Sample records for gross state product

  1. Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for February 2015...

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2007, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption was about $408 million as measured

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 14% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys, respectively. The value

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2007 was $548 million as measured

  9. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  10. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","12015","1151989"...

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2011, the United States was expected to consume about 5% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2010 was $883 million as measured by the value

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, the United States was expected to consume about 7% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2008 was $1,283 million

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production company produced chromium metal. Stainless- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2011 was $1

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, the United States was expected to consume about 2% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production- and heat-resisting-steel producers were the leading consumers of ferrochromium. Superalloys require chromium. The value of chromium material consumption in 2009 was $358 million as measured by the value

  15. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2002, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2001): Chromium contained in chromite ore and chromium ferroalloys and metal: South Africa, 50%; Kazakhstan, 20, Kazakhstan, and South Africa) accounted for about 76% of world production. South Africa alone accounts States -- -- -- 7,000 India 1,680 1,900 18,000 39,000 Kazakhstan 2,050 2,300 410,000 410,000 South Africa

  16. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  17. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  18. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  19. Data Files Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Data Files Data Files 1 EIA Best Estimate of Gross Withdrawals: Combination of historical production data from the Natural Gas Annual and current estimates based on data from the...

  20. Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gross production tax applies to most gas produced in North Dakota. Gas burned at the well site to power an electrical generator that consumes at least 75 percent of the gas is exempt from...

  1. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction 1980

  2. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction 1980Alaska Arkansas

  3. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSalesU.S. Offshore U.S. State

  4. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore

  5. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. State

  6. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear Jan FebFeet) Gross Withdrawals

  7. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProduction 4

  8. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural Gas Exports

  9. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProduction 4 12Exports

  10. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next(MillionProductionFeet)

  11. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA ShaleShaleGross

  12. Econometric and Neural Network Analysis of the Labor Productivity and Average Gross Earnings Indices in the Romanian Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Econometric and Neural Network Analysis of the Labor Productivity and Average Gross Earnings and models that were used consist of several lag econometric models, ARIMA processes, as well as feed forward AGEI and LPI. Key-Words: - labor productivity, econometric model, ARIMA, VAR, neural network, forecast

  13. 4, 30893121, 2007 Gross community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Gross community production and metabolic balance in the South Pacific Gyre, using a non intrusive bio describe a non-intrusive bio-optical method to quantify the various terms of a production budget (Gross

  14. Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569Decade886,0845,02044

  15. Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051per0 1 2 2

  16. Alaska State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYearDecadeYearThousand From Gas

  17. California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590FuelDecadeCalifornia (Millionper977,029

  18. Texas State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011 20123.9 4.0 4.78-2013

  19. Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Monthly Annual Download Series

  20. Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Monthly Annual Download

  1. ,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlantGross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

  2. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (MillionGross

  3. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3ReservesYearGross

  4. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,9322009Feet)Gross Withdrawals

  5. ,"Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996..........RegionTotalPriceShare of Total U.S.Gross

  6. ,"Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheetGas,Gross

  7. ,"US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S. UndergroundState Offshore

  8. State Support of Domestic Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Wright

    2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the State Support of Domestic Production DE-FC26-04NT15456. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) performed efforts in support of State programs related to the security, reliability and growth if our nation's domestic production of oil and natural gas. The project objectives were to improve the States ability to monitor the security of oil and gas operations; to maximize the production of domestic oil and natural gas thereby minimizing the threat to national security posed by interruptions in energy imports; to assist States in developing and maintaining high standards of environmental protection; to assist in addressing issues that limit the capacity of the industry; to promote the deployment of the appropriate application of technology for regulatory efficiency; and to inform the public about emerging energy issues.

  9. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  10. A Continuous Measure of Gross Primary Production for the Conterminous U.S. Derived from MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Law, Beverly E.; Chen, Jiquan; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Cook, David R.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Wharton, Sonia; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Verma, Shashi B.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Scott, Russell L.; Monson, Russell K.; Litvak, Marcy; Hollinger, David Y.; Sun, Ge; Davis, Kenneth J.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Starr, Gregory; Torn, Margaret S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantification of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is of scientific importance and also relevant to climate-policy making. Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of ecosystem-level exchange of carbon dioxide spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. However, these measurements only represent the fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to upscale gross primary productivity (GPP) data from eddy covariance flux towers to the continental scale. We first combined GPP and MODIS data for 42 AmeriFlux towers encompassing a wide range of ecosystem and climate types to develop a predictive GPP model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained using observed GPP over the period 2000-2004, and was validated using observed GPP over the period 2005-2006 and leave-one-out cross-validation. Our model predicted GPP fairly well at the site level. We then used the model to estimate GPP for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the U.S. for each 8-day interval over the period from February 2000 to December 2006 using MODIS data. Our GPP estimates provide a spatially and temporally continuous measure of gross primary production for the U.S. that is a highly constrained by eddy covariance flux data. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for upscaling eddy flux GPP data to the continental scale and producing continuous GPP estimates across multiple biomes. With these estimates, we then examined the patterns, magnitude, and interannual variability of GPP. We estimated a gross carbon uptake between 6.91 and 7.33 Pg C yr{sup -1} for the conterminous U.S. Drought, fires, and hurricanes reduced annual GPP at regional scales and could have a significant impact on the U.S. net ecosystem carbon exchange. The sources of the interannual variability of U.S. GPP were dominated by these extreme climate events and disturbances.

  11. U.S. State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)653,704

  12. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

  13. Advanced Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaics Maximum Rebate 60 million Program Info Start Date 712010 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of gross receipts from sale and...

  14. Quantum secret sharing using product states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, L.-Y.; Li, C.-M. [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li, 32023, Taiwan (China); Institute and Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes quantum secret sharing protocols using product states. The first two protocols adopt the quantum key distribution protocol using product states [Guo et al.Phys. Rev. A 64, 042301 (2001)]. In these two protocols, the sender does not reveal any information about the qutrits until confirming that each receiver has received a qutrit. This study also considers the security and some possible eavesdropping strategies. In the third proposed protocol, three-level Bell states are exploited for qutrit preparation via nonlocality swapping.

  15. Junior Mini Medical School Program Gross...Seriously Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of middle school students in the fields of science and medicine. They give kids who may be curious about at the University of Iowa. The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Mini Medical School programs openJunior Mini Medical School Program Gross...Seriously Gross UI Gross Anatomy The University of Iowa

  16. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model An update to...

  17. Matrix product states for gauge field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Jutho Haegeman; Karel Van Acoleyen; Henri Verschelde; Frank Verstraete

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study 1+1 dimensional one flavour quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study non-equilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field.

  18. Product-state Approximations to Quantum Ground States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandão; Aram W. Harrow

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The local Hamiltonian problem consists of estimating the ground-state energy (given by the minimum eigenvalue) of a local quantum Hamiltonian. First, we show the existence of a good product-state approximation for the ground-state energy of 2-local Hamiltonians with one or more of the following properties: (1) high degree, (2) small expansion, or (3) a ground state with sublinear entanglement with respect to some partition into small pieces. The approximation based on degree is a surprising difference between quantum Hamiltonians and classical CSPs (constraint satisfaction problems), since in the classical setting, higher degree is usually associated with harder CSPs. The approximation based on low entanglement, in turn, was previously known only in the regime where the entanglement was close to zero. Since the existence of a low-energy product state can be checked in NP, the result implies that any Hamiltonian used for a quantum PCP theorem should have: (1) constant degree, (2) constant expansion, (3) a "volume law" for entanglement with respect to any partition into small parts. Second, we show that in several cases, good product-state approximations not only exist, but can be found in polynomial time: (1) 2-local Hamiltonians on any planar graph, solving an open problem of Bansal, Bravyi, and Terhal, (2) dense k-local Hamiltonians for any constant k, solving an open problem of Gharibian and Kempe, and (3) 2-local Hamiltonians on graphs with low threshold rank, via a quantum generalization of a recent result of Barak, Raghavendra and Steurer. Our work introduces two new tools which may be of independent interest. First, we prove a new quantum version of the de Finetti theorem which does not require the usual assumption of symmetry. Second, we describe a way to analyze the application of the Lasserre/Parrilo SDP hierarchy to local quantum Hamiltonians.

  19. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP by...

  20. Gross decontamination experiment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  1. Semantic Awareness in Product Lifecycle Management Systems Casey James Baker, Douglas Eddy, Dr. Sundar Krishnamurty, Dr. Ian Grosse, Dr. Jack Wileden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Semantic Awareness in Product Lifecycle Management Systems Casey James Baker, Douglas Eddy, Dr enterprises turn to Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems to organize product development and to reduce), in which the PLM system was used to help with the design and fabrication of a product. Windchill

  2. Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

  3. Deriving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niels Benedikter

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In experiments, Bose-Einstein condensates are prepared by cooling a dilute Bose gas in a trap. After the phase transition has been reached, the trap is switched off and the evolution of the condensate observed. The evolution is macroscopically described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. On the microscopic level, the dynamics of Bose gases are described by the $N$-body Schr\\"odinger equation. We review our article [BdS12] in which we construct a class of initial data in Fock space which are energetically close to the ground state and prove that their evolution approximately follows the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The key idea is to model two-particle correlations with a Bogoliubov transformation.

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled inventory inventory for disposal FY 2001 FY 2001 Battery: Natural ore 103 0.2 103 27 1 Synthetic dioxide 3

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    of ore were used for such nonmetallurgical purposes as production of dry cell batteries, as an ingredient Recycling: Scrap recovery specifically for manganese was negligible, but a significant amount was recycled, as follows, in tons: natural battery, 16,800, and metallurgical, 331,000. Prepared by Thomas S. Jones [(703

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous and nonferrous scrap inventory inventory for disposal FY 2006 FY 2006 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- 18 -- 27 -- Chemical grade

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese has not been produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    purposes as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant of apparent consumption 100 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor inventory for disposal FY 2009 FY 2009 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- -- 18 -- Chemical grade -- -- 23

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese of apparent consumption 100 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor inventory inventory for disposal FY 2007 FY 2007 Manganese ore: Battery grade 16 2 16 27 2 Chemical grade 0

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous and nonferrous scrap inventory inventory for disposal FY 2005 FY 2005 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- 18 -- 27 23 Chemical grade

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise specified) Domestic Production and Use: Manganese ore containing 35% or more manganese was not produced domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    as production of dry cell batteries, in plant fertilizers and animal feed, and as a brick colorant. Manganese 100 100 100 100 Recycling: Manganese was recycled incidentally as a minor constituent of ferrous FY 2008 FY 2008 Manganese ore: Battery grade -- -- 18 16 Chemical grade -- -- -- -- Metallurgical

  11. Efficient implementation and the product state representation of numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.; Physics

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation between the requirement of efficient implementability and the product-state representation of numbers is examined. Numbers are defined to be any model of the axioms of number theory or arithmetic. Efficient implementability (EI) means that the basic arithmetic operations are physically implementable and the space-time and thermodynamic resources needed to carry out the implementations are polynomial in the range of numbers considered. Different models of numbers are described to show the independence of both EI and the product-state representation from the axioms. The relation between EI and the product-state representation is examined. It is seen that the condition of a product-state representation does not imply EI. Arguments used to refute the converse implication, EI implies a product-state representation, seem reasonable; but they are not conclusive. Thus this implication remains an open question.

  12. Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    CHAPTER 31 ·Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS Have you ever gotten so angry that you've done). Although the topic of emotion regulation is a relatively late addition to the field of emotion, a concern with emotion regulation is anything but new. Emotion regu lation has been a focus in the study of psycho

  13. Solar Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted....

  14. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, W.C.

    1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

  15. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  16. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  17. State of heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    California is unique in the United States because it has the largest heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees}API gravity) resource, estimated to be in excess of 40 billion barrels. Of the current 941,543 barrels/day of oil produced in California (14% of the U.S. total), 70% or 625,312 barrels/day is heavy oil. Heavy oil constituted only 20% of California`s oil production in the early 1940s, but development of thermal oil production technology in the 1960s allowed the heavy industry to grow and prosper to the point where by the mid-1980s, heavy oil constituted 70% of the state`s oil production. Similar to the rest of the United States, light oil production in the Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Region, and San Joaquin Valley peaked and then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Unlike other states, California developed a heavy oil industry that replaced declining light oil production and increased the states total oil production, despite low heavy oil prices, stringent environmental regulations and long and costly delays in developing known oil resources. California`s deep conversion refineries process the nation`s highest sulfur, lowest API gravity crude to make the cleanest transportation fuels available. More efficient vehicles burning cleaner reformulated fuels have significantly reduced the level of ozone precursors (the main contributor to California`s air pollution) and have improved air quality over the last 20 years. In a state where major oil companies dominate, the infrastructure is highly dependent on the 60% of ANS production being refined in California, and California`s own oil production. When this oil is combined with the small volume of imported crude, a local surplus of marketed oil exists that inhibits exploitation of California`s heavy oil resources. As ANS production declines, or if the export restrictions on ANS sales are lifted, a window of opportunity develops for increased heavy oil production.

  18. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines future prospects of bioenergy production in the United States. The analysis examines three issues on liquid fuel and cellulosic ethanol. First, the amount that costs need to decrease in order to make cellulosic ethanol...

  19. Multiple Steady States in Ideal Two-Product Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Multiple Steady States in Ideal Two-Product Distillation Elling W. Jacobsen and Sigurd Skogestad Chemical Engineering Dept., University of Trondheim-NTH, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway Simple distillation and compositions in the column. Introduction Multiple steady states (multiplicity) in distillation columns have

  20. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7

  1. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7Alaska Arkansas

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet)

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet)Alaska

  4. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0 0SalesFrom All

  5. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0 0SalesFrom AllAlaska

  6. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0U.S. Offshore U.S.

  7. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0U.S. Offshore

  8. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exports (No Intransit Deliveries)U.S.

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exports (No Intransit

  10. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSalesU.S. Offshore U.S.

  11. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same 2011 2012 2013 View20090

  12. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same 2011 2012 2013

  13. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889 11,5022009 2010 201130U.S.

  14. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889 11,5022009 2010

  15. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. VehicleNov-14

  16. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. VehicleNov-14Alaska Arkansas

  17. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14 Dec-14Feet)U.S.

  18. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14

  19. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550Increases (Billion1 -5 2Feet)

  20. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550Increases (Billion1 -5

  1. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million CubicSales (Billion 044,0860U.S.

  2. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million CubicSales (Billion

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Billion Cubic2009 20103,015U.S.

  4. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Billion Cubic2009

  5. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion Cubic Feet)U.S. Offshore U.S.

  6. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion Cubic Feet)U.S. Offshore

  7. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercialFeet) New2009Feet)U.S.

  8. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercialFeet)

  9. Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S.: Shale

  10. Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S.: ShaleAlaska

  11. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are there GainsU.S. Offshore

  12. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are there GainsU.S.

  13. Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are there GainsU.S.U.S.

  14. Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5Are there GainsU.S.U.S.Alaska

  15. Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJuly 28,September 25,1 E n e

  16. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercialNov-14U.S. Offshore U.S.

  17. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercialNov-14U.S. Offshore

  18. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million381 -260 74U.S. Offshore

  19. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million381 -260 74U.S.

  20. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumptionper Thousand Cubic4Feet)U.S.

  1. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumptionper Thousand

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,9601. Natural5,19580Feet)U.S.

  3. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,9601.

  4. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNA 24,057 25,124U.S.

  5. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNA 24,057 25,124U.S.Alaska

  6. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View

  7. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

  8. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9ThousandFeet)41Feet)U.S.

  9. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanU.S.

  11. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanU.S.Alaska

  12. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  13. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water...

  14. Aggregate productivity in the United States, 1929-82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosko, Linda Ann

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGGREGATE PRODUCTIVITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1929-82 A Thesis by LINDA ANN KOSKO submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major... Subject: Economics AGGREGATE PRODUCTIVITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 1929-82 A Thesis by LINDA ANN KOSKO Approved as to style and content by: Hae-Shin Hwa (Chairman of Comm ttee) Rudo h J. Freund ( mber) David P. Schutte (Member) John R. Moroney...

  15. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United StatesSustainable Food and Energy Production in the United Statesquality of renewable energy production and then assessing

  16. Matrix Product States approach to non-Markovian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Descamps Benoit

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix product state approach to non-Markovian, classical and quantum processes is discussed. In the classical case, the Radon-Nikodym derivative of all processes can be embedded into quantum measurement procedure. In the both cases, quantum and classical, the master equation can be derived from a projecting a quantum Markovian process onto a lower dimensional subspace.

  17. Geometry of matrix product states: Metric, parallel transport, and curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegeman, Jutho, E-mail: jutho.haegeman@gmail.com; Verstraete, Frank [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria) [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Mariën, Michaël [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Osborne, Tobias J. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany) [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the geometric properties of the manifold of states described as (uniform) matrix product states. Due to the parameter redundancy in the matrix product state representation, matrix product states have the mathematical structure of a (principal) fiber bundle. The total space or bundle space corresponds to the parameter space, i.e., the space of tensors associated to every physical site. The base manifold is embedded in Hilbert space and can be given the structure of a Kähler manifold by inducing the Hilbert space metric. Our main interest is in the states living in the tangent space to the base manifold, which have recently been shown to be interesting in relation to time dependence and elementary excitations. By lifting these tangent vectors to the (tangent space) of the bundle space using a well-chosen prescription (a principal bundle connection), we can define and efficiently compute an inverse metric, and introduce differential geometric concepts such as parallel transport (related to the Levi-Civita connection) and the Riemann curvature tensor.

  18. Carbon emissions in energy production and use in the tropical region: The case of the state of Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freitas, M.A.V. de; Porto, R.M.G. Jr.; Peres, F.M. Jr.; Cecchi, J.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brasil is one of the most important region in the tropics. An efficient management in energy use and production in this state of Rio de Janeiro could be an excellent model to others development regions in the tropics. In 1994, the State of the Rio de Janeiro represented around 13 millions of inhabitants, an economy of 42 billions US$ (gross national products), the biggest brazilian producer in petroleum and natural gas and a large market to energy products (electric power and fossil fuels). This state was responsible for 8.6 millions tonnes of carbon in CO2 emissions in 1994, issue to combustion of petroleum products (65.9%), coal (27.8%), natural gas (3.7%), charcoal and fuelwood (2.6%). The principals responsibles to these carbon emissions are the industrial activities (40%), the transport (35.7%) and energy production (12%). The main objectives of this work are analyze the carbon emissions in energy production and use in Rio de Janeiro between 1980 and 1994, the possibilities to reduction this amount and the perspectives to renewable energy.

  19. Matrix product states for Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Karel Van Acoleyen; Jutho Haegeman; Frank Verstraete

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade tensor network states (TNS) have emerged as a powerful tool for the study of quantum many body systems. The matrix product states (MPS) are one particular case of TNS and are used for the simulation of 1+1 dimensional systems. In [1] we considered the MPS formalism for the simulation of the Hamiltonian lattice gauge formulation of 1+1 dimensional one flavor quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model. We deduced the ground state and lowest lying excitations. Furthermore, we performed a full quantum real-time simulation for a quench with a uniform background electric field. In this proceeding we continue our work on the Schwinger model. We demonstrate the advantage of working with gauge invariant MPS by comparing with MPS simulations on the full Hilbert space, that includes numerous non-physical gauge variant states. Furthermore, we compute the chiral condensate and recover the predicted UV-divergent behavior.

  20. Smoking in top-grossing US movies 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polansky, Jonathan R; Titus, Kori; Atayeva, Renata; Glantz, Stanton A PhD

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoking in top?grossing US movies Jonathan R. PolanskyApril 23, 2015 Smoking in top?grossing US movies: 2014 | 2about 20 percent of all top?grossing films. Tobacco presence

  1. Simulating Potential Switchgrass Production in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, T. O.; Parrish, David J.; Tyler, Donald D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using results from field trials of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in the United States, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) process-level agroecosystem model was calibrated, validated, and applied to simulate potential productivity of switchgrass for use as a biofuel feedstock. The model was calibrated with a regional study of 10-yr switchgrass field trials and subsequently tested against a separate compiled dataset of field trials from across the eastern half of the country. An application of the model in a national database using 8-digit watersheds as the primary modeling unit produces 30-yr average switchgrass yield estimates that can be aggregated to 18 major watersheds. The model projects average annual switchgrass productivity of greater than 7 Mg ha-1 in the Upper Mississippi, Lower Mississippi, and Ohio watersheds. The major factors limiting simulated production vary by region; low precipitation is the primary limiting factor across the western half of the country, while moderately acidic soils limit yields on lands east of the Mississippi River. Average projected switchgrass production on all crop land in the continental US is 5.6 Mg ha-1. At this level of productivity, 28.6 million hectares of crop land would be required to produce the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol called for by 2022 in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. The model described here can be applied as a tool to inform the land-use and environmental consequences of switchgrass production.

  2. ,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlantGross WithdrawalsMarketed Production

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, the United States was expected to consume about 6% of world chromite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primary metal: South Africa, 29%; Kazakhstan, 20%; Russia, 12%; China, 5%; and other 34%. Total imports Normal Trade Relations 12­31­13 Ore and concentrate 2610.00.0000 Free. Ferrochromium: Carbon more than 4% 7202.41.0000 1.9% ad val. Carbon more than 3% 7202.49.1000 1.9% ad val. Other: Carbon more than 0

  4. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  5. Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

  6. California (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0ProvedGross

  7. California (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0ProvedGrossFeet) Proved Reservesoff)

  8. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear Jan FebFeet) GrossBasedFeet)

  9. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (MillionGrossFeet)

  10. Texas--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA(MillionGross Withdrawals

  11. Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProduction (Million Barrels)CubicGross

  12. Michael Gross | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview and HistoryMEMS:Michael Gross Michael Gross

  13. Generalized coherent state representation of Bose-Einstein condensates V. Chernyak,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    in supercooled trapped atoms has stimulated great interest in the theoretical description of the quantum state opera- tor products should be factorized in order to truncate the many-body hierarchy. The Gross of these treatments directly addresses the precise quan- tum state of BEC that consists of the condensate as well

  14. eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada Olivian Pitis products industry in the United States and Canada. Both solid and pulp/paper companies were surveyed the United States & Canada. Objectives #12;All Respondents Results #12;1 company .05% of respondents North

  15. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    competitive, considering both production and market penetration costs. Second, the potential effect of mandate relaxations and carbon market related payments on liquid fuel production potential. Third, the effects of ignoring or considering asset fixity...

  16. Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Establish far-reaching goals to increase the role of biobased energy and products in our nation’s economy

  17. Certified Tropical Hardwood Product Markets in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seminars in Latin America 2005 ·Peru ·Brazil ·Columbia ·Ecuador ·Costa Rica ·Panama ·Nicaragua ·Bolivia Products Marketing Program Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural-cutting practices in North America. Photo: Richard Vlosky Photo: Geo-Images Univ. Cal. Berkeley #12;Generalized

  18. Randomization and the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedran Sohinger; Gigliola Staffilani

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on the spatial domain $\\mathbb{T}^3$. By using an appropriate randomization of the Fourier coefficients in the collision operator, we prove an averaged form of the main estimate which is used in order to contract the Duhamel terms that occur in the study of the hierarchy. In the averaged estimate, we do not need to integrate in the time variable. An averaged spacetime estimate for this range of regularity exponents then follows as a direct corollary. The range of regularity exponents that we obtain is $\\alpha>\\frac{3}{4}$. It was shown in our previous joint work with Gressman that the range $\\alpha>1$ is sharp in the corresponding deterministic spacetime estimate. This is in contrast to the non-periodic setting, which was studied by Klainerman and Machedon, in which the spacetime estimate is known to hold whenever $\\alpha \\geq 1$. The goal of our paper is to extend the range of $\\alpha$ in this class of estimates in a \\emph{probabilistic sense}. We use the new estimate and the ideas from its proof in order to study randomized forms of the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy. More precisely, we consider hierarchies similar to the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy, but in which the collision operator has been randomized. For these hierarchies, we show convergence to zero in low regularity Sobolev spaces of Duhamel expansions of fixed deterministic density matrices. We believe that the study of the randomized collision operators could be the first step in the understanding of a nonlinear form of randomization.

  19. Property:GrossGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpmGrossGen Jump to: navigation,

  20. Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,Production (BillionProved(MillionShale ProductionProduction

  1. DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over...

  2. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:43:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"...

  3. Texas (with State Offshore) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)ThousandNumberWellhead PriceProductionProduction

  4. GrossStark units for totally real number fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Samit

    Gross­Stark units for totally real number fields by Kaloyan Slavov a thesis presented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5 The proof of Gross's conjecture over the rational field 20 5.1 The p-adic Gamma function Computing the multiplicative integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 2 #12;Acknowledgements

  5. Production of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processing that will re- duce the oil content in the meal to a level acceptable to the market. In the pastProduction of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU. Crowther, Director Production of Fish Oil By GEORGE M. PIGOTT Assistant Professor, Food Science Departm

  6. Alabama (with State Offshore) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N EnergyandProduction

  7. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011Dry Production

  8. ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews :ProductsAerosol Retrievals from

  9. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.Year JanProduction

  10. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.Year JanProduction(Million

  11. Mississippi (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic

  12. Louisiana (with State Offshore) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will beProvedShale Production

  13. Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next(MillionProduction

  14. Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation, Proved Reserves

  15. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation,(Million(Million

  16. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation,(Million(Million(Million

  17. Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)ThousandNumberWellhead Price (Dollars perProduction

  18. Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)YearWellhead Price (Dollars perProvedWestern States

  19. Methodology and Analysis Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International's review paper given to the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics PDF 5 Other Sources: EIA-914 Estimates Compared with Other sources PDF 6...

  20. Louisiana Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569Decade886,084 889,570 893,4007

  1. Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569Decade886,084 889,570

  2. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6Cubic

  3. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6CubicAlaska

  4. Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame MonthtotalJoseph

  5. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u oDecadeSame52,051 146,751

  6. Alaska Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYearDecadeYear Jan

  7. Alaska Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYearDecadeYear Jan,027,696

  8. California Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590FuelDecade Year-00,515,162

  9. California Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590FuelDecade

  10. Federal Offshore Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 2010 2011OverviewNA NA NA

  11. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 201044,902 41,229 41,200

  12. Federal Offshore Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 Annual Download Series

  13. Federal Offshore Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 Annual Download03

  14. West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810YearDecade Year-0 Year-11 1 1 1

  15. West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810YearDecade Year-0 Year-11 1 1

  16. Texas Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugDecadeDecade

  17. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugDecadeDecade7,753,869

  18. U.S. Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1(Billion Cubic3,028,561

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023 291,003Year Jan Feb

  20. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYearFeet) NewNov-14 Dec-141 2 3

  1. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYearFeet) NewNov-14 Dec-141 2

  2. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparation 29 0 10 8 676,322

  3. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand CubicFeet)perFeet) New2No

  4. Conditions for uniqueness of product representations for separable quantum channels and separable quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott M. Cohen

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a sufficient condition that an operator sum representation of a separable quantum channel in terms of product operators is the unique product representation for that channel, and then provide examples of such channels for any number of parties. This result has implications for efforts to determine whether or not a given separable channel can be exactly implemented by local operations and classical communication. By the Choi-Jamiolkowski isomorphism, it also translates to a condition for the uniqueness of product state ensembles representing a given quantum state. These ideas follow from considerations concerning whether or not a subspace spanned by a given set of product operators contains at least one additional product operator.

  5. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan Feb MarAugust121

  6. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan Feb MarAugust121Year Jan

  7. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYearThousand CubicYear JanCubic

  8. Area wind farm energy production BACKGROUND -In Central New York State, home of the New York State Fair, wind turbine construction has had a noticeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Area wind farm energy production ­ BACKGROUND - In Central New York State, home of the New York State Fair, wind turbine construction has they are then trucked to their destinations, and quite a few wind farms dot the hills. One

  9. A new integral representation for the scalar products of Bethe states for the XXX spin chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoichi Kazama; Shota Komatsu; Takuya Nishimura

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the method of separation of variables due to Sklyanin, we construct a new integral representation for the scalar products of the Bethe states for the SU(2) XXX spin 1/2 chain obeying the periodic boundary condition. Due to the compactness of the symmetry group, a twist matrix must be introduced at the boundary in order to extract the separated variables properly. Then by deriving the integration measure and the spectrum of the separated variables, we express the inner product of an on-shell and an off-shell Bethe states in terms of a multiple contour integral involving a product of Baxter wave functions. Its form is reminiscent of the integral over the eigenvalues of a matrix model and is expected to be useful in studying the semi-classical limit of the product.

  10. A new integral representation for the scalar products of Bethe states for the XXX spin chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazama, Yoichi; Nishimura, Takuya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the method of separation of variables due to Sklyanin, we construct a new integral representation for the scalar products of the Bethe states for the SU(2) XXX spin 1/2 chain obeying the periodic boundary condition. Due to the compactness of the symmetry group, a twist matrix must be introduced at the boundary in order to extract the separated variables properly. Then by deriving the integration measure and the spectrum of the separated variables, we express the inner product of an on-shell and an off-shell Bethe states in terms of a multiple contour integral involving a product of Baxter wave functions. Its form is reminiscent of the integral over the eigenvalues of a matrix model and is expected to be useful in studying the semi-classical limit of the product.

  11. Emotion Regulation: Taking Stock and Moving Forward James J. Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation: Taking Stock and Moving Forward James J. Gross Stanford University The field). In this article, I take stock of the field and consider how it might be moved forward. I do this by asking

  12. Studies of heavy flavour production and the hadronic final state in high energy ep collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An extract of recent results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations is shown. Various properties of quantum chromo dynamics are investigated by studying the details of the hadronic final state of high energy electron proton collisions at HERA. The presented results include analyses of jet cross sections and single particle production such as $\\gamma$ and $D$. Part of the measurements deal with final states involving identified heavy quarks (charm and beauty).

  13. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    182 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994 of ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste

  14. (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in 1994. In 2000, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 39%; Russia, 21

  15. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for WW and WZ production in final states that contain a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least two jets, produced in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, using data corresponding ...

  16. Multimedia Networking Products By Zeyun Cui(zcui@cis.ohio-state.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    Multimedia Networking Products By Zeyun Cui(zcui@cis.ohio-state.edu) Abstract Multimedia of education or entertainment. Networked multimedia is to build the multimedia on network and distributed features and to communicate with each under these tools. This paper is a detailed survey of the Multimedia

  17. Simultaneous Extrema in the Entropy Production for Steady-State Fluid Flow in Parallel Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niven, Robert K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady-state flow of an incompressible fluid in parallel pipes can simultaneously satisfy two contradictory extremum principles in the entropy production, depending on the flow conditions. For a constant total flow rate, the flow can satisfy (i) a pipe network minimum entropy production (MinEP) principle with respect to the flow rates, and (ii) the maximum entropy production (MaxEP) principle of Paltridge and Ziegler with respect to the choice of flow regime. The first principle - different to but allied to that of Prigogine - arises from the stability of the steady state compared to non-steady-state flows; it is proven for isothermal laminar and turbulent flows in parallel pipes with a constant power law exponent, but is otherwise invalid. The second principle appears to be more fundamental, driving the formation of turbulent flow in single and parallel pipes at higher Reynolds numbers. For constant head conditions, the flow can satisfy (i) a modified maximum entropy production (MaxEPMod) principle of \\v{Z}u...

  18. Matrix Product State and Quantum Phase Transitions in the One-Dimensional Extended Quantum Compass Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-Hua Liu; Wei Li; Wen-Long You; Guang-Shan Tian; Gang Su

    2012-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix product state (MPS) is utilized to study the ground state properties and quantum phase transitions (QPTs) of the one-dimensional quantum compass model (QCM). The MPS wavefunctions are argued to be very efficient descriptions of QCM ground states, and are numerically determined by imaginary time projections. The ground state energy, correlations, quantum entanglement and its spectrum, local and nonlocal order parameters, etc., are calculated and studied in details. It is revealed that the bipartite and block entanglement entropies, as well as the nearest neighbor correlation functions can be used to detect the second-order QPTs, but not the first-order ones, while fidelity detections can recognize both. The entanglement spectrum is extracted from the MPS wavefunction, and found to be doubly degenerate in disordered phases of QCM, where non-local string order parameters exist. Moreover, with linearized tensor renormalization group method, the specific heat curves are evaluated and their low temperature behaviors are investigated.

  19. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  20. ,"Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per Thousand CubicMarketed ProductionGross

  1. Precise QCD predictions for the production of Higgs+jet final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Chen; T. Gehrmann; E. W. N. Glover; M. Jaquier

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the cross section and differential distributions for the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a hadronic jet to next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In Higgs boson studies at the LHC, final states containing one jet are a dominant contribution to the total event rate, and their understanding is crucial for improved determinations of the Higgs boson properties. We observe substantial higher order corrections to transverse momentum spectra and rapidity distributions in Higgs-plus-one-jet final states. Their inclusion stabilises the residual theoretical uncertainty of the predictions around 9\\%, thereby providing important input to precision studies of the Higgs boson.

  2. Economic Implications of a Delayed Uniform Planting Date for Cotton Production in the Texas Rolling Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masud, Sharif M.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Boring, Emory P.; Fuchs, Thomas W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    economic impact was estimated by multiplying the gross revenue chan~es by the respective regional and state production multipliers. The following equation was used to estimate regional and state economic impact: Regional or State Impact = (GR1 x Mct... ) + (GR2 x Mct ) - (GR3 x Mgs) - (GR4 x Mcl where: GR1 = GR2 = increase in cotton revenue from typical cotton acreage, increase total cotton revenue from acres of other crops converted to cotton, 1 Production multipliers are estimates of the total...

  3. Milk production and distribution in nine western states in the 1950s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, G.M.; Whicker, F.W.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information on milk distribution and dairy cattle feeding practices in Nevada, Utah and portions of seven other adjacent states during the 1950s. The information was gathered to support the US Department of Energy's ''Offsite Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP).'' This project is charged with providing radiation dose estimates for residents of Nevada, Utah, and surrounding states from nuclear weapons testing conducted at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1962. The information on milk production and distribution is essential for assessment of the internal organ doses received by people as a result of ingesting radioactive fallout-contaminated foods. The information is used as input data for Colorado State University's PATHWAY computer code which estimates the ingestion of twenty radionuclides by people relative to a given level of fallout deposition.

  4. Quantum Defect Theory for Cold Chemistry with Product Quantum State Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazra, Jisha; Bohn, John L; Balakrishnan, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a formalism for cold and ultracold atom-diatom chemical reactions that combines a quantum close-coupling method at short-range with quantum defect theory at long-range. The method yields full state-to-state rovibrationally resolved cross sections as in standard close-coupling (CC) calculations but at a considerably less computational expense. This hybrid approach exploits the simplicity of MQDT while treating the short-range interaction explicitly using quantum CC calculations. The method, demonstrated for D+H$_2\\to$ HD+H collisions with rovibrational quantum state resolution of the HD product, is shown to be accurate for a wide range of collision energies and initial conditions. The hybrid CC-MQDT formalism may provide an alternative approach to full CC calculations for cold and ultracold reactions.

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

  7. Renormalisation of Noncommutative Quantum Field Harald Grosse1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wulkenhaar, Raimar

    Renormalisation of Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory Harald Grosse1 and Raimar Wulkenhaar2 1 recall some models for noncommutative space-time and discuss quantum field theories on these deformed. Keywords: noncommutative geometry; quantum field theory; renormalisation AMS Subject Classification: 81T15

  8. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2000. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistics--United States: 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports fluctuations. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves2 Reserve

  9. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2002. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistics--United States: 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves3 Reserve base3 2001

  10. Matrix product states and variational methods applied to critical quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley Milsted; Jutho Haegeman; Tobias J. Osborne

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the second-order quantum phase-transition of massive real scalar field theory with a quartic interaction ($\\phi^4$ theory) in (1+1) dimensions on an infinite spatial lattice using matrix product states (MPS). We introduce and apply a naive variational conjugate gradient method, based on the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) for imaginary time, to obtain approximate ground states, using a related ansatz for excitations to calculate the particle and soliton masses and to obtain the spectral density. We also estimate the central charge using finite-entanglement scaling. Our value for the critical parameter agrees well with recent Monte Carlo results, improving on an earlier study which used the related DMRG method, verifying that these techniques are well-suited to studying critical field systems. We also obtain critical exponents that agree, as expected, with those of the transverse Ising model. Additionally, we treat the special case of uniform product states (mean field theory) separately, showing that they may be used to investigate non-critical quantum field theories under certain conditions.

  11. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

  12. Gross Receipts Tax Exemption for Sales of Wind and Solar Systems to Government Entities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted. ...

  13. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure ?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  14. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measuremore »?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.« less

  15. Discovering Higgs boson pair production through rare final states at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Higgs boson pair production at a future proton collider with centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV, focusing on rare final states that include a bottom-anti-bottom quark pair and multiple isolated leptons: $hh \\rightarrow (b\\bar{b}) + n \\ell + X$, $n = \\{2,4\\}$, $X = \\{ E_T^\\mathrm{miss}, \\gamma, -\\}$. We construct experimental search strategies for observing the process through these channels and make suggestions on the desired requirements for the detector design of the future collider.

  16. Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. ,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlantGross WithdrawalsMarketed

  18. The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

  19. Studies of Upsilon(1S) bottomonium state production at the Tevatron Collider Experiment D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jundong

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of heavy quarkonium in hadronic collisions provides an ideal testing ground for our understanding of the production mechanisms for heavy quarks and the non-perturbative QCD effects that bind the quark pairs into quarkonium. In this analysis, the inclusive production cross section of the {Upsilon}(1S) bottomonium state is measured using the {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay mode. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 159.1 {+-} 10.3 pb{sup -1}. We determine differential cross sections as functions of the {Upsilon}(1S) transverse momentum, p{sub T}{sup {Upsilon}}, for three ranges of the {Upsilon}(1S) rapidity: 0 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.6,0.6 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.2 and 1.2 < |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 1.8. The shapes of d{sigma}/d{sub p{sub T}} cross sections show little variation with rapidity and are consistent with the published Run I CDF measurement over the rapidity range |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.4.

  20. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate conditions for the states of Iowa, Illinois phases also had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities

  1. Measurement enhancement for state estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in the power system. A robust state estimation should have the capability of keeping the system observable during different contingencies, as well as detecting and identifying the gross errors in measurement set and network topology. However, this capability...

  2. Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in the electron+muon final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Altona, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the result of a search for the pair production of the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. The scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}), and the search is performed in the electron plus muon final state. No significant excess of events above the standard model prediction is detected, and improved exclusion limits at the 95% C.L. are set in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) mass plane.

  3. Superoperators vs. Trajectories for Matrix Product State Simulations of Open Quantum System: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bonnes; Andreas M. Läuchli

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum trajectories and superoperator algorithms implemented within the matrix product state (MPS) framework are powerful tools to simulate the real-time dynamics of open dissipative quantum systems. As for the unitary case, the reachable time-scales as well as system sizes are limited by the (possible) build-up of entanglement entropy. The aforementioned methods constitute complementary approaches how Lindblad master equations can be integrated relying either on a quasi-exact representation of the full density matrix or a stochastic unraveling of the density matrix in terms of pure states. In this work, we systematically benchmark both methods by studying the dynamics of a Bose-Hubbard chain in the presence of local as well as global dephasing. The build-up as well as system-size scaling of entanglement entropy strongly depends on the method and the parameter regime and we discuss the applicability of the methods for these cases as well as study the distribution of observables and time discretization errors that can become a limiting factor for global dissipation.

  4. Study of the Exclusive Initial State RadiationProduction of the D \\bar D System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of exclusive production of the D{bar D} system through initial-state radiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where D = D{sup 0} or D{sup +}. The D{sup 0} mesons are reconstructed in the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes. The D{sup +} is reconstructed through the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment. The D{bar D} mass spectrum shows a clear {psi}(3770) signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/c{sup 2} regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to D{bar D}, implying an upper limit {Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} D{bar D})/{Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 7.6 (95% confidence level).

  5. The Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on general rectangular tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Herr; Vedran Sohinger

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on general --rational and irrational-- rectangular tori of dimension two and three. This is a system of infinitely many linear partial differential equations which arises in the rigorous derivation of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. We prove a conditional uniqueness result for the hierarchy. In two dimensions, this result allows us to obtain a rigorous derivation of the defocusing cubic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation from the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. On irrational tori, this question was posed as an open problem in previous work of Kirkpatrick, Schlein, and Staffilani.

  6. Other incarnations of the Gross-Pitaevskii dark soliton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indubala I Satija; Radha Balakrishnan

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the dark soliton of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) that describes the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) density of a system of weakly repulsive bosons, also describes that of a system of strongly repulsive hard core bosons at half filling. As a consequence of this, the GPE soliton gets related to the magnetic soliton in an easy-plane ferromagnet, where it describes the square of the in-plane magnetization of the system. These relationships are shown to be useful in understanding various characteristics of solitons in these distinct many-body systems.

  7. Gross shell structure at high spin in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deleplanque, Marie-Agnes; Frauendorf, Stefan; Pashkevich, Vitaly V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, Anja

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental nuclear moments of inertia at high spins along the yrast line have been determined systematically and found to differ from the rigid-body values. The difference is attributed to shell effect and these have been calculated microscopically. The data and quantal calculations are interpreted by means of the semiclassical Periodic Orbit Theory. From this new perspective, features in the moments of inertia as a function of neutron number and spin, as well as their relation to the shell energies can be understood. Gross shell effects persist up to the highest angular momenta observed.

  8. Calif--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0ProvedGross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

  9. Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use as anCubicWells (MillionFeet) Gross

  10. Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in AlabamaGross Withdrawals

  11. Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0SurveyingGross

  12. Alaska--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Cubic Feet) GasGross

  13. Risk Management in Product Design: Current State, Conceptual Model and Future Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    Risk management is an important element of product design. It helps to minimize the project- and product-related risks such as project budget and schedule overrun, or missing product cost and quality targets. Risk management ...

  14. INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH Last year the Alaska Legislature made a controversial change in the oil production tax, the state's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    ;INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 2 HOW THE PRODUCTION TAX WORKS Since 2007 the petroleum production change in the oil production tax, the state's largest source of oil revenue. The old tax, known as ACES (Alaska's Clear and Equitable Share), was replaced with MAPA (More Alaska Production Act, or SB21). How

  15. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2001. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 85.5 75 77 fluctuations caused by economic uncertainties. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  16. (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1997. Domestically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 73.4 70 for the indium market remains promising. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  17. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  18. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process Engineering Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    4 B E 2100 ­ Basic Engineering III: Probability and Statistics in Engineering for Engineering: Materials Science for Engg. Applications 3 B E 1310 ­ Basic Engineering II: Materials Science for EnggDegree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process

  19. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States and soybeans to cooler, drier, and darker conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrial

  20. Forest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post-harvest retention, and wood products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    26 December 2009 Keywords: Carbon sequestration Wood products Structural retention Harvesting tradeoffs among scenarios using a factorial treatment design and two-way ANOVA. Mean carbon sequestrationForest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post

  1. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  2. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: peter.morgan@fccc.edu; Sopka, Dennis M. [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kathpal, Madeera [Division of Neurosurgery, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Haynes, Jeffrey C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published {>=}1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented {>=}1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  3. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  4. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    without the use of fossil fuel energy. Examining seasonalof renewable energy as the longevity of fossil fuel reservessuch energy production can completely replace fossil fuels.

  5. Enabling Verifiable Conformance for Product Lines Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech and Iowa State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    that conformance? 2. How can we enable such verification throughout the development lifecycle? This paper reports that makes or breaks the product-line practice. Verification that the software for each project satisfies its in the application engineering of NASA product lines. Lessons learned may be useful for developers of safety

  6. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Aden, A.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update to the FY 2007 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals, quantified in terms of Minimum Ethanol Selling Price.

  7. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, A.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update to the FY 2005 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals. This assessment contains research results from 2006 and 2007.

  8. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor Attention: Air Filter product manufacturers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in order to size and specify HVAC systems that perform properly with these filters. Our understanding link below) for your California-market filter products to the Energy Commission. Air

  9. DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over 40...

  10. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

  11. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

  12. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Product Development Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the selection of five (5) applications in response to the Solid-State...

  13. Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Sanchez, Marla Christine; Brown, Richard; Homan, Gregory; Webber, Carrie

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2006, US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products saved 4.8 EJ of primary energy and avoided 82 Tg C equivalent. We project that US EPA?S ENERGY STAR labeled products will save 12.8 EJ and avoid 203 Tg C equivalent over the period 2007-2015. A sensitivity analysis examining two key inputs (carbon factor and ENERGY STAR unit sales) bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 54 Tg C and 107 Tg C (1993 to 2006) and between 132 Tg C and 278 Tg C (2007 to 2015).

  14. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation,ProductionMarketed Production (Million Cubic

  15. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND BLOWUP OF SOLUTIONS FOR FOCUSING GROSS-PITAEVSKII HIERARCHIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzirakis, Nikolaos

    ENERGY CONSERVATION AND BLOWUP OF SOLUTIONS FOR FOCUSING GROSS-PITAEVSKII HIERARCHIES THOMAS CHEN . This is usually proven by use of energy conservation combined with a virial identity, a method often referred

  16. Fact #768: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of 17.1 million vehicles sold in 2001, but along the way, there have been significant ups and downs. Those ups and downs are also reflected in the change in Gross Domestic...

  17. Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization Xueyu Chen, Derya) British Petroleum Applications mainly crude units in refineries and ethylene plants #12;Companies

  18. Search for first generation leptoquark pair production in the electron + missing energy + jets final state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. Abazov

    2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the pair production of first generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. In the channel $LQ \\bar{LQ} \\rightarrow e\

  19. Bioenergy Potential of the United States Constrained by Satellite Observations of Existing Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    liters ethanol, which implies an even larger increase in biomass demand (primary energy), from roughly 2 billion liters of ethanol (secondary bioenergy) in 2009, approximately half of the world's total ethanol ethanol production of 136 billion liters by 2022.2 Yet, these bioenergy targets are largely derived from

  20. Analysis of historical gross gamma logging data from TY tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS, D.A.

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross gamma ray logs, recorded from January 1975 through mid-year 1994 as part of the Single-Shell Tank Farm Dry Well Surveillance Program, have been reanalyzed for the TY tank farm to locate the presence of mobile radionuclides in the subsurface. This report presents the TY tank farm gross gamma ray data in such a way as to assist others in their study of vadose zone mechanism.

  1. Reliability measures of second order semi-Markov chain in state and duration with application to wind energy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the problem of wind energy production using a second order semi-Markov chain in state and duration as a model of wind speed. We present the mathematical model, we describe the data and technical characteristics of a commercial wind turbine (Aircon HAWT-10kW). We show how to compute some of the main dependability measures such as reliability, availability and maintainability functions. We compare the results of the model with real energy production obtained from data available in the Lastem station (Italy) and sampled every 10 minutes. The computation of the dependability measures is a crucial point in the planning and development of a wind farm.

  2. West Valley glass product qualification durability studies, FY 1987--1988: Effects of composition, redox state, thermal history, and groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The product qualification subtask of the West Valley Support Task (WVST) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides support for the waste form qualification efforts at West Valley Nuclear Services Co. Testing is being conducted to determine waste form chemical durability in support of these efforts. The effects of composition, ferrous/ferric ratio (redox state), thermal history, and groundwater are being investigated. Glasses were tested using modified Materials Characterization Center (MCC) -3 and MCC-1 test methods. Results obtained in fiscal years (FY) 1987 and 1988 are presented here. 13 refs., 27 figs., 36 tabs.

  3. Search for Sneutrino Production in e? Final States in 5.3??fb(?1) of pp-bar Collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into e? final states using 5.3??fb(?1) of integrated luminosity collected by the ...

  4. Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands is applicable to the natural gas sector. This law delegates...

  5. Search for the associated production of chargino and neutralino in the final state with three leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Anadi; /Purdue U.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetry, if realized in nature, predicts the existence of new particles, as chargino and neutralino, which might manifest themselves with peculiar signatures. Three leptons and large missing transverse energy in the event could signal their associated production. They report the latest results of the search performed by the CDF Collaboration in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at Tevatron Run II.

  6. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulford, Roberta N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian C [LLNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  7. Opportunities to increase the productivity of spent fuel shipping casks in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, G.H.; Faletti, D.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends indicate that future transportation requirements for spent fuel will be different from those anticipated when the current generation of casks and vehicles was designed. Increased storage capacity at most reactors will increase the average post irradiation age of the spent fuel to be transported. A scenario is presented which shows the 18 casks currently available should be sufficient until approximately 1983. Beyond this time, it appears that an adequate transportation system can be maintained by acquiring, as needed, casks of current designs and new casks currently under development. Spent fuel transportation requirements in the post-1990 period can be met by a new generation of casks specifically designed to transport long-cooled fuel. In terms of the number of casks needed, productivity may be increased by 19% if rail cask turnaround time is reduced to 4 days from the current range of 6.5 to 8.5 days. Productivity defined as payloads per cask year could be increased 62% if the turnaround time for legal weight truck casks were reduced from 12 hours to 4 hours. On a similar basis, overweight truck casks show a 28% increase in productivity.

  8. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison...

  9. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  10. The present and future status of the rental economy for consumer products in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessee, William Taze

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ January Q, 196'. 13 oonstruction firas, and business establishasnts rely on ?quipaent leasing quite heavily. International Business Maohinef Inc g leases out to industry a large portion of their conputers and offioe nachines, rather than sells. Snail.... Other spec1alists rely on such iteus as sLink fur pieoes, wigs, paintings and Jewelry. Rsnufacturers have entered the business of renting. Rs has already been stated, Bell Telephone and International Susiness Machines have always leased...

  11. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  12. Search for first generation leptoquark pair production in the electron + missing energy + jets final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Aoki, Masato

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the pair production of first generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV. In the channel LQLQ ? eq?eq?, where q,q? are u or d quarks, no significant excess of data over background is observed, and we set a 95% C.L. lower limit of 326 GeV on the leptoquark mass, assuming equal probabilities of leptoquark decays to eq and ?eq?.

  13. Search for first generation leptoquark pair production in the electron + missing energy + jets final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Aoki, Masato

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the pair production of first generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV. In the channel LQLQ ? eq?eq?, where q,q? are u or d quarks, no significant excess of data over background is observed, and we set a 95% C.L. lower limit of 326 GeV on the leptoquark mass, assuming equal probabilities of leptoquark decays to eq and ?eq?.

  14. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0579,766 568,661Dry Production

  15. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469 39,194Dry Production

  16. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011Dry Production (Million

  17. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA

  18. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShale ProvedA(Million Barrels)

  19. Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProductionSeparation,

  20. Equation of state for the detonation products of several simple explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.S.; Holian, B.L.; Johnson, J.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective spherical potentials for N/sub 2/O/sub 2/, NO, CO, and CO/sub 2/ are obtained by fitting to various experimental and calculated quantities. An equation of state for mixtures of these molecules is determined by using ideal mixing and the hard-sphere perturbation theory of Ross. Calculations are then compared with Hugoniot data for N/sub 2/ + O/sub 2/ mixtures and overdriven NO detonations with excellent agreement. Also, the detonation velocities of O/sub 3//O/sub 2/ mixtures, NO, TNM, and HNB were calculated and were found to be in very good agreement with experiment.

  1. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems |AsApril 1,and SpentStates

  2. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  3. Quark-Antiquark and Diquark Condensates in Vacuum in a 3D Two-Flavor Gross-Neveu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bang-Rong Zhou

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective potential analysis indicates that, in a 3D two-flavor Gross-Neveu model in vacuum, depending on less or bigger than the critical value 2/3 of $G_S/H_P$, where $G_S$ and $H_P$ are respectively the coupling constants of scalar quark-antiquark channel and pseudoscalar diquark channel, the system will have the ground state with pure diquark condensates or with pure quark-antiquark condensates, but no the one with coexistence of the two forms of condensates. The similarities and differences in the interplay between the quark-antiquark and the diquark condensates in vacuum in the 2D, 3D and 4D two-flavor four-fermion interaction models are summarized.

  4. A Matrix-Product-Operator Approach to the Nonequilibrium Steady State of Driven-Dissipative Quantum Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Mascarenhas; Hugo Flayac; Vincenzo Savona

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a numerical procedure to efficiently model the nonequilibrium steady state of one-dimensional arrays of open quantum systems, based on a matrix-product operator ansatz for the density matrix. The procedure searches for the null eigenvalue of the Liouvillian superoperator by sweeping along the system while carrying out a partial diagonalization of the single-site stationary problem. It bears full analogy to the density-matrix renormalization group approach to the ground state of isolated systems, and its numerical complexity scales as a power law with the bond dimension. The method brings considerable advantage when compared to the integration of the time-dependent problem via Trotter decomposition, as it can address arbitrarily long-ranged couplings. Additionally, it ensures numerical stability in the case of weakly dissipative systems thanks to a slow tuning of the dissipation rates along the sweeps. We have tested the method on a driven-dissipative spin chain, under various assumptions for the Hamiltonian, drive, and dissipation parameters, and compared the results to those obtained both by Trotter dynamics and Monte-Carlo wave function. Accurate convergence to the nonequilibrium steady state was always reached without any sign of numerical instability. Our method improves significantly over a variational approach that was very recently introduced [J. Cui, J. Ignacio Cirac, M. C. Banuls, arXiv:1501.06786 (2015)], both in terms of numerical stability and computational complexity.

  5. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  6. Semidirect product of CCR and CAR algebras and asymptotic states in quantum electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Herdegen

    1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A C*-algebra containing the CCR and CAR algebras as its subalgebras and naturally described as the semidirect product of these algebras is discussed. A particular example of this structure is considered as a model for the algebra of asymptotic fields in quantum electrodynamics, in which Gauss' law is respected. The appearence in this algebra of a phase variable related to electromagnetic potential leads to the universal charge quantization. Translationally covariant representations of this algebra with energy-momentum spectrum in the future lightcone are investigated. It is shown that vacuum representations are necessarily nonregular with respect to total electromagnetic field. However, a class of translationally covariant, irreducible representations is constructed excplicitly, which remain as close as possible to the vacuum, but are regular at the same time. The spectrum of energy-momentum fills the whole future lightcone, but there are no vectors with energy-momentum lying on a mass hyperboloid or in the origin.

  7. Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

  8. Delayed neutron emission in the semi-gross theory of nuclear {beta}-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachibana, Takahiro; Yamada, Masami [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-gross theory of nuclear {beta}-decay enables one to estimate some {beta}-decay properties such as half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities (P{sub n}-values) in the region far from the {beta}-stability line. This theory has been obtained by refining the conventional gross theory to take into account some shell effects of the parent nucleus. In this theory, the one-particle energy-levels are assumed to be discrete and non-uniform, and the one-particle strength function depends on the orbital and total angular momenta of the decaying nucleon. The P{sub n}-values obtained with use of the semi-gross theory are lower than the experimental values in many cases. In order to get more reasonable P{sub n}-values, the strength of the semi-gross theory in each small energy interval is spread with a width depending on the excitation energy. Modified P{sub n}-values thus obtained are compared with the experimental data as well as those estimated by the semi-gross theory.

  9. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a division of SGM) PLM Product lifecycle management R&Ddesign software. Product lifecycle management (PLM) software

  10. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

  11. Remote estimation of crop gross primary production with Landsat data Anatoly A. Gitelson a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    --Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA b NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA c Soil and Water Management as well as calculating carbon budgets (Malmstrom et al., 1997; Reeves et al., 2004). An accurate radiation from Earth in various wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, as a powerful and expedient

  12. Federal Offshore U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 Annualandand2,374,857

  13. Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residential EnergyTotal

  14. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic Product,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score MaturityofDepartment of1:

  15. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa.2,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric

  16. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa.2,1,"AK",213,"Alaska

  17. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro

  18. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji AgroMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1989" ,"Release

  19. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji AgroMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1989" ,"Release2. Occupancy

  20. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji AgroMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1989" ,"Release2.

  1. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji AgroMonthly","4/2015","1/15/1989"

  2. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji

  3. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users,

  4. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users,Monthly","4/2015","1/15/1973"

  5. "Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space Heating8Total DeliveredReal

  6. Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

  7. Plutonium: The first 50 years. United States plutonium production, acquisition, and utilization from 1944 through 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains important newly declassified information regarding the US production, acquisition, and removals of plutonium. This new information, when combined with previously declassified data, has allowed the DOE to issue, for the first time, a truly comprehensive report on the total DOE plutonium inventory. At the December 7, 1993, Openness Press Conference, the DOE declassified the plutonium inventories at eight locations totaling 33.5 metric tons (MT). This report declassifies the remainder of the DOE plutonium inventory. Newly declassified in this report is the quantity of plutonium at the Pantex Site, near Amarillo, Texas, and in the US nuclear weapons stockpile of 66.1 MT, which, when added to the previously released inventory of 33.5 MT, yields a total plutonium inventory of 99.5 MT. This report will document the sources which built up the plutonium inventory as well as the transactions which have removed plutonium from that inventory. This report identifies four sources that add plutonium to the DOE/DoD inventory, and seven types of transactions which remove plutonium from the DOE/DoD inventory. This report also discusses the nuclear material control and accountability system which records all nuclear material transactions, compares records with inventory and calculates material balances, and analyzes differences to verify that nuclear materials are in quantities as reported. The DOE believes that this report will aid in discussions in plutonium storage, safety, and security with stakeholders as well as encourage other nations to declassify and release similar data. These data will also be available for formulating policies with respect to disposition of excess nuclear materials. The information in this report is based on the evaluation of available records. The information contained in this report may be updated or revised in the future should additional or more detailed data become available.

  8. Integrable Gross-Neveu models with fermion-fermion and fermion-antifermion pairing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Thies

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The massless Gross-Neveu and chiral Gross-Neveu models are well known examples of integrable quantum field theories in 1+1 dimensions. We address the question whether integrability is preserved if one either replaces the four-fermion interaction in fermion-antifermion channels by a dual interaction in fermion-fermion channels, or if one adds such a dual interaction to an existing integrable model. The relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach is adequate to deal with the large N limit of such models. In this way, we construct and solve three integrable models with Cooper pairing. We also identify a candidate for a fourth integrable model with maximal kinematic symmetry, the "perfect" Gross-Neveu model. This type of field theories can serve as exactly solvable toy models for color superconductivity in quantum chromodynamics.

  9. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProduction 4Cubic

  10. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction

  11. Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

  12. ,"Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed MethaneWellheadAnnual",2014

  13. ,"Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed

  14. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYearThousand CubicYear

  15. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYearThousand CubicYearFeet)

  16. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYearThousand

  17. ,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry NaturalCrude Oil

  18. ,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas,Coalbed Methane

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural Gas Exports and

  20. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller2009 201044,902Production

  1. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production

  2. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future ProductionYear Jan Feb Mar

  3. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future ProductionYear Jan Feb

  4. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProduction 4CubicCubic

  5. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction 1980Alaska

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction 1980AlaskaCubic

  7. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProductionFeet) Year Jan

  8. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  9. A Computational Model based on Gross' Emotion Regulation Theory1 Tibor Bosse (tbosse@few.vu.nl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    A Computational Model based on Gross' Emotion Regulation Theory1 Tibor Bosse (tbosse for emotion regulation by formalizing the model informally described by Gross (1998). The model has been of emotional response) and qualitative aspects (such as decisions to regulate one's emotion). This model

  10. Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine-scale storage [3],[4] to facilitate the improved harnessing of the wind resources by storing wind energy Descloux, George Gross University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Abstract ­ Utility-scale storage

  11. Vanishing beta function for Grosse-Wulkenhaar model in a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Ben Geloun; Razvan Gurau; Vincent Rivasseau

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that the beta function of the Grosse-Wulkenhaar model including a magnetic field vanishes at all order of perturbations. We compute the renormalization group flow of the relevant dynamic parameters and find a non-Gaussian infrared fixed point. Some consequences of these results are discussed.

  12. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

  13. Copyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S. G smoothly functioning electricity wholesale markets in the U.S. and the path taken toward the implementation electricity markets is the desire to capture the benefits provided by competitive markets through improved

  14. FOURIER COEFFICIENTS OF MODULAR FORMS ON G2 WEE TECK GAN, BENEDICT GROSS AND GORDAN SAVIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Wee Teck

    FOURIER COEFFICIENTS OF MODULAR FORMS ON G2 WEE TECK GAN, BENEDICT GROSS AND GORDAN SAVIN Abstract. We develop a theory of Fourier coefficients for modular forms on the split ex- ceptional group G2 on the group SL2(Z) is the wealth of information carried by the Fourier coefficients an(f), for n 0

  15. Note on the Zero-Energy-Limit Solution for the Modified Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kwang-Hua Chu

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The modified Gross-Pitaevskii equation was derived and solved to obtain the 1D solution in the zero-energy limit. This stationary solution could account for the dominated contributions due to the kinetic effect as well as the chemical potential in inhomogeneous Bose gases.

  16. Physical protection cooperation between US Department of Energy national laboratories and Special Scientific and Production State Enterprise (Eleron) of Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishin, E.T.; Davydov, Y.L.; Izmailov, A. [Special Scientific and Production State Enterprise, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US DOE national laboratories and Russian institutes are becoming increasingly cooperative in support of nonproliferation of nuclear materials. This paper describes completed projects, current work, and areas of possible future cooperation between US laboratories and a Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM) entity, Special Scientific and Production State Enterprise (SNPO). The Kurchatov Institute, SNPO, and the US national laboratories jointly completed a physical protection system (PPS) for a facility housing two reactors at Kurchatov Institute within a very short time frame in 1994. Spin- off projects from this work resulted in a US-witnessed acceptance test of the new system adhering to a procedure adopted in Russia, and visits by DOE laboratories` personnel to SNPO`s sensor development and test facilities at Dubna and Penza. SNPO was one of the MINATOM sites at which Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a vulnerability assessment training course. Current cooperative projects include additional physical protection upgrades at Kurchatov where SNPO is involved as an installer and supplier of sensors, alarm display, video, and fiber optic equipment. Two additional contracts between SNL and SNPO result in information on Russian sensor performance and cost and an exchange of US and Russian sensors. Russian sensors will be tested in the United States,a nd US sensors will be tested in Russia. Pacific Northwest Laboratory administers a contract to document the process of certifying physical protection equipment for use at MINATOM facilities. Recent interest in transportation security has opened a new area of cooperation between the national laboratories and SNPO. Future projects are expected to include SNPO participation in physical protection upgrades at other locations in Russia, pedestrian and vehicle portal development, positive personnel identifier testing, and the exchange and testing of additional equipment.

  17. State Energy Production Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 SpecialNanoparticulate FeSSection 1. Documentation

  18. State Energy Production Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14TableConference |6: "Regulating

  19. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  20. First study of ?c(1S), ?(1760) and X(1835) production via ?'???? final states in two-photon collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, C. C.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Ban, Y.; Belous, K.; Bischofberger, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chen, A.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invariant mass spectrum of the ?'???? final state produced in two-photon collisions is obtained using a 673 fb?¹ data sample collected in the vicinity of the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We observe a clear signal of the ?c(1S) and measure its mass and width to be M(?c(1S))=(2982.7±1.8(stat)±2.2(syst)±0.3(model)) MeV/c² and ?(?c(1S))=(37.8+5.8–5.3(stat)±2.8(syst)±1.4(model)) MeV/c². The third error is an uncertainty due to possible interference between the ?c(1S) and a nonresonant component. We also report the first evidence for ?(1760) decay to?'????; we find two solutions for its parameters, depending on the inclusion or notmore »of the X(1835), whose existence is of marginal significance in our data. From a fit to the mass spectrum using coherent X(1835) and ?(1760) resonant amplitudes, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit on the product ???B(?'????) for the X(1835).« less

  1. First study of ?c(1S), ?(1760) and X(1835) production via ?'???? final states in two-photon collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, C. C.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Ban, Y.; Belous, K.; Bischofberger, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Eidelman, S.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Han, Y. L.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Julius, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Mizuk, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhulanov, V.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invariant mass spectrum of the ?'???? final state produced in two-photon collisions is obtained using a 673 fb?¹ data sample collected in the vicinity of the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We observe a clear signal of the ?c(1S) and measure its mass and width to be M(?c(1S))=(2982.7±1.8(stat)±2.2(syst)±0.3(model)) MeV/c² and ?(?c(1S))=(37.8+5.8–5.3(stat)±2.8(syst)±1.4(model)) MeV/c². The third error is an uncertainty due to possible interference between the ?c(1S) and a nonresonant component. We also report the first evidence for ?(1760) decay to?'????; we find two solutions for its parameters, depending on the inclusion or not of the X(1835), whose existence is of marginal significance in our data. From a fit to the mass spectrum using coherent X(1835) and ?(1760) resonant amplitudes, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit on the product ???B(?'????) for the X(1835).

  2. Solid State Lighting Program (Falcon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, Steven

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, KLA-Tencor and partners successfully developed and deployed software and hardware tools that increase product yield for High Brightness LED (HBLED) manufacturing and reduce product development and factory ramp times. This report summarizes our development effort and details of how the results of the Solid State Light Program (Falcon) have started to help HBLED manufacturers optimize process control by enabling them to flag and correct identified killer defect conditions at any point of origin in the process manufacturing flow. This constitutes a quantum leap in yield management over current practice. Current practice consists of die dispositioning which is just rejection of bad die at end of process based upon probe tests, loosely assisted by optical in-line monitoring for gross process deficiencies. For the first time, and as a result of our Solid State Lighting Program, our LED manufacturing partners have obtained the software and hardware tools that optimize individual process steps to control killer defects at the point in the processes where they originate. Products developed during our two year program enable optimized inspection strategies for many product lines to minimize cost and maximize yield. The Solid State Lighting Program was structured in three phases: i) the development of advanced imaging modes that achieve clear separation between LED defect types, improves signal to noise and scan rates, and minimizes nuisance defects for both front end and back end inspection tools, ii) the creation of defect source analysis (DSA) software that connect the defect maps from back-end and front-end HBLED manufacturing tools to permit the automatic overlay and traceability of defects between tools and process steps, suppress nuisance defects, and identify the origin of killer defects with process step and conditions, and iii) working with partners (Philips Lumileds) on product wafers, obtain a detailed statistical correlation of automated defect and DSA map overlay to failed die identified using end product probe test results. Results from our two year effort have led to “automated end-to-end defect detection” with full defect traceability and the ability to unambiguously correlate device killer defects to optically detected features and their point of origin within the process. Success of the program can be measured by yield improvements at our partner’s facilities and new product orders.

  3. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont. Together, these firms operated about 820 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about

  4. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 238 companies operated approximately 700 clay pits or quarries. The leading 20 firms

  5. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Vermont, these firms operated approximately 739 mines. The estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1

  6. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, clays were produced in all States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. A total of 233 companies operated approximately 650 clay pits or quarries

  7. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    50 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Hampshire, Rhode clay produced was about $2.14 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows

  8. Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars. Frothy bloat is the major nonpathogenic cause of death loss and depressed weight gains in stocker cattle grazing winter wheat

  9. Dissociative-recombination product states and the dissociation energy D0 of Ne2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, K. A.; Peterson, J. R.; Ramos, G.; Sheldon, J. W.

    1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final product states of Ne2+ dissociative recombination were studied using time-of-flight spectroscopy to determine the kinetic energies released. The dissociative recombination occurred in a sustained discharge in the presence of a variable magnetic field and discharge voltage, at pressures of 5-15 mTorr. Under different conditions various excited states were observed ranging from the lowest 3s metastable states to higher Rydbcrg states within 0.000 54 eV of the dissociation limit. From their narrow widths, it is deduced that these higher states arose from Ne2+ ions with subthermal energies. From two of these narrow distributions, we obtain an improved value for the dissociation limit D0(Ne2+)= 1.26±0.02 eV.

  10. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Center (a division of SGM) PLM Product lifecycle managementProduct lifecycle management (PLM) software is used by cara French firm, provides PLM software to most of the world‘s

  11. An analysis of the economic incentives for increased trade in milk and milk products between the United States and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernstes, David P

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    continue to increase. Actual analysis of producer and consumer prices for dairy products, processor margins for packaged milk and manufactured products with various component origins, the effects of differing trade scenarios on U.S. federal order...

  12. Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkassim, Ibrahim

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    production of each vertical well vs. Barnett gross thickness (including Forestburg formation) plot. ...........................................44 3.15 EUR in month 480 vs. Barnett gross thickness (including Forestburg formation) plot... .....................................................................................................46 3.18 EUR in month 480 vs. perforation footage plot ..............................................47 3.19 Common Barnett perforated section ...............................................................48 3.20 EUR in month...

  13. The current state of the science related to the re-release of mercury from coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink; Tera D. Buckley [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of mercury associated with CCPs is an issue that has only recently been under investigation but has become a prominent question as the industry strives to determine if current management options for CCPs will need to be modified. Mercury and other air toxic elements can be present in fly ash, FGD material and bottom ash and boiler slag. Mercury concentrations ranging from {lt} 0.01 to 2.41 ppm in fly ash and from 0.001 to 0.342 ppm in bottom ash have been reported. Stability of mercury must be evaluated by tests that include 1) direct leachability; 2) vapor-phase release at ambient and elevated temperatures; and 3) microbiologically induced leachability and vapor-phase release. The amount of mercury leached from currently produced CCPs is extremely low and does not appear to represent an environmental or re-release hazard. Concentrations of mercury in leachates from fly ashes and FGD material using either the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) or the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) are generally below detection limits. The release of mercury vapor from CCPs resulting from the use of mercury control technologies has been evaluated on a limited basis. Research indicates that mercury bound to the ash or activated carbon is fairly stable. The EERC found that organomercury species were detected at very low levels both in the vapor and leachate generated from the microbiologically mediated release experiments. The current state of the science indicates that mercury associated with CCPs is stable and highly unlikely to be released under most management conditions, including utilisation and disposal. The exception to this is exposure to high temperatures such as those that may be achieved in cement and wallboard production. Therefore, existing CCPs management options are expected to be environmentally sound options for CCPs from systems with mercury control technologies installed. 2 refs., 2 photos.

  14. One-loop Beta Functions for the Orientable Non-commutative Gross-Neveu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Lakhoua; Fabien Vignes-Tourneret; Jean-Christophe Wallet

    2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute at the one-loop order the beta-functions for a renormalisable non-commutative analog of the Gross Neveu model defined on the Moyal plane. The calculation is performed within the so called x-space formalism. We find that this non-commutative field theory exhibits asymptotic freedom for any number of colors. The beta-function for the non-commutative counterpart of the Thirring model is found to be non vanishing.

  15. ,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per Thousand CubicMarketedCrudeGross

  16. Waste minimization through high-pressure microwave digestion of soils for gross {alpha}/{beta} analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaeger, J.S.; Smith, L.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) environmental restoration and waste management activities, laboratories receive numerous analytical requests for gross {alpha}/{beta} analyses. Traditional sample preparation methods for gross {alpha}/{beta} analysis of environmental and mixed waste samples require repetitive leaching, which is time consuming and generates large volumes of secondary wastes. An alternative to leaching is microwave digestion. In the past. microwave technology has had limited application in the radiochemical laboratory because of restrictions on sample size resulting from vessel pressure limitations. However, new microwave vessel designs allow for pressures on the order of 11 MPa (1500 psi). A procedure is described in which microwave digestion is used to prepare environmental soil samples for gross {alpha}/{beta} analysis. Results indicate that the described procedure meets performance requirements for several soil types and is equivalent to traditional digestion techniques. No statistical differences at the 95% confidence interval exist between the measurement on samples prepared from the hot plate and microwave digestion procedures for those soils tested. Moreover, microwave digestion allows samples to be prepared in a fraction of the time with significantly less acid and with lower potential of cross-contamination. In comparison to the traditional hot plate method, the waste volumes required for the microwave procedure are a factor of 10 lower, while the analyst time for sample processing is at least a factor of three lower.

  17. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  18. Search for Higgs boson production in trilepton and like-charge electron-muon final states with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs bosons in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, using the full Run II data set with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1. The multilepton states considered are two electron plus muon, electron with two muons, muon with two hadronic tau leptons, and like-charge electron-muon pairs. These channels directly probe the HVV (V=W,Z) coupling of the Higgs boson in production and decay. The muon with two hadronic tau lepton channel is also sensitive to H to tau lepton pair decays. Upper limits at the 95% C.L on the rate of standard model Higgs boson production are derived in the mass range 100 Higgs boson model.

  19. Uncertainties in Estimating the Indirect Production of $B_c$ and Its Excited States Via Top Quark Decays at CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Gang Wu

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Main theoretical uncertainties in estimating the indirect production of $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium ($B^-_c$ meson and its excited states) via top quark decays, $t\\to (b\\bar{c})+c+W^{+}$, are studied within the non-relativistic QCD framework. It is found that the dimensionless reduced decay width for a particular $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium state, $\\bar\\Gamma_{n}=\\Gamma_{n} /\\Gamma_{t\\to W^{+}+b}$, is very sensitive to the $c$-quark mass, while the uncertainties from the $b$-quark and $t$-quark masses are small, where $n$ stands for the eight $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium states up to ${\\cal O}(v^4)$: $|(b\\bar{c})(^1S_0)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^3S_1)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^1P_1)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^3P_J)_1>$ (with $J=(1,2,3)$), $|(b\\bar{c})(^1S_0)_{8}g>$ and $|(b\\bar{c})(^3S_1)_{8}g>$ respectively. About $10^8$ $t\\bar{t}$-pairs shall be produced per year at CERN LHC, if adopting the assumption that all the higher Fock states decay to the ground state with 100% probability, then we shall have $(1.038^{+1.353}_{-0.782})\\times 10^5$ $B^-_c $ events per year. So the indirect production provides another important way to study the properties of $B^-_c$ meson in comparison to that of the direct hadronic production at CERN LHC.

  20. Measurement of ZZ Production in Leptonic Final States at ?s of 1.96 TeV at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    In this Letter, we present a precise measurement of the total ZZ production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV, using data collected with the CDF II detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  1. Test of the Schrödinger functional with chiral fermions in the Gross-Neveu model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorn Leder

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently proposed construction of chiral fermions on lattices with boundaries is tested in an interacting theory up to first order of perturbation theory. We confirm that, in the bulk of the lattice, the chiral Ward identities take their continuum value up to cutoff effects without any tuning. Universal quantities are defined that have an expansion in the renormalised couplings with coefficients that are functions of the physical size and the periodicity in the spatial direction. These coefficient functions have to be identical for different discretisations. We find agreement with the standard Wilson fermions. The computation is done in the asymptotically free Gross-Neveu model with continuous chiral symmetry.

  2. Competing mechanisms of chiral symmetry breaking in a generalized Gross-Neveu model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Christian; Thies, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chiral symmetry of the 2-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model is broken explicitly by a bare mass term as well as a splitting of scalar and pseudoscalar coupling constants. The vacuum and light hadrons--mesons and baryons which become massless in the chiral limit--are explored analytically in leading order of the derivative expansion by means of a double sine-Gordon equation. Depending on the parameters, this model features new phenomena as compared to previously investigated 4-fermion models: spontaneous breaking of parity, a nontrivial chiral vacuum angle, twisted kinklike baryons whose baryon number reflects the vacuum angle, crystals with alternating baryons, and appearance of a false vacuum.

  3. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGross | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType Jump to:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGross Jump to: navigation,

  4. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubicDecade Year-0 Year-1Gross

  5. ,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per ThousandLiquids LeaseNatural Gas Gross

  6. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 3)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce eight selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  7. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce 13 selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  8. The entrepreneurial state : New York's Urban Development Corporation, an experiment to take charge of affordable housing production, 1968-1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freemark, Yonah (Yonah Slifkin)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A federal-local partnership supports the creation of most new affordable housing in the United States. Washington's subsidies, which fund housing construction, vouchers, and tax credits, are paired with local development ...

  9. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Geely to develop electric car,? 6 January. http://and Technology released ?Electric Cars in the United States:the market size for electric cars with switchable batteries.

  10. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration,

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H???, H?ZZ{sup ?}?4? and H?WW{sup ?}?????. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup ?1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  11. Laser fluorescence study of AIO formed in the reaction AI + O2: Product state distribution, dissociation energy, and radiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    + 0 has been studied by Fontijn, Felder, and Houghton! in a fast- flow reactor. They find are reported for AIO products formed under single-collision conditions in a "beam-gas" arrangement the combustion of metals has long been a fruitful topic in chemical research, the gas-phase oxida- tion process M

  12. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$, $H\\rightarrow ZZ^{*}\\rightarrow 4 \\ell$ and $H\\rightarrow W W \\rightarrow \\ell\

  13. Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

  14. CDF note 10582 Search for SM Higgs boson production in association with tt using no lepton final state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF note 10582 Search for SM Higgs boson production in association with t¯t using no lepton final is that t¯t decay all hadronic mode (all t decay into bqq ). In both cases we consider that the Higgs boson discriminant variable from different neural network to discriminate the Higgs boson signal from remained

  15. Measurement of the WW plus WZ Production Cross Section Using the lepton plus jets Final State at CDF II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW+WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp[over-bar] collision data at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV ...

  16. Search for Direct Top Squark Pair Production in Final States with One Isolated Lepton, Jets, and Missing Transverse Momentum in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions Using 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of ATLAS Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search is presented for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The measurement is based on ...

  17. Production of isomeric states in the deuteron-induced reaction of gold at incident energy 4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Balabekyan; N. A. Demekhina; G. S. Karapetyan; D. R. Drnoyan; V. I. Zhemenik; J. Adam; L. Zavorka; A. A. Solnyshkin; V. M. Tsoupko-Sitnikov

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The independent cross section ratio for production of nuclei from 197Au targets irradiated with 4 GeV deuterons have been measured by off-line gamma-spectroscopy. On the basis of the measured independent cross section ratio of 198m, gAu the average intrinsic angular momentum of the primary nucleus was estimated by means of a simple statistical-model analysis based on the formalism developed by Huizenga and Vandenbosch.

  18. ,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

  19. Infrared renormalons and the relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Kataev

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that the infrared renormalon calculus indicates that the QCD theoretical expressions for the Gross-Llewelln Smith sum rules and for the Bjorken polarized and unpolarized ones contain an identical negative twist-4 1/Q^2 correction. This observation is supported by the consideration of the results of calculations of the corresponding twist-4 matrix elements. Together with the indication of the similarity of perturbative QCD corrections to these three sum rules, this observation leads to simple new theoretical relations between the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized and unpolarized sum rules in the energy region $Q^2\\geq 1 GeV^2$. The validity of this relation is checked using concrete experimental data for the Gross-Llewellyn Smith and Bjorken polarized sum rules

  20. First measurement of top quark pair production cross-section in muon plus hadronic tau final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; /Florida State U.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of top quark pair production cross-section in events containing a muon and a tau lepton. The measurement was done with 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected during April 2002 through February 2006 using the D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois. Events containing one isolated muon, one tau which decays hadronically, missing transverse energy, and two or more jets (at least one of which must be tagged as a heavy flavor jet) were selected. Twenty-nine candidate events were observed with an expected background of 9.16 events. The top quark pair production cross-section is measured to be {sigma}(t{bar t}) = 8.0{sub -2.4}{sup +2.8}(stat){sub -1.7}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.5(lumi) pb. Assuming a top quark pair production cross-section of 6.77 pb for Monte Carlo signal top events without a real tau, the measured {sigma} x BR is {sigma}(t{bar t}) x BR(t{bar t} {yields} {mu} + {tau} + 2{nu} + 2b) = 0.18{sub -0.11}{sup +0.13}(stat){sub -0.09}{sup +0.09}(syst) {+-} 0.01(lumi) pb.

  1. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multi-lepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multi-lepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charged light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without an additional hadronically decaying tau; three light leptons; two same-charged light leptons with an additional hadronically decaying tau; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying taus. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value for comp...

  2. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multilepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multilepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charge light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; three light leptons; two same-charge light leptons with a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value f...

  3. Electroweak production of $Z$jj and $W^{\\pm}W^{\\pm}$jj states at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pagan Griso; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of fiducial cross sections for the electroweak production of two jets in association with a $Z$ boson and in association with a pair of same-electric-charge $W$ bosons are presented. The measurements are performed using $20.3~$fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measured fiducial cross sections are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits at 95\\% confidence level are set on anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings.

  4. The Gross-Pitaevskii equations and beyond for inhomogeneous condensed bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. N. Angilella; S. Bartalini; F. S. Cataliotti; I. Herrera; N. H. March; R. Pucci

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple derivation of the static Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation is given from an energy variational principle. The result is then generalized heuristically to the time-dependent GP form. With this as background, a number of different experimental areas explored very recently are reviewed, in each case contact being established between the measurements and the predictions of the GP equations. The various limitations of these equations as used on dilute inhomogeneous condensed Boson atomic gases are then summarized, reference also being made to the fact that there is no many-body wave function underlying the GP formulation. This then leads into a discussion of a recently proposed integral equation, derived by taking the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation as starting point. Some limitations of the static GP differential equation are thereby removed, though it is a matter of further study to determine whether a correlated wave function exists as underpinning for the integral equation formulation.

  5. A modified lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model for convection heat transfer in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liang; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model has become the most popular one in the lattice Boltzmann method for simulating the convection heat transfer in porous media. However, the LBGK model generally suffers from numerical instability at low fluid viscosities and effective thermal diffusivities. In this paper, a modified LBGK model is developed for incompressible thermal flows in porous media at the representative elementary volume scale, in which the shear rate and temperature gradient are incorporated into the equilibrium distribution functions. With two additional parameters, the relaxation times in the collision process can be fixed at a proper value invariable to the viscosity and the effective thermal diffusivity. In addition, by constructing a modified equilibrium distribution function and a source term in the evolution equation of temperature field, the present model can recover the macroscopic equations correctly through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, which is another key point different from pre...

  6. Wave chaos in the nonequilibrium dynamics of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brezinova, Iva; Ludwig, Katharina; Burgdoerfer, Joachim [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/136, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Collins, Lee A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Schneider, Barry I. [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Electron and Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) plays an important role in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at the mean-field level. The GPE belongs to the class of nonlinear Schroedinger equations which are known to feature dynamical instability and collapse for attractive nonlinear interactions. We show that the GPE with repulsive nonlinear interactions typical for BECs features chaotic wave dynamics. We find positive Lyapunov exponents for BECs expanding in periodic and aperiodic smooth external potentials, as well as disorder potentials. Our analysis demonstrates that wave chaos characterized by the exponential divergence of nearby initial wave functions is to be distinguished from the notion of nonintegrability of nonlinear wave equations. We discuss the implications of these observations for the limits of applicability of the GPE, the problem of Anderson localization, and the properties of the underlying many-body dynamics.

  7. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  8. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  9. Production of 26Al in stellar hydrogen-burning environments: spectroscopic properties of states in 27Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Parikh; K. Wimmer; T. Faestermann; R. Hertenberger; H. -F. Wirth; A. A. Chen; J. A. Clark; C. M. Deibel; C. Herlitzius; R. Krucken; D. Seiler; K. Setoodehnia; K. Straub; C. Wrede

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Model predictions of the amount of the radioisotope 26Al produced in hydrogen-burning environments require reliable estimates of the thermonuclear rates for the 26gAl(p,{\\gamma})27Si and 26mAl(p,{\\gamma})27Si reactions. These rates depend upon the spectroscopic properties of states in 27Si within about 1 MeV of the 26gAl+p threshold (Sp = 7463 keV). We have studied the 28Si(3He,{\\alpha})27Si reaction at 25 MeV using a high-resolution quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole magnetic spectrograph. For the first time with a transfer reaction, we have constrained J{\\pi} values for states in 27Si over Ex = 7.0 - 8.1 MeV through angular distribution measurements. Aside from a few important cases, we generally confirm the energies and spin-parity assignments reported in a recent {\\gamma}-ray spectroscopy study. The magnitudes of neutron spectroscopic factors determined from shell-model calculations are in reasonable agreement with our experimental values extracted using this reaction.

  10. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  11. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  12. Summary Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simu-lated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simu- lated with canopy models or retrieved from applications and model development. Keywords: canopy photosynthesis model, carbon dioxide flux- es, eddy in de- termining the balance between photosynthesis and respiration can lead to unexpected behavior

  13. Experience converting a large Fortran-77 program to C++ Ralf W. Grosse-Kunstleve, Thomas C. Terwilliger, Paul D. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf

    Experience converting a large Fortran-77 program to C++ Ralf W. Grosse-Kunstleve, Thomas C. Terwilliger, Paul D. Adams Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley-fitting, and prime-and-switch minimum bias phasing (Terwilliger 2000, Terwilliger 2003). In recent years it has been

  14. Unified Architecture for Large-Scale Attested Metering Michael LeMay, George Gross, Carl A. Gunter, Sanjam Garg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Unified Architecture for Large-Scale Attested Metering Michael LeMay, George Gross, Carl A. Gunter introduce a secure architecture called an attested me- ter for advanced metering that supports large, if they are not based upon a secure system architecture, they could in fact become one of the grid's most significant

  15. Spectrum-based Fault Diagnosis for Service-Oriented Software Systems Cuiting Chen, Hans-Gerhard Gross and Andy Zaidman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidman, Andy

    -Gerhard Gross and Andy Zaidman Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands Email: {cuiting assurance approaches useless. In order to enable service systems to recover from and adapt to runtime of the traditional (offline) quality assurance methods useless [3]. In particular, many failures only emerge during

  16. Midday values of gross CO2 flux and light use efficiency during satellite overpasses can be used to directly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    days when the ground was obscured by cloud cover. Since vegetation carbon exchange can be very dynamic there was a relationship between photosynthetic rates and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for half hour data effect on daily gross CO2 exchange than would have been expected. Conversely, the saturation

  17. Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

  18. Tree damage, allometric relationships, and above-ground net primary production in central Amazon forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    mortality; Forest fragmentation; NPP 1. Introduction Net primary production (NPP) is de®ned as the biochemical construction of new organic material over a speci®ed time interval, or gross primary production (GPP) less autotrophic respiration. The NPP of an ecosystem drives all heterotrophic activity (e

  19. An Assessment of Land Availability and Price in the Coterminous United States for Conversion to Algal Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistic economic assessment of land-intensive alternative energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) requires information on land availability and price. Accordingly, we created a comprehensive, national-scale model of these parameters for the United States. For algae-based biofuel, a minimum of 1.04E+05 km2 of land is needed to meet the 2022 EISA target of 2.1E+10 gallons year-1. We locate and quantify land types best converted. A data-driven model calculates the incentive to sell and a fair compensation value (real estate and lost future income). 1.02E+6 km2 of low slope, non-protected land is relatively available including croplands, pasture/ grazing, and forests. Within this total there is 2.64E+5 km2 of shrub and barren land available. The Federal government has 7.68E+4 km2 available for lease. Targeting unproductive lands minimizes land costs and impacts to existing industries. However, shrub and barren lands are limited by resources (water) and logistics, so land conversion requires careful consideration.

  20. Innovative Energy Projects in Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samson, P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expansion, the 8 million of Canada's 22 million people living in Ontario produce a $130 billion gross provincial product - about the size of Sweden's gross national product - that's broadly based - and still dependant on the United States. Not only...

  1. Insert Title here Alex Liotta, Douglas Eddy, Dr. Sundar Krishnamurty, Dr. Ian Grosse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    the engineering and business sides of a company through the concept called product lifecycle management (PLM a method to transfer data between protégé and Windchill. WindchillProduct Lifecycle Management Classic The design of a product makes up a large part of the time and money required to bring the product

  2. Comparing cropland net primary production estimates from inventory, a satellite-based model, and a process-based model in the Midwest of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Tan, Zhengxi; Bliss, N.; Young, Claudia J.; West, Tristram O.; Ogle, Stephen

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately quantifying the spatial and temporal variability of net primary production (NPP) for croplands is essential to understand regional cropland carbon dynamics. We compared three NPP estimates for croplands in the Midwestern United States: inventory-based estimates using crop yield data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS); estimates from the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NPP product; and estimates from the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) process-based model. The three methods estimated mean NPP in the range of 469–687 g C m?2 yr?1 and total NPP in the range of 318–490 Tg C yr?1 for croplands in the Midwest in 2007 and 2008. The NPP estimates from crop yield data and the GEMS model showed the mean NPP for croplands was over 650 g C m?2 yr?1 while the MODIS NPP product estimated the mean NPP was less than 500 g C m?2 yr?1. MODIS NPP also showed very different spatial variability of the cropland NPP from the other two methods. We found these differences were mainly caused by the difference in the land cover data and the crop specific information used in the methods. Our study demonstrated that the detailed mapping of the temporal and spatial change of crop species is critical for estimating the spatial and temporal variability of cropland NPP. We suggest that high resolution land cover data with species–specific crop information should be used in satellite-based and process-based models to improve carbon estimates for croplands.

  3. Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten Island, the Proctor and Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. This appendix to the final report provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations.

  4. GROUND STATES AND DYNAMICS OF MULTICOMPONENT BOSEEINSTEIN CONDENSATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Weizhu

    GROUND STATES AND DYNAMICS OF MULTICOMPONENT BOSE­EINSTEIN CONDENSATES WEIZHU BAO MULTISCALE MODEL a multicomponent Bose­Einstein condensate (BEC) at zero or a very low temperature. In preparation for the numerics of multicomponent BEC. Key words. multicomponent, Bose­Einstein condensate, vector Gross­Pitaevskii equations

  5. Weak decay processes in pre-supernova core evolution within the gross theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, R. C. [Departamento de Estudos Básicos e Instrumentais, Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, BA (Brazil); Dimarco, A. J.; Samana, A. R. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, BA (Brazil); Barbero, C. A., E-mail: roberto@uesb.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta decay and electron capture rates are of fundamental importance in the evolution of massive stars in a pre-supernova core. The beta decay process gives its contribution by emitting electrons in the plasma of the stellar core, thereby increasing pressure, which in turn increases the temperature. From the other side, the electron capture removes free electrons from the plasma of the star core contributing to the reduction of pressure and temperature. In this work we calculate the beta decay and electron capture rates in stellar conditions for 63 nuclei of relevance in the pre-supernova stage, employing Gross Theory as the nuclear model. We use the abundances calculated with the Saha equations in the hypothesis of nuclear statistical equilibrium to evaluate the time derivative of the fraction of electrons. Our results are compared with other evaluations available in the literature. They have shown to be one order less or equal than the calculated within other models. Our results indicate that these differences may influence the evolution of the star in the later stages of pre-supernova.

  6. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A., E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  7. A Dynamical System Modelling Approach to Gross' Model of Emotion Regulation Tibor Bosse (tbosse@few.vu.nl) Matthijs Pontier (mpontier@few.vu.nl) Jan Treur (treur@few.vu.nl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    A Dynamical System Modelling Approach to Gross' Model of Emotion Regulation Tibor Bosse (tbosse introduces a computational model for emotion regulation formalising the model informally described by Gross a computational model to simulate emotion regulation, based on the process model described informally by Gross

  8. Phase diagram of chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2-dimensional Gross Neveu model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Kohyama

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the phase diagram of the chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 1+1 dimensional (2D) two flavor massless Gross Neveu model. The resultant phase diagram shows (I) the chiral condensed phase at low temperature and density, (II) the diquark condensed phase at low temperature and high density, and (III) the chiral and diquark coexisting phase at low temperature and intermediate density. This phase structure is also seen in the 3D Gross Neveu model and the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Thus the phase diagrams of the chiral and diquark condensates in the NJL-type models do not change qualitatively in 2D, 3D and 4D.

  9. State Policies to Encourage Green Building Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    state green building policies, Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency, energy efficient building codes, energy efficient products

  10. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sfyrla, Anna; /Geneva U.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is {sigma}{sub WW/WZ}{sup theory} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 2.09 {+-} 0.14 pb. They measured N{sub Signal} = 410 {+-} 212(stat) {+-} 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 1.47 {+-} 0.77(stat) {+-} 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be {sigma} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels consist of 4088 silicon modules, with a total of 6.3 million readout channels. The coherent and safe operation of the SCT during commissioning and subsequent operation is the essential task of the Detector Control System (DCS). The main building blocks of the DCS are the cooling system, the power supplies and the environmental system. The DCS has been initially developed for the SCT assembly phase and this system is described in the present work. Particular emphasis is given in the environmental hardware and software components, that were my major contributions. Results from the DCS testing during the assembly phase are also reported.

  11. Weekly Coal Production by State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand expected toallBlender Net

  12. Cooperation between the United States Department of Energy National Laboratories and Mayak Production Association for enhancements to material protection control and accounting systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starodubtsev, G.S.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Zatorsky, Y.M. [Mayak Production Association (Russia); James, L.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ehinger, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manatt, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Olinger, C.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Runyon, L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Suda, S.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agreement Between the Department of Defense of the United States and The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) Concerning Control, Accounting, and Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, as well as a subsequent amendment to that agreement and a joint statement signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and MINATOM, resulted in the selection of the Mayak Production Association (MPA) as one of the Russian enterprises that would participate with DOE Laboratories in expanded cooperation aimed at enhancing Material protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. This paper describes the nature and scope of the expanded cooperation involving MPA and six DOE laboratories at an operating civilian, spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant designated RT-1. RT-1 produces, among other materials, reactor-grade plutonium dioxide, a direct-use material that is stored within the boundaries of this plant. Initial efforts at expanded cooperation will focus on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at MPA`s RT-1 plant.

  13. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

  14. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

  15. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

  16. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

  17. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

  18. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

  19. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

  20. (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

  1. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

  2. Search for Higgs Boson Pair Production in the ??b[bar over b] Final State Using pp Collision Data at ?s = 8 TeV from the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Searches are performed for resonant and nonresonant Higgs boson pair production in the ??b[bar over b] final state using 20??fb[superscript ?1] of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with ...

  3. Search for direct slepton and gaugino production in final states with two leptons and missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the electroweak pair production of charged sleptons and weak gauginos decaying into final states with two leptons is performed using 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] of proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV recorded ...

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

  5. Graphical User Interface Software for Gross Defect Detection at the Atucha-I Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, A C; Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S; Peixoto, O

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Atucha-I pressurized heavy water reactor in Argentina, fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools are stored by suspending them in two vertically stacked layers. This introduces the unique problem of verifying the presence of fuel in either layer without physically moving the fuel assemblies. Movement of fuel, especially from the lower layer, would involve a major effort on the part of the operator. Given that the facility uses both natural uranium and slightly enriched uranium at 0.85 w% {sup 235}U, and has been in operation since 1974, a wide range of burnups and cooling times can exist in any given pool. Additionally, while fuel assemblies are grouped together in a uniform fashion, the packing density from group to group can vary within a single pool. A tool called the Spent Fuel Neutron Counter (SFNC) was developed and successfully tested at the site to verify, in an in-situ condition, the presence of fuel up to burnups of 8,000 MWd/t. Since the neutron source term becomes a nonlinear function of burnup beyond this burnup, a new algorithm was developed to predict expected response from the SFNC at measurement locations covering the entire range of burnups, cooling times, and initial enrichments. With the aid of a static database of parameters including intrinsic sources and energy group-wise detector response functions, as well as explicit spent fuel information including burnups, cooling times, enrichment types, and spacing between fuel assemblies, an expected response for any given location can be calculated by summing the contributions from the relevant neighboring fuel assemblies. Thus, the new algorithm maps the expected responses across the various pools providing inspectors with a visual aid in verifying the presence of the spent fuel assemblies. This algorithm has been fully integrated into a standalone application built in LabVIEW. The GUI uses a step-by-step approach to allow the end-user to first calibrate the predicted database against a set of measurements with SFNC at selected locations where spent fuel is present. Once the database is calibrated it can be used to detect gross defects by comparing the measured signal to the one predicted by the database with differences beyond a set tolerance indicating missing fuel.

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. PRODUCING CRUMB RUBBER MODIFIER (CRM) FROM USED TIRES . . . . . 3 2.1 PRODUCTION OF CRM THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE

  7. Superfluid Mutual-friction Coefficients from Vortex Dynamics in the Two-dimensional Galerkin-truncated Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishwanath Shukla; Marc Brachet; Rahul Pandit

    2014-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present algorithms for the ab-initio determination of the temperature ($T$) dependence of the mutual-friction coefficients $\\alpha$ and $\\alpha'$ and the normal-fluid density $\\rho_{\\rm n}$ in the two-dimensional (2D) Galerkin-truncated Gross-Pitaevskii system. Our algorithms enable us to determine $\\alpha(T)$, even though fluctuations in 2D are considerably larger than they are in 3D. We also examine the implications of our measurements of $\\alpha'(T)$ for the Iordanskii force, whose existence is often questioned.

  8. One-dimensional reduction of the three-dimenstional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with two- and three-body interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, W. B.; Avelar, A. T. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, 74.001-970, Goiania, Goias (Brazil); Bazeia, D. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We deal with the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation which is used to describe a cloud of dilute bosonic atoms that interact under competing two- and three-body scattering potentials. We study the case where the cloud of atoms is strongly confined in two spatial dimensions, allowing us to build an unidimensional nonlinear equation,controlled by the nonlinearities and the confining potentials that trap the system along the longitudinal coordinate. We focus attention on specific limits dictated by the cubic and quintic coefficients, and we implement numerical simulations to help us to quantify the validity of the procedure.

  9. Strangeness Production at COSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

  10. Coal production 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

  11. Search for sneutrino production in $e\\mu$ final states in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt(s) =1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into e{mu} final states using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Having observed no evidence for production of e{mu} resonances, we set direct bounds on the RPV couplings {lambda}{prime}{sub 311} and {lambda}{sub 312} as a function of sneutrino mass.

  12. A Holistic Approach to Service Survivability Angelos D. Keromytis Janak Parekh Philip N. Gross Gail Kaiser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    federal, state, and city agencies) and (semi­) roaming stations and users. Sim­ ilarly, timely message of Computer Science y Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia University fangelos,janak

  13. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Data for boron production and consumption in 2008 in the United States were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; Chile, 24%; Bolivia, 8%; Peru, 5%; and other, 8%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12 of boron-free reinforcement-grade fiberglass in Europe and the United States. The continued rise in energy Reserves6 Reserve base6 2007 2008e United States W W 40,000 80,000 Argentina 550 670 2,000 9,000 Bolivia 50

  14. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  15. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  16. Nuclear Power: A Price Worth Paying For A Stable Climate? Will Cavendish & Robert Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that "nuclear energy will play an essential role in electricity production and strategies against global warming provides a significant share of the world's energy (one quarter of the UK's electricity for example), and unlike other alternatives it is proven ­ nuclear works. Nuclear electricity is more expensive than gas

  17. Dynamical states of the cortico basal ganglia circuits Thesis submitted for the degree of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in these mean discharge rates. It posits that the death of midbrain dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PDDynamical states of the cortico ­ basal ganglia circuits Thesis submitted for the degree of "Doctor variable that represents the mean discharge rate of neurons in that nucleus, and focuses on the gross

  18. Ground states and dynamics of multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowich, Peter A.

    Ground states and dynamics of multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates Weizhu Bao #3; Department) an external driven #12;eld for dynamics describing a multi-component Bose- Einstein condensate (BEC) at zero-component Bose-Einstein condensates. Key Words. Multi-component, Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), Vector Gross

  19. Measurement of the tt? production cross section in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV in dilepton final states containing a ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying ? lepton from the decay tt? ?(??[subscript ?])(?[subscript h]?[subscript ?])bb? , (?=e,?). ...

  20. The Method of Distributed Volumetric Sources for Forecasting the Transient and Pseudo-steady State Productivity of Multiple Transverse Fractures Intersected by a Horizontal Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Diangeng

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    from 9/1/2007 .........................................................64? 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 General Background In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing gas from unconventional sources is the next... In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing gas from unconventional sources is the next level of the fossil-fuel recovery challenge. 6 The mammoth volume and long-term potential of coalbed methane (CBM), tight gas...

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProduction

  2. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProductionFeet)

  3. Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southern States Energy Compact provides for the proper employment and conservation of energy, and for the employment of energy-related facilities, materials, and products, within the context of...

  4. Quark-Antiquark and Diquark Condensates in Vacuum in a 2D Two-Flavor Gross-Neveu Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou Bang-Rong

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis based on the renormalized effective potential indicates that, similar to in the 4D two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, in a 2D two-flavor Gross-Neveu model, the interplay between the quark-antiquark and the diquark condensates in vacuum also depends on $G_S/H_S$, the ratio of the coupling constants in scalar quark-antiquark and scalar diquark channel. Only the pure quark-antiquark condensates exist if $G_S/H_S>2/3$ which is just the ratio of the color numbers of the quarks participating in the diquark and quark-antiquark condensates. The two condensates will coexist if $0condensates arise only at $G_S/H_S=0$ and are not in a possibly finite region of $G_S/H_S$ below 2/3.

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural Gas

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural GasGas Wells

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural GasGas WellsOil

  8. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefiedNatural GasGas

  9. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use as anCubic Feet)ProductionCubic

  10. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use as anCubic Feet)ProductionCubicCubic

  11. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Promethean Homes, Gross-Shepard Residence, Charlottesville, VA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production | Zero EnergyExtremeTownPalo

  12. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) EstimatedProductionFeet) Year

  13. ASYMPTOTICALLY FREE GAUGE THEORIES - I* David J. Gross+ National Accelerator Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In the design of aD. P.91-97. THEnational

  14. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  15. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries, 1998,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State GlossaryEnergy )and 2002 e

  16. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries, 1998,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State GlossaryEnergy )andand 2002

  17. Dynamic Representation of Eye Position in the Parieto-Occipital Sulcus K. NAKAMURA, H. H. CHUNG, M.S.A. GRAZIANO, AND C. G. GROSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziano, Michael

    Dynamic Representation of Eye Position in the Parieto-Occipital Sulcus K. NAKAMURA, H. H. CHUNG, M 08544 Nakamura, K., H. H. Chung, M.S.A. Graziano, and C. G. Gross. Dynamic representation of eye stimulation and to the position and movement of the eyes. We examined the effects of eye position and eye

  18. Measurement of WZ and ZZ production in pp collisions at 8 TeV in final states with b-tagged jets with the CMS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caterina Vernieri on behalf of the CMS collaboration

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we present a measurement of the VZ (V=W,Z) production cross section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$8 TeV in the VZ$\\rightarrow$V$b\\bar{b}$ decay mode with V$=$Z$\\rightarrow (\

  19. (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1995, clays, these firms operated about 983 mines. Estimated value of all marketable clay produced was about $1.8 billion. Major domestic uses for specific clays were estimated as follows: kaolin--55% paper, 8% kiln furniture

  20. Search for Quantum Black Hole Production in High-Invariant-Mass Lepton + Jet Final States Using pp Collisions at ?s = 8 TeV and the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents a search for quantum black-hole production using 20.3??fb[superscript ?1] of data collected with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at the LHC at ?s = 8??TeV. The quantum black holes are assumed to ...

  1. Meat Science and Animal Food Product Safety Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and depth in undergraduate education, graduate education, research and outreach in meat science and animal manufacturing industries and regulatory agencies. Graduate education, research, and outreach will focus on pre and international credibility of the meat products, and producer, consumer, and food handler education in food

  2. Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa underpin the economy of our State.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa in our contributions to national and global food security. Changes in rainfall patterns and other climate and livelihoods. Subtle changes in climate can have large effects on agriculture, making it a sensitive indicator

  3. (Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1995. Domestic indium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , refinery NA NA NA NA -- Imports for consumption 36.3 36.3 73.4 70.2 73.0 Exports NA NA NA NA NA marketed through a U.S. company. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

  4. Measurement of the t[bar over t] Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with Lepton + jets Final States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A measurement of the t[bar over t] production cross section in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is presented. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb[superscript ?1] collected by the ...

  5. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2004. Two companies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    80 INDIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium-efficiency photovoltaic devices. A major manufacturer is testing indium for a new application as a heat-management material in computers, which could increase consumption by 40 metric tons per year. The estimated

  6. (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2008. Indium-containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Data on the quantity of secondary indium recovered from scrap were not available. Indium is most loop--from collection of scrap to production of secondary materials--now takes less than 30 days. ITO to dissolve the ITO, from which the indium is recovered. Indium recovery from tailings was thought to have

  7. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  8. Search for Higgs boson production in trilepton and like-charge electron-muon final states with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Higgs bosons in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, using the full Run II data set with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7??fb(?1...

  9. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report.

  10. & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

  11. A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

  12. Creating a Consortium to Increase minority and Low-Income Community Participation in Alternative Energy Development, Production and Management Melinda Downing, United States Department of Energy Geraldine Herring, United States Department of Agriculture John Rosenthall, Environmental Justice Conference, Inc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, M. [Company United States Department of Energy (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    America's desire for energy independence places a new demand on alternative fuel production. Additional interest and emphasis are being placed on alternatives such as solar, wind, biofuels and nuclear energy. The nuclear fuel production option brings a new look at risk and residual waste management for a number of communities that have traditionally remained outside the energy debate. With the Federal requirements for environmental justice and public participation in energy and environmental decision-making, proponents of alternative energy production facilities will find themselves participating in discussions of risk, production, storage and disposal of hazardous materials and waste matters with low income and minority members in communities where these facilities are located or wish to locate. The fundamental principal of environmental justice is that all residents should have meaningful and intelligent participation in all aspects of environmental decision-making that could affect their community. Impacted communities must have the resources and ability to effectively marshall data and other information in order to make informed and intelligent decisions. Traditionally, many low-income and minority communities have lacked access to the required information, decision-makers and technical advisers to make informed decisions with respect to various risks that accompany alternative energy production, hazardous materials storage and nuclear waste management. In order to provide the necessary assistance to these communities, the Departments of Energy and Agriculture have teamed with others to cerate the Alternative Energy Consortium. The Alternative Energy Consortium is a collaboration of non-profit organizations, Federal agencies, Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving Institutions (HBCU/MSIs), and private sector corporations (energy industry specialists) designed to explore and develop opportunities that empower minorities to own and work in all aspects of the field of alternative energy. The Consortium's primary objectives are to find ways to: - Include minorities in the development and ownership of infrastructure in the alternative energy industry; - Promote research and education programs to inform the public about risks and benefits of various forms of alternative energy; - Build a Mentor/Protege Program between HBCU/MSIs and industry leaders to enhance minority participation in ownership and career success in alternative energy production and distribution. The Consortium will work together to create a process whereby minorities and low income individuals will be recruited, educated, and mentored to maximize alternative energy ownership and job opportunities. Industry specialists and government representatives will work with academicians and others to: 1. research areas and methods where minorities and rural communities can engage in the industry; 2. invest in minorities by serving as mentors to minority serving institutions by offering hands-on experience through apprenticeships; 3. work to identify ownership opportunities for minorities; and 4. work to develop legislation that supports economic development and participation for minorities and rural communities in the industry. To accomplish this goal, the Consortium has set out a three-phase plan. Phase I organized a meeting of professionals to discuss the concept, explore the fundamentals, identify key players, and draft next steps. The group took a critical look at the energy industry: 1) trends, 2) economics, 3) limited number of minorities; and 4) infrastructure. Through that process the group identified four areas that would greatly impact economic development for minorities and rural communities: I Energy; II Broadband Communications; III Education; IV Labor Resources. Phase II presented a roundtable panel discussion that continued to refine the Consortium. The goal of these discussions is to produce a well-balanced Consortium committed to working together to produce effective solutions that bridge the gap between alternative energy

  13. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cerny, K.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying ? lepton from the decay tt¯?(l?l)(?h??)bb¯, (l=e,?). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb?¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb?¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including ? leptons in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7 TeV. The measured value ?tt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  14. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    in Poplar Steven Strauss, Oregon State University (2009-2011) OVERVIEW The production of bioplastics from

  15. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  16. Search for gluino and squark production in multi-jets plus missing transverse energy final states at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portell i Bueso, Xavier; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the results of the search for squarks and gluinos in multiple jets plus missing transverse energy final states have been presented. No evidence of these new particles have been found in 371 pb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data. New limits have been set which exclude gluino masses below 220 GeV and, in the region where M{sub {tilde g}} {approx} M{sub {tilde q}}, masses below 380 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded. These limits are valid in a mSUGRA scenario with tan {beta} = 5, A = 0 and {mu} < 0 assuming the lightest four squark flavours degenerate in mass. To obtain these results a careful study of the beam conditions and their contribution to events with E{sub T} final states has been performed. Special attention has been taken in studying the different SM backgrounds and their normalizations at NLO. Dedicated cuts have been introduced to remove the background processes and main discriminating variables have been optimized for different signal regions. The different systematic uncertainties have also been considered. This is the first time that this search is performed at CDF Run II and the results presented here show significant improvements with respect to the constraints from previous experiments. Thus, this analysis has established the procedure to continue searching for squarks and gluinos with the new data samples that CDF is collecting from Tevatron. Some improvements may also be implemented by considering other hadron final states with different jet multiplicities. This could help extending the sensitivity of the analysis to regions where gluino and squark masses are not similar. At the forthcoming LHC, the search for squarks and gluinos in this inclusive channel constitutes one of the first analyses to be performed. The E{sub T} and multiple jets final states are present in multiple decay modes of many models beyond the SM. The experience from Tevatron in working on an hadron collider environment will be useful for these kind of studies aiming to discover the presence of supersymmetric processes.

  17. Production of cold beams of ND{sub 3} with variable rotational state distributions by electrostatic extraction of He and Ne buffer-gas-cooled beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twyman, Kathryn S.; Bell, Martin T.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P., E-mail: tim.softley@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the rotational state distribution of a velocity-selected, buffer-gas-cooled beam of ND{sub 3} is described. In an apparatus recently constructed to study cold ion-molecule collisions, the ND{sub 3} beam is extracted from a cryogenically cooled buffer-gas cell using a 2.15 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide with three 90° bends. (2+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules exiting the guide show that beams of ND{sub 3} can be produced with rotational state populations corresponding to approximately T{sub rot} = 9–18 K, achieved through manipulation of the temperature of the buffer-gas cell (operated at 6 K or 17 K), the identity of the buffer gas (He or Ne), or the relative densities of the buffer gas and ND{sub 3}. The translational temperature of the guided ND{sub 3} is found to be similar in a 6 K helium and 17 K neon buffer-gas cell (peak kinetic energies of 6.92(0.13) K and 5.90(0.01) K, respectively). The characterization of this cold-molecule source provides an opportunity for the first experimental investigations into the rotational dependence of reaction cross sections in low temperature collisions.

  18. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to the figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJ0-100 published and distributed by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy.

  19. Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinert, Rhonda K.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Robinson, David B.; Backus, George A.; Fogelman, William; Cutler, Laura; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Finely, Ray; Siirola, John; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Mitchiner, John Lovorn; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Strickland, James Hassler; Weddington, Anna Neila; Warren, Drake E.; Taylor, Mark A.; Loose, Verne W.; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Horschel, Daniel S.; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Snyder, Lillian Annabelle; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reno, Marissa Devan; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Baker, Arnold Barry; Adams, Brian M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts from responses to climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

  20. Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Reinert, Rhonda K.; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts of climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.