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1

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

2

Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper draws on Chinese survey data to investigate variations in carbon dioxide emissions across households with different income levels. Rich households generate more emissions per capita than poor households via both their direct energy consumption and their higher expenditure on goods and services that use energy as an intermediate input. An econometric analysis confirms a positive relationship between emissions and income and establishes a slightly increasing marginal propensity to emit (MPE) over the relevant income range. The redistribution of income from rich to poor households is therefore shown to reduce aggregate household emissions, suggesting that the twin pursuits of reducing inequality and emissions can be achieved in tandem.

Jane Golley; Xin Meng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neighborhood Program GETS – Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI – Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO – Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

5

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

6

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

7

The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-Being: A Comparison Across Household Types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using survey data from Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) recipients in Madison County, New ... of the EITC across household types. For tax years 2002 through 2004, we find that ... of EITC amounts, poverty rates, u...

Nicole B. Simpson; Jill Tiefenthaler; Jameson Hyde

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effects on minority and low-income households of the EPA proposal to reduce leaded gasoline use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce the potentially harmful environmental effects of lead in the environment, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a reduction in the amount of lead used in leaded gasoline. This report examines the potential impacts of such action on minority and low-income households in the US. The benefits of the EPA's proposal would presumably accrue primarily to households that contain small children and that are located in the central cities of metropolitan areas. This is because small children (under age seven) are particularly susceptible to the effects of lead and also because the automobile traffic density in central cities is higher than in any other area. Potential costs are examined in terms of households that own vehicles requiring leaded gasoline. Costs could accrue either because of higher gasoline prices due to reduced lead content or because of higher vehicle repair costs for engines that must use leaded gasoline to prevent excessive wear. Because of their location and number, minority and low-income households with small children would benefit more than the average US household. No costs would be incurred by the relatively large segment of minority and low-income households that own no vehicles. However, the Hispanic and other minority (except black) and low-income households that do own vehicles have a greater than average share of vehicles that require leaded gasoline; costs to these households because of the EPA's proposed action would be comparatively high.

Rose, K.; LaBelle, S.; Winter, R.; Klein, Y.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

10

Physical activity of adults in households with and without children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes thanWhites, fewer Hispanics, and higher household incomes than

Candelaria, Jeanette Irene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Do households smooth expenditure over anticipated income changes? Evidence from bonus payments to public employees in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence of consumers’ reaction to an anticipated sizable change in income. Until FY2002, Japanese public employees received predictable large bonus payments three times a fiscal year (in June, December, and March), but the March bonus was abolished in FY2003. We compare the seasonal patterns of public employees’ expenditure before and after the reform of the bonus payment schedule. Contrary to the prediction of the life cycle/permanent income hypothesis (LC/PIH), we find evidence that monthly patterns of household expenditure were significantly affected by the anticipated large change in income pattern. However, at closer inspection, this excess sensitivity of expenditure is observed only for expenditure subcategories of some durability, i.e., durables and semi-durables. Thus, while the LC/PIH does not appear to hold for expenditure (which we observe here), it may still hold for consumption.

Masahiro Hori; Satoshi Shimizutani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Patterns of residential energy demand by type of household: white, black, Hispanic, and low- and nonlow-income  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares patterns of residential energy use by white, black, Hispanic, low-income, and nonlow-income households. The observed downward trend in residential energy demand over the period of this study can be attributed primarily to changes in space-heating energy demand. Demand for space-heating energy has experienced a greater decline than energy demand for other end uses for two reasons: (1) it is the largest end use of residential energy, causing public attention to focus on it and on strategies for conserving it; and (2) space-heating expenditures are large relative to other residential energy expenditures. The price elasticity of demand is thus greater, due to the income effect. The relative demand for space-heating energy, when controlled for the effect of climate, declined significantly over the 1978-1982 period for all fuels studied. Income classes do not differ significantly. In contrast, black households were found to use more energy for space heating than white households were found to use, although those observed differences are statistically significant only for houses heated with natural gas. As expected, the average expenditure for space-heating energy increased significantly for dwellings heated by natural gas and fuel oil. No statistically significant increases were found in electricity expenditures for space heating. Electric space heat is, in general, confined to milder regions of the country, where space heating is relatively less essential. As a consequence, we would expect the electricity demand for space heating to be more price-elastic than the demand for other fuels.

Klein, Y.; Anderson, J.; Kaganove, J.; Throgmorton, J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Race, median household income, and primary Grade IV glioma treatment patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...behaviors among a population of Hispanic origin. Daisy Gonzalez 1...population subgroups, including Hispanics. Objective: This study assessed...population-based sample of Hispanic women in PR. Methods: This...complex sampling design of households in the San Juan Metropolitan...

Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan; Vonetta L. Williams; Marc Chamberlain; and Andrew E. Sloan

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

15

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

16

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

17

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,26.1,28.5,20.2,12.9,21.8,16.3,37.8 "1.",103.3,25.1,27.1,19.2,12.3,19.6,15.8,36.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,1.4,1,0.6,2.2,0.5,1.5

18

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,17.1,10.8,4.2,1.8,1.6,10.3,20.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9.6,18,16.4,11.3,20.3,6.4,17.9 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,8.3,14.2,11.4,7.2,9.2,5.3,14.2

19

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

20

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Collecting program planning and evaluation data from low-income, minority households: A case study baseline survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstrations (WDSD) collaborative effort, Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCo) is implementing a direct-install lighting program in two minority low-income communities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. One of the communities has a very high proportion of Hispanic residents, many of whom speak only Spanish, while the other is a predominantly African-American neighborhood. This demonstration is designed to test the use of community based organizations (CBOs) to contact, market and recruit program participants. As a matter of policy WDSD requires that all programs be evaluated and that whenever feasible, baseline studies be conducted. This paper describes the methods used to conduct the baseline studies in these neighborhoods. The methods are important for evaluators because they demonstrate a very effective way of surveying a hard to reach population. They may also be useful for marketers and program staff who may find the approach useful for working with similar populations. The methods presented in this paper resulted in a 94% completion rate for a baseline survey that averaged twenty-two minutes. The survey probed household activities, appliance mix, appliance use, and community social activities. The paper demonstrates what can be achieved in minority communities when resources located in the neighborhoods are mobilized to obtain market, program or evaluation information.

Hall, N. [RCG/Hagler, Bailly, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Wintersberger, J. [Wisconsin Electric Power Co., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Reed, J.; Maggiore, A.; Pinkowski, C. [Wisconsin Demand Side Demonstration, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.3,4.7,2.8,1.9,3.1,3.6,7.5 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,21.5,24.1,17.8,11.2,18.8,13,31.1 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,21,23.5,17.4,11,18.6,12.6,30.3 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q",0.5,0.8

23

The impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility’s active, reactive and apparent power demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Brazilian low-income households, water-heating requirements are typically met by electrical showerheads. On average, 73.1% of all residential units in the country are equipped with these resistance-heating devices, with nominal powers ranging from 3 to 8 kW. This situation imposes a considerable burden on the electricity utility companies, since electrical showerheads typically represent the highest load but the lowest utilization (load factor) in a residential consumer unit. Furthermore, typical utilization times coincide with, and contribute to, the electrical power demand peaks in Brazil, rendering these low-cost, high-power electrical devices a high-cost consumer for the electrical system to cater for. For low-income residential consumers, electricity tariffs are subsidized, and utilities must therefore make a considerable investment in infrastructure for a limited return. In this paper we analyze the impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility active, reactive and apparent power demands. We have monitored a statistically representative group of low-income residences equipped with a compact domestic solar water heater in Florianopolis – Brazil for 1 year. We show that in comparison with identical residential units using electrical showerheads, with the adoption of solar water heating the reductions in the active, reactive and apparent power demands on the distribution utility were 49%, 29% and 49% respectively.

Helena F. Naspolini; Ricardo Rüther

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Tables Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-7a. Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

25

Serving low income households in a competitive environment: It's a tough job, but someone's got to do it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the brave new world of a more competitive electricity market, low income customers are destined to be the forgotten market segment. Given the endemic challenges of minimal incomes, high turnover, payment problems, security risks, etc., this is the last place where ambitious power marketers (or the new competitively oriented utilities) are going to look for profits. Consequently, whereas private sector research devoted to potentially profitable segments of the residential market has picked up speed (especially regarding those higher socio-economic status early adopter types who participate in pilot programs), little or no market research has been focused on the low income population. The only trouble with this scenario is that the problem of needing to serve low income customers is not going to disappear after deregulation. If anything, it will likely intensify. In recognition of these circumstances, the purpose of this paper is to focus attention on the issue of providing energy efficiency services to low income customers in a restructured electricity market. The vehicle for doing so is to present some highlight results of an extensive sequence of research focused on the low income area, conducted for the Detroit Edison Evaluation Collaborative. This research includes an evaluation of a rather innovative in-home education and energy efficiency program operated by Detroit Edison, together with what the authors believe to be an unprecedented investigation and market assessment of the low income customer population of that major Midwestern utility. The paper then concludes with some more general observations regarding the need for and feasibility of providing energy efficiency services to this customer segment.

Kushler, M.G.; Malinowski, J.P.; Hall, N.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Trip rate comparison of workplace and household surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available vs. Trip Rate) 14 El Paso Household Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 15 El Paso Workplace Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 52 52 53 53 54 54 16 BPA Household Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 17 BPA Workplace... Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 56 56 18 BPA Household Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 19 BPA Workplace Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 20 BPA Household Survey (Vehicles Available vs. Trip Rate) . . 21 BPA Workplace...

Endres, Stephen Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

28

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

29

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

30

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

31

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Office Equipment Tables Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-7a. Home Office Equipment by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1

32

Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This research identifies the housing diversity and the process of housing consolidation in colonias of the US-Mexico border by looking at the patterns of house form and household arrangements in colonias of South Texas. Ten colonias located to the east...

Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 9.7 -- -- -- 6.5 11.3 5.7 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.3 -- -- -- 2.0 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 -- 3.3 -- -- 2.2 5.2 7.3 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 -- 2.2 -- -- -- 4.3 8.1 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1

34

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Program Definitions DOE Weatherization: Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Weatherization Eligible Households: Households with incomes at or below 125% of the Federal poverty level, which varies by family size; however, a State may instead elect to use the LIHEAP income standard if its State LIHEAP income standard is at least 125% of the Federal poverty level. Data listed in this chapter include previously weatherized units. DOE Weatherization Eligible Households are a subset of Federally Eligible Households. DOE Weatherization Recipient Households: Households that have received weatherization under DOE Weatherization funding. Federally Eligible Households: Households with incomes below the Federal maximum standard of 150% to 200% of the poverty

35

Efficient Use of Commercial Lists in U.S. Household Sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......educational attainment, Hispanic ethnicity, household income, and home tenure...on the two persons in the household as well as the Hispanic ethnicity status of the head of household (assuming that the Hispanic ethnicity status of persons......

Richard Valliant; Frost Hubbard; Sunghee Lee; Chiungwen Chang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A theoretical and simulation-based examination of household vehicle choice through an adoption perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=2 Senior h =3 Table 17: Japan household income distributionto 2005 Japan Census (millions of households)). CHAPTER 5.same shifts of household dynamics as Japan (i.e. lower birth

Liu, Jenny Hsing-I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning Tables Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-7a. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

38

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, 3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 12.3 17.4 21.5 31.7 9.6 23.4 3.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 0.4 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.9 20.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 11.9 16.7 21.0 31.2 9.1 22.6 3.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 6.2 10.7 15.2 25.3 4.5 12.4 5.3 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 4.9 9.1 12.1 20.1 3.6 10.4 6.1 With a Heat Pump

39

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

40

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, 3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7 10.7 38.8 3.2 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 3.7 8.7 16.0 31.6 3.7 17.4 4.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 2.8 7.1 12.8 22.4 2.8 13.6 5.1 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.6 0.7 1.7 6.2 0.6 2.2 13.0 Number of Laptop PCs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Space Heating by Household Income, 3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 18.4 22.7 26.8 38.1 14.6 33.4 3.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 23.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 35.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 22.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 18.4 22.7

42

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

43

Income Inequality in Hennepin County University of Minnesota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Totals hide variation by race/ethnicity Hennepin County 2010 median household income by race,000 $70,000 White (not Hispanic) Black Asian Native American Hispanic/Latino Other race Race even" occurs at the median Household income percentiles: 1989 and 2010 $13,502 $24,182 $35,266 $47

Weiblen, George D

44

grossWCI.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mechanics. D.H.E. Gross 1 Hahn-Meitner Institute Glienickerstr. 100 14109 Berlin, Germany gross@hmi.de; http:www.hmi.depeoplegross 2 Freie Universit at Berlin,...

45

Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low-Income Housing Tax Credits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) programme is the primary subsidy mechanism used to support the development of rental housing for low-income households in the United States. The programme adds about 1300 projects and 91 000 units per year. These projects are privately owned. The owners of the projects receive tax credits each year for 10 years in exchange for a commitment to maintain the units at affordable rents for occupancy by low-income households for a period of at least 15 years. The programme is proving to be popular with developers, but it is vulnerable to fluctuations in credit markets.

K. McClure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

48

Household energy consumption and its demand elasticity in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concentrates on the analysis of energy consumption, expenditure on oil and LPG use in cars and aims to examine the elasticity effect of various types of oil consumption. By using the Deaton's analysis framework, the cross-sectional data of Thai households economic survey 2009 were used. By defining energy goods in the scope of automobile fuel, the results reflect the low importance of high-quality automobile fuel on all income level households. Thai households tend to vary the quality rather than the quantity of thermal energy. All income groups have a tendency to switch to lower quality fuel. Middle and high-middle households (Q3 and Q4) are the income groups with the greatest tendency to switch to lower-quality fuel when a surge in the price of oil price occurs. The poorest households (Q1) are normally insensitive to a change of energy expenditure in terms of quality and quantity. This finding illustrates the LPG price subsidy policy favours middle and high-middle income households. The price elasticity of energy quantity demand is negative in all income levels. High to middle income families are the most sensitive to changes in the price of energy.

Montchai Pinitjitsamut

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

50

Economic theory and women's household status: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic development disadvantages wives. Conventional microeconomic theory predicts this. As household incomes rise, wives have incentives to specialize in intangible household production. This may raise total household production according to the theory of comparative advantage, but disproportionately favors husbands in distribution of the gains according to the marginal productivity theory of distribution. Wives may become better off in absolute terms but more dependent financially on their husbands and lose power within the household. Historically, Japanese gender roles became highly specialized and wives’ legal status declined, although other Meiji-era features protected wives. Policies to improve women's status should address the precise economic problem involved.

Barbara J. Redman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 1.1 2.0 1.2 1.2 9.5 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 0.8 1.9 1.3 0.9 11.2 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 0.4 1.1 0.4 0.5 19.8 6 or More Persons ....................................... 4.0 0.4 0.9 0.4 0.1 16.4 2001 Household Income Category

52

Minority and poor households: patterns of travel and transportation fuel use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the travel behavior and transportation fuel use of minority and poor households in the US, using information from numerous national-level sources. The resulting data base reveals distinctive patterns of household vehicle availability and use, travel, and fuel use and enables us to relate observed differences between population groups to differences in their demographic characteristics and in the attributes of their household vehicles. When income and residence location are controlled, black (and to a lesser extent, Hispanic and poor) households have fewer vehicles regularly available than do comparable white or nonpoor households; moreover, these vehicles are older and larger and thus have significantly lower fuel economy. The net result is that average black, Hispanic, and poor households travel fewer miles per year but use more fuel than do average white and nonpoor households. Certain other findings - notably, that of significant racial differences in vehicle availability and use by low-income households - challenge the conventional wisdom that such racial variations arise solely because of differences in income and residence location. Results of the study suggest important differences - primarily in the yearly fluctuation of income - between black and white low-income households even when residence location is controlled. These variables are not captured by cross-sectional data sets (either the national surveys used in our analysis or the local data sets that are widely used for urban transportation planning).

Millar, M.; Morrison, R.; Vyas, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Acculturation, education, and income as determinants of cigarette smoking in New Mexico Hispanics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determinants of smoking by Hispanics remain inadequately...characterized. We have assessed household income, education...cigarette smoking in 1072 Hispanic adults residing in a...determinants of smoking by Hispanics remain inadequately...characterized. We have assessed household income, education...

J M Samet; C A Howard; D B Coultas; and B J Skipper

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

What is Gross Up?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/19/12 Rev 0 /19/12 Rev 0 What is Gross Up? Gross up on relocation refers to money that is added to your pay to offset the federal and state tax deducted from the relocation reimbursement amount. You do not see the money in your pocket, but rather it offsets taxes that would have reduced the payment if we had not paid you the additional amount. For example: If the Relocation reimbursement request submitted = $5668. Without a gross up the net payment received would be $3539.66 because federal and state taxes reduce the pay out by $1694.73 ($1417 federal + $277.73 state). Paying only the additional amount of the taxes would create a larger tax burden because there would be taxes on that additional amount as well. Instead by paying an additional $2417.59 the federal and state taxes on the original $5668 and the additional federal and state taxes on

55

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

56

The impact of retirement on household consumption in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using monthly data from the Japanese Family Income and Expenditure Survey, we examine the impact of retirement on household consumption. We find little evidence of an immediate change in consumption at retirement, on average, in Japan. However, we find a decrease in consumption at retirement for low income households that is concentrated in food and work-related consumption. The availability of substantial retirement bonuses to a large share of Japanese retirees may help smooth consumption at retirement. We find that those households that are more likely to receive such bonuses experience a short-run consumption increase at retirement. However, among households that are less likely to receive a retirement bonus, we find that consumption decreases at retirement.

Melvin Stephens Jr.; Takashi Unayama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 15,584 15,680 15,819 15,886 15,970 16,068 16,173 16,295 16,422 16,557 16,701 16,832 15,742 16,127 16,628 Real Disposable Personal Income (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 11,502 11,618 11,703 11,757 11,883 11,970 12,057 12,151 12,273 12,363 12,451 12,526 11,645 12,015 12,403 Real Personal Consumption Expend. (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 10,644 10,692 10,729 10,813 10,884 10,959 11,036 11,114 11,191 11,264 11,343 11,416 10,719 10,998 11,304 Real Fixed Investment (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 2,420 2,458 2,491 2,508 2,551 2,604 2,655 2,700 2,752 2,816 2,885 2,944 2,469 2,627 2,849 Business Inventory Change (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) .............

58

Households and Pension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter deals with two economic issues. First, we examine Japan’s household structure. In the previous chapter ( Chapter 10 ...), we recognized the importance of the ...

Mitsuhiko Iyoda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

HOUSEHOLD SOLAR POWER SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Photovoltaic power has become one of the most popular research area in new energy field. In this report, the case of household solar power… (more)

Jiang, He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series. Based on the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for...

62

Gross decontamination experiment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Household “Pie”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discussion of theoretical, conceptual, and methodological concerns in the last three chapters has set the stage for an examination of the total effort that households devote to domestic and market activiti...

Sarah Fenstermaker Berk

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Correlated income shocks and excess smoothness of consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the literature, econometricians typically assume that household income is the sum of a random walk permanent component and a transitory component, with uncorrelated permanent and transitory shocks. Using data on realized individual incomes and individual expectations of future incomes from the Survey of Italian Households? Income and Wealth, I find that permanent and transitory shocks are negatively correlated. Relaxing the assumption of no correlation between the shocks, I explore the effects of correlated income shocks on the estimated consumption insurance against permanent and transitory shocks, and consumption smoothness using a life-cycle model with self-insurance calibrated to U.S. data. Negatively correlated income shocks result in smoother consumption, and upward-biased estimates of the insurance against transitory (and permanent when borrowing constraints are not tight) income shocks. While the life-cycle model with negatively correlated shocks fits well the sensitivity of consumption to current income shocks observed in U.S. data, it falls short of explaining the sensitivity of consumption to income shocks cumulated over a longer horizon.

Dmytro Hryshko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Equitable economic energy efficiency : creating good jobs in low-income efficiency programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency is an important consideration in energy policy-making. So, a federal program aimed at funding "energy efficiency retrofits" for low-income households could be an important step in increasing the overall ...

Sarin, Amit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

most non-Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) energythe federal Weatherization Assistance Program may have thefrom the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) due to the

Zimring, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASCSP). 2009. Weatherization Assistance Program Fundingof Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program with State-2009. National Weatherization Assistance Program Training

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve aapproach to energy efficiency market development is

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the residential energy efficiency market is a potentialinstitutions (CDFIs) to market energy improvements. Solve acan open significant markets for energy improvements among

Zimring, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy assessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Theassessments, title searches, and lien recordings. Once INHP

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean Energy Works Oregon Bill Payment History as a ProxyEnergy and Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), also use utility bill repayment history

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE – Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vermont Energy Investment Corporation NYSERDA – New Yorkfor a case study on New York’s energy efficiency programNew York, the New York State Energy Research and Development

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Programs“. March 17, 2011. Available here:Efficiency Programs. ” March 17, 2011. Available here:

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system CFL – Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb IAQ – Indoor Airdiscount compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or providediscount compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) or provide

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Household portfolios in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I provide a detailed description and in-depth analysis of household portfolios in Japan. (1) It is shown that the share of equities in financial wealth and the stock market participation of Japanese households decreased throughout the 1990s. (2) Using survey data, age-related variations in the share of stocks in financial wealth are analyzed. The equity share and stock market participation increase with age among young households, peaking when people reach their 50s, and then stabilizing. However, the share of equities conditional on ownership exhibits no significant age-related pattern, implying that age-related patterns are primarily explained by the decision to hold stocks. A similar mechanism operates to that found in previous studies of Western countries. (3) Owner-occupied housing has a significantly positive effect on stock market participation and on the share of stocks in financial wealth.

Tokuo Iwaisako

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback *...

82

"Keeping Up" or "Keeping Afloat"? : how American households accumulate wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

having a Black or Hispanic household head, and experiencingBlack households, Hispanic households, poor households, etc.that Black- and Hispanic- headed households appear to be at

Lundy, Jeffrey Dalton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 31 ·Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS Have you ever gotten so angry that you've done), and self-regulation (Mischel, Shoda, & Rodriguez, 1989). What is new are the theoretical and empiri cal

Gross, James J.

84

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

85

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aggregate Aggregate Ratio: See Mean and Ratio Estimate. AMPD: Average miles driven per day. See Appendix B, "Estimation Methodologies." Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled: See Vehicle Miles Traveled. Automobile: Includes standard passenger car, 2-seater car and station wagons; excludes passenger vans, cargo vans, motor homes, pickup trucks, and jeeps or similar vehicles. See Vehicle. Average Household Energy Expenditures: A ratio estimate defined as the total household energy expenditures for all RTECS households divided by the total number of households. See Ratio Estimate, and Combined Household Energy Expenditures. Average Number of Vehicles per Household: The average number of vehicles used by a household for personal transportation during 1991. For this report, the average number of vehicles per household is computed as the ratio of the total number of vehicles to the

86

DETERMINANTS OF INCOME INEQUALITY IN BOTSWANA: A REGRESSION-BASED DECOMPOSITION APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level in Botswana. Using the Household Income and Expenditure Survey of 2002/03 an income generating Expenditure Surveys (HIES) undertaken in 1985/86, 1993/94, 2002/03 and the Botswana Core Welfare Indicator capital intensive and employs a very small proportion of the labour force, yet this sector accounts

87

Abstract B63: Barriers to colorectal cancer screening among low income and underinsured Hispanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barriers to CRCS in low income Hispanics, this cross-sectional study...associated with CRCS among Hispanics residing on the Texas-Mexico...older, self-identified as Hispanic or Latino, and no history...primary language spoken, household income, highest education...

Lara S. Savas; Maria E. Fernandez; and Janet Williams

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

89

9 - Chinese healthcare system reforms and household saving patterns: some stylised facts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between one of the recent healthcare reforms in the People’s Republic of China and household decisions both in terms of out-of-pocket expenditure and saving. Evidence on the results achieved by reforms of the health insurance sector in terms of reducing out-of-pocket medical expenditure is still uncertain and contradictory, and very little is known about the effect of these measures on the consumption and saving behaviour of the Chinese population. To shed light on this issue we use data collected by Chinese Household Income Project surveys (CHIPs), through a series of questionnaire-based interviews conducted in urban areas in 1995 and 2002. Our descriptive analysis suggests that there is a positive relationship between public health insurance coverage and household saving. This empirical evidence suggests that public insurance coverage is ineffective as a source of protection against income losses and might induce households to save more.

Vincenzo Atella; Agar Brugiavini; Hao Chen; Noemi Pace

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that households? experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models... of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing iii homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA...

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Life-Cycle General Equilibrium Simulation Model with Continuous Income Distribution An Application to an Aging Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chapters 3 through 6 incorporated plural representative households with unequal incomes in each cohort, and addressed the problem of intragenerational redistribution. However, the changes in the variance of li...

Akira Okamoto Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

93

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

94

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) Oil and Gas Gross Production Tax (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Fees A gross production tax applies to most gas produced in North Dakota. Gas burned at the well site to power an electrical generator that consumes at least 75 percent of the gas is exempt from taxation under this chapter.

95

Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.7 4.7 2.0 6.2 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 8.0 5.4 2.6 5.0 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.8 2.7 1.1 7.9 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 2.5 1.0 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 1.7

97

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Household Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.8 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 5.6 1.8 3.8 5.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 7.3 1.9 5.5 4.9 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 3.5 0.9 2.6 7.6 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 3.5 1.1 2.4 6.4 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 2.0 0.6 1.4 9.7 6 or More Persons

98

Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Asset Pricing with Countercyclical Household Consumption Risk George M. Constantinides that shocks to household consumption growth are negatively skewed, persistent, and countercyclical and play that drives the conditional cross-sectional moments of household consumption growth. The estimated model

Sadeh, Norman M.

99

A comparative evaluation of household preferences for solar photovoltaic standalone and mini-grid system: An empirical study in a costal village of Indian Sundarban  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar PhotoVoltaic (SPV) based systems have been widely accepted technology for rural electrification in developing countries. The standalone SPV home lighting system has increasingly been popular among rural households, while SPV mini-grid supply system is being promoted for rural electrification schemes. This study uses data from household survey to explore the impact of household characteristics on the preference for electrical energy from SPV systems. Econometric evidence shows heterogeneity in behavioural pattern for these two SPV systems. The flexibility in use and cost of systems might explain this difference. Household characteristics such as monthly household income, household size, occupational status of household head, number of room and type of house significantly influence household’s decision for SPV standalone home lighting systems. For SPV mini-grid supply household’s income and monthly expenditure on kerosene are significant predictors. The result reported in this paper might be a valuable input for policy makers to frame right policy mix with regard to provide subsidy on rural electrification programmes.

Amit K. Bhandari; Chinmoy Jana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Federal options for low-income electricity policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protection of low-income consumers remains an important public policy concern in a restructuring electricity industry. Policies are needed to ensure that low-income households have enough affordable electricity to protect their health and safety, and that they are not victimized by unscrupulous suppliers. In this paper, the author presents three broad federal roles in setting low-income electricity policy, and discuss three more specific policy areas: universal service, electricity assistance, and health and safety. He discusses the key policy issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives and draw upon reviews of proposed low-income policies from restructuring proposals in eight states--California, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

Baxter, L.W. [Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Resource handbook for low-income residential retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the handbook is to provide technical assistance to state grantees participating in the Partnerships in Low-Income Residential Retrofit (PILIRR) Program. PILIRR is a demonstration program aimed at identifying innovative, successful approaches to developing public and private support for weatherization of low-income households. The program reflects the basic concept that responsibility for financial support for conservation activities such as low-income residential retrofitting is likely to gradually shift from the DOE to the states and the private sector. In preparing the handbook, PNL staff surveyed over 50 programs that provide assistance to low-income residents. The survey provided information on factors that contribute to successful programs. PNL also studied the winning PILIRR proposals (from the states of Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Washington) and identified the approaches proposed and the type of information that would be most helpful in implementing these approaches.

Callaway, J.W.; Brenchley, D.L.; Davis, L.J.; Ivey, D.L.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

About the modified Gaussian family of income distributions with applications to individual incomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent paper in this journal [Q. Guo, L. Gao, Distribution of individual incomes in China between 1992 and 2009, Physica A 391 (2012) 5139–5145], a new family of distributions for modeling individual incomes in China was proposed. This family is the so-called Modified Gaussian (MG) distribution, which depends on two parameters. The MG distribution shows a satisfactory fit for the individual income data between 1992 and 2009. However, for the practical use of this model with individual incomes, it is necessary to know its probabilistic and statistical properties, especially the corresponding inequality measures. In this paper, probabilistic functions and inequality measures of the MG distribution are obtained in closed form, including the normalizing constant, probability functions, moments, first-degree stochastic dominance conditions, relationships with other families of distributions and standard tools for inequality measurement (Lorenz and generalized Lorenz curves and Gini, Donaldson–Weymark–Kakwani and Pietra indices). Several methods for parameter estimation are also discussed. In order to illustrate all the previous formulations, we have fitted individual incomes of Spain for three years using the European community household panel survey, concluding a static pattern of inequality, since the Gini index and other inequality measures remain constant over the study period.

José María Sarabia; Faustino Prieto; Carmen Trueba; Vanesa Jordá

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

105

Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) June 6, 2006 David Gross David Gross, Nobel Prize recipient and lecturer David Gross,...

106

Reform of Australian urban transport: A CGE-microsimulation analysis of the effects on income distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Australian urban transport industries experienced substantial reform during the 1990s leading to significant structural change. Urban transport is typically an important expenditure item for households and structural change in these services may affect households differently depending on their position in the distribution of income and expenditure. We estimate the effects on household income groups of this structural change by applying a computable general equilibrium model incorporating microsimulation behaviour with top-down and bottom-up links. We compare estimates based on a pure microsimulation approach, a top-down approach and a hybrid top-down/bottom-up approach. We estimate small reductions in real income and small reductions in inequality; this pattern is largely replicated across regions. Our results are insensitive to the inclusion of bottom-up links; in contrast, applying a pure microsimulation approach gives accurate results at the aggregate level but underestimates the variation in effects across deciles and regions.

George Verikios; Xiao-guang Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends November 2005 Release (Next Update: Discontinued) Based on the 2001 National Household Travel Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation and augmented by EIA Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses in an effort to maintain consistency with its past residential transportation series, which was discontinued after 1994. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends, provides details on the nation's energy use for household passenger travel. A primary purpose of this report is to release the latest consumer-based data

108

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

109

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p < 0.05), education level (r{sub xy} = 0.244, p < 0.05) and monthly income (r{sub xy} = 0.671, p < 0.01) of the households. Municipal authorities are usually the responsible agencies for solid waste collection and disposal, but the magnitude of the problem is well beyond the ability of any municipal government to tackle. Hence dwellers were found to take the service from the local waste management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","92014","1151989" ,"Release...

112

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","92014","1151989" ,"Release...

113

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","92014","1151989" ,"Release...

114

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","92014","1151991" ,"Release...

115

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Weatherization Population Facts - Roughly 25% of Federally eligible households move in and out of poverty "classification" each year. - The average income of Federally eligible households in FY 2005 was $16,264, based on RECS and Bureau of the Census' Current Population Survey (CPS) data. - States target the neediest, especially the elderly, persons with disabilities, and families with children. - Since the inception of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1976, over 6.3 million households have received weatherization services with DOE and leveraged funding. - In FY 2009, the energy burden on Federally eligible households was about four times the burden on Federally ineligible households (14% versus 4%). Source(s): ORNL, Weatherization Works: Final Report on the National Weatherization Evaluation, Sept. 1994, p. 1 for migrating poor; ORNL, 1996 for targeting; HHS,

117

Communications on energy Household energy conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the influence of attitudinal and socio-economic factors on household energy conservation actions. A household interview survey in Regina, Saskatchewan found that respondents perceive an energy problem, although no association with energy conservation actions was determined. Two attitudinal and five socio-economic variables influence household energy conservation. Energy and monetary savings are available to households through energy conservation. Public awareness of household energy conservation through the media can reinforce existing energy conservation actions and encourage new actions.

Fred A. Curtis; P. Simpson-Housley; S. Drever

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Low Income Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to serve as a starting point. Mission: The Northwest Public Power Regional Low-income Energy Efficiency Work Group aims to share information and develop best practices in order...

119

Farm Income Taxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the filing status of the taxpayer. Finally, the tax liability is determined by reducing the tax imposed by various credits. Reporting Farm Income Methods of accounting. Almost all farmers and ranchers operate on the cash method of accounting. This means... basis taxpayers must take income into account when it is actually received as well as when it is constructively received. The constructive receipt doctrine can be a concern for farmers and ranchers, especially with respect to government price...

McEowen, Roger A.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22 W and 95 kW h/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.0 2.9 1.3 Total Owner-Occupied Units ....... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 15.8 12.5 0.8 0.9 1.6 10.3 2 Persons ...................................... 25.9 23.4 0.5 0.5 1.5 10.1 3 Persons ...................................... 11.6 9.6 0.5 Q 1.3 12.1 4 Persons ...................................... 11.8 10.9 Q Q 0.7 15.7 5 Persons ...................................... 5.1 4.5 Q Q 0.4 24.2 6 or More Persons

122

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Household Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 9.9 5.0 1.8 3.1 6.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 13.0 6.7 2.5 3.8 4.2 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 6.6 3.7 1.2 1.7 8.8 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.0 3.3 0.8 1.9 10.7 5 Persons ....................................................

123

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 14.6 5.3 4.8 3.6 6.4 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 15.7 5.7 6.9 6.8 5.4 3 Persons .................................................... 17.0 7.6 2.8 3.5 3.1 7.2 4 Persons .................................................... 15.6 6.8 2.3 4.1 2.4 8.1 5 Persons .................................................... 7.1 3.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 12.3 6 or More Persons

124

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 8.1 6.5 4.8 6.2 9.9 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 3.1 9.4 8.2 6.5 7.9 8.7 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 1.3 4.3 4.0 3.3 4.1 10.7 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 1.4 3.9 3.4 3.4 3.5 10.5 5 Persons ......................................

125

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Household Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total Rented Units ........................ 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 12.3 2.5 2.6 7.0 0.3 10.0 2 Persons ...................................... 9.2 2.5 2.5 4.1 Q 11.8 3 Persons ...................................... 5.4 2.0 1.1 2.0 0.4 13.9 4 Persons ...................................... 3.8 1.6 0.7 1.4 Q 17.7 5 Persons ...................................... 2.0 0.9 0.4 0.6 Q 24.1 6 or More Persons ........................

126

char_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons ...................................... 35.1 4.8 6.2 6.6 4.5 5.3 7.8 5.8 3 Persons ...................................... 17.0 2.5 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.9 4.1 8.4 4 Persons ...................................... 15.6 3.4 2.8 2.3 1.9 1.8 3.4 9.6 5 Persons ...................................... 7.1 1.6 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 14.3 6 or More Persons

127

David J. Gross and the Strong Force  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David J. Gross and the Strong Force David J. Gross and the Strong Force Resources with Additional Information The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to David Gross for "the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". 'Gross, who obtained his PhD in physics in 1966, currently is a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara. ... David Gross Courtesy of UC Santa Barbara [When on the faculty at Princeton University,] he and then-graduate student Frank Wilczek came up with a way to describe the "strong force" that governs interactions between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom. He and Wilczek published their proposal simultaneously with H. David Politzer, a graduate student [at Harvard University] who independently came up with the same idea. ...

128

Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 6.1 0.8 2.7 2.6 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 23.2 Race of Householder White ... 54.8 14.4 27.6 12.8 83.7 3.2 6.7 7.2...

129

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

130

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Helicobacter pylori Prevalence and Circulating Micronutrient Levels in a Low-Income United States Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...39.4) 60 (24.6) Household income ($), n...8 (58.4) Total energy intake, kcal/day...supplements, and total energy intake. bFor absolute...supplements, and total energy intake. bFor absolute...of gastric cancer in Japan: a nested case-control...

Meira Epplein; Lisa B. Signorello; Wei Zheng; Qiuyin Cai; Margaret K. Hargreaves; Angelika Michel; Michael Pawlita; Jay H. Fowke; Pelayo Correa; and William J. Blot

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or More...... 23.1 15.2 197 12.3 10.7 13.0 1.3 12.8 13.0| 6.7 | Race of Householder | White... 135.3 89.5 1,429 89.2 73.9 89.2 9.1 87.5 89.1| 2.0...

133

The World Distribution of Household Wealth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan is not a remote prospect. In summary, it is clear that householdJapan Korea, South New Zealand Norway Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Year Unit share of top 2002 household

DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 12312014 Next Release Date: 1302015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...

135

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 12312014 Next Release Date: 1302015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...

136

Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for September 2013 Released: December 6, 2013 Next Release: January 7, 2014 The two graphs below show total U.S. and Lower 48 natural gas production on one and the individual State production on the other. U.S. and Lower 48 States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data State Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data In September, Lower 48 States production decreased 0.8 percent or 0.58 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). Louisiana had the largest volumetric decrease at 5.3 percent or 0.34 Bcf/d as many surveyed operators reported various maintenance issues and normal well decline. Wyoming also dropped

137

Definition: Gross generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gross generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gross generation The total amount of electric energy produced by generating units (e.g. power plants) and measured at the generating terminal in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Electricity generation, Net generation, power References ↑ http://205.254.135.24/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=G#gross_gen Retri Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Gross_generation&oldid=480543" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

138

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 2:04:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AR2","N9011AR2","N9012AR2"...

139

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 2:04:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AL2","N9011AL2","N9012AL2"...

140

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 2:05:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AR2","N9011AR2","N9012AR2"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 2:05:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AZ2","N9011AZ2","N9012AZ2"...

142

,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 2:04:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AK2","N9011AK2","N9012AK2"...

143

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:49:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010NY2" "Date","New York...

144

Generalization Of The Gross-Perry Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A class of SO(n+1) symmetric solutions of the (N+n+1)-dimensional Einstein equations is found. It contains 5-dimensional metrics of Gross and Perry and Millward.

M. Jakimowicz; J. Tafel

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

A comparative multivariate analysis of household energy requirements in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, India and Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we appraise sustainable household consumption from a global perspective. Using per capita energy requirements as an indicator of environmental pressure, we focus on the importance of income growth in a cross-country analysis. Our analysis is supported by a detailed within-country analysis encompassing five countries, in which we assess the importance of various socioeconomic-demographic characteristics of household energy requirements. We bring together family expenditure survey data, input–output tables, and energy statistics in a multivariate analysis. Instead of a uniform Kuznet's curve, we find that the effect of increasing income varies considerably across countries, even when controlling for socioeconomic and demographic variations. The latter variables show similar influences, but differing importance across countries.

Manfred Lenzen; Mette Wier; Claude Cohen; Hitoshi Hayami; Shonali Pachauri; Roberto Schaeffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9 7.7 3.3 3.1 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 8.7 6.2 2.5 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 1.4 0.9 0.5 12.9 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

147

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

148

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.1 9.9 4.2 3.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 10.4 7.2 3.2 3.7 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 2.3 1.6 0.7 10.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ................................................................

149

The causes of Japan's ‘lost decade’: The role of household consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, I analyze the causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and find that the stagnation of investment, especially private fixed investment, was the primary culprit. I then investigate the causes of the stagnation of household consumption during the 1990s and find that the stagnation of household disposable income, the decline in household wealth, and increased uncertainty about the future are among the contributing factors. Finally, I consider whether demand side factors or supply side factors were more important as causes of the prolonged slowdown of the Japanese economy in the 1990s and conclude that the former (especially misguided government policies) were probably more important.

Charles Yuji Horioka

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDAs Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

N April 4, 2012 Extending Efficiency Services to Underserved Households: NYSERDA's Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program Since 2001, New York residents have completed over 39,000 energy upgrades through NYSERDA's Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) initiative. Approximately one third of these projects have been completed through the Assisted HPwES track, which offers large incentives to middle income

151

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 20.2 13.4 6.7 2.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 14.3 9.5 4.8 3.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 13.6 9.0 4.6 3.9 With a Heat Pump .....................................

152

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4 18.6 13.3 4.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 ............................ 57.5 23.6 8.6 15.8 9.4 5.1 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 19.3 7.4 13.1 6.4 6.3 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 4.4

153

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 58.2 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 5.3 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 44.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 7.0 Without a Heat Pump .................. 35.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump .......................

154

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 22.5 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 6.2 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 12.7 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 8.5 Without a Heat Pump .................. 10.6 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 9.3 With a Heat Pump ....................... 2.2 8.6 0.8 1.0

155

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, 1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 36.9 19.0 6.4 11.5 1.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 30.4 16.1 5.0 9.2 2.8 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 22.1 10.4 3.4 8.3 5.6 With a Heat Pump

156

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 14.2 11.1 3.2 3.4 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 5.7 4.9 0.8 8.9 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 5.2 4.5 0.7 9.2 With a Heat Pump .....................................

157

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, 2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 .......................... 80.8 13.4 15.8 14.2 10.1 10.2 17.1 4.7 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 3 .............. 57.5 12.6 13.7 11.0 7.1 6.6 6.4 5.9 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 10.1 10.4 8.0 6.1 5.9 5.7 7.0 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 2.5 3.3

158

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 .......................... 80.8 57.6 6.3 11.8 5.1 4.9 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 .............. 57.5 43.6 3.2 7.1 3.5 6.7 Without a Heat Pump .................. 46.2 35.0 2.4 6.1 2.7 7.7 With a Heat Pump ....................... 11.3 8.6 0.8 1.0 0.8 19.7 Room Air-Conditioning

159

Consumer survey data as a basis for the derivation of retail price and income elasticities of demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and recording their response to the price changes. Prices were presented via use of price cards upon which were printed the various price levels. All price levels were presented during the course of one interview. A sample of 300 households in Dallas, Texas... 128 144 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 10 DISTRIBUTION OF SAtlPLF ViOUSEHOLDS BY INCOME AND SIZE CONSUl"iER DEMiAND STUDY, DALLAS, 1968 COMPARISQi'l OF INCOl~iE LEVELS, DEViAND SAMPLE HOUSEHOLDS AND TOTAL DALLAS COUI'lTY HOUSEHOLDS, 1968 Cotisu...

Wilson, Winston Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Residential Energy Burdens, by Weatherization Eligibility and Year (1) 1987 Mean Mean Mean Mean Mdn Mean Mean Mdn Mean Group Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Indvdl Indvdl Group Total U.S. Households 4.0% 6.8% 3.2% 6.1% 3.5% 2.4% 7.2% 4.4% 3.2% Federally Eligible 13.0% 14.4% 10.1% 12.1% 7.9% 7.7% 13.8% 9.6% 10.0% Federally Ineligible 4.0% 3.5% N.A. 3.0% 2.6% 2.0% 3.6% 3.1% 2.6% Below 125% Poverty Line 13.0% N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1990 FY 2000 (2) FY 2009 (3) 1) Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or the ratio of energy expenditures to income for a household. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are

162

"Table HC15.3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Household Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,1.8,1.9,2,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,2.2,2.3,2.4,3.2 "3 Persons",18.4,1.1,1.3,1.2,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,1,0.9,1,2.3 "5 Persons",7.9,0.6,0.6,0.9,0.9 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.4,"Q",0.5,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,0.8,0.7,0.9,1 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,0.8,0.4,0.6,0.7

163

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, 2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 11.0 11.6 10.3 7.2 7.8 12.0 5.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 8.0 9.0 7.7 5.3 6.1 9.1 5.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 1.8 1.6 2.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 11.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

164

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central Air-Conditioning 2 ............................ 57.5 1.3 3.9 6.2 5.7 6.7 Without a Heat Pump ................................ 46.2 1.2 3.2 5.5 3.8 8.1 With a Heat Pump ..................................... 11.3 Q 0.8 0.6 1.9 14.7 Room Air-Conditioning ................................ 23.3 3.4 1.2 1.2 0.3 13.6 1 Unit

165

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, 1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 20.7 11.7 3.2 5.8 4.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1 ................................................................ 45.1 15.5 8.6 2.6 4.3 4.9 2 or more ................................................... 9.1 3.1 2.0 0.4 0.7 9.6 Number of Laptop PCs

166

Electricity Prices for Households - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA Austria 0.144 0.154 0.152 0.163 0.158 0.158 0.178 0.201 NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.145 0.171 NA Canada 0.067 0.069 0.070 0.071 0.076 0.078 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.140 0.195 NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 0.075 0.071 0.074 0.076 0.079 0.079 0.080 0.086 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.111 0.135 NA

167

homeoffice_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0 21.5 7.8 Personal Computers 2 ................... 60.0 5.7 16.7 13.1 12.1 12.6 7.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 45.1 4.2 12.8 9.6 8.8 9.6 7.8 2 or more .................................... 9.1 0.8 2.4 2.3 2.0 1.7 12.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

168

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

169

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

170

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

171

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2014 From Shale...

172

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

173

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

174

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

History Gross Withdrawals 299,035 277,208 262,287 252,184 194,411 189,411 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From...

175

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

176

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale...

177

Gross Theory of ?-Decay and Shell Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......nuclear final state measured fr:orn the parent. Although actual decays pro- Gross Theory of f3-Decay and Shell Effects 137 ceed only to the region of negative values of E, we extend our consideration to the positive region. Now, we can regard the whole......

Takayoshi Kondoh; Masami Yamada

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Household demand and willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper quantitatively evaluates consumers' willingness to pay for hybrid vehicles by estimating the demand of hybrid vehicles in the U.S. market. Using micro-level data on consumer purchases of hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles from National Household Travel Survey 2009, this paper formulates a mixed logit model of consumers' vehicle choices. Parameter estimates are then used to evaluate consumers' willingness to pay for hybrids. Results suggest that households' willingness to pay for hybrids ranges from $963 to $1718 for different income groups, which is significantly lower than the average price premium (over $5000) of hybrid vehicles, even when taking the fuel costs savings of hybrid vehicles into consideration. The differences reveal that although the market has shown increasing interest in hybrid vehicles, consumers' valuation of the hybrid feature is still not high enough to compensate for the price premium when they make new purchases. Policy simulations are conducted to examine the effects of raising federal tax incentives on the purchase of hybrid vehicles.

Yizao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Left to Our Own Devices – Financing Efficiency for Small Business and Low-Income Families (2009 Environmental Defense Fund Report)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There is a widely known gap between cost-effective behavior, consumption patterns and actual marketplace conditions. This •engineering gap/efficiency gap is particularly the case for low-income households and small businesses, which tend to depend on older, inefficient equipment. This study identifies the limitations of current and potential of relatively new mechanisms for efficiency investment micro-financing.

180

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, 1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q Q 20.1 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q Q 39.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q Q 39.0 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0

182

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.7 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Natural Gas .................................................

183

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q Q Q 39.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 Q Q Q 38.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Natural Gas

184

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, 2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 Q 0.4 18.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.2 Q 0.2 27.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Natural Gas .................................................

185

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

186

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

187

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

188

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

189

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

190

California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

191

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

192

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Revisions to Gross Domestic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

193

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

194

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

195

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 0.4 0.1 Q 0.1 33.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ............................................... 0.4 0.3 Q Q Q 30.2 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ........................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Natural Gas

196

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.9 3.0 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Heat Home ..................................... 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.4 0.2 Q Q Q 46.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.3 0.2 Q Q Q 39.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ Q Q Q Q Q NF Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 72.4 63.0 2.0 1.7 5.7 6.7 Natural Gas

197

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, 2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 Q Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q 23.2 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 Q Q Q 0.2 Q Q 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q Q Q Q Q 37.8 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Natural Gas ...................................

198

More efficient household electricity use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy efficiency of electric appliances has increased markedly in OECD countries, according to data provided by utilities, appliance associations, appliance manufacturers, and independent analyses of each country we reviewed (US, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Japan, Germany, UK). These improvements have, in part, offset increases in electricity demand due to increasing saturation of appliances. However, we see evidence that the efficiency of new devices has hit a temporary plateau: Appliances sold in 1988, while far more efficient than similar ones sold in the early 1970s, may not be significantly more efficient than those sold in 1987. The reason for this plateau, according to manufacturers we interviewed, is that the simple energy-saving features have been incorporated; more sophisticated efficiency improvements are economically justified by five to ten year paybacks, but unattractive to consumers in most countries who appear to demand paybacks of less than three years. Manufacturers see features other than efficiency --- such as number of storage compartments and automatic ice-makers --- as more likely to boost sales, market share, or profits. If this efficiency plateau'' proves lasting, then electricity use for appliance could begin to grow again as larger and more fancy models appear in households. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Schipper, L.; Hawk, D.V.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

200

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.5 0.2 Q 0.3 Q 24.2 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 28.1 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Natural Gas ...................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

202

spaceheat_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 0.6 Q Q 0.5 Q 21.4 No Heating Equipment .................. 0.2 Q Q Q Q 84.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It ................................ 0.4 Q Q 0.3 Q 36.4 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment (Have and Use Equipment) ............ 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Natural Gas ...................................

203

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

314 LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in 1980, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time the...

204

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

205

Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site consumption results in households spending 30% less for energy than the U.S. average.  Average site electricity consumption in California homes is among the lowest in the nation, as the mild climate in much of the state leads to less reliance on

206

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Potential Study.  Technical Report Energy Efficiency  Potential Study.  Technical Report Energy Efficiency   Renewable Energy Technologies   Transportation   Assessment of Household Carbon Footprint Reduction Potentials is the final report 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Household gasoline demand in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nevada: Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydropower project produces enough electricity to annually power nearly 100 typical American households.

210

Low-Income Weatherization: The Human Dimension  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation focuses on how the human dimension saves energy within low-income weatherization programs.

211

The impact of the low income housing tax credit program on local schools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) program has developed over two million rental homes for low-income households since 1986. The perception of deterioration in school quality has been a main reason for community opposition to LIHTC projects in middle- and upper-income areas. In this paper, we examine the impact of LIHTC projects on the nearby school performance using data on all LIHTC projects and elementary schools in Texas from the 2003–04 through 2008–09 academic years. We employ the longitudinal structure of the data to control for school fixed effects and estimate the relationship between the opening of nearby LIHTC on campus-level standardized test scores and performance ratings. We address the potential selection biases by controlling for preexisting trends in school performance prior to the study period. We find no robust evidence that the opening of LIHTC units negatively impacts the performance of nearby elementary schools.

Wenhua Di; James C. Murdoch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction Solar Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Retail Supplier Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info Start Date 7/1/2007 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of gross receipts from sale and installation of solar energy systems Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted. Revenue generated by the sale and installation of solar systems used to provide space heat, hot

213

Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property Type Number Description Avg. Annual Gross Operating Capacity(MW). Pages using the property "AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty" Showing 6 pages using this property. F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 49.5 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 81.7 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 86 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 22 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 50 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 11.5 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty&oldid=400186#SMWResults" Categories: Properties Geothermal Energy Generation Facilities properties What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

214

Tax year 2012 Earned Income Tax Credits, Education Credits, & Unemployment Income  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tax year 2012 ­ Earned Income Tax Credits, Education Credits, & Unemployment Income This article tax year. Expanded Earned Income Tax Credit benefits Many low-income families depend on the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and the good news for this year is that the amount of the credit has been

Stephens, Graeme L.

215

,"Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1...

216

,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

217

,"US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

218

,"Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

219

,"Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

220

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

222

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",8,"Annual",2013,"630...

223

,"California Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",1,"Annual",2013,"6301977"...

224

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",7,"Annual",2013,"6301977" ,"Release...

225

"Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown...

226

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

227

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

228

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 174,470 181,468 176,236 184,625 184,458 179,696 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

229

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

230

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

231

Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

232

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

233

Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

234

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

235

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

236

Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

237

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

238

Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

239

Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

240

Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

242

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 282,018 261,026 234,298 241,910 231,276 247,528 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

243

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

244

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

245

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013

246

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

247

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

248

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 203,544 207,497 197,842 207,415 197,786 181,231 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

249

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 668,363 704,080 673,815 708,526 704,973 680,075 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

250

Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

251

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

252

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

253

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

254

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

255

A gap in formal long-term care use related to characteristics of caregivers and households, under the public universal system in Japan: 2001–2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigated whether the universal provision of long-term care (LTC) under Japan's public system has equalized its use across households with different socio-economic characteristics, with a special focus on the gender and marital status of primary caregivers, and income. We used repeated cross-sectional data from national household surveys (2001, 2004, 2007, 2010) and conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to obtain odds ratios of caregiver and household characteristics for service use, adjusting for recipients’ characteristics. The results showed that the patterns of service use have been consistently determined by caregivers’ gender and marital status over the period despite demographic changes among caregivers. The gap in service use first narrowed, then widened again across income levels after the global economic recession. The results indicate that the traditional gender-bound norms and capacity constraints on households’ informal care provision remained influential on decisions over service use, even after the universal provision of formal care. To improve equality of service utilization, the universal LTC system needs to meet diversifying needs of caregivers/recipients and their households, by overcoming barriers related to gender norms and economic disparity.

Mutsumi Tokunaga; Hideki Hashimoto; Nanako Tamiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) (Million Households) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All...

257

Using census aggregates to proxy for household characteristics: an application to vehicle ownership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instead, Asian and Hispanic households were undersampled byhousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanichousehold Age of the householder/Average age of residents Hispanic

Adjemian, Michael; Williams, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mason Gross School of the Arts Extension Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mason Gross School of the Arts Extension Division Practice Your Passion! 2012-2013 Now Satellite School See page 7 within! #12;Main Office Mason Gross Extension Division Marryott Music Building 81 George Street New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Phone: 732-932-8618 Fax: 732-932-3140 Email: extension

Goodman, Robert M.

259

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU) 2003 Detailed Statistical Report #12;To obtain additional copies of this or other free publications on energy efficiency, please contact: Energy Publications Office of Energy Efficiency Natural Resources Canada c/o St. Joseph Communications Order Processing Unit

260

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

262

Opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from households in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to mitigate climate threats should not exclude the household as the household is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its consumption...2) emissions from kerosene combustion for lighting

O. Adeoti; S. O. Osho

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Household Wealth in a Cross-Country Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a comparative analysis of household wealth in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. ... wealth, looking at the instruments in which households invest...

Laura Bartiloro; Massimo Coletta…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

265

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 3,479,290 3,415,884 3,312,386 3,197,100 3,162,922 3,164,791 1967-2012 From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 1967-2012 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918 1967-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Repressuring 3,039,347 3,007,418 2,908,828 2,812,701 2,795,732 2,801,763 1967-2012 Vented and Flared 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2012 Marketed Production 433,485 398,442 397,077 374,226 356,225 351,259 1967-2012

266

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in in the mid-80s, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time...

267

Just Suppose: Housing Subsidies for Low Income Renters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bonds Low-income housing tax credit Homeowner Multifamilybonds Low-income housing tax credit Fiscal year Fiscal yearthe Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program to provide

Quigley, John M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Home Prices and Household Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jskel and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Discussion Paper Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor, Jarkko Jääskelä. ISSN 1320-7729 (Print) ISSN 1448-5109 (Online) #12;Home Prices and Household Spending Callan Windsor Abstract This paper explores the positive relationship between home prices and household spending

269

Handling Frame Problems When Address-Based Sampling Is Used for In-Person Household Surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......use as the sampling frame for household surveys. This subset includes...However, around 90 percent of households with PO box addresses also have...recent growth, new construction, Hispanic households, non-English-speaking households......

Graham Kalton; Jennifer Kali; Richard Sigman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Incomes of Migratory Agricultural Workers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.64 Colorado 5.35 Minnesota Wisconsin Washington Ohio California Arizona Idaho Illinois North Dakota Other states1 Includes some work in Mexico. !ndicative of family income than are data on in- jividual workers. Average earnings of the fam- dies..., BY STATES, MIGRATORY FARMWORKERS, SOUTH TEXAS, 1956 State and Average Average type of work days earnings worked per worker per per day North Dakota Sugar beets Potatoes Ohio Sugar beets Potatoes Tomatoes Other crops Oklahoma Cotton Oregon...

Sargent, Frederic O.; Metzler, William H.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing household solid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Groundwater Contamination from Household Wastewater... 12;Glossary Household Wastewater Treatment These terms may help you make more accurate assessments......

272

Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for households in rich countries to develop more sustainable consumption patterns is high on the political agenda. An increased awareness of environmental issues among the general public is often presented as an important prerequisite for this change. This article describes how the study team compared the ecological footprints of ''green'' and ''ordinary'' households. These footprint calculations are based on a number of consumption categories that have severe environmental consequences, such as energy and material use in the home, and transport. The comparison is based on a survey of 404 households in the city of Stavanger, where 66 respondents were members of the Environmental Home Guard in Norway. The analysis suggests that, even if the green households have a smaller ecological footprint per household member, this is not caused by their participation in the Home Guard. It merely reflects the fact that green households are larger than ordinary households.

Erling Holden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Household transitions to energy efficient lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New energy efficient lighting technologies can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but adoption has been slow. A unique dataset of German households is used in this paper to examine the factors associated with the replacement of old incandescent lamps (ILs) with new energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The ‘rebound’ effect of increased lamp luminosity in the transition to energy efficient bulbs is analyzed jointly with the replacement decision to account for household self-selection in bulb-type choice. Results indicate that the EU ban on \\{ILs\\} accelerated the pace of transition to \\{CFLs\\} and LEDs, while storage of bulbs significantly dampened the speed of the transition. Higher lighting needs and bulb attributes like energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and durability spur IL replacement with \\{CFLs\\} or LEDs. Electricity gains from new energy efficient lighting are mitigated by 23% and 47% increases in luminosity for CFL and LED replacements, respectively. Model results suggest that taking the replacement bulb from storage and higher levels of education dampen the magnitude of these luminosity rebounds in IL to CFL transitions.

Bradford Mills; Joachim Schleich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GrossProdCapacity GrossProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GrossProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

275

Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP by...

276

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation did not help low income Hispanic women in Texas meet the dietary guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Low-income Hispanic women are at greater risk for dietary deficiencies and obesity. We assessed the association between Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation and dietary intake among 661 Hispanic women aged 26–44 years living in Texas. Methods Cross-sectional data was collected using standard methods. Analysis of variance and logistic regression examined the influence of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on diet after adjusting for household characteristics, body mass index, and food security status. Results Most women did not meet recommended dietary guidelines. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants consumed higher amounts of total sugars, sweets–desserts, and sugar-sweetened beverages than Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program nonparticipants. High sodium intakes and low dairy consumption were observed in both groups. Only 27% of low-income eligible women received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. Discussion Low-income Hispanic women participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program reported less healthful dietary patterns than nonparticipants. This may contribute to the increased obesity prevalence and related comorbidities observed in this population. Conclusion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program should play an important role in enhancing the overall dietary quality of low-income households. Policy initiatives such as limiting the purchase of sugar-sweetened beverages and education to enable women to reduce consumption of high sodium processed foods deserve consideration as means to improve the dietary quality of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants. Effective measures are needed to increase Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation rates among Hispanics.

Angela Hilmers; Tzu-An Chen; Jayna M. Dave; Deborah Thompson; Karen Weber Cullen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 9 13 1990's 19,861 32,603 191,605 218,023 349,380 356,598 361,068 409,091 392,320 376,435 2000's 361,289 200,862 202,002 194,339 165,630 152,902 145,762 134,451 125,502 109,214 2010's 101,487 84,270 87,398 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Alabama Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

278

Current trends in income statements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and tho Caterpi11ar Tractor Company. Tbe first mentioned, included complete statements for tho parent company for the years 19'-1946? snd. tbe second included compIete consolidated statements for the years 3932 1946'? This study has caused the writer... various subjects to be treated in this paper are those that bav'e received considerable attention in recent pubs. cations. , The results of a tabulation of the income and surplus statements in the annual repcz ts oi' two hundred companies are given...

Cass, Edwin Childers

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

The earned income tax credit and fertility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Government programs designed to provide income safety nets often restrict eligibility to families with children, creating an unintended fertility incentive. This paper considers whether dramatically changing ince...

Reagan Baughman; Stacy Dickert-Conlin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

INCOME TAX MANAGEMENT FOR FARMERS IN 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................. 2 Child Tax Credit#12;INCOME TAX MANAGEMENT FOR FARMERS IN 2008 Table of Contents RECENT LAW CHANGES AFFECTING ...................................................................................................... 3 Kiddie Tax

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

282

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

283

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,763 14,963 1980's 14,080 13,929 14,153 13,916 13,844 19,504 18,277 13,030 11,141 9,098 1990's 8,083 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,809 7,289 7,029 6,052 2010's 5,554 5,163 5,051 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

284

High risk of depression among low-income women raises awareness about treatment options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

women were Hispanic, with larger household sizes and lowerthe 3.3-person households of non- Hispanic white clients (Pas household size, age and participation Hispanic and

Block Joy, Amy; Hudes, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

Hoffman, W.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Confronting earthquake risk in Japan—are private households underinsured?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the fact that Japan is an earthquake-prone country and Japanese ... risk averse, less than half of Japanese households are insured against earthquake risk. Based on...

Franz Waldenberger

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Salmon consumption at the household level in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the salmon demand of Japanese households. The specific goals are to illuminate the substitutional relationship between… (more)

Kikuchi, Akihiro

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCC’s fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

Pitcher, Hugh M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fixed Income Division Nomura International plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fixed Income Division © Nomura International plc Symmetry methods for quadratic Gaussian models International plc Outline Motivation The quadratic Gaussian distribution The quadratic Gaussian process The quadratic Gaussian model #12;Fixed Income Division 3© Nomura International plc Part 1 Motivation #12;Fixed

Macrina, Andrea

292

Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Intra-Household Inequality in Transitional Russia Ekaterina Kalugina Natalia Radtchenko Catherine and satisfaction. Using two different subjective questions of the Russian data RLMS (Russia Longitudinal Monitoring and social changes in Russia, we investigate the dynamics of household behavior. Keywords: subjective data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

293

Controlling Households' Drilling Fever in France: an economic modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to generate environmental benefits through reducing water use, has produced economic incentives for households; France; households; domestic boreholes; tube well; water pricing. Author-produced version Fourth World negative environmental impact of water price increase in the drinking water sector. Using primary data

Boyer, Edmond

294

Assimilation and differences between the settlement patterns of individual immigrants and immigrant households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...delineate directions for future household-scale investigations of...Categorization: Individuals or Households? The concentration on the...individual bodies. Of course, household structure and geographic context...children compared with non-Hispanic white children hinge on such...

Mark Ellis; Richard Wright

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Household actions can provide a behavioral wedge to rapidly reduce US carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ineffective in reducing household energy consumption. Mass media...10 years. The changes in household behavior outlined above result...European Union countries and Japan, where the household sector is less energy intensive. Analyses similar...

Thomas Dietz; Gerald T. Gardner; Jonathan Gilligan; Paul C. Stern; Michael P. Vandenbergh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 19,929 20,394 1980's 19,980 26,692 31,904 38,084 60,207 84,062 77,355 67,835 60,308 59,889 1990's 58,055 59,465 62,473 58,635 60,765 60,694 73,092 80,516 81,868 84,547 2000's 83,882 78,209 74,884 64,961 61,622 60,773 47,217 52,805 51,931 47,281 2010's 46,755 41,742 32,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

297

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 72,813 71,946 1980's 63,355 71,477 66,852 68,776 68,315 62,454 63,007 69,656 101,440 122,595 1990's 144,064 171,665 216,377 233,198 224,301 113,552 126,051 123,854 133,111 125,841 2000's 263,958 262,937 293,580 322,010 334,125 380,568 354,816 374,204 388,188 357,490 2010's 370,148 364,702 307,306 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

298

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 24,168 46,363 64,558 59,078 54,805 49,167 50,791 1990's 49,972 51,855 55,231 52,150 53,561 54,790 66,784 73,345 74,985 77,809 2000's 76,075 70,947 67,816 58,095 54,655 54,088 40,407 45,516 44,902 41,229 2010's 41,200 36,579 27,262 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

299

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,838,521 4,101,321 4,262,607 1980's 4,200,273 4,202,553 3,879,918 3,313,354 3,750,641 3,286,091 3,071,900 3,384,442 3,418,949 3,373,680 1990's 3,549,524 3,401,801 3,304,336 3,351,101 3,513,981 3,460,103 3,689,170 3,760,953 3,759,040 3,732,046 2000's 3,671,424 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

300

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 498,876 487,512 1980's 417,312 381,938 366,546 322,588 319,638 256,736 207,265 225,599 214,645 204,005 1990's 182,240 148,429 138,101 157,011 159,513 94,044 192,527 180,848 192,956 164,523 2000's 141,567 153,871 137,192 133,456 129,245 107,584 97,479 72,868 86,198 76,386 2010's 69,836 71,226 73,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gross Energy Cost of Horizontal Treadmill and Track Running  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gross energy cost of treadmill and track running is re-...2...(ml/kg/min) = 2.209 + 3.163 speed (km/h) for 130 subjects (trained and untrained males and females) and 10 treadmill studies. On the track, wind r...

Dr L. Léger; D. Mercier

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Three: Should California Adopt an Earned Income Tax Credit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADOPT AN EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT? Kirk J. Stark, Professorfederal earned income tax credit (EITC) in the past threeits own earned income tax credit. In the past few years,

Stark, Kirk J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Proposed Structure and Organizing Principles for Low Income Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Organizing Principles for Low Income Energy Efficiency Workgroup 1 Background As part of Post-2011-Review, BPA agreed to convene a low income energy efficiency...

304

Structure and Organizing Principles for Low Income Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organizing Principles for Low Income Energy Efficiency Workgroup 1 Background As part of Post-2011-Review, BPA agreed to convene a low income energy efficiency workgroup. The...

305

LIEE (LOW-INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY) GRANT PROGRAM VERSUS THE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

614 LIEE (LOW-INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY) GRANT PROGRAM VERSUS THE UTILITY LOW-INCOME WEATHERIZATION & DUCT SEALING PROGRAM Program Requirements and Specifications Grant Program-...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute household accidental Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy Summary: ; Household energy; Indoor air pollution; Intervention assessment; Kenya 1. Introduction Acute...

307

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of household refrigerators and freezers 2 . Therefore, thesales of the refrigerators and freezers are about 20.6for household refrigerators and freezers has been updated

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling households’ decisions on reconstruction of houses damaged by earthquakes––Japanese case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, households’ decisions on reconstruction of damaged houses were modeled, using questionnaire data in Japan. Characteristics of households’ decisions were investigated using parameter estimation resu...

H. Sakakibara; H. Murakami; S. Esaki; D. Mori; H. Nakata

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Income Tax Deduction for Energy Efficiency Upgrades  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Idaho residents with homes built or under construction before 2002, or who had a building permit issued before January 1, 2002, qualify for an income tax deduction for 100% of the cost of...

310

Low Income Energy Efficiency Workgroup Meeting #1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the creation of this group. To provide background on the ways that BPA works through utilities and states to acquire low-income energy efficiency, presentations were made about...

311

Progress Report Workgroup #3 Low Income  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

asked for an increase in the Low Income Grant Program that is funded by BPA however Boyd Wilson said that this workgroup will not address that issue, but it could be addressed...

312

Gross Receipts Tax Exemption for Sales of Wind and Solar Systems to Government Entities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Mexico has a gross receipts tax structure for businesses instead of a sales tax. Businesses are taxed on the gross amount of their business receipts each year before expenses are deducted. ...

313

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

314

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-3a_  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, 3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | | | 2001 Household Income | | Eli- | | | | | gible | | |___________________________________| | for | | | | | | | | Fed- |

315

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

316

Local well-posedness for Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Cauchy problem for the Gross-Pitaevskii infinite linear hierarchy of equations on $\\mathbb{R}^n.$ By introducing a (F)-norm in certain Sobolev type spaces of sequences of marginal density matrices, we establish local existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions. Explicit space-time type estimates for the solutions are obtained as well. In particular, this (F)-norm is compatible with the usual Sobolev space norm whenever the initial data is factorized.

Zeqian Chen

2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 418,474 760,566 1980's 949,177 1,010,772 1,120,830 992,041 1,021,260 942,413 1,169,038 1,330,604 1,376,093 1,457,841 1990's 1,555,568 1,494,494 1,411,147 1,355,333 1,392,727 1,346,674 1,401,753 1,351,067 1,241,264 1,206,045 2000's 1,177,257 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785 29,229 46,786 37,811 2010's 28,574 23,791 16,506 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014

318

The Future of Capital Income Taxation Alan J. Auerbach*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expenditure tax is not easily dismissed. Indeed, the case against capital income taxation is stronger now thanThe Future of Capital Income Taxation Alan J. Auerbach* University of California, Berkeley for capital income taxation. The disenchantment with capital income taxes is not new, of course. Joseph

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

319

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: active.cput.ac.za/energy/web/DUE/DOCS/422/Paper%20-%20Shuma-Iwisi%20M. Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/appliance-standby-power-and-energy-co Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance A modified engineering model is proposed to estimate standby power and energy losses in households. The modified model accounts for the randomness of standby power and energy losses due to unpredicted user appliance operational behavior.

320

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in gallons, of this household's storage tank(s)? Enter the capacity for the two largest tanks (if there is more than one) in the boxes below. If the capacity is not known, write...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

322

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

323

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

but then declined until about 2004 when gasoline and motor oil expenditures began to rise again. The share of household expenditures on gasoline and oil was exactly the same...

324

Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

Higham, Nicholas J.

325

The Impact of Minimum Quality Standards on Firm Entry, Exit and Product Quality: The Case of the Child Care Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under 5 % Black % Hispanic Household Size Median Income %that are Hispanics Average household size Household median

Hotz, V. Joseph; Xiao, Mo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: May 3, 2010 1: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight on AddThis.com...

329

Income Statement -- A Financial Management Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital asset. Gain or Loss on Sale of Capital Assets Revenue from the sale of farm capital assets such as real estate, buildings/improvements, and machinery/equipment is considered in determining net income. The gain or loss on the sale of capital... assets is equal to the sale revenue minus the book value, or remaining basis value (undepreciated original cost), of the capital asset. For the income statement, purchased breed- ing livestock are treated as a capital asset and the cost depreciated...

Klinefelter, Danny A.

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis -- A Reflexively Designed Survey of New-Car-Buying Multi-Vehicle California Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV,then we expect 13.3 to 15.2% of all light-duty vehicle sales,EV marketpotential for smaller and shorter range velucles represented by our sampleis about 7%of annual, newhght duty vehicle sales.EV body styles" EVs ICEVs Total PAGE 66 THE HOUSEHOLD MA RKET FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES percent mandatein the year 2003will dependon sales

Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Income Tax Income Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Income Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Income Tax Credit A taxpayer that delivers pure, unblended biodiesel (B100) into the tank of a vehicle or uses B100 as an on-road fuel in their trade or business may be

332

Income distribution trends and future food demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...available for food consumption. While there is...between food and energy markets via biofuels...century studied food consumption of the Belgian working...in the market or home-produced. Two...over time. Food consumption can be disaggregated...is poor. Their average income is Y, while...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Taxing corporate income Alan J. Auerbach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposals from those of Meade (1978). Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank Stephen Bond, Harry Century" Abstract: Following Meade (1978), we reconsider issues in the design of taxes on corporate income, and outline significant reforms since the Meade Report (Meade Committee, 1978). We set the UK reforms

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

334

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Energy Consumption of Refrigerators in Ghana - Outcomes of Household Surveys Speaker(s): Essel Ben Hagan Date: July 12, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Robert Van Buskirk Galen Barbose As part of activities to develop refrigerator efficiency standards regulations in Ghana, a national survey on the energy consumption of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers has been conducted. The survey covered 1000 households in urban, peri-urban and rural communities in various parts of the country. The survey found that, on average, refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers in Ghana use almost three times what is allowed by minimum efficiency standards in the U.S., and a few refrigerators had energy use at levels almost ten times the U.S.

335

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

336

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Water Related Energy Use in Households and Cities - an Australian Perspective Speaker(s): Steven Kenway Date: May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon This presentation covers the content of recent journal papers and reports focused on the water-energy nexus and the related theory of urban metabolism. This includes (i) a review of the water-energy nexus focused on cities (ii) quantifying water-related energy in cities (iii) modeling household water-related energy use including key factors, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and (iv) relevance and implications of the urban metabolism theoretical framework. Steven's work focuses on understanding the indirect connections between urban water management, energy use and

337

EIA - Gasoline and Diesel Fuel report: Household Vehicles Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Transportation logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) - survey series has been discontinued after EIA's 1994 survey. Only light-duty vehicles and recreational vehicles are included in this report. EIA has excluded motorcycles, mopeds, large trucks, and buses. This report, Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991, is based on data from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). Focusing on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and energy enduse consumption and expenditures by households for personal transportation, the 1991 RTECS is

338

An exploratory study of Spanish households' WEEE disposal behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study based on a survey of 1,537 households in Spain. The questionnaire included 23 key questions regarding the number of appliances in use, previous appliances lifetimes, reasons for buying each new appliance and end-of-life handling of discarded appliances. The distribution of the households along a number of relevant factors was analysed and a prototypical household was identified. A non-parametric analysis of the duration of each type of appliance has also been carried out and it was found that television sets are the most durable of the appliances considered. Survival rates for irons fall more rapidly than for microwaves. Moreover, television sets are the most durable of the appliances considered. Replacement rates of personal computers rapidly increase after approximately six to eight years. Finally, a statistical analysis of the respondents motivations for recycling the appliances considered in this study was carried out.

Ester Gutiérrez; Belarmino Adenso-Díaz; Sebastián Lozano; Plácido Moreno

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

340

Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, , Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related characteristics of highway vehicles available for personal use by members of U.S. households. The data were collected in the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, the final cycle in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted during the 1980's and 1990's by the Energy Information Administrations. Engines Became More Powerful . . . Percent Distribution of Total Residential Vehicle Fleet by Number of Cylinders, 1988 and 1994 Percent Distribution of Vehicle Fleet by Engine Size, 1988 and 1994 Percent Percent 4 cyl Less than 2.50 liters 6 cyl 2.50- 4.49 liters 8 cyl 4.50 liters or greater 20 20 40 40 Vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy demand of German households and saving potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The implementation of the principles of sustainable development requires both using potentialities in saving resources and cutting down emissions (efficiency strategies) as well as more conscious patterns of behaviour of the actors involved (sufficiency strategies). Starting from the current situation of annual CO2 emissions of about 10 t and a sustainability goal of 1â??2 t CO2 emissions per inhabitant and year, the question arises in how far households can contribute to achieve this goal. Therefore, in this paper, the environmental impacts of the energy demand of German households will be evaluated by means of describing its status quo and there from deriving saving potentials.

Anke Eber; Dominik Most; Otto Rentz; Thomas Lutzkendorf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Agricultural Biotechnology and Poverty Reduction in Low-income Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Biotechnology and Poverty Reduction in Low-income Countries GREGORY GRAFF, DAVID biotechnology innovation is concentrated in high income, ``Tier I'' countries, international diffusion. Ã? 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Key words -- agriculture, biotechnology, globalization, innovation

Kammen, Daniel M.

343

Income tax treaties, tax havens, and the foreign tax credit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Income tax treaties (also called income tax Conventions) are a crucial consideration for many foreign investors in the United States. They are an important consideration for all foreign investors.

Paul Brundage; Adam Starchild

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Earned Income Tax Credit: An Incentive to Rural Employment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) enacted in 1975 to help offset Social Security taxes for low-income families with children. The ... with an increased incentive to work. The tax

Sheila Mammen; Frances C. Lawrence; Jaerim Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the Gross-Neveu model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the occurrence of spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the massive, D-dimensional, Gross-Neveu model with compactified spatial dimensions.

Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Malbouisson, A. P. C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

APPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY Pedro Correia and George Gross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS Pedro Correia and George Gross Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

Gross, George

347

SPPI ORIGINAL PAPER October 11, 2011 GROSS ERRORS IN THE IPCC-AR4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPPI ORIGINAL PAPER October 11, 2011 GROSS ERRORS IN THE IPCC-AR4 REPORT REGARDING PAST & FUTURE FIGURE AND GEORGE WILL QUOTE.....................

Gray, William

348

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

349

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 114,592 111,779 113,921 114,129 109,438 114,219 1991-2013 From Gas Wells

350

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

351

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 114,382 103,384 110,472 103,769 106,596 102,840 1997-2013 From Gas Wells

352

New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

353

Essays on Health Insurance, Household Liquidity, and the Demand for Medical Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earned Income Tax Credit . . . . . . . . . 2.2.2 InsuranceCovered? The Earned Income Tax Credit, Liquidity, and HealthEarned Income Tax Credit . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.2 Changes

Niedzwiecki, Matthew John

354

The Travel Behavior of Immigrants and Race/Ethnicity Groups: An Analysis of the 2001 National Household Transportation Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the average household size for Hispanic respondents isper year, while households of black and Hispanic respondentsHispanic” versus “settled” and native born residents. Vehicle ownership is highly correlated with mode choice as households

Handy, Susan L; Tal, Gil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 32.8 17.2 307 13.4 16.1 14.2 2.0 21.3 14.1 Race of Householder White... 149.5 78.3 1,774 77.6...

356

THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas.46]. The cost of these devices was also statistically significant. Keywords: electricity use; energy efficiency the Canadian Industrial Energy End Use Data and Analysis (CIEEDAC) for their financial support made possible

357

Household Segmentation in Food Insecurity and Soil Improving Practices in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secure household, and households farming medium quality soil increase the probability of adopting soil improving practices. Application of chemical fertilizers, commercial seeds, and pesticides, along with operating under a seasonal lease tenure...

Nata, Jifar T

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a methodology for conducting logistic regression modeling of trip and household information obtained from household travel surveys and vehicle trip information obtained from global positioning systems (GPS) to better understand...

Forrest, Timothy Lee

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Except for housing, transportation was the largest single expenditure for the average American household in 2010. The average household spends more on transportation in a year than on food. Vehicle...

360

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles...

362

A Comparison of Household Budget Allocation Patterns Between Hispanic Americans and Non-Hispanic White Americans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The budget allocation patterns of Hispanic versus non-Hispanic White households are examined. Annual household expenditure data from 1980 to 1992 are ... Index (1990). The sample includes 588 Hispanic and 8,444 n...

Jessie X. Fan; Virginia Solis Zuiker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The household production function approach to valuing climate: the case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In fact ours is not the first attempt to use the household production function technique empirically to estimate the ... climate and the impact of climate change on households. But our analysis uses repeated cros...

David Maddison; Katrin Rehdanz; Daiju Narita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effectiveness and limitations of the Earned Income Tax Credit for reducing child poverty in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on international comparisons, the United States has a high child poverty rate. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which provides a tax benefit to low-income working households and was expanded after the 1990s welfare reform, is currently this country's largest cash transfer program for low-income families with children. This article examines the historical components of the EITC. We then analyze the program's child poverty reduction effectiveness by comparing the percent and percentage point declines in the child poverty rate accounted for by the EITC benefit for six years between 1996 and 2005. Figures for the first four years were drawn from previous studies, while figures for the final two years were estimated with a U.S. Census Bureau calculator. All of the analyses used Current Population Survey data. We determined that the percent decline in the child poverty rate attributed to the EITC generally increased during this period (highest percent was 19.5 in 2005), while the percentage point decline remained relatively stable. We then critically examine four poverty reduction assumptions of the EITC that limit its ability to further reduce child poverty and draw social policy implications.

Mary Keegan Eamon; Chi-Fang Wu; Saijun Zhang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Total: $1,100 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation: full incremental cost above the appropriate baseline Heat Pumps: $400 Central AC: $400 Refrigerator: $200 Lighting: $100 Provider Empire District Electric Empire District Electric offers rebates for the utilization of energy efficient measures and appliances in new, low-income homes. Rebates are

366

The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Labor Supply of Married Couples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Income and Welfare,"1995). "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Transfer Programs:to the Earned Income Tax Credit." Quarterly Journal of

Eissa, Nada; Hoynes, Hilary Williamson

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) Income Tax Capital Credit (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The purpose of this law is to create jobs and to stimulate business and economic growth in the state by providing an income tax capital credit for approved projects. The Income Tax Capital Credit is a credit of five percent (5%) of the capital costs of a qualifying project offered by the Alabama Department of Revenue. The credits is applied to the Alabama income tax liability or financial institution excise tax generated by the project income, each year for 20 years. This credit cannot be carried forward or

368

Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance. Introduction Household care products, such as cleaning products and air fresheners, are frequently used

Leistikow, Bruce N.

369

6 Multicomponent Density-Functional Theory R. van Leeuwen and E.K.U. Gross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Multicomponent Density-Functional Theory R. van Leeuwen and E.K.U. Gross 6.1 Introduction fields. Our goal is to set up a time-dependent multicomponent density-functional theory (TDMCDFT.K.U. Gross: Multicomponent Density-Functional Theory, Lect. Notes Phys. 706, 93­106 (2006) DOI 10

Gross, E.K.U.

370

Other incarnations of the Gross-Pitaevskii dark soliton Indubala I Satija 1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other incarnations of the Gross-Pitaevskii dark soliton Indubala I Satija 1,2 and Radha Balakrishnan3 1 Department of Physics, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 2 National Institute 600113, India (Dated: May 31, 2010) We show that the dark soliton of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE

Satija, Indu

371

The Gross-Pitaevskii Soliton: Relating Weakly and Strongly Repulsive Bosonic condensates and the magnetic soliton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gross-Pitaevskii Soliton: Relating Weakly and Strongly Repulsive Bosonic condensates and the magnetic soliton Indubala I Satija 1,2 and Radha Balakrishnan3 1 Department of Physics, George Mason soliton of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) that describes the Bose-Einstein con- densate (BEC) density

Satija, Indu

372

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

373

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

374

Effects of financial developments and income on energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extending Sadorsky (2010), this paper focuses on nonlinear effects of financial development and income on energy consumption. Utilizing five alternative measures of financial development, it employs a panel threshold regression approach to reexamine the effect of financial development and income on energy consumption. The analysis relies on a sample of 53 countries for the period 1999–2008, showing a single-threshold effect on energy consumption when private credit, domestic credit, value of traded stocks, and stock market turnover are used as financial development indicators. It implies that the sample can be split into two regimes: high income, and non-high income. Energy consumption increases with income in emerging market and developing economies, while in advanced economies energy consumption increases with income beyond a point at which the economy achieves a threshold level of income. In addition, in the non–high income regime, energy consumption increases with financial development when both private and domestic credit are used as financial development indicators. However, when the value of traded stocks and stock market turnover are used as financial development indicators, it slightly declines with financial development in advanced economies, especially in high-income countries, but increases in the higher income countries of emerging market and developing economies.

Shu-Chen Chang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Day) Day) Process: Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Dist. Units Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Operating Capacity Idle Operable Capacity Operable Utilization Rate Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 15,283 15,709 16,327 16,490 16,306 16,162 1985-2013 PADD 1 1,134 1,188 1,178 1,142 1,122 1,130 1985-2013 East Coast 1,077 1,103 1,080 1,058 1,031 1,032 1985-2013 Appalachian No. 1 57 85 98 84 90 97 1985-2013 PADD 2 3,151 3,087 3,336 3,572 3,538 3,420 1985-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 2,044 1,947 2,069 2,299 2,330 2,266 1985-2013

376

Note on gross capital formation and R&D expenditure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Companies often consider the cost of R&D projects (especially salaries paid to R&D personnel) as part of their current expenses. Companies continue to do this practice even without exactly specifying what they mean by R&D project costs. This practice is misleading because spending on research is undeniably a form of fixed capital investment, even more so than the item that economists consider as the epitome of fixed capital investment â?? purchase of machinery. The dynamics of the possible relationship between investment in research and investment in machinery is that during times of economic expansion, firms tend to increase their investment in research to come up with product innovations capable of exploiting increasing effectual demand. Over time, this investment results in the emergence of the direct relationship between expense on industrial R&D and the business cycle. We tested this hypothesis both in Italy and in the USA. Our experiments are based on OECD statistics, referring to R&D spending from 1987 to 1999, and on the magnitude 'Gross Capital Formation' in the manufacturing industry. We chose to represent our conjecture about a causal relationship between investment cycle and R&D expenditure econometrically.

Mario De Marchi; Maurizio Rocchi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Gross Withdrawals 4,430,466 4,839,942 5,225,005 5,864,402 6,958,125 8,225,321 1991-2012 From Gas Wells 2,480,211 2,613,139 2,535,642 2,523,173 1991-2010 From Oil Wells 525,280 534,253 648,906 691,643 1991-2010 From Shale Gas Wells 569,502 796,138 1,146,821 1,787,965 2007-2010 From Coalbed Wells 855,473 896,412 893,636 861,620 2002-2010 Repressuring 48,011 51,781 43,376 45,994 1991-2010 Vented and Flared 32,600 52,667 55,544 53,950 1991-2010 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 223,711 282,651 291,611 352,304 1994-2010

378

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B : E S T I M AT I O N M E T H O D O L O G I E S APPENDIX B A P P E N D I X B ESTIMATION METHODOLOGIES INTRODUCTION The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) is the nation's inventory of local and long distance travel, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Between April 2001 and May 2002, roughly 26 thousand households 41 were interviewed about their travel, based on the use of over 53 thousand vehicles. Using confidential data collected during those interviews, coupled with EIA's retail fuel prices, external data sources of test 42 fuel economy, and internal procedures for modifying test fuel economy to on-road, in-use fuel economy, EIA has extended this inventory to include the energy used for travel, thereby continuing a data series that was discontinued by EIA in 1994. This appendix presents the methods used for each eligible sampled

379

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices

380

RECS Data Show Decreased Energy Consumption per Household  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009 based on RECS. This continues the downward trend in average residential energy consumption of the last 30 years. Despite increases in the number and the average size of homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION/HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's Note Estimates of gallons of fuel consumed, type of fuel used, price paid for fuel, and fuel economy are based on data imputed by EIA, using vehicle characteristics and vehicle-miles traveled data collected during the interview process for the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Rather than obtaining that information directly from fuel purchase diaries, EIA exploited its experience and expertise with modeling techniques for transportation studies, filling missing and uncollected data with information reported to other federal agencies, as described in Appendices B and C of this report.

382

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One-person households 5) Hispanic households 6) Low-incomewhite, more Hispanic, higher annual household income (?$white, more Hispanic, higher annual household income (?$

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Unraveling the Complexity of Land Use and Travel Behavior Relationships: A Four-Part Quantitative Case Study of the South Bay Area of Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Female Hispanic African-American Asian Household income 35-Female Hispanic African-American Asian Household income 35-Female Hispanic African-American Asian Household income 35-

Joh, Kenneth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Analysis of Self-Determination and Transition Planning in Relation to Postsecondary Outcomes for Students with Emotional Disturbances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

African-American Hispanic Other Household income $25,000 orFemale White Hispanic Moderate household income HighFemale White Hispanic Moderate household income High

Sanford, Christopher Brett

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Long-term behaviour of baled household waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was carried out at the laboratory scale (approximately 15 l) and using real baled waste of industrial dimensions (about 1 m3), in order to assess the long-term behaviour of baled household waste. The laboratory assays were carried out with real household waste which was fractioned on site, reconstituted in the laboratory and then compacted into 15 l airtight containers (unless stated otherwise). These containers were incubated under different experimental conditions at a constant temperature (28°C). Three assays were conducted over 34 months and two others over 27 months. For the assays incubated in conditions simulating those of real baled waste (confined medium, with no aeration or water flow), a very low microbial activity was observed. The assay incubated in the same conditions but with slight aeration during the first three months in order to simulate imperfectly airtight wrapping, revealed biodegradation which started in a significant manner after 800 days of incubation. The evolution of two real wrapped bales each containing 900 kg of household waste was monitored over 8 months. These bales were produced industrially, one in July 97 and the other in July 98 at the incinerator plant at Agde (France). The bales were then stored outside at the laboratory location and their evolution was monitored mainly by biogas analysis and temperature measurement. No methane formation was observed, revealing the absence of anaerobic biodegradation, thus confirming the laboratory assays.

Fabian Robles-Mart??nez; Rémy Gourdon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: 500 Integrated Space and Water Heating System: 900 Electronic Programmable Set-Back Thermostat: 100 Water Heater: 100 Drain Water Heat Recovery Device: 300 Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources is now offering rebates for non-profits servicing low-income communities. New construction organizations can take advantage of rebates for efficient technologies if the low-income homes are

387

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

388

Price, costs and income trends for New Zealand pastoral farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation of inflationary adjusted historical price trends of New Zealand pastoral farmers??? income and expenses over the past thirty years was investigated . The… (more)

Aitken, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Denver Energy Challenge- Serving Moderate Income Residents  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides an overview of the Denver Energy Challenge and how services were expanded to moderate income residents including challenges and next steps.

390

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 5,335 4,954 5,465 5,228 5,405 5,163 4,817 5,652 5,165 5,347 4,814 5,420 2004 5,684 5,278 5,822 5,570 5,758 5,500 5,132 6,022 5,502 5,697 5,129 5,774 2005 5,889 5,469 6,033 5,771 5,967 5,699 5,318 6,240 5,702 5,903 5,315 5,983 2006 65,302 59,484 66,007 63,071 65,663 63,437 65,249 65,951 62,242 65,271 63,215 64,841 2007 72,657 65,625 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 2008 75,926 71,027 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926

391

,"US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_rusf_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_rusf_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:21 AM"

392

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r5f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r5f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

393

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO )ATE COMPLETED: ACTION NUMBER: I ! I I DOCUMENT CONTROL DATE INITIALS DATA BASE: ACTION LOG: FILED: To : Doug Tonkay, OTS Decen From: MIchele Landis, dRW Subject: Draft report ~ Result= of the Radiologic; Former Ore Storage Site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania Attached is one copy of the draft report. PIE provide your comments to me by January 16, 1990. tlichele Landis ,9, 1989 "ey at the review and Results of the Radiological SJrvey at the Former Ore S&age Site, Palmerton, PennsylvLnia (PPOOI) J. L Quikd J. W. Cdchdr W. D. &rei ! I : HEALTH AND t5UEI-Y RESEARCH DMSi Waste Management Research and Development Prc (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHOOl) RESULTS OF 'I-HE RADIOLOGICAL SURV

394

The Earned Income Tax Credit and abortion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a panel of states between 1975 and 2005, I examine the relationship between the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and abortion. Results suggest that increases in the EITC are associated with reductions in the overall abortion rate. Specifically, a $1000 increase in the maximum credit is associated with a 7.6% decrease in the overall abortion rate. This effect implies a reduction of approximately 1.6 abortions per 1000 women of childbearing age. I also provide evidence that the reduction in abortions is attributable to a drop in pregnancies, not an increase in the number of births. In other words, women appear to respond to increases in EITC generosity by altering sexual behavior, rather than shifting abortion–birth decisions after a pregnancy occurs.

Chris M. Herbst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

Dixon, Sherry L. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)], E-mail: sdixon@nchh.org; Fowler, Cecile [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Martinez, Yolanda [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Jacobs, David E. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 475,614 500,196 1993...

397

Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic Product, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation plays a major role in the U.S. economy. About 10% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only...

398

Fact #768: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

downs. Those ups and downs are also reflected in the change in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over time which shows a trend similar to the vehicle sales trend. Vehicle sales have...

399

Affecting the Gross Cooling Power of a Pulse Tube Cryocooler with Mass Flow Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To increase the cooling capacity of a pulse tube cryocooler the ... For a given pulse tube volume the gross cooling power is limited. Since the cooling effect originates from the phase shift angle ... we present ...

A. Waldauf; T. Schmauder; M. Thürk; P. Seidel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Is the American Dream Still Attainable? Income Inequality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lost the greatest amount of wealth in absolute terms, but the 50th percentile lost the highest percentage of their wealth. And Now The wealthiest largely have recovered wealth lost in the recession: movement of children above the education, occupation, income, and assets of their parents Capital Income

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSNATIONAL TERRORISM AMONG COUNTRIES BY INCOME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSNATIONAL TERRORISM AMONG COUNTRIES BY INCOME CLASSES AND GEOGRAPHY AFTER 9 and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events University of Southern California Los Angeles, California 3710 Mc;DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSNATIONAL TERRORISM AMONG COUNTRIES BY INCOME CLASSES AND GEOGRAPHY AFTER 9/11 by Walter

Wang, Hai

402

Analysis of historical gross gamma logging data from BY tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gross gamma ray logs, recorded from January 1975 through mid-year 1994 as part of the Single-Shell Tank Farm Dry Well Surveillance Program, have been reanalyzed for the BY tank farm to locate the presence of mobile radionuclides in the subsurface. This report presents the BY tank farm gross gamma ray data in such a way as to assist others in their study of vadose zone mechanisms.

MYERS, D.A.

1999-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Analysis of historical gross gamma logging data from BX tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gross gamma ray logs, recorded from January 1975 through mid-year 1994 as part of the Single-Shell Tank Farm Dry Well Surveillance Program, have been reanalyzed for the BX tank farm to locate the presence of mobile radionuclides in the subsurface. This report presents the BX tank farm gross gamma ray data in such a way as to assist others in their study of vadose zone mechanism.

MYERS, D.A.

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

Comparative evaluation of crop water use efficiency, economic analysis and net household profit simulation in arid Northwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Decreasing water availability for agricultural production has prompted researchers to focus on comparing and evaluating water use efficiency (WUE) of different crops in various water management strategies. A field survey was conducted to investigate the amount of irrigation water, inputs and yields of eight crops (spring wheat, maize, onion, cotton, hot pepper, sunflower, melons and fennel) grown under furrow irrigation systems in an arid region, Minqin county, Northwestern China (NWC). Previous publications reporting crop WUE were identified and major statistics of evapotranspiration (ET), yield (Y) and WUE were calculated for each crop. By comparing with literature reporting, the mean WUE of onion (8.71 kg m?3), cotton (0.56 kg m?3), sunflower seed (0.78 kg m?3) and fennel (0.51 kg m?3) grown in NWC were at the same high levels; while WUE of wheat (0.87 kg m?3) and maize (1.17 kg m?3) were slightly lower and WUE of hot pepper (2.68 kg m?3) and melons (3.27 kg m?3) were extremely low. Great potential of saving water could be achieved to realize increased or ideal WUE values for crops in NWC. The total net profit per household of cotton (1606.62 $ hh?1) was significantly larger and of onion (?3132.30 $ hh?1) significantly lower than that of other crops. Cotton, sunflower seed, melons and hot pepper had significantly higher crop production values per unit water than other crops, 0.39 $ m?3, 0.36 $ m?3, 0.32 $ m?3 and 0.31 $ m?3, respectively. The net household profits were significantly higher when excluding onion production for its extremely low price in 2011. With simulation based on different combinations of onion production and increase of migrant workers, the average net household profit could be optimized to provide benefits to local farmers and policy makers regarding income increase and rural policy design.

Yubing Fan; Chenggang Wang; Zhibiao Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: January 5, 1: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301: January 5, 2004 Number of Household Vehicles has Grown Significantly on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #301:

406

Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit Residential Renewable Energy Income Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 1,000 Program Info Start Date 1979 State Massachusetts Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 15% Provider Massachusetts Department of Revenue Massachusetts allows a 15% credit -- up to $1,000 -- against the state income tax for the net expenditure* of a renewable-energy system (including installation costs) installed on an individual's primary residence. If the credit amount is greater than a resident's income tax liability, the excess credit amount may be carried forward to the next succeeding year for

407

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

408

Greenhouse Gas Implications of Household Energy Technology in Kenya  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3050, Risk, Resource, and Environmental Management Division, Resources for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, and Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7320 ... Household energy policy is further complicated because charcoal markets in many sub-Saharan African countries operate within a complex political economy that can be hard to characterize and still more difficult to regulate. ... While charcoal consumption carries a larger burden of GHG emissions than firewood use, it also has more potential to attract investment in GHG mitigation activities. ...

Rob Bailis; Majid Ezzati; Daniel M. Kammen

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils for household refrigerator systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to industry concerns about the successful employment of hydrofluorocarbon-immiscible hydrocarbon oils in refrigeration systems, enhanced naphthenic refrigeration oils have been developed. These products have been designed to be more dispersible with hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, such as R-134a, in order to facilitate lubricant return to the compressor and to ensure proper energy efficiency of the system. Bench tests and system performance evaluations indicate the feasibility of these oils for use in household refrigeration applications. Results of these evaluations are compared with those obtained with polyol esters and typical naphthenic mineral oils employed in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigeration applications.

Reyes-Gavilan, J.L.; Flak, G.T.; Tritcak, T.R. [Witco Corp., Oakland, NJ (United States); Barbour, C.B. [Americold, Cullman, AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4...

411

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in 10 Household Automobile Ownership Rates:hauseltoldr lacking automobiles were mmit like! ) to be leftWithout 3 Access to an Automobile. Top Ten Metropolitan

Raphael, S; Berube, A; Deakin, Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology… (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Household environmental monitoring a strategy to help homeowners reduce their environmental impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A group of 20 households was established to study whether we can motivate environmentally sustainable behaviour by providing homeowners with a clear picture of their impact, tangible reasons for improvement, and tailored solutions to follow. Reports for each household compared heating fuel, electricity, water, vehicle fuel/waste generation within the group and recommended cost-effective measures to reduce consumption. On average, 26% of the recommended measures were implemented, resulting in an estimated greenhouse gas reduction of about 2 tonnes per household. Wide variations were found between households, demonstrating the potential to reduce environmental impact through lifestyle, conservation, and energy conscious retrofits.

Jane Thompson; Magda Goemans; Peter C. Goemans; Andrzej Wisniowski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wealth: Determinants of Savings Net Worth and Housing Net Worth of Pre-Retired Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to determine effects of household members' characteristics, financial resources, and attitude ... Subsamples of White respondents, Black respondents, and Hispanic respondents were...

Satomi Wakita; Vicki Schram Fitzsimmons…

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Environmental attitudes and household consumption: an ambiguous relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article analyses the relationship between environmental attitudes and energy use in the home and for transport by Norwegian households. Quantitative surveys were used to find statistical correlations, and qualitative analyses to reveal mechanisms that influence the ability to behave in an environmentally friendly way. Three theses about attitudes, mechanisms and household consumption are presented. Firstly, a desire to project an environmentally friendly image has little influence on energy use in the home and for transport. Secondly, a sense of powerlessness prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use in the home and for everyday transport. Thirdly, a desire to self-indulge prevents people from translating positive environmental attitudes into low energy use for long distance leisure travel. These results have important implications for environmental policy. Public information and awareness campaigns can give consumers information on how to behave in an environmentally responsible way, but tend only to influence categories of consumption with little environmental impact. Structural change can be used to mitigate the effect of the sense of powerlessness and encourage environmentally friendly behaviour, but the desire to self-indulge is much more difficult to deal with.

Erling Holden; Kristin Linnerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 2005 Average Energy Expenditures per Household Member and per Square Foot, by Weatherization Eligibility (2010) Members Hhold Hhold Total U.S. Households 780 2.6 0.86 Federally...

420

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) Income Tax Credits Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Personal Tax Incentives Corporate Tax Incentive Rebate Program Provider Department of Economic Develoment There are multiple tax credit programs for businesses new to Arkansas. Additionally, there are investment tax credit programs, job creation incentives, discretionary incentives, and targeted business incentives,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/eceee/2009/Panel_3/3.049/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/measurement-and-verification-low-inco Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report presents results from Brazilian electric utilities evaluation

422

Maternal work conditions, socioeconomic and educational status, and vaccination of children: A community-based household survey in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective This study examined how maternal work-related factors, including the availability of paid maternal leave, affect childhood vaccination status. Relatively little is known about the association between the employment status of mothers and the vaccination status of their children. Method We examined data from the Japanese Study on Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood (J-SHINE), an ongoing epidemiologic household panel study in Japan. We used surveys taken in 2010–2011 in this study. Results We found that mothers who returned to work after giving birth were much less likely to follow recommended vaccine schedules for their children compared with mothers who stayed at home and those who had left the workforce by the time of childbirth. However, taking parental leave significantly reduced the risk of not being up-to-date with the vaccination schedule at 36 months of age. We also found that children whose mother was younger and less educated, and those from an economically deprived family were at a high risk of not being up-to-date with the vaccination status at 36 months of age. Conclusion Because vaccination is free and widely available in Japan, our findings indicate that provision of free vaccinations is not sufficient to achieve high vaccination rates.

Michiko Ueda; Naoki Kondo; Misato Takada; Hideki Hashimoto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Risk assessment of loss of structural integrity of a floating production platform due to gross errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last years The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, as well as Statoil, has put increased focus on how gross errors related to structural integrity are influencing the safety of offshore installations. Also, the loss of the P36, a floating platform outside Brazil in 2001, emphasised the importance to control gross errors in large projects. On this basis, a work to assess the risk of loss of the structural integrity of the Kristin platform, during operation, due to failure from gross errors was initiated. The Kristin platform is a permanently moored ring-pontoon semi-submersible production unit planned to be placed in the south-west part of Haltenbanken area in the North Sea in 2005. The water depth at the site is approximately 315 m. The objective of this work was to quantify the risk contribution from gross errors related to structural integrity and to pinpoint the most critical items that may govern the probability of gross error for the Kristin platform. Some of the main findings from this work are presented in this paper.

Inge Lotsberg; Odd Olufsen; Gunnar Solland; Jan Inge Dalane; Sverre Haver

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery...

Sisk, Cheree L.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

425

Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. Given China's rich coal resources, the production and use of coal-derived DME as a cooking fuelDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

426

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation's aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area's populations that lacked access to an automobile for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

427

The Driving Internal Beliefs of Household Internet Adoption among Jordanians and the Role of Cultural Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a comprehensive model for the determinants of household Internet adoption through identifying the driving internal beliefs of individuals and the effect of cultural values on behavioral intention to ... Keywords: Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions, Household Internet Adoption, Internal Beliefs, Micro Cultural Level, Perceived Risks, Technology Acceptance Model

Amin A. Shaqrah; Khaled Saleh Al Omoush; Raed Musbah Alqirem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Journal: Ecological Applications1 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;1 Journal: Ecological Applications1 2 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household Resources Center, Saint Paul, MN 551089 3 University of Minnesota, Department of Ecology, Evolution with several29 components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption,30

Minnesota, University of

430

Flame Retardant Transfers from U.S. Households (Dust and Laundry Wastewater) to the Aquatic Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytes were ionized by APPI; dopant (acetone) was introduced (150 ?L/min) by a liquid chromatography pump (LC-20AD, Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan). ... We collected repeat dust samples from 292 households in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study during two sampling rounds (from 2001 to 2007 and during 2010) using household vacuum cleaners and measured 22 PBDEs using high resoln. ...

Erika D. Schreder; Mark J. La Guardia

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

Leistikow, Bruce N.

432

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) EmPOWER Maryland Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source EmPOWER Maryland State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Direct installation, no cost to the recipient Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some improvements that might be supported under this program as detailed on the program web site. Not all potentially eligible improvements will be

433

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy of Applicants for and Recipients of Services Amending regulations to require all States and other service providers that participate in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) to treat all requests for information concerning applicants and recipients of WAP funds in a manner consistent with the Federal government's treatment of information requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, including the privacy protections contained in Exemption (b)(6) of the FOIA, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6). Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons: Maintaining the Privacy

434

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Evaporative Cooling: $200-$1000/unit Saver's Switch A/C Cycling: $20/ton of enrolled air conditioning Refrigerator Recycling: $75 CFLs: $1/bulb LED's: $10/bulb

435

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell After a harvest is over, crops can be sold, shipped, canned or consumed. But what happens to the parts of the crops that are inedible-the corn stover, stalks or cobs? Selling crop residues for bioenergy could provide farmers with an extra source of income. Yet, leaving some residue on the fields helps reduce soil erosion and maintain healthy levels of soil carbon and other nutrients. So how can land managers find this balance? Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing the Residue Removal Tool -- new software designed to simulate sustainability criteria -- to help find this balance of what to remove and what to leave behind. The software will

436

The impact of oil prices on income and energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major determinant of real income growth in Korea is real oil prices, followed by money supply, exchange rates, ... longer horizon, the effects of exchange rates, oil prices, government spending, and money sup...

Young U. Glasure; Aie-Rie Lee

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

438

Workgroup 3: Directing EEI to Low Income Name Affiliation Co...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: Directing EEI to Low Income Name Affiliation Co-Chairs Boyd Wilson BPA Eugene Rosolie Cowlitz Participants Bo Downen PPC Brent Barclay BPA Carrie Nelson BPA Christina Zamora...

439

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C : Q U A L I T Y O F T H E D ATA APPENDIX C A P P E N D I X C QUALITY OF THE DATA INTRODUCTION This section discusses several issues relating to the quality of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. In particular, the focus of our discussion is on the quality of specific data items, such as the fuel economy and fuel type, that were imputed to the NHTS via a cold-decking imputation procedure. This imputation procedure used vehicle-level information from the NHTSA Corporate Average Fuel Economy files for model year's 1978 through 2001. It is nearly impossible to quantify directly the quality of this imputation procedure because NHTS does not collect the necessary fuel economy information for comparison. At best, we have indirect evidence on the quality of our

440

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy? June 18, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some people-be they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even yourself-just seem to need some extra reminders to take simple energy-saving steps. How do you encourage everyone in your household to save energy? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

442

Lifestyle change and energy use in Japan: Household equipment and energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy use in the Japanese residential sector has more than doubled (on a per-household basis) during the post-war period. Important factors contributing to the increase include changes in the types of housing built, heating, cooling, water-heating equipment, and other appliances. In this paper, the developments of household equipment and living conditions in Japan are described, from their 1950s state to the present. Trends in energy consumption by fuel types and end uses are reviewed over the same period. The past trends are combined with expectations for future developments in household equipment and quality, as well as with international comparisons of household-energy use, to predict further increases in household-energy consumption. The results indicate the importance of a renewed emphasis on energy efficiency in the residential sector.

Hidetoshi Nakagami

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r44f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r44f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

444

,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_r19f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1060_r19f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:18 AM"

445

Modeling household adoption of earthquake hazard adjustments: a longitudinal panel study of Southern California and Western Washington residents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research, aimed at advancing the theory of environmental hazard adjustment processes by contrasting households from three cities in a high seismic hazard area with households from three other cities in a moderate seismic hazard area...

Arlikatti, Sudha S

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

447

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia APRIL 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

448

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

449

Community Rating, Cross Subsidies and Underinsurance: Why so many Households in Japan do not Purchase Earthquake Insurance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan is famous for its earthquakes. According to ... survey, however, only 20% of Japanese households purchased an earthquake insurance policy in 2005. Why do so many households in Japan not purchase earthquake ...

Michio Naoi; Miki Seko; Kazuto Sumita

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Do single mothers in the United States use the Earned Income Tax Credit to reduce unsecured debt?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable credit for low-income workers mainly targeted at...

H. Luke Shaefer; Xiaoqing Song…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program provides free tax help to people with income under $58,000.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Tax Help The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program provides free tax help to people 28 March 6 March 20 March 27 April 3 Thursday March 1 March 29 Taxpayers interested in free help

Lawrence, Rick L.

452

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 169,219 206,490 1980's 252,996 235,421 245,626 147,330 111,482 107,543 114,501 98,050 97,545 110,901 1990's 108,404 98,493 78,263 79,234 84,573 63,181 63,340 64,528 60,298 48,918 2000's 41,195 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785 29,229 46,786 37,811 2010's 28,574 23,791 16,506 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

453

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 72,813 71,946 1980's 63,355 71,477 66,852 68,776 68,315 62,454 63,007 69,656 101,440 122,595 1990's 144,064 171,665 216,377 233,198 224,301 113,552 126,051 123,854 133,111 125,841 2000's 263,958 262,937 293,580 322,010 334,125 380,568 354,816 374,204 388,188 357,490 2010's 370,148 364,702 307,306 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

454

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 249,255 554,076 1980's 696,181 775,351 875,204 844,711 909,778 834,870 1,054,537 1,232,554 1,278,548 1,346,940 1990's 1,447,164 1,396,001 1,332,883 1,276,099 1,308,154 1,283,493 1,338,413 1,286,539 1,180,967 1,157,128 2000's 1,136,062 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

455

Density-Functional Theory for Triplet Superconductors K. Capelle E.K.U. Gross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density-Functional Theory for Triplet Superconductors K. Capelle E.K.U. Gross Institut f Introduction The purpose of this work is to generalize the density-functional theory (DFT) for superur Theoretische Physik Universitat Wurzburg Am Hubland D-97074 Wurzburg Germany Abstract The density-functional

Gross, E.K.U.

456

Electronic Structure: Density Functional Theory S. Kurth, M. A. L. Marques, and E. K. U. Gross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Structure: Density Functional Theory S. Kurth, M. A. L. Marques, and E. K. U. Gross: July 5, 2003) PACS numbers: 71.15.Mb, 31.15.Ew 1 #12;I. INTRODUCTION Density functional theory (DFT systems becomes prohibitive. A different approach is taken in density functional theory where, instead

Gross, E.K.U.

457

Time-dependent Density Functional Theory Miguel A. L. Marques and E. K. U. Gross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-dependent Density Functional Theory Miguel A. L. Marques and E. K. U. Gross 1 Introduction Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) extends the basic ideas of ground-state density-functional is the one-body electron density, n(r, t). The advantages are clear: The many-body wave-function, a function

Wu, Zhigang

458

Copyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wholesale electricity industry including · the structure of wholesale energy markets; · transmissionCopyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S. G a robust wholesale market via the so-called standard design (SMD) proposed rule making. The SMD was a bold

459

Math 151-2 INTRODUCTION TO MATLAB L. J. Gross -August 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 151-2 INTRODUCTION TO MATLAB L. J. Gross - August 1995 This is a very basic introduction to the elements of MATLAB that will be used in the early part of this course. A much more complete description is available for purchase (The Student Edition of MATLAB for MS-DOS or the version for Windows), however

Gross, Louis J.

460

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by 2013 Priority to Benefit Square Feet Feet Project (Proj. Cost/ Recommended reference No Project Title Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 from Projects (NASF) (GSF) Cost GSF) Date/Rec No. 1 UTILITIES

Slatton, Clint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by 2014 Priority to Benefit Square Feet Feet Project (Proj. Cost/ Recommended reference No Project Title Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 from Projects (NASF) (GSF) Cost GSF) Date/Rec No. 1 UTILITIES

Slatton, Clint

462

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECO-ELIGIBLE PROJECT REQUESTS Academic or Net Gross Project Cost Educational Approved by 2015 Priority to Benefit Square Feet Feet Project (Proj. Cost/ Recommended reference No Project Title Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 from Projects (NASF) (GSF) Cost GSF) Date/Rec No. 1 UTILITIES

Slatton, Clint

463

Species independence of mutual information in coding and noncoding DNA Ivo Grosse,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- isms, and the goal of genome projects is to uncover that genetic information. Hence, genomes of many. Mutual information function, I(k), of human coding thin line and noncoding thick line DNA, from GenSpecies independence of mutual information in coding and noncoding DNA Ivo Grosse,1 Hanspeter

Stanley, H. Eugene

464

Flow pattern and hydraulic performance of the REDAC Gross Pollutant Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the flow pattern and hydraulic performance of a Gross Pollutant Trap (GPT), designed and patented by River Engineering and Drainage Research Centre (REDAC) at Universiti Sains Malaysia. Stormwater problems have become more severe due to the increase in urbanization. The increase in the amount of impervious surface in urban areas produces more stormwater runoff, that is carried to the receiving bodies of water. The higher runoff volume also carries more pollutants (gross pollutants, sediments, and nutrients) from the contributing catchment area. Coarse sediments transported by stormwater runoff have negative effects on the receiving body of water and the aquatic environment by covering up aquatic habitats and clogging waterways. One of the challenges in designing a GPT for urban stormwater drainage is providing effective trapping without hindering the hydraulic function of the channel, thus, avoiding overspill or flooding. The current study presents a GPT design to meet these specific requirements of trapping efficiency and hydraulic function. The current GPT overcame the common problem of overspilling of gross pollutants in GPT by the introduction of additional overspill compartments that can handle excessive runoff and improve pollutant trapping in higher flow conditions. In laboratory testing, the prototype GPT was capable of achieving good trapping efficiency (over 80% for gross pollutants and over 60% for coarse sediments) without causing any overspill.

Aminuddin Ab Ghani; H.Md. Azamathulla; Tze Liang Lau; C.H. Ravikanth; Nor Azazi Zakaria; Cheng Siang Leow; Mohd Azlan Mohd Yusof

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The relationship between incomes and age of heads of households viewed locally as being in poverty in a twelve-county area of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the benefits Gf lligle! cFEucation wE ion yI . r!o. ed Ice to urlcez|, ake s, IFastF. r's dcg cee p egress ano. gave Ice he nee!3ed -'ncentive tc cos!cl. . +e tEd s +3!esf s. Sincere grr, i;ituic 3 s !, '-, coded to ry Lwo daugntcr, l'ichelle and !Ce, I'3...

Martin, Marsha Pyle

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Correlation between Median Household Income and LEED Sustainable Site Criteria for Public Transportation Access and a Regression Model Predicting Appraised Unit Value of Unimproved Parcels in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, it does not provide any direct economic incentives to the owners and developers. An early research suggested that there was a significant correlation between appraised unit value of a parcel and LEED sustainable site criteria for public...

Ji, Qundi

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

Spreading the wealth: The effect of the distribution of income and race/ethnicity across households and neighborhoods on city crime trajectories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sociological Review 45:3-32. Kakwani, N. C. and N. Podder.and Goldberger, 1970; Kakwani and Podder, 1976), which

Hipp, John R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Income distribution dependence of poverty measure: A theoretical analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a modified deprivation (or poverty) function, in this paper, we theoretically study the changes in poverty with respect to the ‘global’ mean and variance of the income distribution using Indian survey data. We show that when the income obeys a log-normal distribution, a rising mean income generally indicates a reduction in poverty while an increase in the variance of the income distribution increases poverty. This altruistic view for a developing economy, however, is not tenable anymore once the poverty index is found to follow a pareto distribution. Here although a rising mean income indicates a reduction in poverty, due to the presence of an inflexion point in the poverty function, there is a critical value of the variance below which poverty decreases with increasing variance while beyond this value, poverty undergoes a steep increase followed by a decrease with respect to higher variance. Identifying this inflexion point as the poverty line, we show that the pareto poverty function satisfies all three standard axioms of a poverty index [N.C. Kakwani, Econometrica 43 (1980) 437; A.K. Sen, Econometrica 44 (1976) 219] whereas the log-normal distribution falls short of this requisite. Following these results, we make quantitative predictions to correlate a developing with a developed economy.

Amit K. Chattopadhyay; Sushanta K. Mallick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Household equipment of Canadians -- features of the 1993 stock and the 1994 and 1995 purchases: Analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the results of three surveys that collected information on household equipment: The 1994 and 1995 Household Equipment Surveys and the 1993 Survey of Household Energy Use. The goal of the report is to highlight the features of energy-consuming equipment bought by Canadian households in 1994 and 1995 in comparison to those owned by households in 1993. Results are presented by type of equipment: Refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, freezers, automatic washers, automatic dryers, air conditioning systems, heating systems, and water heaters. Appendices include information on survey methodology and a copy of the survey questionnaire.

Not Available

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Dipole oscillations in Bose-Fermi mixtures in the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii and Vlasov equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dipole oscillations in Bose-Fermi mixtures in the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii and Vlasov equations Tomoyuki Maruyama1,2,3 and George F. Bertsch1 1 Institute for Nuclear Theory, University with the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Vlasov equation. While the Bose gas oscillates

Bertsch George F.

471

Solitons in a hard-core bosonic system: Gross-Pitaevskii type and beyond Radha Balakrishnan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solitons in a hard-core bosonic system: Gross-Pitaevskii type and beyond Radha Balakrishnan1, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA A unified formulation of the hallmarks of quantum coherence inherent in ultracold atomic systems As predicted theoretically in the Gross

Satija, Indu

472

Supporting Systolic and Memory Communication in iWarp Shekhar Borkar, Robert Cohn, George Cox, Thomas Gross,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Systolic and Memory Communication in iWarp Shekhar Borkar, Robert Cohn, George Cox, Thomas Gross, H. T. Kung, Monica Lam, Margie Levine, Brian Moore, Wire Moore, Craig Peterson, Jim Susman/CMO under Contract MDA972­90­C­0035. Authors' affiliations: R. Cohn, T. Gross, H. T. Kung, and J. Webb

Shewchuk, Jonathan

473

Special Topics on Energy Use in Household Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Home > Transportation Home Page > Special Topics Special Topics Change in Method for Estimating Fuel Economy for the 1988 and subsequent RTECS (Released 09/12/2000) Can Household Members Accurately Report How Many Miles Their Vehicles Are Driven? (Released 08/03/2000) Calculate your Regional Gasoline Costs of Driving using the “Transportation Calculator” updated for new model years! Choose your car or SUV and see the gasoline part of the cost of driving in various parts of the country using EIA's current weekly prices. This application uses DOE/EPA's Fuel Economy Guide to set the MPG, but you can change it to compare your estimate of your car's mpg to the average of everyone else who takes the test. (Released 04/11/2000; Updated Yearly for Fuel Economies and Weekly for Fuel Prices)

474

Analysis of household refrigerators for different testing standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study highlights the salient differences among various testing standards for household refrigerator-freezers and proposes a methodology for predicting the performance of a single evaporator-based vapor-compression refrigeration system (either refrigerator or freezer) from one test standard (where the test data are available-the reference case) to another (the alternative case). The standards studied during this investigation include the Australian-New Zealand Standard (ANZS), the International Standard (ISO), the American National Standard (ANSI), the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS), and the Chinese National Standard (CNS). A simple analysis in conjunction with the BICYCLE model (Bansal and Rice 1993) is used to calculate the energy consumption of two refrigerator cabinets from the reference case to the alternative cases. The proposed analysis includes the effect of door openings (as required by the JIS) as well as defrost heaters. The analytical results are found to agree reasonably well with the experimental observations for translating energy consumption information from one standard to another.

Bansal, P.K. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; McGill, I. [Fischer and Paykel Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

476

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stock, household size, fuel prices and household income.needed by the model. Fuel price projections are implementedand Exogenous Drivers Fuel Prices Income Household Size

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Manager Race and the Race of New Hires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other Population % Hispanic Median household income (in $other Population % Hispanic Median household income (in $Hispanic Population % other Population % black Median household

Giuliano, Laura; Levine, David I.; Leonard, Jonathan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

An Analysis of PM and NOx Train Emissions in the Alameda Corridor, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

African American Hispanic Weighted Household Income WinterAfrican American Hispanic Weighted Household Income WinterHispanic and to a lesser degree, African American, with a median household

Sangkapichai, Mana; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Ritchie, Stephen G.; You, Soyoung Iris; Lee, Gunwoo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Solar disinfection: an approach for low-cost household water treatment technology in Southwestern Ethiopia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disinfection of contaminated water using solar radiation (SODIS) is known to inactivate ... study was aiming to test the efficiency of solar disinfection using different water parameters as low-cost household wat...

Awrajaw Dessie; Esayas Alemayehu…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Metering Campaign on All Cooking End-Uses in 100 Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an experimental study performed in 100 French households on the end-use power demand and energy consumption of domestic appliances focusing on cooking appliances [1].

Olivier Sidler

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gross household income" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Household technology adoption in a global marketplace: Incorporating the role of espoused cultural values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While MATH and the extended MATH have done an excellent job in explaining household technology adoption, there is still room for advancing our understanding of this phenomenon in light of the complexities embo...

Xiaojun Zhang; Likoebe M. Maruping

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data for Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions have at their core efforts to put a price on carbon emissions. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor ...

Rausch, Sebastian

484

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices...

485

Essays on Price Dynamics, Welfare Analysis, Household Food Insecurity in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices, and determinants of household food insecurity are discussed and presented in three separate essays. In the first essay, the dynamic information flows among prices of important agricultural commodities in the United States (U.S.) and Mexico...

Magana Lemus, David

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

486

Household structure and labor force participation of black, hispanic, and white mothers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates whether the inclusion of nonnuclear adults in a household facilitates the labor force participation of single and married mothers. Results based on a sample of extended and nuclear hous...

Marta Tienda; Jennifer Glass

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009 February 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy...

488

A Dynamic household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model Using Stated and Revealed Transaction Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market share for alternative-fuel vehicles drop from thePreferences for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles”, Brownstone DavidA Dynamic Household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model

Sheng, Hongyan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The effect of household characteristics on saving behaviour and the theory of savings in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the household saving functions based on cross-section data which contain fruitful informations of individual observations. The paper also attempts to test various theor...

T. Suruga; T. Tachibanaki

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Relationship Between Life Satisfaction Among Wives and Financial Preparedness of Households in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wealth gap between the rich and poor is widening and contributing to Japan’s shrinking middle class. This study examined ... future and life satisfaction and their association with household financial prepare...

Yoko Mimura

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dollars for selected years. AHAM Fact Book, TSDs. Operatingselected years. 1999 dollars. AHAM fact book. Income. Meanof units sold, in millions. AHAM Factbook and Appliance

Dale, Larry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

494

A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Applications of demand analysis for the dairy industry using household scanner data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education 7 10 Martial Status 5 11 Male Head Occupation 12 12 Female Head Occupation 12 13 Household Composition 8 14 Race 4 15 Hispanic Origin 2 16 Region 4 17 Scantrack Market Identifier 53 18 Projection Factor 1... classified as either Hispanic or not Hispanic, with 18% being Hispanic and 82% not Hispanic. Since female household heads are considered primary to making food purchase decisions some key statistics about this demographic variable are included. Of all...

Stockton, Matthew C.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

496

Household Light Makes Global Heat: High Black Carbon Emissions From Kerosene Wick Lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Lighting is another component of this household energy challenge, with millions of households still relying on simple liquid-fueled lamps, but little is known of the associated environmental and health impacts. ... For laboratory tests, CO2 and CO concentrations were measured in real-time with a Li-COR 6252 (Li-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE) and Horiba AIA-220 (Horiba, Kyoto, Japan) nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer, respectively. ...

Nicholas L. Lam; Yanju Chen; Cheryl Weyant; Chandra Venkataraman; Pankaj Sadavarte; Michael A. Johnson; Kirk R. Smith; Benjamin T. Brem; Joseph Arineitwe; Justin E. Ellis; Tami C. Bond

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Household Sand Filters:? Comparative Field Study, Model Calculations, and Health Benefits ... Simultaneously, raw groundwater from the same households and additional 31 tubewells was sampled to investigate arsenic coprecipitation with hydrous ferric iron from solution, i.e., without contact to sand surfaces. ... Concentra tions of total Fe, Mn, Na, K, Mg, and Ca were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (Shimadzu AA-6800, Kyoto, Japan). ...

Michael Berg; Samuel Luzi; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Walter Giger; Doris Stüben

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

498

Trade and Income Exploiting Time Series in James Feyrer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade and Income ­ Exploiting Time Series in Geography James Feyrer Dartmouth College October 23. Rodriguez and Rodrik (2000) show that these results are not robust to controlling for omitted variables conferences for helpful comments. All errors are my own. james.feyrer@dartmouth.edu, Dartmouth College

Lotko, William

499

Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption Physics Colloquium Presented in financial markets. Globally, data analysis of energy consumption per capita around the world shows@american.edu Similarly to the probability distribution of energy in physics, the probability distribution of money among

Hill, Wendell T.

500

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY to save energy. The major elements influenced by this project: people, energy/air quality and apartments save energy and improve indoor environmental quality conditions. Project Description The broad goals