into thin single or polycrystalline wafers, or ground to a powder and prepared as a sintered compact or a print paste, and then configured with appropriate electronic hardware, in order to function as neutron detectors.

  1. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  2. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  3. The exposure of the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It consists of a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level and a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The 'hybrid' detection mode combines the information from the two subsystems. We describe the determination of the hybrid exposure for events observed by the fluorescence telescopes in coincidence with at least one water-Cherenkov detector of the surface array. A detailed knowledge of the time dependence of the detection operations is crucial for an accurate evaluation of the exposure. We discuss the relevance of monitoring data collected during operations, such as the status of the fluorescence detector, background light and atmospheric conditions, that are used in both simulation and reconstruction.

  4. President Obama Announces Commitments and Executive Actions to Advance Solar Deployment and Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 9, 2014, President Obama announced more than 300 private and public sector commitments to create jobs and cut carbon pollution by advancing solar deployment and energy efficiency.

  5. Sensor-Aided Overlay Deployment and Relocation for Vast-Scale Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Daji

    a wireless sensor network is to monitor a target field and, upon occurrence of events of interest, to deliver are deployed to monitor a huge target area. Moreover, due to the funneling effect, it becomes more difficult

  6. Deployment summary: Fiscal years 1995-2000 [USDOE Office of International Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication summarizes the progress made by the Office of International Programs (IP) in deploying innovative technologies for the environmental remediation of the DOE complex and for sites of its international collaborators for fiscal years 1995 through 2000.

  7. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional deployment analysis for underwater acoustic sensor networks q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Three-dimensional and two-dimensional deployment analysis for underwater acoustic sensor networks q Accepted 23 July 2008 Available online 7 August 2008 Keywords: Underwater acoustic sensor networks data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation

  8. Development and Deployment of Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Buses Development and Deployment of Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Buses 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  9. Automatic deployment of autonomous cars in a robotic urban-like environment (RULE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itani, Sara T.

    We present a computational framework and experimental setup for deployment of autonomous cars in a miniature Robotic Urban-Like Environment (RULE). The specifications are given in rich, human-like language as temporal logic ...

  10. Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Carter T.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    code based on potential flow theory with provisions for deformable geometry to incorporate a trailing edge flap. Experimental tests were conducted using a 2-D wind tunnel setup incorporating a pressure instrumented airfoil section with a deployable 20...

  11. High-temperature superconductors as electromagnetic deployment and support structures in spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettliffe, Gwendolyn Vines

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate a new structural and mechanical technique aimed at reducing the mass and increasing the stowed-to-deployed ratio of spacecraft systems. This technique uses the magnetic fields generated by ...

  12. An assessment of the economic, regulatory and technical implications of large-scale solar power deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrick, James Hubert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity from solar energy has many favorable attributes. Despite its current high cost relative to other technology options, a combination of cost reductions and policy support measures could lead to increasing deployment ...

  13. The potential impact of renewable energy deployment on natural gas prices in New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Deployment on Natural Gas Prices in New England Datethe price and supply of natural gas have deepened in recentcan directly hedge natural gas price risk by reducing the

  14. Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

  15. Cloud Computing, REST and Mashups to Simplify RFID Application Development and Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinard, Dominique

    While of increasing importance for the real-time enterprise, deployments of Internet of Things infrastructures such as RFID remain complex and expensive. In this paper, we illustrate these challenges by studying the ...

  16. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Bleve; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  17. LUCID A Cherenkov Tube Based Detector for Monitoring the ATLAS Experiment Luminosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbrizzi, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, which will be installed in january 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment. An absolute luminosity calibration is needed and it will be provided by a Roman Pot type detector with the two arms placed at about 240 m from the interaction point. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at 1.5 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The challenging aspect of this detector is its readout in an environment characterized by the high dose of radiation (about 0.7 Mrad/year at 10^33cm^2 s^-1) it must withstand. In order to fulfill these radiation hardness requirem...

  18. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

  19. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  20. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  1. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  2. Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

  3. Calibration of the IMB Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker-Szendy, R.; Bionta, R.M.; Bratton, C.B.; Casper, D.; Claus, R.; Cortez, B.; Dye, S.T.; Errede, S.; Foster, G.W.; Gajewski, W.; Ganezer, K.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T.J.; Halverson, P.G.; Hazen, E.; Jones, T.W.; Kielczewska, D.; Kropp, W.R.; Learned, J.G.; Losecco, J.M.; Matsuno, S.; /UC, Irvine /Michigan U. /Brookhaven /Boston U. /Hawaii U. /University Coll. London /Warsaw U. /Cleveland State U. /Notre Dame U. /Louisiana State U. /Maryland U. /AT-T Bell Labs, Holmdel /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab /LLNL, Livermore /New Mexico U. /SLAC /Adelaide U. /CERN /Cal State, Dominguez Hills

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The IMB detector (named after its founding institutions: University of California, Irvine, the University of Michigan and Brookhaven National Laboratory) collected data on a wide range of phenomena for over eight years. It was the first and the largest of the ring imaging water Cherenkov detectors. The detector consisted of 8000 metric tons of ultra-pure water instrumented with 2048 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs were placed on the roof, floor, and walls of the detector in a lattice of approximately 1 m spacing. It made measurements of contained events that ranged in energy from 15 MeV up to 1.5 GeV. This paper describes the calibration of the IMB detector. This procedure was accurate and stable over a wide range of physical variables. It was used with little change throughout the entire eight-year lifetime of the experiment. The IMB calibration is a model for future large-scale detectors that employ the water Cherenkov technique.

  4. North Village Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview: Installation of Ground Source Heat Pumps. Replacement of Aging Heat Pumps. Alignment with Furmans Sustainability Goals.

  5. Electrical Signal Path Study and Component Assay for the MAJORANA N-Type Segmented Contact Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amman, Mark; Bergevin, Marc; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Brian .; Lesko, Kevin T.; Luke, Paul N.; Prior, Gersende; Poon, Alan W.; Smith, Alan R.; Vetter, Kai; Yaver, Harold; Zimmermann, Sergio

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the present electrical signal path study is to explore the various issues related to the deployment of highly-segmented low-background Ge detectors for the MAJORANA double-beta decay experiment. A significant challenge is to simultaneously satisfy competing requirements for the mechanical design, electrical readout performance, and radiopurity specifications from the MAJORANA project. Common to all rare search experiments, there is a very stringent limit on the acceptable radioactivity level of all the electronics components involved. Some of the findings are summarized in this report.

  6. Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients: 1 onion 1/2 pound ground turkey 1 cup ketchup, low, brown ground turkey and onion together over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes or until turkey is no longer. Return turkey to skillet. 3. Add ketchup to skillet; cover and simmer over medium-low heat 10 minutes. 4

  7. Case Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    , or the lack thereof, of ground water flow systems driven by similar hydrogeologic and economic conditionsCase Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and Application to the North China Plain of a ground water flow system in the North China Plain (NCP) subject to severe overexploitation and rapid

  8. Ground-based transmission line conductor motion sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Milano, U.

    1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A ground-based-conductor motion-sensing apparatus is provided for remotely sensing movement of electric-power transmission lines, particularly as would occur during the wind-induced condition known as galloping. The apparatus is comprised of a motion sensor and signal-generating means which are placed underneath a transmission line and will sense changes in the electric field around the line due to excessive line motion. The detector then signals a remote station when a conditioning of galloping is sensed. The apparatus of the present invention is advantageous over the line-mounted sensors of the prior art in that it is easier and less hazardous to install. The system can also be modified so that a signal will only be given when particular conditions, such as specific temperature range, large-amplitude line motion, or excessive duration of the line motion, are occurring.

  9. Characterisation of micro-strip and pixel silicon detectors before and after hadron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allport, P.P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of segmented silicon detectors for tracking and vertexing in particle physics has grown substantially since their introduction in 1980. It is now anticipated that roughly 50,000 six inch wafers of high resistivity silicon will need to be processed into sensors to be deployed in the upgraded experiments in the future high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) at CERN. These detectors will also face an extremely severe radiation environment, varying with distance from the interaction point. The volume of required sensors is large and their delivery is required during a relatively short time, demanding a high throughput from the chosen suppliers. The current situation internationally, in this highly specialist market, means that security of supply for large orders can therefore be an issue and bringing additional potential vendors into the field can only be an advantage. Semiconductor companies that could include planar sensors suitable for particle physics in their product lines will, however, need to prove their pro...

  10. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  11. Near infrared detectors for SNAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

  12. Passive environmental radon detector study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak{reg_sign} brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

  13. Passive environmental radon detector study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak[reg sign] brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

  14. The EXO-200 detector, part I: Detector design and construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; L. Bartoszek; E. Baussan; E. Beauchamp; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; D. Chauhan; B. Cleveland; R. Conley; J. Cook; S. Cook; A. Coppens; W. Craddock; T. Daniels; C. G. Davis; J. Davis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr; J. Farine; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hagemann; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; J. Hodgson; M. Hughes; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; J. Kirk; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; F. LePort; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; K. Merkle; B. Mong; M. Montero Díez; A. R. Müller; R. Neilson; A. Odian; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; A. Rivas; E. Rollin; P. C. Rowson; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; K. Skarpaas; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; V. Strickland; M. Swift; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; J. -L. Vuilleumier; J. -M. Vuilleumier; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    EXO-200 is an experiment designed to search for double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with a single-phase, liquid xenon detector. It uses an active mass of 110 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in the isotope 136 in an ultra-low background time projection chamber capable of simultaneous detection of ionization and scintillation. This paper describes the EXO-200 detector with particular attention to the most innovative aspects of the design that revolve around the reduction of backgrounds, the efficient use of the expensive isotopically enriched xenon, and the optimization of the energy resolution in a relatively large volume.

  15. Technology Section of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrum, K; Bugayov, S; Dingus, B; Fegan, S; Funk, S; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lebohec, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A; Vasilev, V; Wakely, S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the findings of the technology working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses different technology opportunities and the technical feasibility for substantially improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors to achieve an order of magnitude better sensitivity than the instruments employed today as well as their planned upgrades. A technology roadmap for improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors is presented.

  16. Technology Section of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Byrum; J. Buckley; S. Bugayov; B. Dingus; S. Fegan; S. Funk; E. Hays; J. Holder; D. Horan; A. Konopelko; H. Krawczynski; F. Krennrich; S. Lebohec; G. Sinnis; A. Smith; V. Vassiliev; S. Wakely

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the findings of the technology working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses different technology opportunities and the technical feasibility for substantially improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors to achieve an order of magnitude better sensitivity than the instruments employed today as well as their planned upgrades. A technology roadmap for improving IACTS and ground based particle detectors is presented.

  17. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Riess, David; Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) deployments within the territories serviced by California?s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and the transition from the OpenADR 1.0 specification to the formal standard?OpenADR 2.0. As demand response service providers and customers start adopting OpenADR 2.0, it is necessary to ensure that the existing Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) infrastructure investment continues to be useful and takes advantage of the formal standard and its many benefits. This study focused on OpenADR deployments and systems used by the California IOUs and included a summary of the OpenADR deployment from the U.S. Department of Energy-funded demonstration conducted by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected and analyzed data about OpenADR 1.0 deployments, categorized architectures, developed a data model mapping to understand the technical compatibility of each version, and compared the capabilities and features of the two specifications. The findings, for the first time, provided evidence of the total enabled load shed and average first cost for system enablement in the IOU and SMUD service territories. The OpenADR 2.0a profile specification semantically supports AutoDR system architectures and data propagation with a testing and certification program that promotes interoperability, scaled deployments by multiple vendors, and provides additional features that support future services.

  18. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

    1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  19. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  20. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  1. Niobium superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Chudow, Joel D; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Frydman, Aviad; Prober, Daniel E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the performance of superconducting nanowire photon detectors fabricated from ultra-thin Nb. A direct comparison is made between these detectors and similar nanowire detectors fabricated from NbN. We find that Nb detectors are significantly more susceptible than NbN to thermal instability (latching) at high bias. We show that the devices can be stabilized by reducing the input resistance of the readout. Nb detectors optimized in this way are shown to have approximately 2/3 the reset time of similar large-active-area NbN detectors of the same geometry, with approximately 6% detection efficiency for single photons at 470 nm.

  2. Ground Penetrating Radar in Hydrogeophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Lambot, S.; Binley, A.; Slob, E.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the needs of a growing population and to provide us with a higher quality of life, increasing pressures are being placed on our environment through the development of agriculture, industry, and infrastructures. Soil erosion, groundwater depletion, salinization, and pollution have been recognized for decades as major threats to ecosystems and human health. More recently, the progressive substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels for energy production and climate change have been recognized as potential threats to our water resources and sustained agricultural productivity. The vadose zone mediates many of the processes that govern water resources and quality, such as the partition of precipitation into infiltration and runoff , groundwater recharge, contaminant transport, plant growth, evaporation, and energy exchanges between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. It also determines soil organic carbon sequestration and carbon-cycle feedbacks, which could substantially impact climate change. The vadose zone's inherent spatial variability and inaccessibility precludes direct observation of the important subsurface processes. In a societal context where the development of sustainable and optimal environmental management strategies has become a priority, there is a strong prerequisite for the development of noninvasive characterization and monitoring techniques of the vadose zone. In particular, hydrogeophysical approaches applied at relevant scales are required to appraise dynamic subsurface phenomena and to develop optimal sustainability, exploitation, and remediation strategies. Among existing geophysical techniques, ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology is of particular interest for providing high-resolution subsurface images and specifically addressing water-related questions. Ground penetrating radar is based on the transmission and reception of VHF-UHF (30-3000 MHz) electromagnetic waves into the ground, whose propagation is determined by the soil electromagnetic properties and their spatial distribution. As the dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity of other soil components, the presence of water in the soil principally governs GPR wave propagation. Therefore, GPR-derived dielectric permittivity is usually used as surrogate measure for soil water content. In the areas of unsaturated zone hydrology and water resources, GPR has been used to identify soil stratigraphy, to locate water tables, to follow wetting front movement, to estimate soil water content, to assist in subsurface hydraulic parameter identification, to assess soil salinity, and to support the monitoring of contaminants. The purpose of this special section of the Vadose Zone Journal is to present recent research advances and applications of GPR in hydrogeophysics, with a particular emphasis on vadose zone investigations. This special section includes contributions presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006 (EGU 2006, Vienna, Austria) and the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR 2006, Columbus, OH). The studies presented here deal with a wide range of surface and borehole GPR applications, including GPR sensitivity to contaminant plumes, new methods for soil water content determination, three-dimensional imaging of the subsurface, time-lapse monitoring of hydrodynamic events and inversion techniques for soil hydraulic properties estimation, and joint interpretation of GPR and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) data.

  3. NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION-TASK 1: Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kleppe, Ph.D., William Norris, Ph.D., Mehdi Etezada, Ph.D., P.E.

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  4. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possibly to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy, Apache, and nginx. In this contribution, the reasons and design decisions for the deployment, the actual implementation, and an evaluation of all involved services and c...

  5. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possibly to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy and Apache. In this contribution, the interplay between these component, their deployment, software mitigation, and the monitoring strategy are discussed.

  6. Coiled tubing deployed ESP works well for Shell in North Sea field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, P. [Centrilift, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Stewart, D.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is believed to be the world`s first offshore coiled tubing deployed ESP system was installed by Centrilift, a Division of Baker Hughes Ltd., on Shell Expro`s Auk field Alpha platform in March 1995. After one year, the system is working well and is now viewed as a major step forward in alternative deployment methods for ESPs. Basic features of the system and project background are overviewed here. Shell U.K. Exploration and Production (Expro) operates in the UK Sector of the North Sea on behalf of Shell and Esso. Centrilift worked closely with Shell on this high-profile project and is active on several others, all aimed at reducing the operator`s cost for installing ESPs by using alternative deployment methods.

  7. Examining CCS deployment potential in China via application of an integrated CCS cost curve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Li, Xiaochun; Wei, Ning

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost curves focusing on CO2 transport and storage have been previously published and used to help establish the large potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China. This paper examines the results from recent work to incorporate the costs of CO2 capture and compression within integrated cost curves that better reflect the complete costs and therefore possible value of CCS. Results show that significant potential exists for large-scale deployment of CCS at costs less than $70/tCO2. Mapping of the cost curve results confirms that the majority of existing CO2 point sources may be able to utilize CCS technologies, and that - except for many sources in southern China - onshore storage capacity appears accessible and sufficient for decades of large-scale deployment.

  8. Seismic isolation of Advanced LIGO gravitational waves detectors: Review of strategy, instrumentation, and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matichard, F; Mittleman, R; Mason, K; Kissel, J; McIver, J; Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Abbott, S; Allwine, E; Barnum, S; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Celerier, C; Clark, D; Coyne, D; DeBra, D; DeRosa, R; Evans, M; Foley, S; Fritschel, P; Giaime, J A; Gray, C; Grabeel, G; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Hillard, M; Hua, W; Kucharczyk, C; Landry, M; Roux, A Le; Lhuillier, V; Macleod, D; Macinnis, M; Mitchell, R; Reilly, B O; Ottaway, D; Paris, H; Pele, A; Puma, M; Radkins, H; Ramet, C; Robinson, M; Ruet, L; Sarin, P; Shoemaker, D; Stein, A; Thomas, J; Vargas, M; Venkateswara, K; Warner, J; Wen, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolating ground-based interferometric gravitational wave observatories from environmental disturbances is one of the great challenges of the advanced detector era. In order to directly observe gravitational waves, the detector components and test masses must be highly inertially decoupled from the ground motion not only to sense the faint strain of space-time induced by gravitational waves, but also to maintain the resonance of the very sensitive 4 km interferometers. This article presents the seismic isolation instrumentation and strategy developed for Advanced LIGO interferometers. It reviews over a decade of research on active isolation in the context of gravitational wave detection, and presents the performance recently achieved with the Advanced LIGO observatory. Lastly, it discusses prospects for future developments in active seismic isolation and the anticipated benefits to astrophysical gravitational wave searches. Beyond gravitational wave research, the goal of this article is to provide detailed is...

  9. Astroparticle Physics with a Customized Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAJORANA Collaboration; C. E. Aalseth; M. Amman; F. T. Avignone III; H. O. Back; A. S. Barabash; P. S. Barbeau; M. Bergevin; F. E. Bertrand; M. Boswell; V. Brudanin; W. Bugg; T. H. Burritt; M. Busch; G. Capps; Y-D. Chan; J. I. Collar; R. J. Cooper; R. Creswick; J. A. Detwiler; J. Diaz; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Ely; J. Esterline; H. Farach; J. E. Fast; N. Fields; P. Finnerty; B. Fujikawa; E. Fuller; V. M. Gehman; G. K. Giovanetti; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusey; A. L. Hallin; G. C Harper; R. Hazama; R. Henning; A. Hime; E. W. Hoppe; T. W. Hossbach; M. A. Howe; R. A. Johnson; K. J. Keeter; M. Keillor; C. Keller; J. D. Kephart; M. F. Kidd; A. Knecht; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; L. Leviner; J. C. Loach; P. N. Luke; S. MacMullin; M. G. Marino; R. D. Martin; D. -M. Mei; H. S. Miley; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; A. W. Meyers; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; D. Peterson; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; J. Qian; D. C. Radford; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; L. Rodriguez; K. P. Rykaczewski; H. Salazar; A. G. Schubert; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; D. Steele; J. Strain; G. Swift; K. Thomas; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; T. D. Van Wechel; I. Vanyushin; R. L. Varner; K. Vetter; J. F. Wilkerson; B. A. Wolfe; W. Xiang; E. Yakushev; H. Yaver; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; C. Zhang; S. Zimmerman

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c^2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  10. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c{sup 2} mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  11. Remote grounding device for subterranean power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.P.

    1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote grounding device is described for subterranean power cable of an insulated conducting cable which comprises: a grounding module and a grounding mechanism; the grounding module is an assembly of a power buss, an insulation sheath, a reducing tap plug and an insulating receptacle cap. The power buss is intimately connected to the conducting cable by a means of an attachment. The reducing tap plug fits concentrically over the power buss and has a tubular probe path void contiguous and in-line to the power buss and a lip around the outer periphery of the reducing tap plug. The insulating receptacle cap covers the tubular void. The insulating sheath covers and holds reducing tap plug and power cable by a multiplicity of locking means and a grounding mechanism assembly of a frame, a probe, a power drive means, a grounding means, a handle means.

  12. FABRICATION TECHNIQUES FOR REVERSE ELECTRODE COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS W.L. Hansenon Semiconductor Nuclear Radiation Detectors", IEEE Trans.COAXIAL GERMANIUM NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS LBL-10726 W.

  13. Deployment of ITS: A Summary of the 2010 National Survey Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Stephen Reed [ORNL; Trombly, Jeff [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents summary results of the 2010 ITS Deployment Tracking survey, the most recent survey conducted by the ITS Deployment Tracking Project. The U.S. Department of Transportation and its member agencies, including the Research and Innovative Technology Administration, have pursued a research and development agenda, the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Program, designed to integrate the latest in information technologies to improve the safety, mobility, and reliability of surface transportation modes. Within metropolitan areas, implementation of these advanced technologies has been accomplished by a variety of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies as well as the private sector. In order to measure the rate of ITS deployment within the nation s largest metropolitan areas, the ITS Deployment Tracking Project has conducted a nationwide survey of state and local transportation and emergency management agencies nearly every year since 1997. The results presented in this report are intended to be a summary of the entire database from the 2010 survey. Access to the complete survey results and previous national surveys are available on-line at http://www.itsdeployment.its.dot.gov. The website also provides access to survey results in the form of downloadable reports, including a survey summary for each survey type and fact sheets. Nearly 1,600 surveys were distributed to state and local transportation agencies in 2010. A total of seven (7) survey types were distributed including: Freeway Management, Arterial Management, Transit Management, Transportation Management Center (TMC), Electronic Toll Collection (ETC), Public Safety Law Enforcement, and Public Safety Fire/Rescue. Among other things, the data collection results indicate that ITS has moved from being experimental to mainstream and interest in continuing investments in ITS continues to be very strong. When asked about future deployment plans, one-third to three-fourths of the different agency types report they will expand current deployments and about half are planning to invest in new technologies over the next three years.

  14. Natural restoration of ground water in UCG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humenick, M.J.; Britton, L.N.; Mattox, C.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contamination from underground coal gasification (UCG) has been documented at several field tests in Texas and Wyoming. However, monitoring data following the termination of gasification operations has shown that contaminant concentrations decrease with time, apparently because of natural processes. This research evaluates the probable natural mechanisms for the reduction of organic contaminant concentrations in ground water. Results indicated that biological degradation and adsorption could be a significant mechanism for removal of organics from ground waters. 12 refs.

  15. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  16. Induction loop detector systems crosstalk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagat, Victor

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Tests were also conducted to measure the potential of crosstalk within a controller cabinet and in twisted and untwisted lead wires. As a part of this ongoing research, attention was also given to determine the distance of no spillover at detector unit...

  17. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  18. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mendez, Victor P. (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  19. Where Machine and Detector Meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    University of Oregon #12;Beam Delivery System => EDRBeam Delivery System => EDR Andrei Seryi for BDS Area Delivery System => EDR Andrei Seryi for BDS Area leaders Deepa Angal-Kalinin, A.S., Hitoshi Yamamotop g Is M2 NE DetectorView MachineView #12;Beam Delivery System => EDRBeam Delivery System => EDR Andrei

  20. Entrapment of the StarClose Vascular Closure System After Attempted Common Femoral Artery Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durack, Jeremy C., E-mail: jeremy.durack@ucsf.edu; Thor Johnson, D.; Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K.; LaBerge, Jeanne M. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A complication of the StarClose Vascular Closure System (Abbott, Des Plaines, IL) after a transarterial hepatic chemoembolization is described. After attempted clip deployment, the entire device became lodged in the tissues overlying the common femoral artery and could not be removed percutaneously. Successful removal of the device required surgical cutdown for removal and arterial repair. Entrapment of the StarClose vascular closure deployment system is a potentially serious complication that has been reported in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, but has not been recognized in the literature.

  1. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  2. VisPortal: Deploying grid-enabled visualization tools through a web-portal interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethel, Wes; Siegerist, Cristina; Shalf, John; Shetty, Praveenkumar; Jankun-Kelly, T.J.; Kreylos, Oliver; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL/NERSC Visportal effort explores ways to deliver advanced Remote/Distributed Visualization (RDV) capabilities through a Grid-enabled web-portal interface. The effort focuses on latency tolerant distributed visualization algorithms, GUI designs that are more appropriate for the capabilities of web interfaces, and refactoring parallel-distributed applications to work in a N-tiered component deployment strategy. Most importantly, our aim is to leverage commercially-supported technology as much as possible in order to create a deployable, supportable, and hence viable platform for delivering grid-based visualization services to collaboratory users.

  3. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) for IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports, Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). Subtask 1 discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. Subtask 2 included here, is the larger of the two volumes and contains five chapters that cover background information and objectives of Subtask 2 and results from each of the four phases of the project.

  4. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  5. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  6. Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, D.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

  7. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  8. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector – Final Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger; Takashi Ito

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is fundedby the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: • Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. • MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. • The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. • MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. • The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately measure the flux and temperature profiles in the reactor. This report summarizes the status at the end of year two of this three year project. As documented in this report, all planned accomplishments for developing this unique new, compact, multipurpose sensor have been completed.

  9. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  10. R&D and deployment valuation of intelligent transportation systems : a case example of the intersection collision avoidance systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodota, Kenichi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared with investments in the conventional infrastructure, those in Intelligent Transportation Technology (ITS) include various uncertainties. Because deployment of ITS requires close public-private partnership, projects ...

  11. Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One must remember that, in addition to attempting to do isotope removal in the competition of seawater (as high as 18,000 ppm sodium due to concentration), some 350,000 gallons of turbine oil was dispersed into the flooded buildings as well. The proposed system consisted of a 4 guard vessel skid for the oil and debris, 4 skids containing 16 cesium towers in a lead-lag layout with removable vessels (sent to an interim storage facility), and a 4 polishing vessel skid for iodine removal and trace cesium levels. At a flow rate of at least 220 gallons per minute, the system has routinely removed over 99% of the cesium, the main component of the activity, since going on line. To date, some 50% of the original activity has been removed and stabilized and cold shutdown of the plant was announced on December 10, 2011. In March and April alone, 10 cubic feet of Engineered Herschelite was shipped to Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NPP, to support the April 1, 2011 outage cleanup; 400 cubic feet was shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for strontium (Sr-90) ground water remediation; and 6000 cubic feet (100 metric tons, MT, or 220,400 pounds) was readied for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station with an additional 100 MT on standby for replacement vessels. This experience and accelerated media production in the U.S. bore direct application to what was to soon be used in Fukushima. How such a sophisticated and totally unique system and huge amount of media could be deployable in such a challenging and changing matrix, and in only seven weeks, is outlined in this paper as well as the system and operation itself. As demonstrated herein, all ten major steps leading up to the readiness and acceptance of a modular emergency technology recovery system were met and in a very short period of time, thus utilizing three decades of experience to produce and deliver such a system literally in seven weeks: - EPRI - U.S. Testing and Experience Leading to Introduction to EPRI - Japan and Subsequently TEPCO Emergency Meetings - Three Mile Island (TMI) Media and Vitrification Experience

  12. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  13. Comparisons of Scintillating Fiber, Diamond Particle Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    /W detector response map x-ray injection diamond detector response drooping ? To be examined on other (more intense) x-ray beamlines the drooping effect of diamond detector, if any x-ray injected on the back response is fairly uniform No drooping ? #12;

  14. Hybrid anode for semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ge; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E; Camarda, Guiseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the internal electric field in compound semiconductor detectors by focusing the internal electric field of the detector and redirecting drifting carriers away from the side surfaces of the semiconductor toward the collection electrode(s).

  15. Evaluation of analytical methods to interpret ground deformations due to soft ground tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zymnis, Despina M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in depth study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of analytical solutions in describing ground movements induced by soft ground tunneling. The analytical solutions that were examined consider both isotropic ...

  16. Special Section on Ground Water Research in China Featured in This Issue of Ground Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of Ground Water by Xun Zhou1, Jiu J. Jiao2, and Mary P. Anderson3 Contained in this issue of Ground Water, Groundwater Resources and the Related Environ- Hydrogeologic Problems in China, Beijing: Seismological Press

  17. Subatomic Physics Detector Lab Design, construction and testing of particle detectors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    for position sensitivity. polycrystalline diamond after surface prep at NSFL ebeam in to expt.Diamond detector imaging at HSC #12; Diamond Detectors for Particle Physics J.W. Martin et al, U. Winnipeg Detectors. Synthetic diamond used as a semiconductor detector (eh pair creation) ­ fast response, low noise ­ very

  18. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vadnais, Kenneth G. (Ojai, CA); Bashforth, Michael B. (Buellton, CA); Lewallen, Tricia S. (Ventura, CA); Nammath, Sharyn R. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  19. Roads2HyCOM Research co-Ordination, Assessment, Deployment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of which nine are specific to hydrogen (H2) and/or fuel cell (FC) technology and two to generalRoads2HyCOM Research co-Ordination, Assessment, Deployment and Support to HyCOM (Hydrogen October 2006 Work Package 3 Task 3.1-2, Deliverable D3.1b 1. A study of experiences with hydrogen

  20. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Deployment on Public Property by State and Local Governments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Coggeshall, C.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and local governments have grown increasingly aware of the economic, environmental, and societal benefits of taking a lead role in U.S. implementation of renewable energy, particularly distributed photovoltaic (PV) installations. Recently, solar energy's cost premium has declined as a result of technology improvements and an increase in the cost of traditional energy generation. At the same time, a nationwide public policy focus on carbon-free, renewable energy has created a wide range of financial incentives to lower the costs of deploying PV even further. These changes have led to exponential increases in the availability of capital for solar projects, and tremendous creativity in the development of third-party ownership structures. As significant users of electricity, state and local governments can be an excellent example for solar PV system deployment on a national scale. Many public entities are not only considering deployment on public building rooftops, but also large-scale applications on available public lands. The changing marketplace requires that state and local governments be financially sophisticated to capture as much of the economic potential of a PV system as possible. This report examines ways that state and local governments can optimize the financial structure of deploying solar PV for public uses.

  1. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Steinberg, D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Zinaman, O.; James, T.; Porro, G.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Logan, J.; Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis explores the potential effects of wind production tax credit expiration and various extension scenarios on future wind deployment with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a model of the U.S. electricity sector. The analysis does not estimate the potential implications on government tax revenue associated with the PTC. Key findings include: Under a scenario in which the PTC is not extended and all other policies remain unchanged, wind capacity additions are expected to be between 3 and 5 GW per year from 2013-2020; PTC extension options that ramp-down from the current level to zero-credit by year-end 2022 appear to be insufficient to support deployment at the recent historical average; Extending the PTC at its historical level may provide the best opportunity to support deployment consistent with recent levels across a range of potential market conditions; it therefore may also provide the best opportunity to sustain wind power installation and manufacturing sector at current levels.

  2. A Model-Based Framework for Developing and Deploying Data Aggregation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    A Model-Based Framework for Developing and Deploying Data Aggregation Services Ramakrishna Soma1 , Amol Bakshi2 , V.K.Prasanna2 , Will Da Sie3 1 Dept of Computer Science, USC, Los Angeles, CA 2 Dept of Electrical Engineering, USC, Los Angeles, CA {rsoma, amol, prasanna}@usc.edu 3 Chevron Corporation, San Ramon

  3. User Interaction and Uptake Challenges to Successfully Deploying Semantic Web Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web applications and services at the 3rd European Semantic Web Conference (ESWC2006), before the deployment of Semantic Web technologies at the 3rd European Semantic Web Conference (ESWC2006), in Budva Technical Report kmi-06-18 September 2006 Tom Heath, John Domingue, Paul Shabajee Published In: Proceedings

  4. WARPnet: Clean Slate Research on Deployed Wireless Siddharth Gupta, Chris Hunter, Patrick Murphy and Ashutosh Sabharwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WARPnet: Clean Slate Research on Deployed Wireless Networks Siddharth Gupta, Chris Hunter, Patrick to allow clean-slate prototyping of real-time wireless networks, which can both be tested in the lab clean-slate programmability of any subset of nodes in the network. Second, the platform should have ex

  5. Advanced Engineering Informatics, 2004 (To appear) Deployment of an Ontological Framework of Functional Design Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    design knowledge on production systems since May, 2001. An empirical evaluation by Sumitomo's engineers The importance of knowledge sharing among designers and engineers has been widely recognized in knowledgeAdvanced Engineering Informatics, 2004 (To appear) - 1 - Deployment of an Ontological Framework

  6. Deployable Tensegrity Reflectors for Small Satellites1 A.G. Tibert2 and S. Pellegrino3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, U.K. Abstract Future small satellite missions require low-cost, precision reflector structures with large aperture that can be packaged in a small envelope. Existing that deploys two identical cable nets (front and rear nets) interconnected by tension ties; the reflecting mesh

  7. Chapter 6: Innovation-Focused Policy Framework for TW-Scale PV Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 Chapter 6: Innovation-Focused Policy Framework for TW-Scale PV Deployment 6.1. Demand, and installation, which all have one common goal: to reduce the cost of PV technology and make it an affordable & development (R&D). These policy instruments in the PV sector can be broadly categorized into two approaches

  8. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Deployable Inspector Spacecraft for Distributed Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, William

    maneuvers in the region near the parent, performs the required measurements, relays the data, and then re field maps of the vehicles RF, magnetic or nuclear emissions. One proposed solution to this inspection problem is a small, low-cost deployable spacecraft that detaches from its parent vehicle, performs its

  9. Ontology Technology for the Development and Deployment of Learning Technology Systems -a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyowon

    Ontology Technology for the Development and Deployment of Learning Technology Systems - a Survey is an initiative to bring meaning to the Web. The Semantic Web is based on ontology technology ­ a knowledge five scenarios demonstrating different forms of applications of ontology technologies

  10. Approximation Algorithms For Wireless Sensor Deployment Xiaochun Xu and Sartaj Sahni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahni, Sartaj K.

    will be able to adequately monitor the target region. When site selection is possible, we use deterministic of the problem considered here is in the deployment of chemical and radioactive sensors so as to monitor high risk targets that may be approximated as points; the cost of a sensor may be from hundreds of dollars

  11. Challenges and Opportunities in Large-Scale Deployment of Automated Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    to the locational marginal price (LMP) at that bus. We show that a key challenge in large- scale deployment of ECS, locational marginal price. I. INTRODUCTION Real-time and time-of-use electricity pricing models can- edge among users on how to respond to time-varying prices and the lack of effective home automation

  12. A WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK SYSTEM DEPLOYMENT FOR DETECTING STICK SLIP MOTION IN GLACIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    A WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK SYSTEM DEPLOYMENT FOR DETECTING STICK SLIP MOTION IN GLACIERS K. Martinez, jhart@soton.ac.uk Keywords: Glaciers, Environmental sensor networks Abstract The behaviour of glaciers The current understanding of how glaciers and ice sheets respond to climate change is extremely limited

  13. Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures O. A. Araromi*a , I. Gavrilovichb , J. Shintakea , S. Rosseta , H. R. Sheaa a Microsystems For Space Technologies Laboratory, �cole Polytechnique Fédérale de

  14. Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3 governments are promoting renewable energy. Renewable energy ­ Policy Landscape #12;Div ision of T echnology

  15. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Introduction Wireless sensor network (WSN) is a key element of the pervasive/ubiquitous computing sensor network (heterogeneous WSN) consists of sensor nodes with different ability, such as different

  16. IEEE COMMUNICATIONS MAGAZINE, VOL. XX, NO. Y, 2013 1 Automated Small-Cell Deployment for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    - and energy-efficient method of improving local spectral efficiency. Whilst unarticulated cell deployments can§ University of Warwick, UK, Email: weisi.guo@warwick.ac.uk University of South Australia, Australia, Email, capital expenditure, and energy consumption of the cellular network. The theoretical work is supported

  17. Development and Deployment of a Large-Scale Flower Recognition Mobile App

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engine and re- lies on computer vision recognition technology. The mobile phone app is available freeDevelopment and Deployment of a Large-Scale Flower Recognition Mobile App Anelia Angelova NEC Labs- eration of user generated content, especially from mobile de- vices, there is a need to develop

  18. Samovar : An evaluation framework for real time applications deployment Lionel Havet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    have to meet specific require- ments in terms of performance, dependability, energy and cost which for the a priori validation, deployment optimization and fine tuning and sizing in terms of safety, resources usage able to represent their continuous aspects: hybrid automata, hybrid Petri Nets, etc

  19. IEEE IGARSS 03, Toulouse, France, July 2003 Puerto Rico Deployable Radar Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

    IEEE IGARSS 03, Toulouse, France, July 2003 Puerto Rico Deployable Radar Network Design; Site of Atmospheric Events (CLiMMATE) Electrical and Computer Engineering Department University of Puerto Rico (CLiMMATE) Laboratory at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez are collaborating to modify a MK2

  20. National Deployment Strategy for Truck Stop Electrification Josias Zietsman, Ph.D., P.E.*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 long-haul trucks operating in the United States (2). The U.S. Department of Transportation mandates that drivers spend resting and sleeping in the cabs of their trucks. As a consequence, long-haul truck driversNational Deployment Strategy for Truck Stop Electrification by Josias Zietsman, Ph.D., P

  1. Comparison of House and Senate Clean Energy Deployment Administration (CEDA) provisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Comparison of House and Senate Clean Energy Deployment Administration (CEDA) provisions What is CEDA? Both the American Clean Energy Leadership Act of 2009 (ACELA) in the Senate and Subtitle J- Nuclear and Advanced Technologies of the American Clean Energy and Security Act (H.R. 2454) in the House

  2. Mobile Access of Wide-Spectrum Networks: Design, Deployment and Experimental Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knightly, Edward W.

    --Wireless networks increasingly utilize diverse spec- tral bands that exhibit vast differences in both transmissionMobile Access of Wide-Spectrum Networks: Design, Deployment and Experimental Evaluation Anastasios Giannoulis Paul Patras Edward W. Knightly Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University

  3. SUDAN: ANATOMY OF A CONFLICT Escalation: SAF and SPLA Force Deployment Within and Around Abyei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    SUDAN: ANATOMY OF A CONFLICT Chapter I Escalation: SAF and SPLA Force Deployment Within and Around Abyei Mid-2010 to January 2011 1 Harvard Humanitarian Initiative Sudan: Anatomy of a Conflict Executive in Sudan Since January 2011, humanitarian actors and international observers, including United Nations

  4. A Policy Deployment Model for the Ponder N. Dulay, E. Lupu, M. Sloman, N. Damianou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupu, Emil C.

    A Policy Deployment Model for the Ponder Language N. Dulay, E. Lupu, M. Sloman, N. Damianou}@doc.ic.ac.uk Abstract Policies are rules that govern the choices in behaviour of a system. Security policies define what policies define what actions need to be carried out when specific events occur within a system or what

  5. Demo Abstract: Wireless Sensor Network for Substation Monitoring: Design and Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    -voltage substations, lower installation cost, and utilization of the distributed pro- cessing capabilities of wirelessDemo Abstract: Wireless Sensor Network for Substation Monitoring: Design and Deployment Asis-Transmissions & Substations 9625 Research Drive Charlotte, NC 28262 {lvanderz,birodriguez} @epri.com Ralph McKosky, Joseph

  6. MIRAGE: A Management Tool for the Analysis and Deployment of Network Security Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and VPN routers. We review the two main functionalities embedded technologies, such as filter- ing of traffic, use of encrypted communications, and deployment of authentication of firewalls, NIDSs (network intrusion detection systems), and VPN (Virtual Private Network) routers, is still

  7. Smart Home in a Box: A Large Scale Smart Home Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Smart Home in a Box: A Large Scale Smart Home Deployment Aaron S. CRANDALL a and Diane J. COOK a,1 systems. This work summa- rizes some of the existing works and introduces the Smart Home in a Box (SHiB) Project. The upcoming SHiB Project targets building 100 smart homes in several kinds of living spaces

  8. Middleware Support for the Deployment of Resource-Aware Parallel Java Components on Heterogeneous Distributed Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Distributed Platforms Yves Mahéo, Frédéric Guidec, Luc Courtrai VALORIA Laboratory, Université de Bretagne of the Concerto platform, which is dedicated to supporting the deployment of resource-aware parallel Java components on heteroge- neous distributed platforms, such as pools of workstations in labs or offices. Our

  9. VoxNet: An Interactive, Rapidly-Deployable Acoustic Monitoring Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    VoxNet: An Interactive, Rapidly-Deployable Acoustic Monitoring Platform Michael Allen Cogent applica- tions and virtual fences. VoxNet is a complete hardware and software platform for distributed environments; (2) a high level pro- gramming language that abstracts the user from platform and network details

  10. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  11. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  12. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  13. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  14. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  15. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  16. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  17. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  20. More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how early market end users are operating 1,111 fuel cell units at 301 sites in 20 states with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program and analysis by NREL. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded the deployment of approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. In support of the ARRA fuel cell deployment objectives, NREL analyzes and validates the technology in real-world applications, reports on the technology status, and facilitates the development of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations in strategic markets-including material handling equipment, backup power, and stationary power-where fuel cells can compete with conventional technologies. NREL is validating hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world settings through data collection, analysis, and reporting. The fuel cell and infrastructure analysis provides an independent, third-party assessment that focuses on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure performance, operation, maintenance, use, and safety. An objective of the ARRA fuel cell project-to deploy approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets - has been met in two years. By the end of 2011, 504 material handling equipment (MHE) fuel cell units were operating at 8 facilities and 607 backup power fuel cell units were operating at 293 sites. MHE and backup power are two markets where fuel cells are capable of meeting the operating demands, and deployments can be leveraged to accelerate fuel cell commercialization.

  1. Development and Deployment of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Christopher A.; Landon, Matthew R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Hanson, Carl E. [AREVA Federal Services, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012. (authors)

  2. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  3. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  4. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Alonso; N. Barros; M. Bergevin; A. Bernstein; L. Bignell; E. Blucher; F. Calaprice; J. M. Conrad; F. B. Descamps; M. V. Diwan; D. A. Dwyer; S. T. Dye; A. Elagin; P. Feng; C. Grant; S. Grullon; S. Hans; D. E. Jaffe; S. H. Kettell; J. R. Klein; K. Lande; J. G. Learned; K. B. Luk; J. Maricic; P. Marleau; A. Mastbaum; W. F. McDonough; L. Oberauer; G. D. Orebi Gann; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; M. C. Sanchez; M. H. Shaevitz; T. M. Shokair; M. B. Smy; A. Stahl; M. Strait; R. Svoboda; N. Tolich; M. R. Vagins; K. A. van Bibber; B. Viren; R. B. Vogelaar; M. J. Wetstein; L. Winslow; B. Wonsak; E. T. Worcester; M. Wurm; M. Yeh; C. Zhang

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diffuse supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon tracking detector proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The goal is the deployment of a 30-100 kiloton-scale detector, the basic elements of which are being developed now in experiments such as WATCHMAN, ANNIE, SNO+, and EGADS.

  5. A radio air shower surface detector as an extension for IceCube and IceTop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Auffenberg; T. Gaisser; K. Helbing; T. Huege; T. Karg; A. Karle

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The IceCube neutrino detector is built into the Antarctic ice sheet at the South Pole to measure high energy neutrinos. For this, 4800 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are being deployed at depths between 1450 and 2450 meters into the ice to measure neutrino induced charged particles like muons. IceTop is a surface air shower detector consisting of 160 Cherenkov ice tanks located on top of IceCube. To extend IceTop, a radio air shower detector could be built to significantly increase the sensitivity at higher shower energies and for inclined showers. As air showers induced by cosmic rays are a major part of the muonic background in IceCube, IceTop is not only an air shower detector, but also a veto to reduce the background in IceCube. Air showers are detectable by radio signals with a radio surface detector. The major emission process is the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by e+ e- shower particles in the Earths magnetic field (geosynchrotron effect). Simulations of the expected radio signals of air showers are shown. The sensitivity and the energy threshold of different antenna field configurations are estimated.

  6. Integrated Risk Framework for Gigawatt-Scale Deployments of Renewable Energy: The U.S. Wind Energy Case; October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the potential environmental and human effects of deploying renewable energy on private and public lands, along our coasts, on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and in the Great Lakes requires a new way of evaluating potential environmental and human impacts. The author argues that deployment of renewables requires a framework risk paradigm that underpins effective future siting decisions and public policies.

  7. IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 17, NO. 4, APRIL 1999 689 The Rapidly Deployable Radio Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , and mobile node management. This paper describes the architecture for the Rapidly Deployable Radio Network for implementing mobile, rapidly deployable, and adaptive wireless communica- tions systems. The driving and a prototype system built to evaluate key system components. Index Terms-- Adaptive protocols, mobile

  8. Scaling Considerations in Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    2000-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study design challenges associated with realizing a ground state quantum computer. In such a computer, the energy gap between the ground state and first excited state must be sufficiently large to prevent disruptive excitations. Here, an estimate is provided of this gap as a function of computer size. We then address the problem of detecting the output of a ground state quantum computer. It is shown that the exponential detection difficulties that appear to be present at first can be overcome in a straightforward manner by small design changes.

  9. A LOW-COST GPR GAS PIPE & LEAK DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Cist; Alan Schutz

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-weight, easy to use ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for tracking metal/non-metal pipes has been developed. A pre-production prototype instrument has been developed whose production cost and ease of use should fit important market niches. It is a portable tool which is swept back and forth like a metal detector and which indicates when it goes over a target (metal, plastic, concrete, etc.) and how deep it is. The innovation of real time target detection frees the user from having to interpret geophysical data and instead presents targets as dots on the screen. Target depth is also interpreted automatically, relieving the user of having to do migration analysis. In this way the user can simply walk around looking for targets and, by ''connecting the dots'' on the GPS screen, locate and follow pipes in real time. This is the first tool known to locate metal and non-metal pipes in real time and map their location. This prototype design is similar to a metal detector one might use at the beach since it involves sliding a lightweight antenna back and forth over the ground surface. The antenna is affixed to the end of an extension that is either clipped to or held by the user. This allows him to walk around in any direction, either looking for or following pipes with the antenna location being constantly recorded by the positioning system. Once a target appears on the screen, the user can locate by swinging the unit to align the cursor over the dot. Leak detection was also a central part of this project, and although much effort was invested into its development, conclusive results are not available at the time of the writing of this document. Details of the efforts that were made as a part of this cooperative agreement are presented.

  10. Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinsheng Liu; Jing Huang; Ding Chen; Ying Zhang; Liuming Zhai; Xu Chen; Xiaobin Hu; Yuhui Lin; Xueyao Zhang; Cunfeng Feng; Huanyu Jia; Xunxiu Zhou; DanZengLuoBu; Tianlu Chen; Haijin Li; Maoyuan Liu; Aifang Yuan

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called "YAC-II", consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage about 500 m$^2$. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm $\\times $ 50 cm each are deployed in a 10 $\\times$ 10 matrix from with a 1.9 m separation and the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm $\\times$ 50 cm each are distributed around them to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC-II array. YAC-II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of proton, helium and iron nuclei between 5$\\times$$10^{13}$ eV and $10^{16}$ eV covering the "knee" and also being connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC-II in this paper.

  11. Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); University Graduate Center, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, DE-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institut fuer Optik, Information und Photonik, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, DE-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

  12. Deploying Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGas SeparationsRelevantDOEDelegationsElectronic

  13. Deployment Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D * A LFederalCooperation

  14. Proceedings of the National Groundwater National Ground Water Association Southwest focused ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA, June 3-4, pp:87-90.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA

  15. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  16. Hydrostatic Level Sensors as High Precision Ground Motion Instrumentation for Tevatron and Other Energy Frontier Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, James; Hansen, Sten; Johnson, Todd; Jostlein, Hans; Kiper, Terry; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Chupyra, Andrei; Kondaurov, Mikhail; Medvedko, Anatoly; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle accelerators require very tight tolerances on the alignment and stability of their elements: magnets, accelerating cavities, vacuum chambers, etc. In this article we describe the Hydrostatic Level Sensors (HLS) for very low frequency measurements used in a variety of facilities at Fermilab. We present design features of the sensors, outline their technical parameters, describe their test and calibration procedures, discuss different regimes of operation and give few illustrative examples of the experimental data. Detail experimental results of the ground motion measurements with these detectors will be presented in subsequent papers.

  17. Grounding linguistic analysis in control applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of grounding linguistic analysis in control applications, such as automated maintenance of computers and game playing. We assume access to natural language documents that describe the ...

  18. Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/AST_Inspection_Form.pdf #12;

  19. Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive provisions and funding mechanisms to the extent that funds are available to enable the state to take corrective action at...

  20. Building an entanglement measure on physical ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Teresi; A. Napoli; A. Messina

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce on physical grounds a new measure of multipartite entanglement for pure states. The function we define is discriminant and monotone under LOCC and moreover can be expressed in terms of observables of the system.