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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Remaining gross market potentials for the Central District  

SciTech Connect

The remaining gross market potential for the central district was studied for 28 power distributors. A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP) data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: The largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of Nashville Electric Service (28.0%). Approximately 20% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed one or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 47.1% of the consumers went on to install one or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 1.6% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installations in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is less than 0.005%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the Nashville Electric Service (NES) area (60.4%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, NES had the highest overall average in performance and closures.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Remaining gross market potentials for the Appalachian District  

SciTech Connect

A survey provided a rank ordering of the 22 power distributors and each option's installations under the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP). A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the RHIP data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: the largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of the Knoxville utilities Board (22.6%). Approximately 23% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed 1 or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 48.3% of the RHIP participants went on to install 1 or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 1.8% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installation in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is 0.1%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the Knoxville Utilities Board's service area (43.3%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, the municipality of Oak Ridge had the highest overall average in performance and closure.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Remaining gross market potentials for the Alabama District  

SciTech Connect

A survey provided a rank ordering of the 25 power distributors and each option's installations under the Revised Home Insulation Program (RHIP). A special cross tabulation from the Bureau of the Census was used to develop a housing base from which work completions from the RHIP data base could be subtracted. Key observations were: The largest percentage of remaining gross market potential for RHIP surveys lies in the service area of the City of Huntsville Utilities (22.0%). Approximately 34% of the electrically heated and/or cooled living quarters have installed one or more measures under the Home Weatherization Option. In comparison to the number of RHIP surveys completed, 77.3% of the consumers went on to install one or more of the recommended weatherization measures. Only 2.5% of the occupied living quarters have installed a heat pump under the Heat Pump Option of RHIP. The district penetration rate for heat pump water heater installations in living quarters with existing electric water heaters is less than 0.01%. The largest percentage of remaining solar water heater installations is found in the City of Huntsville Utilities service area (52.5%). Of the distributors that offered all 4 options in addition to the survey, the municipality of Sheffield had the highest overall average in performance and closure.

Camp, W.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

5

The Gross-Pitaevskii functional with a random background potential and condensation in the single particle ground state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For discrete and continuous Gross-Pitaevskii energy functionals with a random background potential, we study the Gross-Pitaevskii ground state. We characterize a regime of interaction coupling when the Gross-Pitaevskii ground state and the ground state of the random background Hamiltonian asymptotically coincide.

Frédéric Klopp; Bernd Metzger

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

7

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

8

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

9

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

10

Nuclear Power: A Price Worth Paying For A Stable Climate? Will Cavendish & Robert Gross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. For a major chemical company, the CNWRA used trans- port analysis and dose techni- cal assistance and research to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Its initial focus was on work needed to license a potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high

11

Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

13

Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Measurements in Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to provide information to help interpret gross alpha and gross beta concentrations in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate. This objective was accomplished by chemically characterizing 15 field leachate samples that were collected at three CCP management facilities. The leachate samples were analyzed for gross alpha and gross beta concentrations and for the potential individual alpha and beta emitters in solution. Gross alpha concentrations at the three sites ranged fro...

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

,"GOM Gross EST",,,"Louisiana Gross EST",,,"New Mexico Gross...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross EST",,,"Wyoming Gross EST",,,"Other States Gross EST",,,"Lower 48 Gross EST",,,"Alaska Gross State Data",,,"U. S. Gross EST" ,"Initial Est","Revised Est",,"Initial...

15

Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

Starke, M.R.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Definition: Gross generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gross generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gross generation The total amount of electric energy produced by generating units (e.g. power plants) and measured at the generating terminal in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Electricity generation, Net generation, power References ↑ http://205.254.135.24/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=G#gross_gen Retri Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Gross_generation&oldid=480543" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

17

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

18

What is Gross Up?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/19/12 Rev 0 /19/12 Rev 0 What is Gross Up? Gross up on relocation refers to money that is added to your pay to offset the federal and state tax deducted from the relocation reimbursement amount. You do not see the money in your pocket, but rather it offsets taxes that would have reduced the payment if we had not paid you the additional amount. For example: If the Relocation reimbursement request submitted = $5668. Without a gross up the net payment received would be $3539.66 because federal and state taxes reduce the pay out by $1694.73 ($1417 federal + $277.73 state). Paying only the additional amount of the taxes would create a larger tax burden because there would be taxes on that additional amount as well. Instead by paying an additional $2417.59 the federal and state taxes on the original $5668 and the additional federal and state taxes on

19

Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property Type Number Description Avg. Annual Gross Operating Capacity(MW). Pages using the property "AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty" Showing 6 pages using this property. F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 49.5 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 81.7 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 86 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 22 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 50 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 11.5 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty&oldid=400186#SMWResults" Categories: Properties Geothermal Energy Generation Facilities properties What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

20

Power Potential of Geothermal Wells Related to Reservoir Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For equal flows of hot water wells, the electric power which can be generated increases with feed water temperature. However, high temperature wells discharge greater flows than that of lower temperature wells of similar permeability, with the result of enhanced power potential. In fact, where fluids are exploited utilizing two-stage flash, these factors combine to give a power potential which is proportional to the cube of the feed water temperature in degrees celsius. Hence a feed of 315 C would generate twice the power of that of water at 250 C for wells of good permeability and where the reservoir exists under conditions of boiling point with depth. Higher temperature water (exceeding 300 C) has, however, a commensurate higher tendency to mineral deposition in reinjection water lines and this disposes design to single-stage flash with slightly reduced power, compared with the two-stage alternative.

James, Russell

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy October 3, 2011 - 7:03pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs As Secretary Chu noted this weekend, America finds itself in a fierce global competition for the clean energy jobs and industries of the future - with countries like China, Germany and others investing tens of billions of dollars to expand their domestic renewable energy industry and capture the lead in a rapidly growing field. In this context, the Department of Energy's loan programs have played a crucially important role in helping the United States compete, by providing affordable financing to innovative projects that might not otherwise happen but that hold the potential to seed entire new industries for U.S.

22

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

23

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

24

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments October 4, 2011 - 12:46pm Addthis This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Click here to see more amazing supercomputer simulations. | Image courtesy of ORNL. This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease. Click here to see more amazing

25

Market potential of IGCC for domestic power production  

SciTech Connect

Mitretek Systems and CONSOL Inc. have completed the first phase of a market potential study for Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) domestic power production. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this study. The objective of this study is to provide DOE with data to estimate the future domestic market potential of IGCC for electricity generation. Major drivers in this study are the state of technology development, feedstock costs, environmental control costs, demand growth, and dispatchability. This study examines IGCC potential for baseload power production in the Northeast U. S., an important market area by virtue of existing coal infrastructure and proximity to coal producing regions. IGCC market potential was examined for two levels of technology development as a function of natural gas price and carbon tax. This paper discusses the results of this study, including the levels of performance and cost necessary to insure competitiveness with natural gas combined cycle plants.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; Hawk, E.; Maskew, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remote sensing for wind power potential: a prospector's handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote sensing can aid in identifying and locating indicators of wind power potential from the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments (i.e.: wind-deformed trees, white caps, and areas of thermal flux). It is not considered as a tool for determining wind power potential. A wide variety of remotely sensed evidence is described in terms of the scale at which evidence of wind power can be identified, and the appropriate remote sensors for finding such evidence. Remote sensing can be used for regional area prospecting using small-scale imagery. The information from such small-scale imagery is most often qualitative, and if it is transitory, examination of a number of images to verify presistence of the feature may be required. However, this evidence will allow rapid screening of a large area. Medium-scale imagery provides a better picture of the evidence obtained from small-scale imagery. At this level it is best to use existing imagery. Criteria relating to land use, accessibility, and proximity of candidate sites to nearby transmission lines can also be effectively evaluated from medium-scale imagery. Large-scale imagery provides the most quantitative evidence of the strength of wind. Wind-deformed trees can be identified at a large number of sites using only a few hours in locally chartered aircraft. A handheld 35mm camera can adequately document any evidence of wind. Three case studies that employ remote sensing prospecting techniques are described. Based on remotely sensed evidence, the wind power potential in three geographically and climatically diverse areas of the United States is estimated, and the estimates are compared to actual wind data in those regions. In addition, the cost of each survey is discussed. The results indicate that remote sensing for wind power potential is a quick, cost effective, and fairly reliable method for screening large areas for wind power potential.

Wade, J.E.; Maule, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.; Rosenfeld, C.L.; Woolley, S.G.; McClenahan, M.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

28

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

29

Rooftop Solar Potential Distributed Solar Power in NW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/19/2013 1 Rooftop Solar Potential Distributed Solar Power in NW Massoud Jourabchi June 2013 1 in 2012 4 #12;6/19/2013 3 Regional Growth In Solar Energy Consumption Solar consumption both Thermal and PV h b t d i i lhas been on steady increase since early 1990s. From 2000-2010 Solar PV grow

30

Testing and Evaluation of a Power Factor Correction for Power-Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power factor correction (PFC) is an important technology that can be used to enhance power quality. It was noted that the power factor was low for packaged air-conditioning (PAC) units utilized in residential buildings in Kuwait. To study the impact of PFC units, a PAC unit was selected, a PFC unit was installed,and three cases were developed to assess their energy-saving potential. It was found that the PFC unit was able to correct the power factor from 0.61 to 0.96. The reactive power was then reduced from 13.9 to 3.0 kVAR (kilo volts amps reactive), the apparent power was decreased from 17.5 to 11.0 kVA (kilo volts amps). and the current was reduced from 23.4 to 14.5 amps. The Ministry of Electricity & Water (MEW) in Kuwait is expected to be the major beneficiary of installing PFC units since MEW does not charge consumers for the cost of reactive power.. Key words: PFC unit, power factor, reactive power, active power and apparent power.

Alotaibi, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Shale oil: potential for electric power fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the oil shale industry and the impact it will have on the electric power industry in the years 1990 to 2000. The nontechnical problems are not addressed in detail as they have been suitably dealt with elsewhere. The available technologies for producing shale oil are reviewed. The major problem most processes face today is scale-up to commercial size. An industry of nearly 400,000 BPD is anticipated for 1990. The industry could grow to 1,000,000 BPD by the year 2000 with the introduction of second generation processes in the 1990s. The availability of shale oil may have a direct impact on the electric power industry initially. As the refineries improve their ability to handle shale oil, the availability of this fuel to the electric power industry for direct firing will decrease. The offgas from the oil shale industry could be of major importance to the electric power industry. One-quarter to one-third of the energy produced by the oil shale industry will be in the form of offgas (the gas produced in the retorting process). This will usually be a low Btu gas and therefore likely to be utilized on site to make electricity. The high yield of distillate fuels from shale oil could be important to the utility industry's demand for distillate fuels in peak shaving power generation. In addition to the potential supply implications, a shale oil industry and the people to support it will represent a substantial increase in power generation required in the shale oil region.

Gragg, M.; Lumpkin, R.E.; Guthrie, H.D.; Woinsky, S.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Determination of the 5 MW gross nominal design case binary cycle for power generation at Raft River, Idaho. [Using GEOSYS program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of Rankine cycle studies for power generation utilizing geothermal fluid as the heat source and isobutane as the working fluid are reported. To find the plant configuration which would most effectively utilize the available energy, a parametric study was performed. The desirability of supercritical, single boiler or double boiler cycles, and the relative boiler temperatures and percentage isobutane flow split between the boilers in the double cycles for geothermal fluid temperatures of 260/sup 0/F to 360/sup 0/F were considered. This study was designed to discover thermodynamic trends which would point to an optimum isobutane cycle for geothermal fluid temperatures in this temperature range. The results of the parametric study were applied to derive a Nominal Design Case for a demonstration plant at Raft River, with a geothermal fluid resource at 290/sup 0/F. In addition, plant variations due to tolerances applied to thermodynamic properties and other key factors are included.

Ingvarsson, I.J.; Madsen, W.W. (eds.)

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Tower Improvements Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power

35

Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GrossProdCapacity GrossProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GrossProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

36

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply Jan von Appen1 , Chris. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power. Index Terms ­ microgrids

37

The Potential for Low-Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concern over the possibility of global climate change as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gas buildup in the atmosphere is resulting in increased interest in renewable energy technologies. The World Bank recently sponsored a study to determine whether solar thermal power plants can achieve cost parity with conventional power plants. The paper reviews the conclusions of that study.

Price, H. W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Carpenter, S. (Enermodal Engineering Limited)

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onEconomic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supplyof creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

312013 Next Release Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

40

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

42

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 1312014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

43

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from...

44

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Potential hydroelectric power Mora Canal Drop. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of installing a hydroelectric power plant on the Mora Canal Drop site in Idaho was studied. It was recommended that a 1900 kW unit be installed to generate 8,113,000 kWh per year. The project should cost approximately $1.8 million. The generating cost would be between 20.3 and 22.2 mills/kWh. A local utility has offered to buy all power produced at 26 mills/kWh. No adverse environment, safety, or socio-economic effects are foreseen. (LCL)

Willer, D.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydroelectric power potential, Woonsocket Falls Dam, Woonsocket, Rhode Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of developing a hydroelectric power plant at an existing flood control dam of the city of Woonsocket, RI was examined considering environmental, economic, technical and engineering factors. It was concluded that the City should proceed with plans to develop a hydro plant. (LCL)

Daly, J C; Dowdell, R B; Kelly, W E; Koveos, P E; Krikorian, Jr, J S; Lengyel, G; Prince, M J; Seely, S; Tromp, L; Urish, D W

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The potential for location-aware power management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of location-awareness to dynamically optimise the energy consumption of an office. It makes use of high-accuracy location data collected over 60 days randomly selected from a year in a commercial environment to evaluate the ... Keywords: context-aware, energy efficiency, location-aware, power management

R. K. Harle; A. Hopper

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

innovati nNREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovati nNREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power To fully harvest the nation's bountiful wind and solar resources, it is critical to know how much electrical power from at adding enough wind and solar power capacity to the grid to produce 35% of the WestConnect's electricity

49

An analysis of the potential for shifting electric power demand within daily load requirement  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential for shifting the electric power demand within the daily load requirements for large industrial and commercial customers of the Philadelphia Electric Company. This shifting of electric power demand would tend to flatten the daily load curve of electricity demand, benefitting both the power industry and the consumer. Data on estimated summer load curves of large commercial and industrial customers are analyzed for load flattening potential. Cost savings to the customers are determined. (GRA)

Lamb, P.G.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Factors affecting potential market penetration of laser fusion power plants  

SciTech Connect

A mini-model has been constructed to estimate the optimal size of laser fusion power plants and to estimate the allowable cost of the first such plant in relation to the next best alternative. In estimating the costs of laser fusion, the mini-model incorporates such factors as market penetration, learning, economies of scale, system size, transmission costs, reserve requirements, development and licensing costs and site costs. The results of the mini-model simulations indicate that the optimal laser fusion plant size is approximately 3 GWe; risk considerations unincorporated in the mini-model suggest an optimal size closer to 2.5 GWe.

Deonigi, D.E.; Fraley, D.W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

53

,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

54

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

55

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

56

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

57

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

58

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

59

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151991" ,"Release...

60

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151991" ,"Release...

62

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release...

63

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72013","1151991" ,"Release...

64

,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

65

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

66

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

67

,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

68

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

69

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

70

,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

71

,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

72

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

73

,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301991" ,"Release Date:","1212...

74

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301979" ,"Release Date:","1212...

75

,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

76

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

77

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

78

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

79

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

80

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

82

,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

83

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

84

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

85

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

86

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

87

,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

88

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

89

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

90

,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

91

,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

92

,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

93

Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High Renewables Scenarios in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the analysis of concentrating solar power (CSP) in two studies -- The SunShot Vision Study and the Renewable Electricity Futures Study -- and the potential role of CSP in a future energy mix.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Margolis, R.; Brinkman, G.; Drury, E.; Mowers, M.; Turchi, C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory the intermittency in wind power generation. Our focus is on an isolated microgrid with one wind turbine, one fast supply and demand in an isolated microgrid [2], which is an important concept for renewable energy

Huang, Jianwei

96

David J. Gross and the Strong Force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David J. Gross and the Strong Force David J. Gross and the Strong Force Resources with Additional Information The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to David Gross for "the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". 'Gross, who obtained his PhD in physics in 1966, currently is a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara. ... David Gross Courtesy of UC Santa Barbara [When on the faculty at Princeton University,] he and then-graduate student Frank Wilczek came up with a way to describe the "strong force" that governs interactions between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom. He and Wilczek published their proposal simultaneously with H. David Politzer, a graduate student [at Harvard University] who independently came up with the same idea. ...

97

Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 15,584 15,680 15,819 15,886 15,970 16,068 16,173 16,295 16,422 16,557 16,701 16,832 15,742 16,127 16,628 Real Disposable Personal Income (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 11,502 11,618 11,703 11,757 11,883 11,970 12,057 12,151 12,273 12,363 12,451 12,526 11,645 12,015 12,403 Real Personal Consumption Expend. (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 10,644 10,692 10,729 10,813 10,884 10,959 11,036 11,114 11,191 11,264 11,343 11,416 10,719 10,998 11,304 Real Fixed Investment (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 2,420 2,458 2,491 2,508 2,551 2,604 2,655 2,700 2,752 2,816 2,885 2,944 2,469 2,627 2,849 Business Inventory Change (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) .............

98

Savings Potential of ENERGY STAR(R) External Power Adapters andBattery Chargers  

SciTech Connect

External power adapters may lose 10 to 70 percent of theenergy they consume, dissipated as heat rather than converted into usefulenergy. Battery charging systems have more avenues for losses: inaddition to power conversion losses, power is consumed by the chargingcircuitry, and additional power may be needed after the battery is fullcharged to balance self-discharge. In 2005, the Environmental ProtectionAgency launched a new ENERGY STAR(R) label for external power supplies(EPSs) that convert line-voltage AC electricity into low-voltage DCelectricity for certain electronic devices. The specification includedpower supplies for products with battery charging functions (e.g. laptopsand cell phones), but excluded others. In January 2006, a separatespecification was issued for battery charging systems contained primarilyin small household appliances and power tools. In addition to the ENERGYSTAR(R) label, the state of California will implement minimum energyperformance standards for EPSs in 2007, and similar standards for EPSsand battery chargers are in development at the national level.Many of theproducts covered by these policies use relatively little power and havemodest per-unit savings potential compared to conventional energyefficiency targets. But with an estimated 1.5 billion adapters and 230million battery charging systems in use in the United States, theaggregate savings potential is quite high. This paper presents estimatesof the savings potential for external power adapters and battery chargingsystems through 2025.

Webber, Carrie; Korn, David; Sanchez, Marla

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Study of the export potential of the Bolivian Power Sector. Final report. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Black & Veatch International, was conducted by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report shows the results of a review of export potential and to assess the ability of the Bolivian power sector to provide these exports economically and with financially viable projects. The study includes technical, economic, and financial analyses of export power stations alternatives. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) The Bolivian Power Sector; (3) Market Assessment for Brazil; (4) Market Assessment for Argentina; (5) Market Assessment for Export; (6) Market Assessment for Peru; (7) Project Selection; (8) Transmission Plans for Power Export; (9) Delivered Natural Gas Costs; (10) Power Plant Characteristics; (11) Economic Screening of Export Power Station Options; (12) Project Financing; (13) Conclusions and Recommendations.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Area: U.S. Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico...

102

Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for September 2013 Released: December 6, 2013 Next Release: January 7, 2014 The two graphs below show total U.S. and Lower 48 natural gas production on one and the individual State production on the other. U.S. and Lower 48 States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data State Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data In September, Lower 48 States production decreased 0.8 percent or 0.58 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). Louisiana had the largest volumetric decrease at 5.3 percent or 0.34 Bcf/d as many surveyed operators reported various maintenance issues and normal well decline. Wyoming also dropped

103

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010NM2" "Date","New Mexico...

104

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

105

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan...

106

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

107

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ... U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production;

108

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

109

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

110

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

111

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

112

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

113

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

114

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

115

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

116

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

117

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

118

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

119

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

120

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

122

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

123

The Long-Term Market Potential of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter will examine the conditions under which thermal CSP systems might play a large role in the global energy system. CSP technologies, such as troughs or power towers, have a large advantage over other solar technologies in that they offer the potential for firm power delivery, mitigating intermittency issues. These systems require relatively cloud-free conditions to operate, which limits their geographic applicability.

Smith, Steven J.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Submitted Citation: Lewis, A; Long, CM; Peterson, MK; Weatherstone, S; Quick, W; Campleman, S; Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power. Submitted to INT J ENVIRON RES PUBLIC HEALTH. Biomass power plants will increasingly contribute to reaching international energy targets for renewable production of electricity and greenhouse gas emission reductions. Biomass combustors, common in small scale, industrial boiler applications, are being developed for ap...

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Private-sector power generation in Thailand: potential, impediments, and policy issues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Royal Thai Government (RTG) is exploring ways of involving the private sector in electricity generation. The study: (1) assesses the sector's potential for non-utility power generation, including such options as industrial cogeneration, agricultural-waste-based energy systems, and large-scale systems using domestic fossil fuels; (2) reviews existing power-sector institutions in Thailand and analyzes the major issues and impediments associated with private-sector power generation; and (3) based on U.S. experience, describes possible approaches to establishing the price of non-utility electricity.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

NREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To fully harvest the nation's bountiful wind and solar resources, it is critical to know how much electrical power from these renewable resources could be integrated reliably into the grid. To inform the discussion about the potential of such variable sources, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched two key regional studies, examining the east and west sections of the U.S. power grid. The studies show that it is technically possible for U.S. power systems to integrate 20%-35% renewable electricity if infrastructure and operational improvements can be made.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems utilize solar thermal energy for the generation of electric power. This attribute makes it relatively easy to integrate CSP systems with fossil-fired power plants. The 'solar-augment' of fossil power plants offers a lower cost and lower risk alternative to stand-alone solar plant construction. This study ranked the potential to add solar thermal energy to coal-fired and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants found throughout 16 states in the southeast and southwest United States. Each generating unit was ranked in six categories to create an overall score ranging from Excellent to Not Considered. Separate analysis was performed for parabolic trough and power tower technologies due to the difference in the steam temperatures that each can generate. The study found a potential for over 11 GWe of parabolic trough and over 21 GWe of power tower capacity. Power towers offer more capacity and higher quality integration due to the greater steam temperatures that can be achieved. The best sites were in the sunny southwest, but all states had at least one site that ranked Good for augmentation.

Turchi, C.; Langle, N.; Bedilion, R.; Libby, C.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distri- bution hemisphere extratropics, respectively, between hub heights of 10 m and 100 m. A turbine with a cut-out speed

Zender, Charles

130

An Empirical Analysis of the Potential for Market Power in California's Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-044r An Empirical Analysis of the Potential for Market Power in California's Electricity's Electricity Industry Severin Borenstein and James Bushnell University of California Energy Institute 2539 the California electricity market after deregulation as a static Cournot market with a competitive fringe. Our

California at Berkeley. University of

131

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Fees A gross production tax applies to most gas produced in North Dakota. Gas burned at the well site to power an electrical generator that consumes at least 75 percent of the gas is exempt from taxation under this chapter.

132

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

133

Rocky Mountains (PADD 4) Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units ; PAD District 4 Refinery Utilization and Capacity ...

134

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

135

Assessment of the technology transfer potential of federal photovoltaic power system applications to commercial markets. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the market potential of photovoltaic power supplies is presented. Markets analyzed include the water pumping market, marine navigational aids, cathodic protection, remote general power sources, telecommunications, air navigational aids, mobile generator market, instrumentation, and utility connected applications.

Jaras, T F

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Small scale hydroelectric power potential in Nevada: a preliminary reconnaissance survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary reconnaissance survey is intended to: develop a first estimate as to the potential number, location and characteristics of small-scale (50 kW to 15 MW) hydroelectric sites in Nevada; provide a compilation of various Federal and state laws and regulations, including tax and financing regulations, that affect small-scale hydroelectric development and provide information on sources of small-scale hydroelectric generation hardware and consultants/ contractors who do small scale hydroelectric work. The entire survey has been conducted in the office working with various available data bases. The site survey and site evaluation methods used are described, and data are tabulated on the flow, power potential, predicted capital expenditures required, etc. for 61 potential sites with measured flows and for 77 sites with derived flows. A map showing potential site locations is included. (LCL)

Cochran, G.F.; Fordham, J.W.; Richard, K.; Loux, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques to triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 1,783,682 1,886,710 1,901,556 1,827,328 1,888,870 2,021,001 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 1,583,356 1,452,148 1,413,759...

140

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 3,479,290 3,415,884 3,312,386 3,197,100 3,162,922 3,182,084 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417...

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141

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 1,382,828 1,387,722 1,558,638 2,218,283 3,040,523 3,007,147 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 1,261,539 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967...

142

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 2,257,884 2,488,267 2,536,336 2,514,657 2,375,301 2,253,310 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 1,649,284 1,764,084 1,806,807...

143

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 6,960,858 7,800,655 7,653,647 7,593,697 7,934,689 8,112,398 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 4,992,042 5,285,458 4,860,377...

144

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART II. ECONOMIC POTENTIAL AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. HEAVY WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The reactor design which forms the base for the current economic status of D/sub 2/O-moderated reactors was estimated from developments in several reactor programs. However, since a heavy water-moderated reactor was not operated on natural U fuel at power reactor conditions, considerable improvement from this current status can be foreseen. A summary of improvements is presented concerning the concept which would result solely from operation of succeeding generation plants without a parallel development program, and improvements which would result from the successful completion of the development program as presented. One plant size was used in the evaluation of plant potential, with a 300 Mw/sub e/ nominal rating. The boiling D/sub 2/O-cooled, pressure tube direct cycle plant design was used. The current development program is outlined; this work includes several items leading to the long-range development of the concept. (auth)

Hutton, J.H.; Davis, S.A.; Graves, C.C.; Duffy, J.G. comps.

1960-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Direct methanol fuel cells: Developments for portable power and for potential transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe here results of recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), devoted to potential application of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) as (1) portable power sources at the 50 W level, and (2) primary power sources for electric vehicles. In general, DMFC R and D efforts focus on further improvements in anode catalytic activity, fuel utilization (as related to methanol crossover) and air cathode performance in the presence of the presence of the significant flux of aqueous methanol from anode to cathode. There are significant differences between technical parameters and targets for the two different DMFC applications, which the authors have addressed. They include the lower cell temperature (about 60 C) preferred in portable power vs. operation around 100 C as target temperature for transportation applications, and the much stronger concern for cost of catalyst and any other stack materials in DMFCs developed for potential transportation applications. Most, if not all, recent DMFC work for either portable power or potential transportation applications has strongly focused on cells with polymeric (primarily PFSA) membrane electrolytes. In work at LANL, thin film catalysts bonded to the membrane, e.g., by the decal method, provided best results in terms of catalyst utilization and overall cell performance. In most tests, the single DMFC hardware consisted of uncatalyzed carbon-cloth gas-diffusion backings and graphite blocks with machined serpentine flow channels--quite similar to hardware employed in work with hydrogen/air PEFCs. However, the machined graphite hardware has recently been replaced by alternative, non-machined flow-field/bipolar plates, which enables effective air and aqueous methanol solution distribution along an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}, at a pitch per cell of 2 mm.

Ren, X.; Thomas, S.C.; Zelenay, P.; Gottesfeld, S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

151

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

152

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

153

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

154

California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

155

Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power transfer potential for bringing renewable energy into the Southeast in response to a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors. This interim report examines how the commonly used EIA NEMS and EPRI NESSIE energy equilibrium models are considering such power transfers. Using regional estimates of capacity expansion and demand, a base case for 2008, 2020 and 2030 are compared relative to generation mix, renewable deployments, planned power transfers, and meeting RPS goals. The needed amounts of regional renewable energy to comply with possible RPS levels are compared to inter-regional transmission capacities to establish a baseline available for import into the Southeast and other regions. Gaps in the renewable generation available to meet RPS requirements are calculated. The initial finding is that the physical capability for transferring renewable energy into the SE is only about 10% of what would be required to meet a 20% RPS. Issues that need to be addressed in future tasks with respect to modeling are the current limitations for expanding renewable capacity and generation in one region to meet the demand in another and the details on transmission corridors required to deliver the power.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Potential hydroelectric power. Vertical turbine: spillway combine Broadwater Dam. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was made of the hydroelectric power potential at Broadwater Dam in western Montana. Two alternative configurations for the potential project were evaluated and the economics of four possible sources of project funding were assessed. The configurations analyzed were an apron-mounted configuration, in which the turbine-generator units are located on the downstream apron of the existing dam, and a conventional configuration, in which the units are located in a new powerhouse adjacent to the existing dam. The funding sources considered were the Department of Energy loan program, the United States Bureau of Reclamation PL-984 loan program and conventional revenue bonds, both taxable and tax-exempt. The optimal project alternative was determined to be the apron-mounted configuration. The final choice of funding would be dependent on the power purchaser. It was shown that, regardless of the configuraton or funding source selected, the project would be feasible. The cost of the apron-mounted configuration, which would consist of four turbine-generator units for a total installed capacity of 9.76 MW, was estimated as $13,250,000 with financing provided by either a PL-984 loan or tax-exempt bonds. The cost per installed kilowatt was therefore $1,350, and the cost per kilowatt-hour was 19.6 mills. The average annual energy was estimated to be 56.44 million kWh, the equivalent of approximately 87,000 barrels of oil per y. It is therefore recommended that the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation proceed with the project and that discussions be initiated with potential power purchasers as soon as possible.

Willer, D.C.

1979-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, not including Florida, is approximately 24% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient long distant transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. It shows that development of wind resources will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Deb, Rajat [LCG Consulting

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples clean.'' This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD's), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples ``clean.`` This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD`s), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Analysis of the potential use of geothermal energy for power generation along the Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three forms of potential geothermal energy may exist in the State of Texas: hot rocks in the Trans Pecos region, convection type geothermal water in the Rio Grande Rift basin, and geopressured geothermal water along the Gulf Coast. Of these, only the geopressured waters have been verified. Exploration wells for oil and gas have established the presence of deep hot water deposits along the coastal area, offshore and inland for 75 miles. These exist in thick shale and sand beds in the geopressured zone. The most favorable area appears to be at depths of 12,000 to 15,000 feet where the temperatures range from 300 to 400/sup 0/F. Indications are that a series of relatively small, 10 to 50 megawatt, power plants could be located along the coastal plain of Texas. These plants could produce at least 20,000 megawatts and possibly as much as 100,000 megawatts under the most favorable conditions. Cost of the power appears to be in the range of 25 to 35 mills per kilowatt hour in 1980 providing the water is saturated with natural gas which could be sold to offset some of the cost. If the gas is present, at least 6 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas would be produced. Unit capital investment for such plants would exceed projected costs for nuclear or fossil fueled power plants. Successful development of a demonstration plant with public funds could establish the viability of geopressured waters as a source of power and natural gas and encourage private investment to exploit this energy source, should it prove competitive with other sources of electric power generation.

Wilson, J.S.; Shepherd, B.P.; Kaufman, S.

1975-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Potential air quality impact of geothermal power production in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional assessment of the potential impact on air quality of developing the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources for power production is presented. A network of six stations was installed to characterize the air quality and atmospheric transport properties of the valley before development. These measured the ambient air concentrations of H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub x/, CO/sub 2/, Hg, Rn, and particulates. Wind velocity and the directional variability of the winds were also measured to determine atmospheric stability. The geothermal fluids were analyzed chemically to estimate potential emission rates of H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, Hg, and Rn from future power plants. Using these data and advanced air quality modeling led to the prediction of the potential valley-wide impact of a 3000 MW development scenario. The impact analysis reveals that H/sub 2/S is the principal gaseous pollutant of concern due to its noxious odor and the potential release rate. The ambient H/sub 2/S concentrations that would result from generating 3000 MW without emission controls exceed the California air quality standard (30 ppb) at least 1% of the time for an area in the northern part of the valley that is roughly 1500 km/sup 2/ in size. This compares with current ambient air concentrations that exceed the standard much less than 0.1% of the time. The population center most impacted is Calipatria, where the standard could be exceeded almost 10% of the time. In addition, the odor of H/sub 2/S will be noticeable at least 1% of the time for most of the valley if the 3000 MW are placed on-line without abatement systems.

Gudiksen, P.H.; Ermak, D.L.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Worldwide wind/diesel hybrid power system study: Potential applications and technical issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world market potential for wind/diesel hybrid technology is a function of the need for electric power, the availability of sufficient wind resource to support wind/diesel power, and the existence of buyers with the financial means to invest in the technology. This study includes data related to each of these three factors. This study does not address market penetration, which would require analysis of application specific wind/diesel economics. Buyer purchase criteria, which are vital to assessing market penetration, are discussed only generally. Countries were screened for a country-specific market analysis based on indicators of need and wind resource. Both developed countries and less developed countries'' (LDCs) were screened for wind/diesel market potential. Based on the results of the screening, ten countries showing high market potential were selected for more extensive market analyses. These analyses provide country-specific market data to guide wind/diesel technology developers in making design decisions that will lead to a competitive product. Section 4 presents the country-specific data developed for these analyses, including more extensive wind resource characterization, application-specific market opportunities, business conditions, and energy market characterizations. An attempt was made to identify the potential buyers with ability to pay for wind/diesel technology required to meet the application-specific market opportunities identified for each country. Additionally, the country-specific data are extended to corollary opportunities in countries not covered by the study. Section 2 gives recommendations for wind/diesel research based on the findings of the study. 86 refs.

King, W.R.; Johnson, B.L. III (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the standard efficiency natural gas power plant case, highand imports Natural gas plants providing power to Californianatural gas and petroleum products as well as the remote power plant

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Recent Progress and Future Potential for Concentrating Photovoltaic Power Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential of utility-scale PV power, and, specifically, the opportunity that may arise for concentrating photovoltaics (CPV). In the 1990s, sales of PV modules were dominated by small-size applications such as PV-powered water pumping, emergency telephones, and calculators. More recently, the dramatic growth in the PV industry has been fueled by rooftop systems, especially in Japan and Germany. Such subsidized, grid-connected PV systems are likely to drive PV markets in coming years. Distributed systems deliver power where it is needed, avoiding transmission losses; and residential and commercial systems can be financed along with the rest of a building. Japan and Germany continue to provide market incentives because of their belief in PV's long-term benefits. As successful and important as the rooftop market is for PV sales today, the PV industry will be able to penetrate a larger fraction of the electricity market if PV systems are also used in larger installations, such as utility-owned systems, PV parks, and customer-owned systems. Because retail electricity costs more than wholesale electricity, it is often assumed that PV will address, with incentives, the retail market long before the wholesale market. Here, we show data suggesting that they can grow together. CPV, which uses low-cost lenses or mirrors to focus sunlight on high-efficiency solar cells, has often been presented as a lower-cost approach to utility-scale PV power. Although CPV typically does not compete in rooftop or other current PV markets, CPV could be a major player in a utility-scale market.

Kurtz, S.; Lewandowski, A.; Hayden, H.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electriicty Generation (EPACT 2005--Section 934(c))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summary of DOE's assessment of issues regarding EPAct 2005, which requires the Secretary of Energy to assess conflicting guidance on the economic potential of concentrating solar power for electricity production.

Wilkins, F.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, including Florida, is approximately 32% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. We found that significant wind energy transfers, at the level of 30-60 GW, are expected to be economic in case of federal RPC or CO2 policy. Development of wind resources will depend not only on the available transmission capacity and required balancing resources, but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Deb, Rajat [LCG Consulting

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Emerging Technologioes in Instrumentation and Controls and Their Potential Regulatory Implications for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a summary of eight instrumentation and control (&C) technology areas, with applications in nuclear power plants (NPPs), that were the focus of a recent study performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC.) The state of the technology s application in NPPs, along with potential regulatory impact(s), are discussed. The technology focus areas are: (1) sensors and measurement systems, (2) communications media and networking, (3) microprocessors and other integrated circuits, (4) computational platforms, (5) surveillance, diagnostics, and prognostics, (6) human-system interactions, (7) high-integrity software, and (8) I&C architectures in new plants. The regulatory implications of these focus areas with regard to their application in NPPs are also discussed.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Shourbaji, Ayman A [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Coastal zone wind energy. Part III: a procedure to determine the wind power potential of the coastal zone  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stepwise procedure is presented for determining the seasonal and/or annual mean potential wind power density for any location on the East and Gulf coasts of the United States. The steps include reference to the dominant wind regimes and mean power densities already obtained to estimate the wind power potential of the location under consideration; methods to calculate the potential wind power distributions and steps to be taken to locate the best site in the area of interest. The method can be best applied where the atmospheric systems which produce most of the wind energy at the surface are relatively persistent. The method is least successful in areas where the wind field is highly variable. Application of the complete method requires the use of an existing two- or three-dimensional mesoscale numerical model.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.; Snow, J.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Savings Potential of ENERGY STAR(R) External Power Adapters and Battery Chargers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements for Products with Battery Charging Systems (Power Tools Slow Charger Battery Energy No load (stdby) FastWorkshop on Power Supply and Battery Test Procedures, San

Webber, Carrie; Korn, David; Sanchez, Marla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rooftop Solar Challenge NEUP Award Recipients NEUP Award Recipients 2011 Grants for Offshore Wind Power 2011 Grants for Offshore Wind Power 2011 Grants for Advanced...

174

Solar Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction Solar Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Retail Supplier Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info Start Date 7/1/2007 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of gross receipts from sale and installation of solar energy systems Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted. Revenue generated by the sale and installation of solar systems used to provide space heat, hot

175

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013

176

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

177

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

178

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 203,544 207,497 197,842 207,415 197,786 181,231 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

179

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 668,363 704,080 673,815 708,526 704,973 680,075 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

180

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

182

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 174,470 181,468 176,236 184,625 184,458 179,696 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

183

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

184

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

185

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

186

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

187

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

188

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

189

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

190

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

191

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

192

Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

193

Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

194

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

195

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

196

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 282,018 261,026 234,298 241,910 231,276 247,528 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

197

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

198

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

199

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

200

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

202

,"Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

203

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

204

Gross Wash Project in Washers of Red Mud Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Alumina and Bauxite. Presentation Title, Gross Wash Project in Washers of ...

205

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

206

,"Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

207

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

208

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

209

,"LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

210

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

211

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

212

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

213

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

214

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

215

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

216

,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

217

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

218

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

219

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

220

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

222

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

223

,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

224

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

225

,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

226

,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

227

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

228

,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

229

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

230

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

231

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

232

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

233

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

234

,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

235

,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

236

,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

237

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

238

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

239

,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

240

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

242

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

243

,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

244

,"California Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",1,"Annual",2011,"6301977"...

245

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

246

,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

247

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",7,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release...

248

Drivers of gross margins in UK retail electricity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims at explaining why the UK residential electricity (retail) market enjoys high gross margins in comparison to Vattenfall’s markets in for example… (more)

Törnqvist, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSWVMMCF" "Date","West Virginia...

250

,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

251

,"Texas Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",1,"Annual",2011,"6301977"...

252

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

253

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

254

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

255

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

256

Booster main magnet power supply, present operation and potential future upgrades  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a 24 pulse thyristor control supply, rated at 5500 Amps, +/-2000 Volts, or 3000 Amps, +/-6000 Volts. The power supply is fed directly from the power utility and the peak magnet power is 18 MWatts. This peak power is seen directly at the incoming ac line. This power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years. This paper will describe the present topology and operation of the power supply, the feedback control system and the different modes of operation of the power supply. Since the power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years, upgrading this power supply is essential. A new power supply topology has been studied where energy is stored in capacitor banks. DC to DC converters are used to convert the dc voltage stored in the capacitor banks to pulsed DC voltage into the magnet load. This enables the average incoming power from the ac line to be constant while the peak magnet power is pulsed to +/- 18 MWatts. Simulations and waveforms of this power supply will be presented.

Bajon, E.; Bannon, M.; Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Savatteri, S.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

260

U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Person Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Renewable Energy Production By State Renewable Energy Production By State 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Self-interfering matter-wave patterns generated by a moving laser obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate inside a power trap cut off by box potential boundaries  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of highly energetic self-interfering matter-wave (SIMW) patterns generated by a moving obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) inside a power trap cut off by hard-wall box potential boundaries. The obstacle initially excites circular dispersive waves radiating away from the center of the trap which are reflected from hard-wall box boundaries at the edges of the trap. The resulting interference between outgoing waves from the center of the trap and reflected waves from the box boundaries institutes, to the best of our knowledge, unprecedented SIMW patterns. For this purpose we simulated the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation using the split-step Crank-Nicolson method and the obstacle was modelled by a moving impenetrable Gaussian potential barrier. Various trapping geometries are considered in which the dynamics of the spatial and momentum density, as well as the energy, are considered. The momentum dynamics reveal an oscillatory behavior for the condensate fraction, indicative of excitations out of and de-excitations back into the condensate state. An oscillatory pattern for the energy dynamics reveals the presence of solitons in the system. Some vortex features are also obtained.

Sakhel, Roger R. [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Al-Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

High-Impact, Low-Frequency (HILF) Events in the Electric Power Industry: Potential Impacts, Mitigation, and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the North American electricity grid is one of the most reliable power systems in the world, a class of rare but potentially catastrophically damaging risks is of growing concern in the industry. These so-called "high-impact, low-frequency" (HILF) events potentially include electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons, geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs), coordinated cyber and/or physical attacks, and pandemics. Some HILF events have never occurred, and the probability of their occurrence is ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 3,479,290 3,415,884 3,312,386 3,197,100 3,162,922 3,164,791 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918 1967-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Repressuring 3,039,347 3,007,418 2,908,828 2,812,701 2,795,732 2,801,763 1967-2012 Vented and Flared 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2012 Marketed Production 433,485 398,442 397,077 374,226 356,225 351,259 1967-2012

264

Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska University of Massachusetts Amherst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska Mia Devine Electric Use (kWh/year) 2,173,400 1,032,800 2,520,500 Average Load 300 kW 140 kW 280 kW Peak Load 600 k load profile. Villages usuall

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

267

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART II. ECONOMIC POTENTIAL AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

The status of technology of nuclear power reactors in 1959 is reviewed. General research and engineering development activities are discussed. The reactors considered include the pressurized water, boiling water, light water moderated superheat, organic cooled, sodium graphite, gas cooled enriched fuel, gas cooled natural uranium, fast breeder, aqueous homogeneous, and heavy water. Power costs are compared with the cost of power from conventional plants. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power toand Imports 20% RPS 2010, 33% RPS 2020 California Electricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Savings Potential of ENERGY STAR(R) External Power Adapters and Battery Chargers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintaining the battery Standby – Used in sensing circuitsthe AC power source in standby mode. This test was meant tothe battery and during standby would only address 25 percent

Webber, Carrie; Korn, David; Sanchez, Marla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A historical survey of solar powered airplanes and evaluation of it’s potential market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Project Solaris is a student research project with the goal to build a solar powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. This study is one in a… (more)

Hoffborn, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change Mitigation Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, construction, commissioning, operation, modifications, and eventually decommissioning of a nuclear power plantA Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety

273

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP is GHG preferable to grid power only when supply projection, in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power to California are a mix ....................................................................................................................... 12 Table 7. 2020 forecasts of California electricity and natural gas prices

274

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential value of absorption cooling, but California’sit should be noted that absorption cooling does not displace

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The potential for a nuclear renaissance : the development of nuclear power under climate change mitigation policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are very likely to have already changed the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power, a nearly carbon-free source of ...

Osouf, Nicolas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of Wind Power Potential for Two Contrasting Coastlines of South Africa Using a Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model is used to predict near surface wind velocities, and consequently wind power, for five distinct synoptic regimes for contrasting east and west coasts of South Africa. The model results suggest that no one ...

R. D. Diab; M. Garstang

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Potential growth of electric power production from Imperial Valley geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of geothermal electric power operations in Imperial Valley, California is projected over the next 40 years. With commercial power forecast to become available in the 1980's, the scenario considers three subsequent growth rates: 40, 100, and 250 MW per year. These growth rates, along with estimates of the total resource size, result in a maximum level of electric power production ranging from 1000 to 8000 MW to be attained in the 2010 to 2020 time period. Power plant siting constraints are developed and used to make siting patterns for the 400- through 8000-MW level of power production. Two geothermal technologies are included in the scenario: flashed steam systems that produce cooling water from the geothermal steam condensate and emit noncondensable gases to the atmosphere; and high pressure, confined flow systems that inject the geoghermal fluid back into the ground. An analysis of the scenario is made with regard to well drilling and power plant construction rates, land use, cooling water requirements, and hydrogen sulfide emissions.

Ermak, D.L.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Automatic Detection of Learner's Affect From Gross Body Language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explored the reliability of detecting learners' affect by monitoring their gross body language (body position and arousal) during interactions with an intelligent tutoring system called AutoTutor. Training and validation data on affective states were ...

Sidney D'Mello; Art Graesser

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Area: U.S. U.S. Offshore U.S. State Offshore Federal...

280

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

282

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12122013 7:02:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010US2","N9011US2","N9012US2","NGMEPG...

283

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

284

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

285

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

286

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

287

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

288

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No chart available. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

289

Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

290

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

291

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

292

Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

293

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

294

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

295

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

296

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

297

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

298

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

299

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

300

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

302

Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

303

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

304

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

305

New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

306

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

307

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

308

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

309

Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

310

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

311

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

312

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

313

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

314

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data (XLS File) No chart available. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

315

New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data (XLS File) No chart available. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0...

316

Federal Offshore Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1977-2011 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA...

317

,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMIMMCF" "Date","Michigan Natural...

318

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSWYMMCF" "Date","Wyoming Natural...

319

,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMOMMCF" "Date","Missouri Natural...

320

,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSNVMMCF" "Date","Nevada Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSNMMMCF" "Date","New Mexico...

322

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSORMMCF" "Date","Oregon Natural...

323

,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSINMMCF" "Date","Indiana Natural...

324

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSPAMMCF" "Date","Pennsylvania...

325

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSTXMMCF" "Date","Texas Natural...

326

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSUTMMCF" "Date","Utah Natural Gas...

327

,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSOHMMCF" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas...

328

,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSFLMMCF" "Date","Florida Natural...

329

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSCAMMCF" "Date","California...

330

,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMDMMCF" "Date","Maryland Natural...

331

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSAZMMCF" "Date","Arizona Natural...

332

,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSVAMMCF" "Date","Virginia Natural...

333

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSCOMMCF" "Date","Colorado Natural...

334

Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - No Data...

335

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSOKMMCF" "Date","Oklahoma Natural...

336

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSARMMCF" "Date","Arkansas Natural...

337

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSNEMMCF" "Date","Nebraska Natural...

338

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSNDMMCF" "Date","North Dakota...

339

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSTNMMCF" "Date","Tennessee...

340

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMSMMCF" "Date","Mississippi...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSLAMMCF" "Date","Louisiana...

342

Texas--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

343

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSALMMCF" "Date","Alabama Natural...

344

,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 3:31:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSKSMMCF" "Date","Kansas Natural...

345

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMTMMCF" "Date","Montana Natural...

346

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSNYMMCF" "Date","New York Natural...

347

Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

348

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 128,014: 129,583 ...

349

Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Refinery District Gross Inputs to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Refinery District Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 1,739 ...

350

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May...

351

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9011NM2"...

352

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012NM2"...

353

Ground potential rise characteristics of urban step-down substations fed by power cables - A practical example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows some special ground potential rise characteristics of substations fed by power cables. These characteristics were detected during the study of the interconnected ground system of 14 step-down urban substations fed by the 138 kV underground cable network serving the South Zone of Rio de Janeiro city in Brazil. As this type of system is very common in large cities, the subject can be of general interest for the industry. It was verified that when a fault occurs at a ''cable substation'' (a substation fed exclusively by power cables), almost no ground potential effects were detected at the faulted substation or at the other ''cable substations'' of the 138 kV network. However, high values of ground potential occurred at the ''transition substations'' (substations in which the power cables are connected to overhead 138 kV transmission lines, with steel groundwires). That ground potential was enough to produce shocks and equipment damage in certain ''transition substations''. It was verified that this problem has no relation with potential transfer. The paper shows also that the utilization of overhead lines with ACSR groundwires on the initial spans closer to the ''transition substation'' would be enough to avoid the problem. Even if the ACSR conductor is used only at the initial section of one of the lines, a reduction of the problem would be obtained. The paper shows also that the utilization of ACSR ground-wires near the ''transition substations'' contributes to reduce the amount of the copper necessary to control step, touch and mess potentials in these substations. Additional mitigation procedures are also examined in the paper.

Sobral, S.T. (IESA - Internacional de Engenharia S.A. (BR)); Barbosa, J.O.; Numes, J.V.C.; Chinelli, E.; Netto, A.F. (Light - Servicos de Eletricidade S.A. (BR)); Costa, V.S.; Campos, J.H. (Eletrobras - Centrais Eletricas, Brasileiras (BR))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

355

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and Implicit Price Deflator, 1949-2011: Year: Population: U.S. Gross Domestic Product: United States 1

356

Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, ... Total (Gross Withdrawals ... natural gas wells divided by the number of producing wells, ...

357

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 9 13 1990's 19,861 32,603 191,605 218,023 349,380 356,598 361,068 409,091 392,320 376,435 2000's 361,289 200,862 202,002 194,339 165,630 152,902 145,762 134,451 125,502 109,214 2010's 101,487 84,270 87,398 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

358

Potential impacts of Title I nonattainment on the electric power industry: A Chicago case study (Phase 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses version IV of the Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) to examine the potential impacts of Title I (nonattainment) and Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) on the utility industry. The UAM is run for a grid that covers the Commonwealth Edison Power Pool and encompasses the greater Chicago area and surrounding rural areas. Meteorological conditions are selected from an ozone (O{sub 3}) episode on July 5 and 6, 1988.

Fernau, M.E.; Makofske, W.J.; South, D.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel from the Sky: Solar Power's Potential for Western Energy Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reliable and affordable supply of electricity is essential to protect public health and safety and to sustain a vigorous economy in the West. Renewable energy in the form of wind or solar provides one of the means of meeting the demand for power while minimizing adverse impacts on the environment, increasing fuel diversity, and hedging against fuel price volatility. Concentrating solar power (CSP) is the most efficient and cost-effective way to generate electricity from the sun. Hundreds of megawatts of CSP solar-generating capacity could be brought on-line within a few years and make a meaningful contribution to the energy needs of the West.

Leitner, A.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Market Potential for Nitrogen Fertilizers Derived from the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology evaluation report describes the potential market for fertilizer materials derived from utility by-products from developing ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to control sulfur oxides (SOx) and nitrogen oxides (NOx).

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Potential impacts of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on regional power generation  

SciTech Connect

Simulations predict that the introduction of PHEVs could impact demand peaks, reduce reserve margins, and increase prices. The type of power generation used to recharge the PHEVs and associated emissions will depend upon the region and the timing of the recharge. (author)

Hadley, Stanton W.; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Potential impact of new power system technology on the design of a manned space station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large, more complex spacecraft of the future such as a manned Space Station will require electric power systems of 100 kW and more, orders of magnitude greater than the present state of the art. Power systems at this level will have a significant impact on the spacecraft design. Historically, long-lived spacecraft have relied on silicon solar cell arrays, a nickel-cadium storage battery and operation at 28 V dc. These technologies lead to large array areas and heavy batteries for a Space Station application. This, in turn, presents orbit altitude maintenance, attitude control, energy management and launch weight and volume constraints. Size (area) and weight of such a power system can be reduced if new higher efficiency conversion and lighter weight storage technologies are used. Several promising technology options including concentrator solar photovoltaic arrays, solar thermal dynamic and ultimately nuclear dynamic systems to reduce area are discussed. Also higher energy storage systems such as nickel-hydrogen and the regenerative fuel cell (RFC) and higher voltage power distribution which add system flexibility, simplicity and reduce weight are examined. Emphasis is placed on the attributes and development status of emerging technologies that are sufficiently developed that they could be available for flight use in the early to mid 1990's.

Fordyce, J.S.; Schwartz, H.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended).xls SLIP Energy WY Gross Gen from Hydro LP Dolores Gen. Total SLIP Gross Gen Avg. Plant Use SLIP Net Gen @ Plant...

366

Trading in power: the potential for US-Canadian electricity exchange  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is one of the most important forms of future energy in the US and Canada. Government officials and utility planners in both countries increasingly view exchanges of electricity by long-term contract as mutually beneficial. Recent developments in world politics, technological and environmental complications, and economic considerations, including supply and price, have combined to make increased electricity trade a promising option. Purchases of firm-capacity Canadian electricity would lower rates for US customers and allow US utilities to postpone construction of new nuclear or coal-fired generating plants. Providing enough domestic capacity to meet projected demand to the year 2000 might require as much as $180 billion in capital investment in the Northeast and Midwest alone. Canadian imports would allow US utilities to diversify their supplies and retire oil-fired plants, and would reduce the need for excess capacity as reserve power. The issues involved in the importing of Canadian power by the US are discussed.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrogen Detection in Nuclear Power Plants: Comparison of Potential, Existing, and Innovative Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to monitor hydrogen volumes accurately and quickly within containment environments at nuclear power plants is a critical capability, especially during accident conditions where hydrogen generation may be occurring within the reactor vessel. Since the initial installation of hydrogen monitoring systems in plants following the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, new technologies have been developed and offer performance advantages when compared with existing installed sensors. In addition ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

An evaluation of potential solar radio emission power threat on GPS and GLONASS performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The L-band solar radio emission has recently been regarded as a potential threat to stable GPS and GLONASS performance. However, the threat has not been completely investigated or assessed so far. We evaluate in detail the occurrence of GPS/GLONASS signal ... Keywords: GLONASS performance, GPS, Solar flares, Solar radio emission

Vladislav V. Demyanov; Edward L. Afraimovich; Shuanggen Jin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Power in the wind. [Techniques for estimation of wind potential energy  

SciTech Connect

Techniques are described which can be used by engineers, technicians and homeowners for the estimation of potential energy in wind and in particular wind machines. They are suitable for onsite calculations with the use of nothing more than a pocket calculator. (JMT)

Gipe, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy Policy 32 (2004) 289297 The potential of solar electric power for meeting future US energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting; Energy futures analysis; PV-ANWR comparison Direct comparison of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) oil production and potential photovoltaics (PV) output (during the 70-year expected pumping lifetime of the ANWR deposit) has been neglected in the recent US policy debate. In part, this is because

Delaware, University of

372

Assessment of NOx Reduction Potential from Combustion Modifications at Illinois Power -- Baldwin Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclone boilers have recently become regulated with respect to NOx emissions due to the adoption of Title IV -- Group 2 NOx emission limits for cyclones of 0.86 lb/MBtu. This project explored the NOx reduction potential of cyclone biasing on a bituminous coal-fired cyclone boiler.

1998-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,763 14,963 1980's 14,080 13,929 14,153 13,916 13,844 19,504 18,277 13,030 11,141 9,098 1990's 8,083 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,809 7,289 7,029 6,052 2010's 5,554 5,163 5,051 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

374

The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 7.5 - Electricity Trade (Billion Kilowatthours) 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Interregional Electricity Trade Gross Domestic Firm Power Trade...

378

Study of Potential Sites for the Deployment of New Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the United States The work reflected in this document represents Dominion’s and Bechtel's best judgment as recognized companies familiar with the engineering, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Nevertheless, since the work has been based on preliminary design information only, evaluations contained in this document should be considered preliminary in nature, and are not intended to be the basis of final financial and other management decisions. The information on which these evaluations have been based was provided to Dominion and Bechtel by DOE and third parties, and, except where specifically stated otherwise, has not been independently verified. Accordingly, neither Dominion, Bechtel, nor anyone acting on their behalf makes any warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information or conclusions contained in this document or assumes any liability for damages resulting from the use of or reliance on such information or conclusions.

Bechtel Power Corporation; North Anna; Bechtel Power Corporation

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the current status of externalities considerations--nonmarket costs and benefits--in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and determines how externalities considerations might help or hinder the development of biomass power plants. It provides an overview of biomass resources and technologies, including their market status and environmental impacts; reviews the current treatment of externalities in the states; and documents the perspectives of key utility, regulatory, and industry representatives concerning externalities considerations. The authors make the following recommendations to the biomass industry: (1) the wood and agricultural waste industries should work toward having states and utilities recognize that wood and agricultural waste are greenhouse gas neutral resources because of carbon sequestration during growth; (2) the biomass industry should emphasize nonenvironmental benefits such as economic development and job creation; and (3) the biomass industry should pursue and support efforts to establish renewable energy set-asides or ``green`` requests for proposals.

Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control system and energy savings potential for switchableto Assess the Gross Annual Energy-Saving Potential of Energysales. Fig. 14. Primary energy savings (TBtu) for each of

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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381

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Gross Thermal Efficiency of a Solar Power Plant • .and Maintenance* - Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar PowerMWe Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar Power Plant,MWe-hr/

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

788-1), December 1976. Electric Power Research Institute,CONCEPT FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC POWER: Interim Report, Report No.generate t 100 MW , gross electric power. e Storage has been

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no specific Hg controls) ranged from 5.7 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest to 2 x 10{sup -5} in the Southeast. Reducing emissions from coal plants by 90% reduced the estimated range in risk to 5 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest and 1.5 x 10{sup -5} in Southeast, respectively. The population risk for the subsistence fisher using the Southeast regional fish Hg levels was 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, a factor of 200 greater than the general population risk. For the subsistence fishers and the Savannah River Hg levels, the population risk was 4.3 x 10{sup -5}, a factor of 2 greater than for the general population. The estimated risk reductions from a 90% reduction in coal plant Hg emissions ranged from 25%-68%, which is greater than the assumed reduction in Hg levels in fish, (15.5%). To place this risk in perspective, there are approximately 4 x 10{sup 6} births/year in the U.S (National Vital Statistics Report, 2000). Assuming that the Southeast risk level (the highest of the regions) is appropriate for the entire U.S., an estimate of 80 newborn children per year have a 5% chance of realizing any of the 16 adverse effects used to generate the DRF. If Hg emissions from power plants are reduced 90%, the number of children at risk is reduced to 60.

SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.W.MORRIS,S.C.MOSKOWITZ,P.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 24,168 46,363 64,558 59,078 54,805 49,167 50,791 1990's 49,972 51,855 55,231 52,150 53,561 54,790 66,784 73,345 74,985 77,809 2000's 76,075 70,947 67,816 58,095 54,655 54,088 40,407 45,516 44,902 41,229 2010's 41,200 36,579 27,262 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

385

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,838,521 4,101,321 4,262,607 1980's 4,200,273 4,202,553 3,879,918 3,313,354 3,750,641 3,286,091 3,071,900 3,384,442 3,418,949 3,373,680 1990's 3,549,524 3,401,801 3,304,336 3,351,101 3,513,981 3,460,103 3,689,170 3,760,953 3,759,040 3,732,046 2000's 3,671,424 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

386

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 498,876 487,512 1980's 417,312 381,938 366,546 322,588 319,638 256,736 207,265 225,599 214,645 204,005 1990's 182,240 148,429 138,101 157,011 159,513 94,044 192,527 180,848 192,956 164,523 2000's 141,567 153,871 137,192 133,456 129,245 107,584 97,479 72,868 86,198 76,386 2010's 69,836 71,226 73,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

387

Excited State Spectroscopy in the Lattice Gross-Neveu Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present preliminary results of an excited state spectroscopy calculation in the 2-d lattice Gross-Neveu model. We address the construction of suitable interpolators for the variational method and their overlap with excitations. We comment on the role of the eigenvectors as a tool for matching scattering states on lattices with different volumes.

Julia Danzer; Christof Gattringer

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

389

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 19,929 20,394 1980's 19,980 26,692 31,904 38,084 60,207 84,062 77,355 67,835 60,308 59,889 1990's 58,055 59,465 62,473 58,635 60,765 60,694 73,092 80,516 81,868 84,547 2000's 83,882 78,209 74,884 64,961 61,622 60,773 47,217 52,805 51,931 47,281 2010's 46,755 41,742 32,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

390

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 72,813 71,946 1980's 63,355 71,477 66,852 68,776 68,315 62,454 63,007 69,656 101,440 122,595 1990's 144,064 171,665 216,377 233,198 224,301 113,552 126,051 123,854 133,111 125,841 2000's 263,958 262,937 293,580 322,010 334,125 380,568 354,816 374,204 388,188 357,490 2010's 370,148 364,702 307,306 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

391

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 119,737 117,931 114,382 103,384 110,472 104,257 1997-2013 From...

392

Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 764,528 753,844 794,353 783,940 817,880 837,660 1991-2013 From...

393

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 1,555,450 1,487,123 1,425,222 1,341,475 1,287,682 1,317,755 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 657,593 732,483 682,334 616,134...

394

1Â…10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat 1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-48265 November 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

395

Coastal zone wind energy. Part II: Validation of the coastal zone wind power potential. A summary of the field experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Procedures have been developed to determine the wind power potential of the coastal region from Maine to Texas. The procedures are based upon a climatological analysis and a mesoscale numerical model. The results of this procedure are encouraging but need to be tested. In January to February 1980 a field measurement program was carried out over the Delmarva Peninsula centered on Wallops Island and extending into the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay to provide an observational basis on which to test our wind assessment methods. The field experiment is described. Listings of the measurements made by aircraft, tethered balloon, rawinsonde kites, tower mounted anemometry and surface thermometry are given together with sample results. The analysis of these data and the comparison between them and the model predicted fields are presented.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation of severe accident risks and the potential for risk reduction: Surry Power Station, Unit 1: Draft report for comment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SARRP) has completed a rebaselining of the risks to the public from a particular pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment (Surry, Unit 1). Emphasis was placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing on a point estimate. The risk-reduction potential of a set of proposed safety option backfits was also studied, and their costs and benefits were also evaluated. It was found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved issues (such as direct containment heating) caused the top of the uncertainty band to appear at a level that is comparable with the RSS point estimate. None of the postulated safety options appears to be cost effective for the Surry power plant. This work supports the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's assessment of severe accidents in NUREG-1150.

Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.; Kunsman, D.M.; Murfin, W.B.; Williams, D.C.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

398

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

399

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

400

Determination of gross plasma equilibrium from magnetic multipoles  

SciTech Connect

A new approximate technique to determine the gross plasma equilibrium parameters, major radius, minor radius, elongation and triangularity for an up-down symmetric plasma is developed. It is based on a multipole representation of the externally applied poloidal magnetic field, relating specific terms to the equilibrium parameters. The technique shows reasonable agreement with free boundary MHD equilibrium results. The method is useful in dynamic simulation and control studies.

Kessel, C.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 418,474 760,566 1980's 949,177 1,010,772 1,120,830 992,041 1,021,260 942,413 1,169,038 1,330,604 1,376,093 1,457,841 1990's 1,555,568 1,494,494 1,411,147 1,355,333 1,392,727 1,346,674 1,401,753 1,351,067 1,241,264 1,206,045 2000's 1,177,257 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785 29,229 46,786 37,811 2010's 28,574 23,791 16,506 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014

402

Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

The potential role of new technology for enhanced safety and performance of nuclear power plants through improved service maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinements in the safety and performance of nuclear power plants must be made to maintain public confidence and ensure competitiveness with other power sources. The aircraft industry, US Navy, and other programs have ...

Achorn, Ted Glen

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: May 3, 2010 1: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on AddThis.com...

405

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and economic cost?benefit analysis of offshore wind energy,energy sources [Jacobson, 2009]. Onshore wind power costs

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine Characteristics and Siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distribution and siting depth. Mean wind power increases by 30%, 69 % and 73 % within the tropics and northern and southern hemisphere extratropics, respectively, between hub heights of 10 m and 100 m. A turbine with a cut-out speed of 25 m s?1 (30 m s?1) within the northern hemisphere storm track harvests between 55 % (82%) and 85% (> 98%) of available power. Within this region, a 2–3m s?1 change in cut-out speed can result in a 5–7 % change in usable power. 80 m wind power accumulates at a rate of 20–45 GW km2 m?2 per meter depth increase from the shore to the shelf break. Beyond the shelf break, wind power accumulates at a slower rate (wind power is assessed for three technology tiers: existing, planned, and future innovations. Usable percent of 80 m available global ocean wind power ranges from 0.40 % for existing to 2.73 % for future envisioned turbine specifications. Offshore wind power production is estimated using typical turbine characteristics including rotor diameter, rated power and siting density. Global offshore wind power is as much as 37 TW (50 % of onshore) and is maximized for the smallest and least powerful of the three turbine specifications evaluated. 1 1

Charles S. Zender

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triples Previous Estimates of Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques that triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009. Detailed state-by-state estimates of wind energy potential for the United States show the estimated average wind speeds at an 80-meter height. The wind resource maps and estimates

408

Constraining the electric charges of some astronomical bodies in Reissner-Nordstrom spacetimes and generic r^-2-type power-law potentials from orbital motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We put model-independent, dynamical constraints on the net electric charge Q of some astronomical and astrophysical objects by assuming that their exterior spacetimes are described by the Reissner-Nordstroem metric, which induces an additional potential U_RN \\propto Q^2 r^-2. Our results extend to other hypothetical power-law interactions inducing extra-potentials U_pert = r^-2 as well (abridged).

Lorenzo Iorio

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Potential for Using Stormwater in Power Plants: Lessons Learned from Case Studies at Two Great River Energy Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through detailed analyses for two power plants, this report evaluates the use of stormwater for cooling and other uses. The report will benefit environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, and water resource stakeholders.BackgroundIn recent years, there has been a focus on evaluating the use of nontraditional water sources for thermoelectric power plant cooling, such as reclaimed municipal wastewater, produced ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. S. Zender (2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity toG. C. Johnson (2001), Ocean currents evident in satellitepower distribution over the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 35,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for off- shore wind turbines in Europe and North America,of wind power and wind turbine characteristics, Renewablea multi?megawatt wind turbine, Renewable Energy, Matthews,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Areal power density: A preliminary examination of underground heat transfer in a potential Yucca Mountain repository and recommendations for thermal design approaches; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The design of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is subject to many thermal goals related to the compliance of the site with federal regulations. This report summarizes a series of sensitivity studies that determined the expected temperatures near the potential repository. These sensitivity studies were used to establish an efficient loading scheme for the spent fuel canisters and a maximum areal power density based strictly on thermal goals. Given the current knowledge of the site, a design-basis areal power density of 80 kW/acre can be justified based on thermal goals only. Further analyses to investigate the impacts of this design-basis APD on mechanical and operational aspects of the potential repository must be undertaken before a final decision is made.

Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Ryder, E.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

414

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 114,382 103,384 110,472 103,769 106,596 102,840 1997-2013 From Gas Wells

415

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

416

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 114,592 111,779 113,921 114,129 109,438 114,219 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

417

New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

418

Review of Potential Federal and State Green House Gas Policy Drivers for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb the reduction of green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. The more efficient utilization of natural gas fuel via use of distributed combined cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems in the end-use sector may be one option to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project was undertaken to assess the extent...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

420

Figure 52. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 52. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2040 (index, 1980 = 1) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detailed 200-meter resolution maps. The NREL analysis found enormous U.S. wind energy potential of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated Finds U.S. Wind Energy Potential Triples Previous Estimates #12;

422

In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

426

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

427

P E Appendix D N D I Real Gross Domestic Product by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix D Real Gross Domestic Product by State The real gross domestic product (GDP) ... R 75.5 R 76.9 R 75.0 R 78.7 R 82.4 R 86.3 R 87.2 R 92.0 R 96.5 R 96.4

428

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting Scott B. Capps1 and Charles S. Zender1 Received 17 June, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub, between hub heights of 10 m and 100 m. A turbine with a cutout speed of 25 m s-1 (30 m s-1 ) within

Zender, Charles

429

Solar powered desalination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Day) Day) Process: Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Dist. Units Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Operating Capacity Idle Operable Capacity Operable Utilization Rate Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 15,283 15,709 16,327 16,490 16,306 16,162 1985-2013 PADD 1 1,134 1,188 1,178 1,142 1,122 1,130 1985-2013 East Coast 1,077 1,103 1,080 1,058 1,031 1,032 1985-2013 Appalachian No. 1 57 85 98 84 90 97 1985-2013 PADD 2 3,151 3,087 3,336 3,572 3,538 3,420 1985-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 2,044 1,947 2,069 2,299 2,330 2,266 1985-2013

431

Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 4,430,466 4,839,942 5,225,005 5,864,402 6,958,125 8,225,321 1991-2012 From Gas Wells 2,480,211 2,613,139 2,535,642 2,523,173 1991-2010 From Oil Wells 525,280 534,253 648,906 691,643 1991-2010 From Shale Gas Wells 569,502 796,138 1,146,821 1,787,965 2007-2010 From Coalbed Wells 855,473 896,412 893,636 861,620 2002-2010 Repressuring 48,011 51,781 43,376 45,994 1991-2010 Vented and Flared 32,600 52,667 55,544 53,950 1991-2010 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 223,711 282,651 291,611 352,304 1994-2010

432

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

433

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains,...

434

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MARCH 2006 1 Numerical simulation of transferred potentials in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is essential to assure the security of the grounding systems in electrical substations. This paper presents a numerical formulation for the analysis of transferred earth potentials in a grounding installation due to metallic stuctures or conductors in the surroundings of the grounding grid when a layered soil model

Colominas, Ignasi

435

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 5,335 4,954 5,465 5,228 5,405 5,163 4,817 5,652 5,165 5,347 4,814 5,420 2004 5,684 5,278 5,822 5,570 5,758 5,500 5,132 6,022 5,502 5,697 5,129 5,774 2005 5,889 5,469 6,033 5,771 5,967 5,699 5,318 6,240 5,702 5,903 5,315 5,983 2006 65,302 59,484 66,007 63,071 65,663 63,437 65,249 65,951 62,242 65,271 63,215 64,841 2007 72,657 65,625 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 2008 75,926 71,027 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926

437

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

438

,"US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_rusf_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_rusf_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:21 AM"

439

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r5f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r5f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

440

Concentrating Solar Deployment System (CSDS) -- A New Model for Estimating U.S. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Market Potential: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the Concentrating Solar Deployment System Model (CSDS). CSDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. CSDS is designed to address the principal market and policy issues related to the penetration of concentrating solar power (CSP) electric-sector technologies. This paper discusses the current structure, capabilities, and assumptions of the model. Additionally, results are presented for the impact of continued research and development (R&D) spending, an extension to the investment tax credit (ITC), and use of a production tax credit (PTC). CSDS is an extension of the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). While WinDS examines issues related to wind, CSDS is an extension to analyze similar issues for CSP applications. Specifically, a detailed representation of parabolic trough systems with thermal storage has been developed within the existing structure.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Short, W.; Heimiller, D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-1840: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the SunPower, Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the SunPower, 40: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the SunPower, Systems California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, California EA-1840: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the SunPower, Systems California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, California Overview The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the California Valley Solar Ranch (CVSR) project, a 250-megawatt (MW) gross output commercial solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant project proposed by High Plains Ranch II, LLC (HPR II) in southeastern San Luis Obispo County, California. The CVSR Project would include the construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of the CVSR and reconductoring

442

Emergence of Tricritical Point and Liquid-Gas Phase in the Massless 2+1 Dimensional Gross-Neveu Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete thermodynamical analysis of the 2+1 dimensional massless Gross-Neveu model is performed using the optimized perturbation theory. This is a non-perturbative method that allows us to go beyond the known large-N results already at lowest order. Our results, for a finite number of fermion species, N, show the existence of a tricritical point in the temperature and chemical potential phase diagram for discrete chiral phase transition allowing us to precisely to locate it. By studying the phase diagram in the pressure and inverse density plane, we also show the existence of a liquid-gas phase, which, so far, was unknown to exist in this model. Finally, we also derive N dependent analytical expressions for the fermionic mass, critical temperature and critical chemical potential.

Jean-Loic Kneur; Marcus Benghi Pinto; Rudnei O. Ramos; Ederson Staudt

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

444

The energy space for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the energy space for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with magnetic field and non-vanishing conditions at infinity. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the magnetic field for which the energy space is non-empty.

Kachmar, Ayman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Free field representation and form factors of the chiral Gross-Neveu model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free field representation of the Zamolodchikov-Faddeev algebra for the chiral Gross-Neveu model is analysed in detail, and used to construct an integral representation for form factors of the model.

Stephen Britton; Sergey Frolov

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; ...

447

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis of the tradeoff between irrigated agriculure and hydroelectric power in the Pacific Northwest. [Base-line estimate of the effects of agricultural irrigation on the hydroelectric power generating potential projected for the year 2020  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogeneration and irrigated agriculture are major competing users of the waters of the Columbia River and its tributaries. Irrigated agriculture requires the diversion of large amounts of water from the rivers, only part of which returns. As a result, streamflow is reduced and the generation potential of dams located downstream from points of irrigation diversion is reduced. In addition, irrigated agriculture involves the direct consumption of electricity to pump irrigation water and to apply it to crops in the field. The purpose of this report is to make a baseline estimate of the impact on the electrical generation system in the region of the level of irrigation development projected for year 2020 by the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. This baseline estimate reflects the assumption that current conditions will prevail in the future. The results, therefore, provide a standard against which the impacts of changes in current conditions can be measured. It is estimated that the projected development level of 11.4 million acres of irrigated agriculture in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho by year 2020 would result in foregone hydroelectric generation potential of approximately 17.8 million megawatt-hours (MWh) annually and direct consumption of electric power for pumping and application of approximately 10.3 million MWh's annually. Thus, a total of 28.1 million MWh's of electric power generation will have to be traded off each year if irrigated agriculture is to be conducted on the projected scale. (ERB)

Davis, A. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Potential benefits of oxygen-enriched intake air in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A production vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine (3.1-L Chevrolet Lumina, model year 1990) was tested. The test used oxygen-enriched intake air containing 25 and 28% oxygen by volume to determine (1) if the vehicle would run without difficulties and (2) if emissions benefits would result. Standard Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions test cycles were run satisfactorily. Test results of catalytic converter-out emissions (emissions out of the converter) showed that both carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were reduced significantly in all three phases of the emissions test cycle. Test results of engine-out emissions (emissions straight out of the engine, with the converter removed) showed that carbon monoxide was significantly reduced in the cold phase. All emission test results were compared with those for normal air (21% oxygen). The catalytic converter also had an improved carbon monoxide conversion efficiency under the oxygen-enriched-air conditions. Detailed results of hydrocarbon speciation indicated large reductions in 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and benzene from the engine with the oxygen-enriched air. Catalytic converter-out ozone was reduced by 60% with 25%-oxygen-content air. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased significantly, both for engine-out and catalytic converter-out emissions, we anticipate that they can be ameliorated in the near future with new control technologies. The automotive industry currently is developing exhaust-gas control technologies for an oxidizing environment; these technologies should reduce NO{sub x} emissions more efficiently in vehicles that use oxygen-enriched intake air. On the basis of estimates made from current data, several production vehicles that had low NO{sub x} emissions could meet the 2004 Tier II emissions standards with 25%-oxygen-content air.

Ng, H.K.; Sekar, R.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Summary of results. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry and Grand Gulf, were selected as the plants to be studied by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). This report documents the work performed during the analysis of the Grand Gulf plant. A phased approach was used for the overall study. In Phase 1, the objectives were to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenario frequencies and risks, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. It was in Phase 1 that the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to allow the analysts to better represent the plant as it transitions from power operation to nonpower operation than was possible with the traditional technical specification divisions of modes of operation. This phase consisted of a coarse screening analysis performed for all POSs, including seismic and internal fire and flood for some POSs. In Phase 2, POS 5 (approximately cold shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the Phase 1 study. The scope of the Level 1 study includes plant damage state analysis and uncertainty analysis and is documented in a multi-volume NUREG/CR report (i.e., NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4, respectively. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. The Level 2/3 study of the traditional internal events is documented in Volume 6, and a summary of the results for all analyses is documented in Volume 1.

Whitehead, D.W. [ed.; Staple, B.D.; Daniel, S.L. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nanocomposite Magnets for Power Electronic Applications: IEEE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion ... Potential Ceramic Dielectrics for Air Force Applications.

453

Components for Advanced Power Conditioning Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion ... Potential Ceramic Dielectrics for Air Force Applications.

454

TRANSMISSION EFFECTS IN MARKET POWER ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICITY MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSMISSION EFFECTS IN MARKET POWER ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICITY MARKETS Thomas J. Overbye George Gross, congestion, merger analysis, PTDF 1. INTRODUCTION The electric power industry throughout the world of the impact that the electrical transmission system has on the analysis market power opportunities

Gross, George

455

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation of an oxyfuel power plant using mixed conductingA Vision for Thermal Power-Plant Technology Development inon an Existing US Coal-Fired Power Plant . First National

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

457

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Resource Potential  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Resource Potential Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Wind Resource Potential State Wind Resource Potential Tables Find state wind resource potential tables in three versions: Microsoft Excel 2007, 2003, and Adobe Acrobat PDF. 30% Capacity Factor at 80-Meters Microsoft 2007 Microsoft 2003 Adobe Acrobat PDF Additional 80- and 100-Meter Wind Resource Potential Tables Microsoft 2007 Microsoft 2003 Adobe Acrobat PDF The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated the windy land area and wind energy potential for each state using AWS Truepower's gross capacity factor data. This provides the most up to date estimate of how wind energy can support state and national energy needs. The table lists the estimates of windy land area with a gross capacity of

458

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r44f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r44f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

459

,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r19f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r19f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

460

Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture environmental pollutants in the gaseous state and co-inject them with the CO2, in order to mitigate problems associated with solid waste disposal in surface impoundments. Under such conditions, the injected pollutant concentrations could be roughly equivalent to their concentrations in the coal feed. The fate of the injected contaminants can only be determined through further testing and geochemical modeling. However, the concentrations of inadvertent contaminants in the injected CO2 would probably be comparable to their ambient concentrations in confining shales of the injection zone. In general, the aqueous concentrations of hazardous constituents in distal parts of the injection zone, regardless of source, are likely to be limited by equilibrium with respect to coexisting solid phases under the acid conditions induced by the dissolved high pressure CO2, rather than by the initial concentrations of injected contaminants. Therefore, even if a deliberate policy of contaminant recovery and injection were to be pursued, water quality in USDWs would more likely depend on thermodynamic controls governing aqueous contaminant concentrations in the presence of high pressure CO2 rather than in the injected CO2. The conclusions reached in this report are preliminary, and should be confirmed through more comprehensive data evaluation and supporting geochemical modeling.

Apps, J.A.

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 169,219 206,490 1980's 252,996 235,421 245,626 147,330 111,482 107,543 114,501 98,050 97,545 110,901 1990's 108,404 98,493 78,263 79,234 84,573 63,181 63,340 64,528 60,298 48,918 2000's 41,195 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785 29,229 46,786 37,811 2010's 28,574 23,791 16,506 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

463

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 72,813 71,946 1980's 63,355 71,477 66,852 68,776 68,315 62,454 63,007 69,656 101,440 122,595 1990's 144,064 171,665 216,377 233,198 224,301 113,552 126,051 123,854 133,111 125,841 2000's 263,958 262,937 293,580 322,010 334,125 380,568 354,816 374,204 388,188 357,490 2010's 370,148 364,702 307,306 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

464

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 249,255 554,076 1980's 696,181 775,351 875,204 844,711 909,778 834,870 1,054,537 1,232,554 1,278,548 1,346,940 1990's 1,447,164 1,396,001 1,332,883 1,276,099 1,308,154 1,283,493 1,338,413 1,286,539 1,180,967 1,157,128 2000's 1,136,062 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

465

Vanishing beta function for Grosse-Wulkenhaar model in a magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the beta function of the Grosse-Wulkenhaar model including a magnetic field vanishes at all order of perturbations. We compute the renormalization group flow of the relevant dynamic parameters and find a non-Gaussian infrared fixed point. Some consequences of these results are discussed.

Geloun, Joseph Ben; Rivasseau, Vincent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 11,583: 11,485: 11,484: 11,969: 12,269: 12,422 ...

467

Determination of Uncertainty in Gross Calorific Value of Coal Using Bomb Calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bomb calorimeter is an apparatus used for measuring the performance of coal in term of heat of combustion. Recent awareness has been created regarding uncertainty of measurement, due to mainly two reasons. Laboratory accreditation, which has steadily ... Keywords: Bomb Calorimeter, Gross Calorific Value, Heat, Uncertainty, Water Equivalent

N.K. Mandavgade; S.B. Jaju; R.R. Lakhe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2008) M. Gross and D. James (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2008) M. Gross and D. James (Editors projection of Batty et al. [BBB07]. Categories and Subject Descriptors (according to ACM CCS): I.3, at the interface between air and liquid a host of complex and distinctive effects can arise. When viscous fluid

Grinspun, Eitan

469

APPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY Pedro Correia and George Gross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for managing the grid usage. The commercial transactions take place using the electric network or grid, a factAPPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS Pedro Correia and George Gross Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

Gross, George

470

Economics and policies for carbon capture and sequestration in the western United States : a marginal cost analysis of potential power plant deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a technology that can significantly reduce power sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from coal-fired power plants. CCS technology is currently in development and requires higher ...

Shu, Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plantspower plants, petroleum refining, chemical processing industries, and natural gasnatural gas. If CO 2 capture and geologic sequestration from coal-fired power plants

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Integration of Storage Devices into Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy Report Project Team George Gross, Project Leader Alejandro Dominguez-Garcia University of Illinois to copy without fee all or part of this publication for internal use if appropriate attribution is given

473

NET SYSTEM POWER: A SMALL SHARE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in-state generation and electricity imports by fuel type. Each year, the gross-system-power mix it was calculated and allocated to different fuel types and renewable energy technologies. In addition to generating used to generate it. Fuel types include coal, natural gas, nuclear, and other fuels, such as distillate

474

United States Wind Resource Potential Chart  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

18,000 18,000 Rated Capacity Above Indicated CF (GW) United States - Wind Resource Potential Cumulative Rated Capacity vs. Gross Capacity Factor (CF) 80 m The estimates show the potential gigawatts of rated capacity that could be installed on land above a given gross capacity factor (without losses) at 80-m and 100-m heights above ground. Areas greater than 30% at 80 m are generally considered to have suitable wind resource for potential wind development with today's advanced wind turbine technology. AWS Truewind, LLC developed the wind resource data for windNavigator® (http://navigator.awstruewind.com) with a spatial resolution of 200 m. NREL filtered the wind potential estimates to

475

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

477

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with conventional steam turbine powered electric generation.used to boil water for steam turbine generation as a secondturbine) and Rankine (steam turbine) cycles, as illustrated

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology: IGCC.integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants (output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Readiness for Coal Power – Revisited. Powerof New Zealand industrial coals. Energy News, 16(3), p. 69-elements during pulverized coal combustion. Energy & Fuels,

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010sd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010sd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:15 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,9 26480,8 26845,10 27210,48 27575,39 27941,52

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross power potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgs_sky_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgs_sky_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGS_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

482

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgs_ssd_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgs_ssd_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGS_SSD_MMCF" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

483

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:15 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" 33253,525 33284,421 33312,458 33343,445 33373,421 33404,427 33434,474

484

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgs_ssd_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgs_ssd_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGS_SSD_MMCF" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

485

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgs_sky_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgs_sky_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGS_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

486

Twisted Grosse-Wulkenhaar $\\phi^{\\star 4}$ model: dynamical noncommutativity and Noether currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the computation of Noether currrents for the renormalizable Grosse-Wulkenhaar (GW) $\\phi^{\\star 4}$ model subjected to a dynamical noncomutativity realized through a twisted Moyal product. The noncommutative (NC) energy-momentum tensor (EMT), angular momentum tensor (AMT) and the dilatation current (DC) are explicitly derived. The breaking of translation and rotation invariances has been avoided via a constraint equation.

Hounkonnou, Mahouton Norbert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Positive Impact on Gomchen Tradition on Achieving and Maintaining Gross National Happiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to attain this goal of Gross National Happiness. The gomchen or lay priest community is a unique source for * Director, National Museum of Bhutan, Paro Journal of Bhutan Studies 76 this type... of the community and results in fewer negative circumstances to disturb the communal mind. Because the gomchens are foremost dharma teachers with several lay practitioner in communities that are positively effected by their spiritual teachings and services...

Tashi, Khenpo Phuntsok

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Constellation Proposal for an Automated Determination of the RPM Gross Cost of New Entry (CONE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constellation offers the following outline for reforming the annual development of Gross CONE in an automated fashion. The purpose of the proposal is to derive CONE in a manner that reasonably approximates the contemporaneous cost to build a Reference Resource in the auction year, via rules that are easily understood, reasonably accurate, transparent, and replicable. In summary, our proposal features an initial benchmark gross CONE for the 2012?13 Delivery Year that will be adjusted based on an the Handy Whitman Index prior to subsequent annual Base Residual Auctions. Periodically, the prevailing cost to build the reference resource will be comprehensively studied by a third party expert. If the study varies from the index?adjusted CONE by more than a predetermined amount, then the study value shall be set as the CONE for the next BRA and shall be the new benchmark. The gross CONE would subsequently be adjusted to account for expected energy and ancillary services revenues as currently set forth in the OATT.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Constellation Proposal for an Automated Determination of the RPM Gross Cost of New Entry (CONE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constellation offers the following outline for reforming the annual development of Gross CONE in an automated fashion. The purpose of the proposal is to derive CONE in a manner that reasonably approximates the contemporaneous cost to build a Reference Resource in the auction year, via rules that are easily understood, reasonably accurate, transparent, and replicable. In summary, our proposal features an initial benchmark gross CONE for the 2012-13 Delivery Year that will be adjusted based on an the Handy Whitman Index prior to subsequent annual Base Residual Auctions. Periodically, the prevailing cost to build the reference resource will be comprehensively studied by a third party expert. If the study varies from the index-adjusted CONE by more than a predetermined amount, then the study value shall be set as the CONE for the next BRA and shall be the new benchmark. The gross CONE would subsequently be adjusted to account for expected energy and ancillary services revenues as currently set forth in the OATT.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Revisions to Gross Domestic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

491

US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,932,196 4,355,742 4,822,114 1980's 4,902,354 4,990,667 4,772,873 4,182,233 4,706,782 4,185,519 4,185,515 4,671,801 4,746,664 4,771,411 1990's 5,046,660 4,849,657 4,771,744 4,765,865 4,996,197 4,942,089 5,246,422 5,315,514 5,185,312 5,130,746 2000's 5,043,769 5,136,962 4,615,443 4,505,443 4,055,340 3,204,906 2,954,538 2,858,713 2,374,857 2,485,331 2010's 2,300,344 1,867,492 1,555,138 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

492

Elements of Power Conversion Integration in Group-III Nitride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion ... Potential Ceramic Dielectrics for Air Force Applications.

493

Solar Energy Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Addthis Browse By...

494

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Power Block R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the potential of advanced power cycles to integrate with concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This research increases the efficiency and reduces the levelized cost of...

495

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Test of the Schrödinger functional with chiral fermions in the Gross-Neveu model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently proposed construction of chiral fermions on lattices with boundaries is tested in an interacting theory up to first order of perturbation theory. We confirm that, in the bulk of the lattice, the chiral Ward identities take their continuum value up to cutoff effects without any tuning. Universal quantities are defined that have an expansion in the renormalised couplings with coefficients that are functions of the physical size and the periodicity in the spatial direction. These coefficient functions have to be identical for different discretisations. We find agreement with the standard Wilson fermions. The computation is done in the asymptotically free Gross-Neveu model with continuous chiral symmetry.

Bjorn Leder

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

Li, Z. [Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z