National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gro bdwt wo

  1. GroSolar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: GroSolar Name: GroSolar Address: 601 Old River Road Suite 3 Place: White River Junction, Vermont Zip: 05001 Sector: Solar Website: www.grosolar.com...

  2. 2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo 2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo February 17, 2016 8:00AM MST to February 18, 2016 1:00PM MST 2016 GRO-Biz Conference & Idea Expo...

  3. NaWoTec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NaWoTec Jump to: navigation, search Name: NaWoTec Place: Rossdorf, Germany Zip: 64380 Product: Germany-based company developing 3-dimensional additive lithography using...

  4. TriWo AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TriWo AG Place: Trier, Denmark Zip: 54290 Sector: Solar Product: Developer of solar photovoltaic electricity generation project in Germany. Coordinates: 49.757256, 6.636521...

  5. GroSolar formerly Global Resource Options Inc | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that designs, distributes, and installs solar electric, hot water and air systems in the USA. References: groSolar (formerly Global Resource Options Inc)1 This article is a stub....

  6. Chesapeake Solar LLC a groSolar company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland Zip: 20794 Sector: Solar Product: Maryland-based company that installs solar electricity and solar hot water systems, which was acquired by groSolar in July 2008....

  7. Bureau of Land Management - WO-210 - Contact Information | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - WO-210 - Contact Information Abstract This page provides contact information for...

  8. Exploring the structural dynamics of the E. coli chaperonin GroEL using translation-libration-screw crystallographic refinement of intermediate states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhry, Charu; Horwich, Arthur L.; Brunger, Axel T.; Adams, Paul D.

    2004-08-12

    Large rigid-body domain movements are critical to GroEL-mediated protein folding, especially apical domain elevation and twist associated with the formation of a folding chamber upon binding ATP and co-chaperonin GroES. Here, we have modeled the anisotropic displacements of GroEL domains from various crystallized states, unliganded GroEL, ATP?S-bound, ADP-AlFx/GroES-bound, and ADP/GroES bound, using translation-libration-screw (TLS) analysis. Remarkably, the TLS results show that the inherent motions of unliganded GroEL, a polypeptide-accepting state, are biased along the transition pathway that leads to the folding-active state. In the ADP-AlFx/GroES-bound folding-active state the dynamic modes of the apical domains become reoriented and coupled to the motions of bound GroES. The ADP/GroES complex exhibits these same motions, but they are increased in magnitude, potentially reflecting the decreased stability of the complex after nucleotide hydrolysis. Our results have allowed the visualization of the anisotropic molecular motions that link the static conformations previously observed by X-ray crystallography. Application of the same analyses to other macromolecules where rigid body motions occur may give insight into the large scale dynamics critical for function and thus has the potential to extend our fundamental understanding of molecular machines.

  9. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of polyols over Pd/WO3-ZrO2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of polyols over PdWO3-ZrO2: Role of Pd-WO3 interaction and hydrodeoxygenation pathway Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  11. AmeriFlux CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCaughey, Harry [Queen's University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.. Site Description - Groundhog River (FCRN or CCP site "ON-OMW") is situated in a typical boreal mixedwood forest in northeastern Ontario (48.217 degrees north and 82.156 degrees west) about 80 km southwest of Timmins in Reeves Twp. near the Groundhog River. Rowe (1972) places the site in the Missinaibi-Cabonga Section of the Boreal Forest Region. In terms of ecoregion and ecozone, the site is in the Lake Timiskaming Lowlands of the Boreal Shield. The forest developed after high-grade logging in the 1930's. The average age in 2013 is estimated at beteen 75 and 80 years. The forest is dominated by five species characteristic of Ontario boreal mixedwoods: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss.), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.). The surficial geology is a lacustrine deposit of varved or massive clays, silts and silty sands. The soil is an orthic gleysol with a soil moisture regime classified as fresh to very fresh. Plonski (1974) rates it as a site class 1. The topography is simple and flat with an overall elevation of 340 m ASL.

  12. Effect of Structural Stress on the Laser Quality of Highly Doped Yb:KY(WO4)2/KY(WO4)2 and Yb:KLu(WO4)2/KLu(WO4)2 Epitaxial Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvajal, J.; Raghothamachar, B; Silvestre, O; Chen, H; Pujol, M; Petrov, V; Dudley, M; Aguilo, M; Diaz, F

    2009-01-01

    In this communication we demonstrate how the difference in laser performance of two highly doped (20 at %) epitaxial layers of Yb-doped KY(WO4)2 (KYW) grown on a KYW substrate and Yb-doped KLu(WO4)2 (KLuW) grown on a KLuW substrate, respectively, is related to the presence of structural stress in the epilayers, investigated by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography. From the results obtained, it is clear that the samples that show a larger amount of structural stress, Yb:KYW/KYW epitaxies, lead to lower efficiency in laser operation, giving a direct correlation between the existence and magnitude of such structural stress and the loss in efficiency of laser performance in such epitaxial layers which, from a spectroscopical point of view, are otherwise equivalent.

  13. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  14. Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl Photoactive Biological Systems. Abstract not provided. Authors: Small, Leo J ; Spoerke, Erik David ; ...

  15. CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs: Selective preparation, electronic structures, and photocatalytic activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Tingjiang; Li, Liping; Tong, Wenming; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yunjian; Li, Guangshe

    2011-02-15

    This work explored the selective synthesis of polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase by optimizing the experimental parameters. Systematic characterization indicated that both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies but different structural building blocks. Electronic structures calculations for both polymorphs demonstrated the same constructions of conduction band or valence band, while the conduction band widths of both polymorphs were quite different. Both CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs exhibited good photocatalytic activity for degradation of methyl orange under UV light irradiation. When comparing to some other well-known tungstate oxide materials, the photocatalytic activity was found to follow such a consequence, monoclinic CdWO{sub 4{approx}}monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CdWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CaWO{sub 4}. The specific photocatalytic activity of monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} was even higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (Degussa P25). The increased activity from the tetragonal CdWO{sub 4} to the monoclinic was consistent with the trend of the decreased symmetry, and this could be explained in terms of the geometric structures and electronic structures for both polymorphs. -- Graphical abstract: Monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} exhibited a much higher photocatalytic activity than the tetragonal form owing to the lower symmetry, more distorted geometric structure, and the dispersive band configuration. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase were selectively synthesized. > Both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies, while the relevant structural building blocks were different. > Photocatalytic activities of CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs depended strongly on the symmetry, geometric structure, as well as band configuration.

  16. Strain Accommodation By Facile WO6 Octahedral Distortion and Tilting During WO3 Heteroepitaxy on SrTiO3(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Varga, Tamas; Wang, Chong M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-27

    In this paper, we show that compared to other BO6 octahedra in ABO3 structured perovskite oxides, the WO6 octahedra in tungsten trioxide (WO3) can withstand a much larger degree of distortion and tilting to accommodate interfacial strain, which in turn strongly impact the nucleation, structure, and defect formation during the epitaxial growth of WO3 on SrTiO3(001). A meta-stable tetragonal phase can be stabilized by epitaxy and a thickness dependent phase transition (tetragonal to monoclinic) is observed. In contrast to misfit dislocations to accommodate the interfacial stain, the facial WO6 octahedral distortion and tilting give rise to three types of planar defects that affect more than 15 monolayers from the interface. These atomically resolved, unusual interfacial defects may significantly alter the electronic, electrochromic, and mechanical properties of the epitaxial films.

  17. MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Reyhani, Ali; Naseri, Naimeh; Moshfegh, Alireza Z.

    2013-08-15

    The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNTs weight percentages were prepared by solgel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using solgel derived method. TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

  18. Epitaxial growth of high quality WO3 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leng, X.; Pereiro, J.; Strle, J.; Bollinger, A. T.; Bozovic, I.

    2015-09-09

    We have grown epitaxial WO3 films on various single-crystal substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. While pronounced surface roughness is observed in films grown on LaSrAlO4 substrates, films grown on YAlO3 substrates show atomically flat surfaces, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The crystalline structure has been confirmed to be monoclinic by symmetric and skew-symmetric XRD. Furthermore, the dependence of the growth modes and the surface morphology on the lattice mismatch is discussed.

  19. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films for application in advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullapalli, S. K.; Vemuri, R. S.; Manciu, F. S.; Enriquez, J. L.; Ramana, C. V.

    2010-07-15

    Inherent processes in coal gasification plants produce hazardous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which must be continuously and efficiently detected and removed before the fuel is used for power generation. An attempt has been made in this work to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films by radio-frequency reactive magnetron-sputter deposition. The impetus being the use of WO{sub 3} films for H{sub 2}S sensors in coal gasification plants. The effect of growth temperature, which is varied in the range of 30-500 deg. C, on the growth and microstructure of WO{sub 3} thin films is investigated. Characterizations made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the effect of temperature is significant on the microstructure of WO{sub 3} films. XRD and SEM results indicate that the WO{sub 3} films grown at room temperature are amorphous, whereas films grown at higher temperatures are nanocrystalline. The average grain-size increases with increasing temperature. WO{sub 3} films exhibit smooth morphology at growth temperatures {<=}300 deg. C while relatively rough at >300 deg. C. The analyses indicate that the nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} films grown at 100-300 deg. C could be the potential candidates for H{sub 2}S sensor development for application in coal gasification systems.

  20. CTAB-assisted ultrasonic synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D. Gomez-Solis, C.; Torres-Martinez, Leticia M.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures were synthesized by ultrasound method assisted with CTAB. WO{sub 3} morphology was mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of ?50 nm. The highest surface area value of WO{sub 3} was obtained to lowest concentration of CTAB. WO{sub 3} activity was attributed to morphology, surface area and the addition of CTAB. WO{sub 3} nanoplates were able to causing almost complete mineralization of rhB and IC. - Abstract: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures have been prepared by ultrasound synthesis method assisted with CTAB using different molar ratios. The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the WO{sub 3} samples was complemented by analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed morphology mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of around 50 nm and length of 100500 nm. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to confirm the elimination of the CTAB in the synthesized samples. The specific surface area was determinate by the BET method and by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) it was determinate the band-gap energy (E{sub g}) of the WO{sub 3} samples. The photocatalytic activity of the WO{sub 3} oxide was evaluated in the degradation reactions of rhodamine B (rhB) and indigo carmine (IC) under Xenon lamp irradiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the samples containing low concentration of CTAB with morphology of rectangular nanoplates and with higher surface area value than commercial WO{sub 3}. Photodegradation of rhB and IC were followed by means of UVvis absorption spectra. The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 92% for rhB and 50% for IC after 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  1. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-activity and of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes These ...

  2. WO3/TiO2 nanotube photoanodes for solar water splitting with simultaneous wastewater treatment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured WO3/TiO2 nanotubes with properties that enhance solar photoconversion reactions were developed, characterized and tested. The TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization of Ti foil, and WO3 was electrodeposited on top of the nanotubes. SEM images show that these materials have the same ordered structure as TiO2 nanotubes, with an external nanostructured WO3 layer. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed an increase in the visible absorption relative to bare TiO2 nanotubes, and in the UV absorption relative to bare WO3 films. Incident simulated solar photon-to-current efficiency increased from 30% (for bare WO3) to 50% (for WO3/TiO2 composites). With the addition of diverse organic pollutants, the photocurrent densities exhibited more than a 5-fold increase. Chemical oxygen demand measurements showed the simultaneous photodegradation of organic pollutants. The results of this work indicate that the unique structure and composition of these composite materials enhance the charge carrier transport and optical properties compared with the parent materials.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical studies of nanostructured CaWO{sub 4} as platinum support for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farsi, Hossein; Barzgari, Zahra

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured CaWO{sub 4} was fabricated by co-precipitation method. • Platinum was electrodeposited onto the surface prepared nanostructured CaWO{sub 4}. • Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite demonstrate good oxygen reduction reaction activity. - Abstract: In the present work, we employed nanostructured calcium tungstate as a supporting material for platinum, a well-known electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction. The co-precipitation method has been utilized to synthesize nanostructured calcium tungstate from aqueous solution. The structure and morphology of the obtained CaWO{sub 4} were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Preparation of the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite catalyst was carried out by electrodeposition of Pt onto the surface of CaWO{sub 4}/graphite electrode. The physical properties of the catalyst were determined by scanning electron microscopy analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX). The electrochemical activity of the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated in acid solution by cyclic voltammetry measurements, linear sweep voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite has higher electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction in comparison with Pt/graphite catalyst.

  4. H.sub.2O doped WO.sub.3, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee

    2011-03-22

    An ultra-fast response, high sensitivity structure for optical detection of low concentrations of hydrogen gas, comprising: a substrate; a water-doped WO.sub.3 layer coated on the substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the water-doped WO.sub.3 layer.

  5. WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes | Department of Energy WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 8_nrel_turner.pdf (4.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis Working Group Meeting: January 2015 DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities

  6. Synthesis and characterization of novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO and its photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subash, B.; Krishnakumar, B.; Pandiyan, V.; Swaminathan, M.; Shanthi, M.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO was prepared by a simple solvothermal method. ► ‘Ag’ traps the electron from both ZnO and WO{sub 3} reducing electro–hole recombination. ► WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO is more efficient than Ag–ZnO, WO{sub 3}–ZnO, Ag–WO{sub 3} and undoped catalysts. ► WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO material will be much useful for the treatment of dye effluents. -- Abstract: A novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by a simple solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images, energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO was investigated for the degradation of RR 120 and RO 4 dyes in aqueous solution using UV-A light. WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO is found to be more efficient than Ag–ZnO, WO{sub 3}–ZnO, Ag–WO{sub 3}, commercial ZnO, prepared ZnO, TiO{sub 2}-P25 and TiO{sub 2} (Merck) at neutral pH for the mineralization of dyes. First time we have reported that novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO has been found to be very efficient for two azo dyes removal when compared to commercially available catalyst (Degussa P25, ZnO (Merck) and TiO{sub 2} (Merck)). The mineralization of dyes has been confirmed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. A mechanism of degradation has been proposed for the higher efficiency of WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO.

  7. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reyes-Gil, Karla R.; Stephens, Zachary D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2015-01-06

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NT) with WO3 electrodeposited on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its Ti substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. Several adhesion layers were tested, finding that a paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length and WO3 concentration on the EC performancemore » were studied. As a result, the composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast, and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2 materials« less

  8. Neutron diffraction and scattering study on M/sub x/WO/sub 3/ (M=Rb and K)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, M.; Fujishita, H.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.; Hoshino, S.; Grier, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    To study the relationship between the lattice instability and the superconductivity of nonstoichiometric hexagonal tungsten bronze, M/sub x/WO/sub 3/, neutron diffraction and scattering studies were made. Two types of the structural phase transitions were observed. One is associated with the distortion of the corner linked WO/sub 6/ octahedra. The other is associated with the ordering of the M atoms which partially fill the sites in the WO/sub 3/ cage. A long period modulation of the structure appears for some values of x at low temperature. The discussion on the x dependence of the superconducting transition temperature is presented.

  9. THE DISCOVERY OF A RARE WO-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STAR IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2012-12-01

    While observing OB stars within the most crowded regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud, we happened upon a new Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in Lucke-Hodge 41, the rich OB association that contains S Doradus and numerous other massive stars. At first glance the spectrum resembled that of a WC4 star, but closer examination showed strong O VI {lambda}{lambda}3811, 34 lines, leading us to classify it as a WO4. This is only the second known WO in the LMC, and the first known WO4 (the other being a WO3). This rarity is to be expected due to these stars' short lifespans as they represent the most advanced evolutionary stage in a massive star's lifetime before exploding as supernovae. This discovery shows that while the majority of WRs within the LMC have been discovered, there may be a few WRs left to be found.

  10. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D.; Martnez-de la Cruz, A.; Lpez-Cullar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ? WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ? WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BrunauerEmmittTeller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UVvis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  11. Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500700 C. Particularly, the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of WO{sub 3} nanostructures prepared by an aged-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huirache-Acuna, R.; Paraguay-Delgado, F.; Albiter, M.A.; Lara-Romero, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.

    2009-09-15

    Nanostructures of tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) have been successfully synthesized by using an aged route at low temperature (60 deg. C) followed by a hydrothermal method at 200 deg. C for 48 h under well controlled conditions. The material was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Specific Surface Area (S{sub BET}) were measured by using the BET method. The lengths of the WO{sub 3} nanostructures obtained are between 30 and 200 nm and their diameters are from 20 to 70 nm. The growth direction of the tungsten oxide nanostructures was determined along [010] axis with an inter-planar distance of 0.38 nm.

  13. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    t.~19'v Section 1- Originator Request Document No .: -~"Q, EP- WCRR- WO-DOP-0233 I Revision No.: 36 . Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page _1_ of -' Description of requested action (Attach numbered additional sheets if needed.): Revised procedure to incorporate EP-SO-1708, and add steps to clarify the amount of absorbent needed when processing Nitrate Salts. Also added Appendix 6 Administrative Control Lock Log Sheet. No additional hazards were identified during

  14. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Stephens, Zachary Dan.; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with WO3 electrodeposited homogeneously on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. A paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length on the current density and the EC contrast of the material were studied. The EC redox reaction seen in this material is diffusion- limited, having relatively fast reaction rates at the electrode surface. The composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2.

  15. Ab-initio structure determination of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambrier, M-H.; Kodjikian, S.; Ibberson, R.M.; Goutenoire, F.

    2009-02-15

    The structure of the low-temperature form of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} has been determined from laboratory X-ray, neutron time-of-flight and electron diffraction data. This tungstate crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group (no. 19) P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with Z=8, a=7.5196(1) A, b=10.3476(1) A, c=12.7944(2) A, and a measured density 7.37(1) g cm{sup -3}. The structure consists of tungsten [WO{sub 6}] octahedra and tetrahedral [OLa{sub 4}]. Tungsten polyhedra are connected such that [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup 10-} units are formed. - Graphical abstract: Projection of La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} structure along [100]. The structure could be described by [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup -10} structural unit formed by two corner-sharing octahedra.

  16. Enhancement of photocatalytic properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoparticles by Pt deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, R.M.; Aazam, E.S.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was used for photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange dye. Photocatalytic degradation was dependent on wt% of Pt reaction time, and weight of catalyst. Kinetic study revealed that the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange dye followed the first order. Catalyst re-use revealed the present photocatalyst remain effective and active after five cycles. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoparticles were prepared using a hydrothermal method, and Pt was immobilized on the surface of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} via a photo-assisted deposition (PAD) method. The samples produced were characterized using X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence emission spectra, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and surface area measurements. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} samples was examined in the degradation of methyl orange dye (MO) under visible light. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results, which showed the presence of peaks assigned to the PtPt at approximately 2.50 ?, indicate the formation of nanoscale Pt features. The UVvis spectral analysis detected a red shift after loading the Pt into the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. The maximum degradation efficiency achieved was 100% with 0.3 Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} as the photocatalyst after a 30-min reaction time. The catalyst could be reused without any loss in activity for the first five cycles.

  17. Generation of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts from solid solutions of tungsten in zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, Maria A.; Angeles-Chavez, Carlos; Bokhimi, Xim; Toledo-Antonio, J.A. . E-mail: jtoledo@imp.mx

    2006-08-15

    WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} samples were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =} species in solution from ammonium metatungstate at pH=10.0. Samples were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy filtered-TEM. The ammonia retained in the dried sample produced a reductive atmosphere to generate W{sup 5+} ions coexisting with W{sup 6+} ions to produce a solid solution of tungsten in the zirconia lattice to stabilize the zirconia tetragonal phase when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C. When the sample was annealed at 800 deg. C, the W atoms near crystallite surface were oxidized to W{sup 6+}, producing patches of WO{sub 3} on the zirconia crystallite. The HR-TEM analysis confirmed the existence of the solid solution when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C, and two types of crystalline regions were identified: One with nearly spherical morphology, an average diameter of 8 nm and the atomic distribution of tetragonal zirconia. The second one had a non-spherical morphology with well-faceted faces and dimensions larger than 30 nm, and the atom distribution of tetragonal zirconia. When samples were annealed at 800 deg. C two different zirconia crystallites were formed: Those where only part of the dissolved tungsten atoms segregated to crystallite surface producing patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on the crystallite surface of tetragonal zirconia stabilized with tungsten. The second type corresponded to monoclinic zirconia crystallites with patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on their surface. The tungsten segregation gave rise to the WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts. - Graphical abstract: WO {sub x} -ZrO{sub 2} catalysts were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =}species. Initially, the W atoms remained inside the crystallite after

  18. Epitaxial growth of high quality WO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, X.; Pereiro, J.; Strle, J.; Bollinger, A. T.; Bozovic, I.

    2015-09-09

    We have grown epitaxial WO3 films on various single-crystal substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. While pronounced surface roughness is observed in films grown on LaSrAlO4 substrates, films grown on YAlO3 substrates show atomically flat surfaces, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The crystalline structure has been confirmed to be monoclinic by symmetric and skew-symmetric XRD. Furthermore, the dependence of the growth modes and the surface morphology on the lattice mismatch is discussed.

  19. Synthesis and luminescent properties of spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yue [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China) [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Yu [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China); Hua, Ruinian, E-mail: rnhua@dlnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Na, Liyan [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)] [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process. Dependence of emission intensity on Sm{sup 3+} ions concentration in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor were also calculated via a nonlinear fitting by using the formula y = ax/(1 + bx{sup c}). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were prepared via a PVP assisted sonochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The D-D interaction is responsible for concentration quenching between Sm{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical energy transfer distances (R{sub c}) were obtained. -- Abstract: Spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process, and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The XRD results suggested that the prepared samples are single-phase. The FE-SEM images indicated that the prepared CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors are composed of many spindles with maximum average diameter of 150 nm and maximum average length of 500 nm. Under 404 nm excitation, the characteristic emissions corresponding to {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub J} (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2) transitions of Sm{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4} phosphors were observed. The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated to be (0.595, 0.404). The fluorescent concentration quenching of Sm{sup 3+} doped spindle-like phosphors was studied based on the Van Uitert's model, and it was found that the electric dipole-dipole (D-D) interaction is the dominant energy transfer mechanism between Sm{sup 3+} ions in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors. The critical energy transfer distance was

  20. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Zhang, Hongliang; Varga, Tamas; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-08

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  1. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction beam-induced structural and property changes on WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Y. Varga, T.; Zhang, K. H. L.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-08-04

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO{sub 3} as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO{sub 3}, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  2. Rapid preparation and magnetodielectric properties of trirutile Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaultois, Michael W.; Kemei, Moureen C.; Harada, Jaye K.; Seshadri, Ram

    2015-01-07

    Dense pellets of > 99% purity trirutile Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} were prepared in one step from starting oxides using spark plasma sintering, leading to simultaneous reaction and consolidation in 3 min at 1473 K. The reducing environment during processing may be partly responsible for the rapid reaction time in these oxides, with partial reduction of Cr{sup 3+} and the associated oxygen vacancies allowing rapid diffusion of cations. The low-temperature physical properties of Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} were examined, and a new transition at T = 5.9 K was observed as an anomaly in the temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity and a corresponding anomaly in the specific heat. A strong enhancement of the magnetocapacitance is observed below this transition temperature at T = 5.9 K and may be associated with a change from collinear spin order to more complex spin order.

  3. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes-Gil, Karla R.; Stephens, Zachary D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2015-01-06

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NT) with WO3 electrodeposited on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its Ti substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. Several adhesion layers were tested, finding that a paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length and WO3 concentration on the EC performance were studied. As a result, the composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast, and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2 materials

  4. Flower-like and hollow sphere-like WO{sub 3} porous nanostructures: Selective synthesis and their photocatalysis property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jiarui; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gu, Cuiping; Fu, Gujun; Wang, Weizhi; Liu, Jinhuai

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Nanoflake-based flower-like and hollow microsphere-like hydrated tungsten oxide architectures were selectively synthesized by acidic precipitation of sodium tungstate solution at mild temperature. Several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric-differential thermalgravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and BrunauerEmmettTeller N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption analyses, were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the products. The experimental results show that the nanoflake-based flower-like and hollow sphere-like WO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O architectures can be obtained by changing the concentration of sodium tungstate solution. The possible formation process based on the aggregationrecrystallization mechanism is proposed. The corresponding tungsten oxide three-dimensional architectures were obtained after calcination at 450 C. Finally, the obtained WO{sub 3} three-dimensional architectures were used as photocatalyst in the experiments. Compared with WO{sub 3} microflowers, the as-prepared WO{sub 3} hollow microspheres exhibit superior photocatalytic property on photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B due to their hollow porous hierarchical structures.

  5. Structural peculiarities and Raman spectra of TeO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}-based glasses: A fresh look at the problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirgorodsky, Andreie; Colas, Maggy; Smirnov, Mikhael; Merle-Mejean, Therese; El-Mallawany, Raouf; Thomas, Philippe

    2012-06-15

    Ideas currently dominating the field of structural studies of TeO{sub 2}-based glasses are critically considered. A new physically and chemically consistent approach to the constitution of binary TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses is proposed, in which the reasoning coming from the Raman spectra reexamination are correlated with the basic principles of thermodynamics. Separation into two phases is suggested in such glasses. One phase is TeO{sub 2}, and another is Te(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} consisting of tetrahedral [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions and of Te{sup 4+} cations. Supplementary M{sub n}O{sub k} oxides added to the glasses are found incorporated in the former phase, thus producing solid solutions (for M=Ti, Nb) or tellurite compounds (for M=Nd). - Graphical abstract: Raman scattering spectra of TeO{sub 2}-based glasses with the following compositions (mol%): (a) pure TeO{sub 2}, (b) 85TeO{sub 2}-15WO{sub 3}, (c) 80TeO{sub 2}-15WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2} ,(d) 80TeO{sub 2}-10WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-5Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, (e) 80TeO{sub 2}-12WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-3 Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (f) 80TeO{sub 2}-10WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-5Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural studies of TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses are critically considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxide glass formation is analyzed from Raman spectra and thermodynamic principles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Separation into two phases, TeO{sub 2} and Te(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is intrinsic in such glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition to TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses leads to produce solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition to TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses leads to produce a tellurite compound.

  6. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3 with WO3-TiO2 Catalysts: Influence of Catalyst Synthesis Method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-02-02

    A series of supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts was prepared by a new synthesis procedure involving co-precipitation of an aqueous TiO(OH)2 and (NH4)10W12O41*5H2O slurry under controlled pH conditions. The morphological properties, molecular structures, surface acidity and surface chemistry of the supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts were determined with BET, in situ Raman, in situ IR and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) spectroscopy, respectively. Isotopic 18O-16O exchange demonstrated that tungsten oxide was exclusively present as surface WOx species on the TiO2 support with mono-oxo W=O coordination. In contrast to previous studies employing impregnation synthesis that found only surface one mono-oxo O=WO4 site on TiO2, the co-precipitationmore » procedure resulted in the formation of two distinct surface WOx species: mono-oxo O=WO4 (~1010-1017 cm-1) on low defect density patches of TiO2 and a second mono-oxo O=WO4 (~983-986 cm-1) on high defect density patches of TiO2. The concentration of the second WOx surface species increases as a function of solution pH. Both surface WOx sites, however, exhibited the same NO/NH3 SCR reactivity. The co-precipitated WO3-TiO2 catalysts synthesized in alkaline solutions exhibited enhanced performance for the NO/NH3 SCR reaction that is ascribed to the greater number of surface defects on the resulting TiO2 support. For the co-precipitated catalyst prepared at pH10, surface NH4+ species on Br nsted acid sites were found to be more reactive than surface NH3* species on Lewis acid sites for SCR of NO with NH3.« less

  7. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphor for white LED application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jingshan; CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Yin, Xin; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Huang, Fuqiang; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Jiang, Weizhong

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► NaLa{sub 1−x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. ► Compared with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} performed better luminescence properties. ► The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6} as a suitable host for RE{sup 3+}-doping. -- Abstract: Single phase of NaLa{sub 1−x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} (0 < x ≤1) (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphors were prepared by solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the morphology energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence were used to characterize the samples. Under the light excitation, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Sm{sup 3+} and NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Tb{sup 3+}, phosphors showed the characteristic emissions of Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 4,3,2,1}), Sm{sup 3+} ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 5/2,7/2,9/2}), and Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 6,5,4,3}), respectively. The intensity of the red emission for Na(La{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4})MgWO{sub 6} is 2.5 times higher than that of (Y{sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 3} under blue light irradiation. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 394 nm and 464 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}G{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} phosphors as potential candidates for white light emitting diode pumped by UV or blue chip.

  8. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ► Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ► By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ► XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ► TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  9. Highly efficient visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaiwichian, Saranyoo; Inceesungvorn, Burapat; Wetchakun, Khatcharin; Phanichphant, Sukon; Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong; Wetchakun, Natda

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were obtained using hydrothermal method. Physicochemical properties played a significant role on photocatalytic efficiency. Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterogeneous structures were greatly enhanced for degradation of MB. A tentative mechanism of charge transfer process in MB degradation was proposed. - Abstract: The Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Physical properties of the heterojunction photocatalyst samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The XRD results indicated that BiVO{sub 4} retain monoclinic and tetragonal structures, while Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} presented as orthorhombic structure. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) adsorptiondesorption of nitrogen gas for specific surface area determination at the temperature of liquid nitrogen was performed on all samples. UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra (UVvis DRS) were used to identify the absorption range and band gap energy of the heterojunction photocatalysts. The photocatalytic performance of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts was studied via the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The results indicated that the heterojunction photocatalyst at 0.5:0.5 mole ratio of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}:BiVO{sub 4} shows the highest photocatalytic activity.

  10. Photocatalytic activity and stability of TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcel, Radu Adrian; Andronic, Luminita Duta, Anca

    2012-08-15

    Photocatalysis represents a viable option for complete degrading the dye molecules resulted in the textile industry, up to products that do not represent environmental threats. The photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange has been investigated using TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3} and mixed thin films. The photodegradation efficiency is examined in correlation with the experimental parameters (irradiation time, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition and stability), along with the morphology and crystallinity data. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition increases the photodegradation efficiency by providing additional hydroxyl groups and further reducing the recombination of the electron-hole pairs by reacting with the electrons at the catalyst interface. To test the stability of the photocatalytic films in long time running processes, batch series of experiments were conducted using contact periods up to 9 days. The results show that the thin films maintained their photocatalytic properties confirming their stability and viability for up-scaling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3} and mixed thin films Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the photocatalytic activity and photocatalyst stability over a period up to 9 days of continuous irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of medium pH and oxidizing agent (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was analyzed.

  11. Visible light-induced photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3} films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imai, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Maiko; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2012-05-15

    The authors examined the photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} films (thickness 500-600 nm) deposited on a fused quartz substrate heated at 350-800 deg. C by dc reactive magnetron sputtering using a W metal target under the O{sub 2} gas pressure from 1.0 to 5.0 Pa. Films deposited at 800 deg. C under 5.0 Pa have excellent crystallinity of triclinic, P1(1) structure and a large surface area, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Exposure of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) adsorbed onto the film surface to ultraviolet, visible, or standard fluorescence light induces oxidative photocatalytic decomposition indicated by a decrease in CH{sub 3}CHO concentration and generation of CO{sub 2} gas. For all three types of irradiation, concentration ratio of decreased CH{sub 3}CHO to increased CO{sub 2} is about 1:1, suggesting the possible presence of intermediates. The sputter-deposited WO{sub 3} film can be a good candidate as a visible light-responsive photocatalyst.

  12. A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Special...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A P P E N D I X A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Report on Security Problems at the U.S. Department of Energy A Special Investigative Panel President's...

  13. Enhanced photoluminescence of SrWO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter, Anthuvan John Banu, I. B. Shameem

    2015-06-24

    Optically efficient europium activated alkaline earth metal tungstate nano phosphor (SrWO{sub 4}) with different doping concentrations have been synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction at room temperature for the first time. The XRD and Raman spectra results indicated that the prepared powders exhibit a scheelite-type tetragonal structure. FTIR spectra exhibited a high absorption band situated at around 854 cm{sup −1}, which was ascribed to the W–O antisymmetric stretching vibrations into the [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2−} tetrahedron groups. Analysis of the emission spectra with different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations revealed that the optimum dopant concentration for SrWO{sub 4}: x Eu{sup 3+} phosphor is about 8 mol% of Eu{sup 3+}.The red emission intensity of the SSM prepared SrWO{sub 4}: 0.08Eu{sup 3+} phosphors are 2 times greater than that of the commercial Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S: Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method. All the results indicate that the phosphor is a promising red phosphor pumped by NUV InGaN chip for fabricating WLED.

  14. Electrosprayed heterojunction WO{sub 3}/BiVO{sub 4} films with nanotextured pillar structure for enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mali, Mukund G.; Yoon, Hyun; Yoon, Sam S.; Kim, Min-woo; Swihart, Mark T.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate that the addition of a tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) layer beneath a bismuth vanadate (BiVO{sub 4}) photocatalyst layer with a nanotextured pillar morphology significantly increases the photocurrent density in photoelectrochemical water splitting. The WO{sub 3}-BiVO{sub 4} bilayer films produced a photocurrent of up to 3.3 mA/cm{sup 2} under illumination at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} (AM1.5 spectrum). The bilayer film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoelectrochemical methods, which confirmed the superiority of the bilayer film in terms of its morphology and charge separation and transport ability. Both WO{sub 3} and BiVO{sub 4} were deposited by electrostatic spraying under open-air conditions, which resulted in nanotextured pillars of BiVO{sub 4} atop a smooth WO{sub 3} film. The optimal coating conditions are also reported.

  15. Microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} photocatalyst and its photocatalytic activity under simulated solar light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Gyawali, Gobinda; Sekino, Tohru; Wohn Lee, Soo

    2013-01-15

    Simulated solar light responsive Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} composite photocatalyst was synthesized by microwave assisted hydrothermal process. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS), and BET surface area analyzer to investigate the crystal structure, morphology, chemical composition, optical properties and surface area of the composite photocatalyst. This photocatalyst exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B under simulated solar light irradiation. Dye degradation efficiency of composite photocatalyst was found to be increased significantly as compared to that of the commercial WO{sub 3} nanopowder. Increase in photocatalytic activity of the photocatalyst was explained on the basis of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect caused by the silver nanoparticles present in the composite photocatalyst. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful synthesis of Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic experiment was performed under simulated solar light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposite photocatalyst was very active as compared to WO{sub 3} commercial powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPR effect due to Ag nanoparticles enhanced the photocatalytic activity.

  16. Deuterium sites in the defect pyrochlore DTaWO/sub 6/: location from neutron power-diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotella, F.J.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Morosin, B.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Time-of-flight Rietveld refinement and Fourier synthesis of high-resolution powder diffraction data from DTaWO/sub 6/ led to the location of deuterium in partially occupied 48f sites of Fd3m (origin at 3m) as distances of 1.024(9) A at 300/sup 0/K and 1.021(10) A at 12/sup 0/K from each oxygen position. The deuterium sites form spirals in the interconnecting open channels parallel to (110) directions with distances between nearest neighbors of 2.653(2) A at 300/sup 0/K and 2.652(2) A at 12/sup 0/K. These results are consistent with both classical hopping and tunneling models of deuteron transport in this system.

  17. Luminescent and lasing characteristics of heavily doped Yb{sup 3+}:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisel', V E; Troshin, A E; Shcherbitskii, V G; Kuleshov, N V; Pavlyuk, A A; Brunner, F; Paschotta, R; Morier-Genoud, F; Keller, U

    2006-04-30

    The luminescence decay times are measured taking into account reabsorption for KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Yb(KYW:Yb) crystals with atomic concentrations of active ions from 0.2% to 30%. The radiative lifetime of Yb{sup 3+} ions was measured to be 233 {mu}s. The cw output power of 1.46 and 1.62 W was achieved with the slope efficiency 52% and 47% for Yb:KYW lasers with the atomic concentration of Yb{sup 3+} ions equal to 10% and 30%, respectively. Using a semiconductor mirror with a saturable absorber (SESAM) in the passive mode-locking regime, pulses of duration 194 and 180 fs were obtained at wavelengths of 1042 and 1039 nm for crystals with Yb{sup 3+} concentrations equal to 10% and 30%, respectively, the average output power being 0.63 and 0.75 W. (lasers and amplifiers)

  18. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Misewich, James A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-01-30

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.

  19. Investigation of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–WO{sub 3} ternary phase diagram: Isolation and crystal structure determination of the original La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vu, T.D.; Barre, M.; Adil, K.; Jouanneaux, A.; Suard, E.; Goutenoire, F.

    2015-09-15

    In the course of the exploration of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3}–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} ternary phase diagram, a new compound with the formula La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} was discovered. Its structure was determined from a combination of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}/nmc (no. 137) with the lattice parameters: a=10.0807(1) Å; c=12.5540(1) Å. The structure is built up from infinite ribbons of octahedra (W/Nb)O{sub 5} which are perpendicular to each other, lanthanum ions being distributed around these ribbons. The electrical properties of this compound were investigated on sintered pellets by means of complex impedance spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: Projection along the c-axis of cationic and anionic positions of a La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} unit cell. - Highlights: • The structure of La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} was resolved from the XRD and ND data. • The structure was described in many ways. • The ionic conduction property was studied.

  20. Origin of the improved photo-catalytic activity of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4}: A quantum mechanical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Honggang; Fan, Weiliu; Li, Yanlu; Cheng, Xiufeng; Li, Pan; Zhao, Xian

    2010-12-15

    Two different mechanisms for improving photo-catalytic activity in different types of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} are tentatively proposed, based on density function theory calculations. When the lattice O atom is substituted by one F atom, our calculations show that a reduced W{sup 5+} center adjacent to the doped F atom will act as a trap for the photo-induced electron, and will thus result in a reduction of electron-hole recombination and improvement of the photo-catalytic activity. For the interstitial F-doped model, partial F 2p states mixing with O 2p states localize above the top of the valence band and act as the frontier orbital level. Electronic transitions from these localized states induce a red shift of about 54 nm of the optical absorption edge. This work shows that F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} will be a promising photo-catalyst with favorable photo-catalytic activity in the UV region. -- Graphical Abstract: DFT calculations are used to investigate the origin of the improved photo-activity of monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4} induced by the substituted and interstitial F-doping. Two possible mechanisms are tentatively put forward according to the F-doping types. Display Omitted

  1. Novel Y doped Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst: Hydrothermal fabrication, characterization and enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity for Rhodamine B degradation and photocurrent generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Ranran; Huang, Hongwei; Tian, Na; Zhang, Yihe; Guo, Yuxi; Zhang, Tierui

    2015-03-15

    Visible-light-driven (VLD) Yttrium (Y) ion doped Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst has been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route. Incorporation of Y{sup 3} {sup +} into Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} lattice was successfully confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ICP analysis. The microstructure and optical property of the as-prepared samples have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The photocatalytic experiments indicated that the Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} showed a much higher photocatalytic activity than the pristine Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and photocurrent (PC) generation. This enhancement should be ascribed to the slightly increased band gap and the generated defects by Y{sup 3} {sup +} doping, thus resulting in a much lower recombination rate of the photoinduced electrons and holes. Such a process was verified by the photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In addition, the active species trapping experiments indicated that holes (h{sup +}) and superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) play important roles in the photocatalytic reaction. - Highlights: • Novel Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst has been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route. • Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} exhibits a much higher photocatalytic activity than pristine Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Holes (h{sup +}) and superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) are the two main active species. • Y{sup 3} {sup +} ion can result in a low recombination of photogenerated electron and hole.

  2. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  3. Influence of catalyst synthesis method on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 with V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-04-14

    We compared the molecular structures, surface acidity and catalytic activity for NO/NH3/O2 SCR of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts for two different synthesis methods: co-precipitation of aqueous vanadium and tungsten oxide precursors with TiO(OH)2 and by incipient wetness impregnation of the aqueous precursors on a reference crystalline TiO2 support (P25; primarily anatase phase). Bulk analysis by XRD showed that co-precipitation results in small and/or poorly ordered TiO2(anatase) particles and that VOx and WOx do not form solid solutions with the bulk titania lattice. Surface analysis of the co-precipitated catalyst by High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering (HS-LEIS) confirms that the VOx and WOx aremore » surface segregated for the co-precipitated catalysts. In situ Raman and IR spectroscopy revealed that the vanadium and tungsten oxide components are present as surface mono-oxo O = VO3 and O = WO4 sites on the TiO2 supports. Co-precipitation was shown for the first time to also form new mono-oxo surface VO4 and WO4 sites that appear to be anchored at surface defects of the TiO2 support. IR analysis of chemisorbed ammonia showed the presence of both surface NH3* on Lewis acid sites and surface NH4+* on Brønsted acid sites. TPSR spectroscopy demonstrated that the specific SCR kinetics was controlled by the redox surface VO4 species and that the surface kinetics was independent of TiO2 synthesis method or presence of surface WO5 sites. SCR reaction studies revealed that the surface WO5 sites possess minimal activity below ~325 °C and their primary function is to increase the adsorption capacity of ammonia. A relationship between the SCR activity and surface acidity was not found. The SCR reaction is controlled by the surface VO4 sites that initiate the reaction at ~200 °C. The co-precipitated catalysts were always more active than the corresponding impregnated catalysts. Finally, we ascribe the higher activity of the co-precipitated catalysts to the presence of

  4. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-activity and of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WO 3 and HPA based system for ultra high activity and stability of Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-high activity and stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Project Kick-Off Venue: Washington D.C. Presenter: John Turner Organization: NREL Date: Sept 28th, 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. "This presentation

  5. Optimization study of solid-state electrochromic devices based on WO[sub 3]/lithium-polymer electrolyte/V[sub 2]O[sub 5] structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Deb, S.K.; Czanderna, A.W.; Crandall, R.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Transmissive solid-state electrochromic devices based on the structure of WO[sub 3]/lithium-polymer electrolyte/V[sub 2]O[sub 5] were optimized for potential large-area window applications. The electrochromic layer thicknesses, polymer molecular weights, lithium-containing electrolytes, preassembly lithium-ion injection amounts, and transparent conductor substrates were systematically investigated for large optical modulation and fast response of the devices. The transmittance of the optimized device at 633 nm can be switched between 74 and 12% in 1 min. The coloring and bleaching voltages were [minus]1.8 and 1.2 V, respectively.

  6. UV absorption properties of ceria-modified compositions within the fluorite-type solid solution CeO{sub 2}-Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevire, Francois; Munoz, Francisco; Baker, Charles F.; Tessier, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Tessier@univ-rennes1.fr; Larcher, Olivier; Boujday, Souhir; Colbeau-Justin, Christophe; Marchand, Roger

    2006-10-15

    A new fluorite-type solid solution domain has been evidenced in the system (1-x) CeO{sub 2}-x/7 Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12}{open_square}{sub 2} using the amorphous citrate route. All the studied phases (0{<=}x{<=}1) crystallize in a cubic-type symmetry. Diffuse reflectance spectra reveal a strong optical absorption between 380 and 400 nm. All substituted compositions spectral selectivities are estimated suitable for application as inorganic UV absorbers. The non linear variation observed in the optical gap values between Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12} and CeO{sub 2} is attributed to the presence of the cerium 4f-block band. Additionally, Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity (TRMC) experiment and phenol photodegradation analyses carried out on the Ce{sub 0.81}Y{sub 0.16}W{sub 0.03}O{sub 1.95}{open_square}{sub 0.05} (x=0.19) composition do not indicate any photocalatytic activity for this material. - Graphical abstract: Diffuse reflectance spectra of the Ce-Y-W-O samples calcined at 1000 deg. C.

  7. Strain-induced orbital polarization and multiple phase transitions in Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Weiwei; Zhao, Bao; Yang, Zhongqin

    2013-11-28

    Electronic structures of double perovskite Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} with epitaxial strain are explored by using methods based on density functional theory. An in-plane compressive strain is found not only resulting in a semiconductor-metal transition (SMT), but also altering the magnetic structures, from different kinds of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic orders. Orbital polarization and different orbital occupancies of Mn d{sub z{sup 2}} and d{sub x{sup 2}?y{sup 2}} states, induced by the epitaxial strain, are employed to understand the SMT. The rich magnetic phase transitions are rationalized by a magnetic stabilization mechanism. Our results show that many technological applications may be carried out in the material with the control of epitaxial strain.

  8. Thermal stability and transport studies of (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upender, G.; Ramesh, Ch.; Mouli, V. Chandra

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Typical modulated DSC (NRHF and C{sub p}) results during a heating scan in the 85TeO{sub 2}-7.5Ag{sub 2}O-7.5WO{sub 3} glass sample. Research highlights: {yields} The addition of equal mol% of WO{sub 3} and Ag{sub 2}O to TeO{sub 2} increases the thermal stability. {yields} The 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5WO{sub 3}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O shows the highest thermal stability ({Delta}T = 237 {sup o}C). {yields} These glasses are more useful for drawing of optical fibers. {yields} The present glass system shows higher conductivity. -- Abstract: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR) and direct current (DC) conductivity studies have been carried out on (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system. The IR studies show that the structure of glass network consists of [TeO{sub 4}], [TeO{sub 3}]/[TeO{sub 3+1}], [WO{sub 4}] units. Thermal properties such as the glass transition (T{sub g}), onset crystallization (T{sub o}), thermal stability ({Delta}T), glass transition width ({Delta}T{sub g}), heat capacities in the glassy and liquid state (C{sub pg} and C{sub pl}), heat capacity change ({Delta}C{sub p}) and ratios C{sub pl}/C{sub pg} of the glass systems were calculated. The highest thermal stability (237 {sup o}C) obtained in 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O-22.5WO{sub 3} glass suggests that this new glass may be a potentially useful candidate material host for rare earth doped optical fibers. The DC conductivity of glasses was measured in temperature region 27-260 {sup o}C, the activation energy (E{sub act}) values varied from 1.393 to 0.272 eV and for the temperature interval 170-260 {sup o}C, the values of conductivity ({sigma}) of glasses varied from 8.79 x 10{sup -9} to 1.47 x 10{sup -6} S cm{sup -1}.

  9. Pumping-route-dependent concentration quenching and temperature effect of green up- and down-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingjing; Sun, Jiashi [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Jutao [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Fu, Shaobo; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key laboratory of Photo-electronic Materials, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A comparative study on the concentration quenching behaviors of green down- and up-conversion emissions was carried out for the first time, and the different concentration quenching mechanisms were analyzed. Secondly, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration. Highlights: ? Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er/Yb phosphors were prepared via a co-precipitation reaction. ? Morphology and structure of the phosphors were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? Concentration quenching mechanisms for down and up emissions were studied. ? Thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was studied via temperature sensing tech. - Abstract: Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors with various Er{sup 3+} concentrations and fixed Yb{sup 3+} concentration were synthesized via a co-precipitation method, and their crystal structure and morphology were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration quenching behaviors of green up- and down-conversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} were analyzed, and it was confirmed that the difference between quenching concentration for up- and down-conversion emissions resulted from the different population routes. The temperature sensing properties of the Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were studied, and it was found that the Er{sup 3+} doping concentration slightly affected the sensitivity, and Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors could be used in a broad temperature region for detecting temperature. Finally, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pentagon City Metro Station Pentagon City Metro Station Fashion Centre Fashion Centre Pentagon Row Pentagon Row Shuttle departs every 30 minutes From Hotel To Hotel 6:15 AM ...

  11. Cationic disorder and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge ordering in the B? and B? sites of Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} perovskite: a comparison with Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, C.A.; Saleta, M.E.; Pedregosa, J.C.; Snchez, R.D.; Alonso, J.A.; and others

    2014-02-15

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 2}WO{sub 9} and Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+/4+}{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P2{sub 1}/n); Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} is strongly disordered. By in-situ NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size (?MnO?) for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T?160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below T{sub C}=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime. - Graphical abstract: Comparison between the octahedron size and the magnetic behaviour for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} in the temperature region where the charge and magnetic order occur. Display Omitted - Highlights: Two novel Mn-containing double perovskites were obtained by solid-state reactions. Both double perovskites are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) determined by XRPD and NPD. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} contains Mn{sup 3+} while Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} includes mixed-valence cations Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} presents a charge-ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} evidenced by NPD. The magnetic and transport studies evidenced the charge ordering in Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}.

  12. {open_quotes}Nb{sub 2-x}P{sub 3-y}O{sub 12},{close_quotes} a novel Nb{sup v} oxophosphate with disordered cation vacancies in a Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zah-Letho, J.J.; Verbaere, A.; Jouanneaux, A.

    1995-05-01

    The title compound was prepared at 360{degrees}C, starting from Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. The orthorhombic unit-cell parameters were determined by electron and X-ray diffractions: a = 12.0819 (2) {angstrom}, b = 8.6848 (1) {angstrom}, c = 8.7452 (1) {angstrom}, space group Pbcn. Reitveld refinements from X-ray powder diffraction data, chemical analyses, and the measured density show that the basic structure consists of a three-dimensional framework of the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} structure type, with NbO{sub 6} octahedra and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra sharing corners, and that both Nb and P vacancies occur. The actual formula is close to Nb{sub 2-x}P{sub 3-y}O{sub 12}. Comparative spectroscopic studies of the title compound and of Nb{sub 3}(NbO){sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 7} confirm the occurrence of the vacancies, and thus an important local variation of the bond lengths near the defect sites. The presence of small amounts of H and N in the structure is discussed. Upon heating in air, the structure is preserved up to 900{degrees}C. The so-called {epsilon}-NbOPO{sub 4} has the same basic structure, and its existence seems questionable.

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    from: Jeffrey A. Smith, 1555 subject: Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure. ... Redmond, J. M., 1550, jmredmo@sandia.gov Smith, J. A., 1555, jasmith@sandia.gov Rath, ...

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 3 ) 2 *6H 2 O 0.6220 0.06341 HNO 3 0.01531 NaNO 3 0.1364 0.1391 NaF 0.001824 0.001860 ... 2 O 5.7 4.50 Mg(NO 3 ) 2 *6H 2 O 20.6 16.3 NaNO 3 36.7 29.0 Pb(NO 3 ) 2 1.9 1.50 (COOH) 2 ...

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  16. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:130) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S., Hansen, C. W., King, B. H., Outdoor PV Performance Evaluation of Three Different Models: Single-Diode, SAPM and Loss Factor Model, in: 28th European PV Solar Energy...

  1. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... reduce heating in the direction towards Panel 7. However, for this analysis, the bulk of ... equations were integrated through time using the Runge-Kutta method 6 . Error ...

  3. MESSAGE: WIA W/O CLOSING REF CLOSING REF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial ... Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws. X-ray services were provided by General ...

  4. SNL Letterhead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exceptional Service in the National Interest Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation Don J. Devoti P.O. Box 5800 Manager, Small Business Utilization Albuquerque, NM 87185- Phone: (505).284.4338 Fax: (505).845.9394 Email: djdevot@sandia.gov July 15, 2015 Sandia Supplier: Sandia National Laboratories has been advised by colleagues from other Department of Energy National Laboratories of fraudulent attempts by scam artists to procure goods from legitimate, existing

  5. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SITEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EA-1008 for CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 WR-3) Natrona County, Wyoming Prepared For U.S. Department of Energy Casper, Wyoming July 1995 OISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT is UNLIMITED& i Portions of this document be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original dOCUIIlent, c AGENCY: ACTION: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Continued Development - Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Naval Petroleum and Oil

  6. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exceptional Service in the National Interest Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration by Sandia Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 date: January 10, 2014 to: Leanna Minier, Org. 2554 from: Marvin E. Larsen, John Tencer, and Roy E. Hogan, Org. 1514 subject: Summary of MgO Bag and Room Model Team Executive Summary The salt truck fire of February 5th introduced heating to the mine air and resulted in reduction of the total airflow through the mine

  7. SNL Memohead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1454 date: January 30, 2015 to: Distribution from: Michael Kaneshige (2554), MS-1454 and Shane Snedigar (2554), MS-1454 subject: Cook-off Experiments with Surrogate WIPP Drum Contents Executive Summary A number of cook-off experiments were performed to provide understanding of potential thermal ignition of drum 68660 in the February 14, 2014 radiation release at WIPP. Testing was begun according to

  8. Pd/Ni-WO3 anodic double layer gasochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping

    2004-04-20

    An anodic double layer gasochromic sensor structure for optical detection of hydrogen in improved response time and with improved optical absorption real time constants, comprising: a glass substrate; a tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer coated on the glass substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer.

  9. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0034-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hand held hammer would be supplied by a 2.4 kW generator. The probe would remain in the ground for approximately one hour to ensure temperature stabilization. Upon stabilization,...

  12. DOI-BLM-NV-WO10-2014-0002-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NVN-086871 Proposed Action Ormat Nevada, Inc. (Ormat) is proposing up to five exploratory temperature gradient (TG) well locations to assess the geothermal resource of the Baltazor...

  13. Materials Data on Pb2WO5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. The W-WO[subscript 2] oxygen fugacity buffer (WWO) at high pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rebecca A. ; Wang, Yanbin ; Prakapenka, Vitali 1 ; UC) 2 + Show Author Affiliations NASA-JSC ( Publication Date: 2016-01-11 OSTI Identifier: 1234736 Resource Type: Journal ...

  15. Materials Data on Ca4Al6WO16 (SG:217) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on LiFe(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Cs(WO3)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)3 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on YbK(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Na5Nd(WO4)4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on K(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ba2WO3F4 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Fe(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on LiWO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on LiNi(WO4)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Ferroelastic twin structures in epitaxial WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Shinhee; Woo, Chang-Su; Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young; Sharma, Pankaj; Seidel, Jan; Song, Jong Hyun; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2015-12-21

    Tungsten trioxide is a binary oxide that has potential applications in electrochromic windows, gas sensors, photo-catalysts, and superconductivity. Here, we analyze the crystal structure of atomically flat epitaxial layers on YAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrates and perform nanoscale investigations of the ferroelastic twins revealing a hierarchical structure at multiple length scales. We have found that the finest stripe ferroelastic twin walls along pseudocubic 〈100〉 axes are associated with cooperative mosaic rotations of the monoclinic films and the larger stripe domains along pseudocubic 〈110〉 axes are created to reduce the misfit strain through a commensurate matching of an effective in-plane lattice parameter between film and substrate. The typical widths of the two fine and larger stripe domains increase with film thickness following a power law with scaling exponents of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4, respectively. We have also found that the twin structure can be readily influenced by illumination with an electron beam or a tip-based mechanical compression.

  7. Materials Data on CoWO4 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Sr2CoWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ba2MnWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ca2FeWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sc2(WO4)3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sr2MnWO6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sr2CdWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ba2SrWO6 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ba2CaWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on NaCr(WO4)2 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on KLu(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on SnWO4 (SG:198) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sr2MgWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Sr2MgWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on FeWO4 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr2CaWO6 (SG:59) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on BaWO4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Y2(WO4)3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on LiPr(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Co(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Pr(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Y6WO12 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Mn3WO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ba2SrWO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Li2WO4 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ho6WO12 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on H2WO4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on H(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Dynamics of the photochromic effect of WO{sub 3} (Book) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the basis of this model, a simple nonlinear rate equation is presented which accounts ... ed. Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany); Granqvist, C.G. ...

  16. WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 8nrelturner.pdf (4.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis Working Group ...

  17. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Revision 35 Final 6-27...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 7-1-2012 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  18. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R38 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 082913 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  19. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page 1 of -' Description of ... ERID-223251 * - E- WCRR-O-DOP0233, R.3: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox ...

  20. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R28 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Revision No .: 28 Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I ... stuck on the WCG drum lift, and to allow for processing waste at greater than 10 remhr. ...

  1. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R37 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 032013 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  2. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0002-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    These facilities would be maintained by a local contractor. * Solid wastes (paper trash and garbage) generated by the operations would be transported offsite to an...

  3. Microsoft Word - 01-3199 Rev 6 Final w_o signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and natural gas: state-level issues and perspectives July 12, 2016 RRC Mission To serve Texas by our stewardship of natural resources and the environment, our concern for personal and community safety, and our support of enhanced development and economic vitality for the benefit of Texans. History * Established in 1891 - Texas' oldest regulatory agency - Almost 100 years regulating oil and gas * Led by 3 statewide elected officials Jurisdiction * Oil and natural gas exploration and

  4. Materials Data on Hg2WO4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)6 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ba2CoWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Tl(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Na(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on NaNdMnWO6 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on CoPb2WO6 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-26

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on SrLaMnWO6 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Bi2WO8 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)10 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Cr2WO6 (SG:136) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ba2La2Zn(WO6)2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents ...

  19. A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Special...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    waiting to happen. The physical security efforts of the weapons labs (often called the "guns, guards, and gates") have had some isolated shortcomings, but on balance they have...

  20. Anne Arundel County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC a groSolar company EnergyWorks North America International Masonry Institute Jay Hall & Associates, Inc. Synergics UEK Corporation Places in Anne Arundel County, Maryland...

  1. File:Breakout Session Groups.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information) File usage The following page links to this file: Energy Data InitiativeResources Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFile:BreakoutSessionGro...

  2. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Environmental Management, Energy and Materials Research Gro)up Smith, Richard J. (Richard J. Smith) - Department of Physics, Montana State University Stefanopoulou, Anna ...

  3. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Renewable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detector Gro)up Buscaglia, Gustavo C. (Gustavo C. Buscaglia) - Departamento de Cincia da Computao, Universidade de So Paulo Go back to Individual Researchers ...

  4. Growind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: GroWind provides consulting services to development companies, landowners, economic development, and municipal and public utilities interested in developing wind...

  5. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  6. 20F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a (1954WO23) > 9 (1952AL26, 1952AL30) 5.406 0.017 1.63 b 2+ (1975AL27) 99.98 c 4.97 (1954WO23) 5.419 0.013 (1954WO23) 4.99 (1959AL06) 5.416 0.015 (1975AL27) 4.972...

  7. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 | Department of Energy Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents included in this listing are additional references not included in the Phase 2 Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Attachment F: Bibliography and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the

  8. Solar House in Milton, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features a DeSantis home that sports an 8.4-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) solar electric system manufactured by Evergreen Solar of Marlboro, Massachusetts, and installed by groSolar of...

  9. Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -M-24 GROUNDWATER WELL-DRILLING CHANGE PACKAGE Dear Mr. Martin: This letter is in response to HAB's advice 152 regarding the M-24 groWldwaterwell-drilling Tri- party Agreement ...

  10. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films Du, Yingge ; Zhang, Hongliang ; Varga, Tamas ; Chambers, Scott A. Reduction of ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl Photoactive Biological Systems. Small, Leo J ; Spoerke, Erik David ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Wolf, Steven ; ...

  13. I SAND95-2448C

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    self-ejecting combustible plumes for large-area heating; ignition aids for thermites; ... Generators, International Application WO 95104672, 1995. A. Gibson, L. D. Haws, and J. ...

  14. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  15. Fluid Submersible Sensing Device - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication WO2010151470A1.pdf (476 KB) Technology Marketing Summary The present invention relates to a fluid submersible sensing device and,...

  16. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic body comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa.

  17. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    biorefineries o Cost-competitive biofuel with conventional petroleum (wo ... F2F2 13 | Bioenergy Technologies Office * Engine re-light at altitude, polar climate, in ...

  18. Power Business Line Decision Forums, as of March 14, 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implementation - Rate Case 6 Renewable Budget Levels (wo rate credit) PFR PFR 7 Calpine Geothermal PFR Forecast Assumption - Rate Case Actual Implementation Cancellation -...

  19. White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes Basic ...

  20. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Michael G; Ohanessian, Lucy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Patel, Virendra; Holloway, Lois C

    2015-06-15

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy.

  1. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  2. In-situ growth of zinc tungstate nanorods on graphene for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Junling; Ao, Yanhui; Wang, Peifang

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/ZnWO{sub 4} (GZnWO{sub 4}) nanorod composite photocatalysts were prepared by a simple one-step method. Namely, the reduction of graphene oxide and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod occurred simultaneously in one single process. An enhancement in the photocatalytic activities were observed in GZnWO{sub 4} composites compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: GrapheneZnWO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was prepared for the first time. The as-prepared composite photocatalysts show high activity for dye degradation. Effect of graphene amount on the photocatalytic activity was investigated. - Abstract: Graphenezinc tungstate (GZnWO{sub 4}) hybrid photocatalysts were prepared by an in-situ growth method in which the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals occurred simultaneously. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of dye methylene blue (MB). An enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was observed for GZnWO{sub 4} hybrids compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light. This improvement was attributed to the following two reasons: increased migration efficiency of photo-induced electrons and increased adsorption activity for dye molecules. The effect of the amount of graphene on the photocatalytic activity was also investigated. Results showed that there was an optimum amount of 2%.

  3. Export is the default pathway for soluble unfolded polypeptides that accumulate during expression in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotto-Lavino, E.; Freimuth, P.; Bai, M.; Zhang, Y.-B.

    2011-09-01

    Several E. coli endogenous, cytoplasmic proteins that are known clients of the chaperonin GroEL were overexpressed to examine the fate of accumulated unfolded polypeptides. Substantial fractions of about half of the proteins formed insoluble aggregates, consistent with the hypothesis that these proteins were produced at rates or in amounts that exceeded the protein-folding capacity of GroEL. In addition, large fractions of three overexpressed GroEL client proteins were localized in an extra-cytoplasmic, osmotically-sensitive compartment, suggesting they had initially accumulated in the cytoplasm as soluble unfolded polypeptides and thus were able to access a protein export pathway. Consistent with this model, an intrinsically unfoldable, hydrophilic, non-secretory polypeptide was quantitatively exported from the E. coli cytoplasm into an osmotically-sensitive compartment. Our results support the conclusion that a soluble, unfolded conformation alone may be sufficient to direct non-secretory polypeptides into a protein export pathway for signal peptide-independent translocation across the inner membrane, and that export rather than degradation by cytoplasmic proteases is the preferred fate for newly-synthesized, soluble, unfolded polypeptides that accumulate in the cytoplasm. The stable folded conformation of exported GroEL client proteins further suggests that the requirement for GroEL may be conditional on protein folding in the molecularly-crowded environment of the cytoplasm.

  4. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated MolybdateTungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ 0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition with our 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.

  5. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated Molybdate–Tungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 –CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ –0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³⁺-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW₁₋xMoxO₄ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmore » our 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³⁺ activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.« less

  6. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu? 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmoreour 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.less

  7. Women of Wind Energy Honor Wind Program Researchers | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This is an excerpt from the Second Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Chicago, Illinois-The Women of Wind Energy (WoWE) honored Ian Baring-Gould, Wind ...

  8. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1998-06-02

    A ceramic body is disclosed comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa. 4 figs.

  9. p

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AM-T. Thim her mt bow QDO protiow4 booewo oi tlm oandltloru wbloh wo rooogrisod would k onoountond dw to tb mpllr homogealty oi tb mteerlal uul th random yr in rhloh it 11 pllod. ...

  10. Potl,,]) u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... You must receive notification of approval from the DOE Contracting Officer prior to commencing with wo beyond that currently approved. Note to Specialist: Crisllna Tyler 2.7.2012 ...

  11. David Turner! User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services Group Accounts and Allocations --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 Accounts There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * ...

  12. Mr. W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II 4th Floor 26 Federal Plaza New York, ... S. Lichtman, EPA R. Guimond, EPA C. Goddard, NYS bee: wo encls. V. De Carlo, PE-243 C. ...

  13. Status of Simonds Saw and Steel Co., Lockport, New York Bob Bowles

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    wsr 4.lJ7lr.7 lE 23 Attached are the files relating to the elimination of the ... Projects Office of Nuclear Energy Attachments bee: G. Turi, wo attachs. ...

  14. Women of Wind Energy Annual Luncheon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Women of Wind Energy (WoWE) annual luncheon, held each year during the American Wind Energy Association's WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, is a premier networking event and highly visible...

  15. OFFICZ OF OCCUPAIIOXAL EILhLlH h SAFZETY JAXRS FORRESTAL CAMPUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J* &*r, -A ti.:,?*-cl>- +ysics Gffict. s'wo mics of &jr. : hzs's retort 2nd Sqpcrr-Lng iosea for y& infCrn&ifcn 2nd Is: ThP 2, v-m -- --- , - --- ---- ---- --- . --- "c-- ...

  16. MiniBooNE Results / MicroBooNE Status! Eric Church, Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trigger ReconstructionpID: LArSoft LAr fill w.o. evacuation Surface Running UV Laser Calibration System Spring-Summer, 2014 16 February 22, 2014 MicroBooNE ...

  17. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Developmen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    homes (60 wo PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV. PDF icon Rural ...

  18. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflection High-Energy ...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/5-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Planning Memorandum BLMFS MOU for Leasing and Permitting - WO300-2006-08 Oil and Gas Gold Book Feedback | Add a Reference Print PDF Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/5-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Planning Memorandum BLMFS MOU for Leasing and Permitting - WO300-2006-08 Oil and Gas Gold Book Feedback | Add a Reference Print PDF Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  1. Memorandum of Understanding between DOI and DOA - Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOI and DOA - Implementation of Section 225 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Regarding Geothermal Leasing and PermittingLegal Abstract (BLM MOU WO300-2006-08; Forest Service...

  2. Solar photocatalytic activities of porous Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres by coupling with tungsten oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Yanqiang; Yang, Jikai; Li, Bing; Fu, Shencheng

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} was prepared by USP method combined impregnation method. Nb-doping extend the spectral absorption of TiO{sub 2} into visible spectrum. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} has a similar optical band gap as Nb-TiO{sub 2}. PL spectra indicate WO{sub 3} can accept the photoexcited electrons from Nb-TiO{sub 2}. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} shows higher activity than TiO{sub 2} and Nb-TiO{sub 2} under solar light. - Abstract: Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres modified with WO{sub 3} (Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}) was prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method combined with impregnation method. The microspheres were characterized with SEM, TEM, XRD, BET, photoluminescence and UVvis absorption spectra. The Nb-doping was observed to extend the spectral absorption of TiO{sub 2} into visible spectrum, and the absorption onset was red-shifted for about 88 nm compared to pristine TiO{sub 2} microspheres. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} microspheres do not display a red-shifted absorption edge compared with Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres. Under solar irradiation, Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} microspheres showed higher photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation compared with that of pure TiO{sub 2} microspheres and Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres, which could be ascribed to the extended light absorption range and the suppression of electron-hole pair recombination.

  3. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (?) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, ? increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, ?{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, ?{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  4. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanks, H.R.; Bevolo, A.J.; Danielson, G.C.; Weber, M.F.

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A/sub x/WO/sub 3/ where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt/sub y/WO/sub 3/ where y is at least 0.8.

  5. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanks, Howard R.; Bevolo, Albert J.; Danielson, Gordon C.; Weber, Michael F.

    1980-11-04

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

  6. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  7. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  8. New scheelite-type oxynitrides in systems RWO{sub 3}N-AWO{sub 4} (R = rare-earth element; A = Ca, Sr) from precursors obtained by the citrate route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevire, Francois; Tessier, Franck; Marchand, Roger

    2004-06-08

    RWO{sub 3}N oxynitrides were isolated as single phases for R=Nd and Pr, after thermal ammonolysis of reactive precursors prepared using the citrate complexation/calcination route. Both stoichiometric compounds crystallize with a scheelite-type tetragonal unit cell, with a=5.2821(3) A, c=11.5893(8) A (NdWO{sub 3}N) and a=5.299(3) A, c=11.631(9) A (PrWO{sub 3}N). Neutron diffraction experiments performed on the Nd-phase did not evidence any oxygen/nitrogen order within the scheelite anionic subnetwork (space group: I4{sub 1}/a). (Nd,A)W(O,N){sub 4} (A=Ca, Sr) solid solution domains were identified between NdWO{sub 3}N and the AWO{sub 4} oxide composition.

  9. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  10. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  11. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2006-02-21

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  12. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.

    2001-01-01

    Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

  13. A=20N (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.770 ± 0.050 MeV (1995AU04). It has been observed in heavy-ion transfer (1989OR03) and projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1988DUZT, 1988MU08, 1990MU06, 1991OR01) and in target fragmentation reactions (1988WO09, 1991RE02, 1993WOZZ). See also the review (1988VI1D). Mass measurements were reported in (1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1989OR03, 1991OR01, 1993WOZZ). Nuclear matter rms radii have been derived from

  14. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  15. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  16. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  17. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Rural Development, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 w/o PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV

  19. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  20. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  1. Si composite electrode with Li metal doping for advanced lithium-ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Gao; Xun, Shidi; Battaglia, Vincent

    2015-12-15

    A silicon electrode is described, formed by combining silicon powder, a conductive binder, and SLMP.TM. powder from FMC Corporation to make a hybrid electrode system, useful in lithium-ion batteries. In one embodiment the binder is a conductive polymer such as described in PCT Published Application WO 2010/135248 A1.

  2. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  3. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See also (1989PO1K, 1990LO11). 19 C (Fig. 4) 19 C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeVA argon ...

  4. A=14Be (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    +)14B reaction (1984GI09), in the interaction of 30 MeVA 18O ions with 181Ta (1986CU01) and in the spallation of thorium by 800 MeV protons (1988WO09). See also (1986AJ01). ...

  5. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    + ) 14 B reaction (1984GI09), in the interaction of 30 MeVA 18 O ions with 181 Ta (1986CU01) and in the spallation of thorium by 800 MeV protons (1988WO09). See also (1986AJ01). ...

  6. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! New User Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  7. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! NUG New User Training...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  8. 02-AccountsAllocations-Turner.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  9. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  10. TO: A. B. GrenFnpr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    November 23, 1'343 . TO: A. B. GrenFnpr "rom: J. 1, Simmo;f:3 In Ra: WoLvsrine Tube ...

  11. WASHINGTON. DC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASHINGTON. DC. tzr.~Dfak nuf, Ama fall- II* 8. Atoalc l%mqy Camlealnn . . . . ,L:,. ' ,. 8ta loui Are0 offlaa " . . : ' ; ,.' ~. ._ ; . . ..!"C.. ,:. . . ..~.;~..?n:,.;,, ,_ ," .L,: ' ..: ' I I. P.O. Box 36 ,, ,,,,: ,.,.:... . . Brorarw Btotlrn . St. Louis, $105cnlr1 =- %A. WO. LB - FCA Fbn. A. Dfcklooa, V?,ao huralb$

  12. FY 1993 Projection Capability Assurance Program waste and hazard minimization. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, L.D.; Homan, D.A.

    1993-01-15

    Waste and hazard minimization efforts in the following areas are described: (1) environmentally responsive cleaning, (2) hazardous material exposure, (3) explosive processing, (4) flex circuit manufacturing, (5) tritium capture w/o conversion to water, (6) ES&H compatible pyrotechnic materials, and (7) remote explosive component assembly.

  13. Cycloaliphatic epoxide-based photocured gelled electrolytes for secondary lithium battery applications; Electrochemical kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-06-01

    Cycloaliphatic epoxide-based thin gelled films prepared by ultraviolet photocuring were characterized electrochemically. Mixtures of ethylene carbonate and various organic liquids in different volume ratios were used as solvents. General composition of the electrolyte was cycloaliphatic epoxide (being sold under the trade name ENVIBAR by Union Carbide) 10 to 28 weight percent (w/o), polyethylene oxide (200,000 Mw) 4 to 10 w/o, LiAsF[sub 6], 6 to 22 w/o, and mixed solvent (of different volume ratios) 80 to 40 w/o. Thin gelled films were formed on lithium (Li) electrodes and subjected to electrochemical studies. Typical values of bulk electrolyte specific conductivity and interfacial resistance obtained from ac impedance and dc measurements at room temperatures are 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] S/cm and 3.2 [Omega] cm[sup 2], respectively. Charge/discharge characteristics of the cells of the Li/electrolyte/TiS[sub 2] type were evaluated. Cathode utilization was only 33% of the total capacity.

  14. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  15. Chattan

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ...

  16. A=6He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987YA16, 1988AL1G, 1988LI1A, 1988ST06, 1988TA1A, 1988WO10). Applications: (1985TA1D). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1983JU01, 1984WA1J). Reactions involving pions,...

  17. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ...

  18. I,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Distributicnc cy. lA- B. 2. Kirk (w-a. cy. IA) 2A, 3A - 8. H. Brown (want. cy. :?A,sA) P. Mb. Balrrara (w'eac. cy. 4A) R. J. Smith, Jr. (w&o. cy. 5A) 4A- 6A - 6A - 7A - SA- SA ...

  19. FINAL DOE/OR/21950-1016 RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY= PRAXAIR INTERIM...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... WO 9. Air pollutionEPA ;&g,&ation (40 C.F.R. 61). lQ6Q. 0.01 rem&. 1 in3.000 10. Drinking water ...

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of reduced europium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Gerke, Birgit; Morrison, Gregory; Hsieh, Chun H.; Smith, Mark D.; Pöttgen, Rainer; Makris, Thomas M.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} were grown from molten chloride fluxes contained in vacuum-sealed fused silica and structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. All four compounds crystallize in the tetragonal space group of I4{sub 1}/a and adopt the scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) structure type. The magnetic susceptibility of the reported compounds shows paramagnetic behavior down to 2 K. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. All the compounds were further characterized by EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: TOC Caption Two new reduced europium containing quaternary oxides, K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, and two previously reported ternary reduced oxides, EuWO{sub 4} and EuMoO{sub 4}, were synthesized via an in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} under flux method using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. - Highlights: • K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} have been synthesized and characterized. • The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. • Magnetic susceptibility data were collected. • {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content.

  1. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  2. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detectedmore » were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.« less

  3. A=13B (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13B) GENERAL: See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 13.1 preview 13.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1988WO04, 1989PO1K, 1989WO1E). Complex reactions involving 13B: (1985BO1A, 1986AV1B, 1986BI1A, 1986UT01, 1987AN1A, 1987BA38, 1987SA25, 1987VI02, 1988CA06, 1988RU01, 1988SA19, 1989KI13, 1989SA10, 1989YO02, 1990HA46). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1985KO39). Pion capture and reactions (See also reactions 5

  4. A=13C (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 13.4 preview 13.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models:(1985KW02, 1987KI1C, 1988MI1J, 1988WO04, 1989AM02, 1989PO1K, 1989WO1E, 1990FE01, 1990HO01, 1990VA01). Special states:(1984KO40, 1985GO1A, 1985RO1J, 1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1986XU02, 1987KI1C, 1988KW02, 1988MI1J, 1988RO1R, 1988ZH1B, 1989AM02, 1989OR02, 1989RO03, 1990HO01). Electromagnetic transitions and giant

  5. Doctor Hugh Elliot Montgomery Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 1 3 4 6 / J U N E 2 011 by Marco J. Lombardi and Ine Van Robays DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 13 4 6 / J U N E 2011 DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? 1 by Marco J. Lombardi 2 and Ine Van Robays 3 1 This paper was initiated when the second author was with the European Central Bank. Without implicating, we would like to thank Bahattin Büyüksahin, Gert Peersman, Jaap Bos, Julio

  6. Planarized arrays of aligned, untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rochford, C.; Limmer, S. J.; Howell, S. W.; Beechem, T. E.; Siegal, M. P.

    2014-11-26

    Vertically aligned, untangled planarized arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with Ohmic back contacts were grown in nanopore templates on arbitrary substrates. The templates were prepared by sputter depositing Nd-doped Al films onto W-coated substrates, followed by anodization to form an aluminum oxide nanopore array. The W underlayer helps eliminate the aluminum oxide barrier that typically occurs at the nanopore bottoms by instead forming a thin WO3 layer. The WO3 can be selectively etched to enable electrodeposition of Co catalysts with control over the Co site density. This led to control of the site density of MWNTs grown by thermalmore » chemical vapor deposition, with the W also serving as a back electrical contact. As a result, Ohmic contact to MWNTs was confirmed, even following ultrasonic cutting of the entire array to a uniform height.« less

  7. 08-Wrapup-Wasserman.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Steps You A re N ot A lone ! A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S FINCS c ode o n Edison. T he c olors represent t he a mount o f electric c urrent a long the magne'c field, and the b lack l ines s how magne'c fi eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful ! Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a c orner o f the e vent. C olors

  8. A=19C (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19C) 19C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeV/A argon ions (1987GI05) and in 44 MeV/A 22Ne on 181Ta, and in 112 MeV/A 20Ne on 12C (1994RAZW, 1995OZ02). The mass excess adopted by (1993AU05) is 32.23 ± 0.11 MeV. See also (1986VI09, 1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1991OR01). 19C is then stable with respect to decay into 18C + n by 0.16 MeV and into 17C + 2n by 4.35 MeV. The half-life was

  9. A=9Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1988AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983VA31, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1987KI1C, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1983MI1E, 1983SH38, 1985HA1P, 1985KW02, 1986CR1B, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1981PL1A, 1983AU1B, 1983GO28, 1983MI08, 1983VA31, 1984BA49, 1984KO40, 1984VA06, 1984WO09, 1984ZW1A, 1985GO1A, 1985HA1J, 1985PO19, 1985SH24,

  10. 17F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949BR27: 17F. 1954KO54: 17F. 1954WO20: 17F. 1958AR15: 17F. 1960JA12: 17F; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1969GA05: 17F; measured Iγ; deduced log ft, β-branching. 17O deduced levels. 1969WO09: 17F; measured T1/2. 1972AL42: 17F; measured T1/2. 1977AL20: 17F; measured T1/2. 1977AZ01: 17F; measured T1/2. 1987SEZL, 1987SEZR, 1988SE11: 17F(β+); measured β-anisotropy. 1989SE07: 17F(β+); measured β(θ), oriented nuclei. 1990FUZQ,