National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gro bdwt wo

  1. GroSolar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: GroSolar Name: GroSolar Address: 601 Old River Road Suite 3 Place: White River Junction, Vermont Zip: 05001 Sector: Solar Website: www.grosolar.com...

  2. 2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo 2016 GRO-Biz Conference and Idea Expo February 17, 2016 8:00AM MST to February 18, 2016 1:00PM MST 2016 GRO-Biz Conference & Idea Expo...

  3. NaWoTec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NaWoTec Jump to: navigation, search Name: NaWoTec Place: Rossdorf, Germany Zip: 64380 Product: Germany-based company developing 3-dimensional additive lithography using...

  4. TriWo AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TriWo AG Place: Trier, Denmark Zip: 54290 Sector: Solar Product: Developer of solar photovoltaic electricity generation project in Germany. Coordinates: 49.757256, 6.636521...

  5. GroSolar formerly Global Resource Options Inc | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that designs, distributes, and installs solar electric, hot water and air systems in the USA. References: groSolar (formerly Global Resource Options Inc)1 This article is a stub....

  6. Chesapeake Solar LLC a groSolar company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland Zip: 20794 Sector: Solar Product: Maryland-based company that installs solar electricity and solar hot water systems, which was acquired by groSolar in July 2008....

  7. Bureau of Land Management - WO-210 - Contact Information | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - WO-210 - Contact Information Abstract This page provides contact information for...

  8. Exploring the structural dynamics of the E. coli chaperonin GroEL using translation-libration-screw crystallographic refinement of intermediate states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhry, Charu; Horwich, Arthur L.; Brunger, Axel T.; Adams, Paul D.

    2004-08-12

    Large rigid-body domain movements are critical to GroEL-mediated protein folding, especially apical domain elevation and twist associated with the formation of a folding chamber upon binding ATP and co-chaperonin GroES. Here, we have modeled the anisotropic displacements of GroEL domains from various crystallized states, unliganded GroEL, ATP?S-bound, ADP-AlFx/GroES-bound, and ADP/GroES bound, using translation-libration-screw (TLS) analysis. Remarkably, the TLS results show that the inherent motions of unliganded GroEL, a polypeptide-accepting state, are biased along the transition pathway that leads to the folding-active state. In the ADP-AlFx/GroES-bound folding-active state the dynamic modes of the apical domains become reoriented and coupled to the motions of bound GroES. The ADP/GroES complex exhibits these same motions, but they are increased in magnitude, potentially reflecting the decreased stability of the complex after nucleotide hydrolysis. Our results have allowed the visualization of the anisotropic molecular motions that link the static conformations previously observed by X-ray crystallography. Application of the same analyses to other macromolecules where rigid body motions occur may give insight into the large scale dynamics critical for function and thus has the potential to extend our fundamental understanding of molecular machines.

  9. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of polyols over Pd/WO3-ZrO2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of polyols over PdWO3-ZrO2: Role of Pd-WO3 interaction and hydrodeoxygenation pathway Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become ...

  11. AmeriFlux CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCaughey, Harry [Queen's University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.. Site Description - Groundhog River (FCRN or CCP site "ON-OMW") is situated in a typical boreal mixedwood forest in northeastern Ontario (48.217 degrees north and 82.156 degrees west) about 80 km southwest of Timmins in Reeves Twp. near the Groundhog River. Rowe (1972) places the site in the Missinaibi-Cabonga Section of the Boreal Forest Region. In terms of ecoregion and ecozone, the site is in the Lake Timiskaming Lowlands of the Boreal Shield. The forest developed after high-grade logging in the 1930's. The average age in 2013 is estimated at beteen 75 and 80 years. The forest is dominated by five species characteristic of Ontario boreal mixedwoods: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss.), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.). The surficial geology is a lacustrine deposit of varved or massive clays, silts and silty sands. The soil is an orthic gleysol with a soil moisture regime classified as fresh to very fresh. Plonski (1974) rates it as a site class 1. The topography is simple and flat with an overall elevation of 340 m ASL.

  12. Effect of Structural Stress on the Laser Quality of Highly Doped Yb:KY(WO4)2/KY(WO4)2 and Yb:KLu(WO4)2/KLu(WO4)2 Epitaxial Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvajal, J.; Raghothamachar, B; Silvestre, O; Chen, H; Pujol, M; Petrov, V; Dudley, M; Aguilo, M; Diaz, F

    2009-01-01

    In this communication we demonstrate how the difference in laser performance of two highly doped (20 at %) epitaxial layers of Yb-doped KY(WO4)2 (KYW) grown on a KYW substrate and Yb-doped KLu(WO4)2 (KLuW) grown on a KLuW substrate, respectively, is related to the presence of structural stress in the epilayers, investigated by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography. From the results obtained, it is clear that the samples that show a larger amount of structural stress, Yb:KYW/KYW epitaxies, lead to lower efficiency in laser operation, giving a direct correlation between the existence and magnitude of such structural stress and the loss in efficiency of laser performance in such epitaxial layers which, from a spectroscopical point of view, are otherwise equivalent.

  13. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  14. Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl Photoactive Biological Systems. Abstract not provided. Authors: Small, Leo J ; Spoerke, Erik David ; ...

  15. CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs: Selective preparation, electronic structures, and photocatalytic activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Tingjiang; Li, Liping; Tong, Wenming; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yunjian; Li, Guangshe

    2011-02-15

    This work explored the selective synthesis of polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase by optimizing the experimental parameters. Systematic characterization indicated that both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies but different structural building blocks. Electronic structures calculations for both polymorphs demonstrated the same constructions of conduction band or valence band, while the conduction band widths of both polymorphs were quite different. Both CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs exhibited good photocatalytic activity for degradation of methyl orange under UV light irradiation. When comparing to some other well-known tungstate oxide materials, the photocatalytic activity was found to follow such a consequence, monoclinic CdWO{sub 4{approx}}monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CdWO{sub 4}>tetragonal CaWO{sub 4}. The specific photocatalytic activity of monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} was even higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (Degussa P25). The increased activity from the tetragonal CdWO{sub 4} to the monoclinic was consistent with the trend of the decreased symmetry, and this could be explained in terms of the geometric structures and electronic structures for both polymorphs. -- Graphical abstract: Monoclinic CdWO{sub 4} exhibited a much higher photocatalytic activity than the tetragonal form owing to the lower symmetry, more distorted geometric structure, and the dispersive band configuration. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Polymorphs of CdWO{sub 4} in either tetragonal or monoclinic phase were selectively synthesized. > Both polymorphs possessed similar spherical morphologies, while the relevant structural building blocks were different. > Photocatalytic activities of CdWO{sub 4} polymorphs depended strongly on the symmetry, geometric structure, as well as band configuration.

  16. Strain Accommodation By Facile WO6 Octahedral Distortion and Tilting During WO3 Heteroepitaxy on SrTiO3(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Varga, Tamas; Wang, Chong M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-27

    In this paper, we show that compared to other BO6 octahedra in ABO3 structured perovskite oxides, the WO6 octahedra in tungsten trioxide (WO3) can withstand a much larger degree of distortion and tilting to accommodate interfacial strain, which in turn strongly impact the nucleation, structure, and defect formation during the epitaxial growth of WO3 on SrTiO3(001). A meta-stable tetragonal phase can be stabilized by epitaxy and a thickness dependent phase transition (tetragonal to monoclinic) is observed. In contrast to misfit dislocations to accommodate the interfacial stain, the facial WO6 octahedral distortion and tilting give rise to three types of planar defects that affect more than 15 monolayers from the interface. These atomically resolved, unusual interfacial defects may significantly alter the electronic, electrochromic, and mechanical properties of the epitaxial films.

  17. MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Reyhani, Ali; Naseri, Naimeh; Moshfegh, Alireza Z.

    2013-08-15

    The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNTs weight percentages were prepared by solgel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using solgel derived method. TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

  18. Epitaxial growth of high quality WO3 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leng, X.; Pereiro, J.; Strle, J.; Bollinger, A. T.; Bozovic, I.

    2015-09-09

    We have grown epitaxial WO3 films on various single-crystal substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. While pronounced surface roughness is observed in films grown on LaSrAlO4 substrates, films grown on YAlO3 substrates show atomically flat surfaces, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The crystalline structure has been confirmed to be monoclinic by symmetric and skew-symmetric XRD. Furthermore, the dependence of the growth modes and the surface morphology on the lattice mismatch is discussed.

  19. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films for application in advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullapalli, S. K.; Vemuri, R. S.; Manciu, F. S.; Enriquez, J. L.; Ramana, C. V.

    2010-07-15

    Inherent processes in coal gasification plants produce hazardous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which must be continuously and efficiently detected and removed before the fuel is used for power generation. An attempt has been made in this work to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films by radio-frequency reactive magnetron-sputter deposition. The impetus being the use of WO{sub 3} films for H{sub 2}S sensors in coal gasification plants. The effect of growth temperature, which is varied in the range of 30-500 deg. C, on the growth and microstructure of WO{sub 3} thin films is investigated. Characterizations made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the effect of temperature is significant on the microstructure of WO{sub 3} films. XRD and SEM results indicate that the WO{sub 3} films grown at room temperature are amorphous, whereas films grown at higher temperatures are nanocrystalline. The average grain-size increases with increasing temperature. WO{sub 3} films exhibit smooth morphology at growth temperatures {<=}300 deg. C while relatively rough at >300 deg. C. The analyses indicate that the nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} films grown at 100-300 deg. C could be the potential candidates for H{sub 2}S sensor development for application in coal gasification systems.

  20. CTAB-assisted ultrasonic synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D. Gomez-Solis, C.; Torres-Martinez, Leticia M.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures were synthesized by ultrasound method assisted with CTAB. WO{sub 3} morphology was mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of ?50 nm. The highest surface area value of WO{sub 3} was obtained to lowest concentration of CTAB. WO{sub 3} activity was attributed to morphology, surface area and the addition of CTAB. WO{sub 3} nanoplates were able to causing almost complete mineralization of rhB and IC. - Abstract: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures have been prepared by ultrasound synthesis method assisted with CTAB using different molar ratios. The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the WO{sub 3} samples was complemented by analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed morphology mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of around 50 nm and length of 100500 nm. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to confirm the elimination of the CTAB in the synthesized samples. The specific surface area was determinate by the BET method and by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) it was determinate the band-gap energy (E{sub g}) of the WO{sub 3} samples. The photocatalytic activity of the WO{sub 3} oxide was evaluated in the degradation reactions of rhodamine B (rhB) and indigo carmine (IC) under Xenon lamp irradiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the samples containing low concentration of CTAB with morphology of rectangular nanoplates and with higher surface area value than commercial WO{sub 3}. Photodegradation of rhB and IC were followed by means of UVvis absorption spectra. The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 92% for rhB and 50% for IC after 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  1. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-activity and of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes These ...

  2. WO3/TiO2 nanotube photoanodes for solar water splitting with simultaneous wastewater treatment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured WO3/TiO2 nanotubes with properties that enhance solar photoconversion reactions were developed, characterized and tested. The TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization of Ti foil, and WO3 was electrodeposited on top of the nanotubes. SEM images show that these materials have the same ordered structure as TiO2 nanotubes, with an external nanostructured WO3 layer. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed an increase in the visible absorption relative to bare TiO2 nanotubes, and in the UV absorption relative to bare WO3 films. Incident simulated solar photon-to-current efficiency increased from 30% (for bare WO3) to 50% (for WO3/TiO2 composites). With the addition of diverse organic pollutants, the photocurrent densities exhibited more than a 5-fold increase. Chemical oxygen demand measurements showed the simultaneous photodegradation of organic pollutants. The results of this work indicate that the unique structure and composition of these composite materials enhance the charge carrier transport and optical properties compared with the parent materials.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical studies of nanostructured CaWO{sub 4} as platinum support for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farsi, Hossein; Barzgari, Zahra

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured CaWO{sub 4} was fabricated by co-precipitation method. • Platinum was electrodeposited onto the surface prepared nanostructured CaWO{sub 4}. • Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite demonstrate good oxygen reduction reaction activity. - Abstract: In the present work, we employed nanostructured calcium tungstate as a supporting material for platinum, a well-known electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction. The co-precipitation method has been utilized to synthesize nanostructured calcium tungstate from aqueous solution. The structure and morphology of the obtained CaWO{sub 4} were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Preparation of the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite catalyst was carried out by electrodeposition of Pt onto the surface of CaWO{sub 4}/graphite electrode. The physical properties of the catalyst were determined by scanning electron microscopy analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX). The electrochemical activity of the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated in acid solution by cyclic voltammetry measurements, linear sweep voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the Pt/CaWO{sub 4}-graphite has higher electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction in comparison with Pt/graphite catalyst.

  4. H.sub.2O doped WO.sub.3, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee

    2011-03-22

    An ultra-fast response, high sensitivity structure for optical detection of low concentrations of hydrogen gas, comprising: a substrate; a water-doped WO.sub.3 layer coated on the substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the water-doped WO.sub.3 layer.

  5. WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes | Department of Energy WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 8_nrel_turner.pdf (4.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis Working Group Meeting: January 2015 DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities

  6. Synthesis and characterization of novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO and its photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subash, B.; Krishnakumar, B.; Pandiyan, V.; Swaminathan, M.; Shanthi, M.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO was prepared by a simple solvothermal method. ► ‘Ag’ traps the electron from both ZnO and WO{sub 3} reducing electro–hole recombination. ► WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO is more efficient than Ag–ZnO, WO{sub 3}–ZnO, Ag–WO{sub 3} and undoped catalysts. ► WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO material will be much useful for the treatment of dye effluents. -- Abstract: A novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by a simple solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images, energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO was investigated for the degradation of RR 120 and RO 4 dyes in aqueous solution using UV-A light. WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO is found to be more efficient than Ag–ZnO, WO{sub 3}–ZnO, Ag–WO{sub 3}, commercial ZnO, prepared ZnO, TiO{sub 2}-P25 and TiO{sub 2} (Merck) at neutral pH for the mineralization of dyes. First time we have reported that novel WO{sub 3} loaded Ag–ZnO has been found to be very efficient for two azo dyes removal when compared to commercially available catalyst (Degussa P25, ZnO (Merck) and TiO{sub 2} (Merck)). The mineralization of dyes has been confirmed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. A mechanism of degradation has been proposed for the higher efficiency of WO{sub 3}–Ag–ZnO.

  7. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reyes-Gil, Karla R.; Stephens, Zachary D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2015-01-06

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NT) with WO3 electrodeposited on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its Ti substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. Several adhesion layers were tested, finding that a paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length and WO3 concentration on the EC performancemore » were studied. As a result, the composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast, and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2 materials« less

  8. Neutron diffraction and scattering study on M/sub x/WO/sub 3/ (M=Rb and K)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, M.; Fujishita, H.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.; Hoshino, S.; Grier, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    To study the relationship between the lattice instability and the superconductivity of nonstoichiometric hexagonal tungsten bronze, M/sub x/WO/sub 3/, neutron diffraction and scattering studies were made. Two types of the structural phase transitions were observed. One is associated with the distortion of the corner linked WO/sub 6/ octahedra. The other is associated with the ordering of the M atoms which partially fill the sites in the WO/sub 3/ cage. A long period modulation of the structure appears for some values of x at low temperature. The discussion on the x dependence of the superconducting transition temperature is presented.

  9. THE DISCOVERY OF A RARE WO-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STAR IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2012-12-01

    While observing OB stars within the most crowded regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud, we happened upon a new Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in Lucke-Hodge 41, the rich OB association that contains S Doradus and numerous other massive stars. At first glance the spectrum resembled that of a WC4 star, but closer examination showed strong O VI {lambda}{lambda}3811, 34 lines, leading us to classify it as a WO4. This is only the second known WO in the LMC, and the first known WO4 (the other being a WO3). This rarity is to be expected due to these stars' short lifespans as they represent the most advanced evolutionary stage in a massive star's lifetime before exploding as supernovae. This discovery shows that while the majority of WRs within the LMC have been discovered, there may be a few WRs left to be found.

  10. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D.; Martnez-de la Cruz, A.; Lpez-Cullar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ? WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ? WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BrunauerEmmittTeller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UVvis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  11. Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500700 C. Particularly, the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of WO{sub 3} nanostructures prepared by an aged-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huirache-Acuna, R.; Paraguay-Delgado, F.; Albiter, M.A.; Lara-Romero, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.

    2009-09-15

    Nanostructures of tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) have been successfully synthesized by using an aged route at low temperature (60 deg. C) followed by a hydrothermal method at 200 deg. C for 48 h under well controlled conditions. The material was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Specific Surface Area (S{sub BET}) were measured by using the BET method. The lengths of the WO{sub 3} nanostructures obtained are between 30 and 200 nm and their diameters are from 20 to 70 nm. The growth direction of the tungsten oxide nanostructures was determined along [010] axis with an inter-planar distance of 0.38 nm.

  13. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    t.~19'v Section 1- Originator Request Document No .: -~"Q, EP- WCRR- WO-DOP-0233 I Revision No.: 36 . Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page _1_ of -' Description of requested action (Attach numbered additional sheets if needed.): Revised procedure to incorporate EP-SO-1708, and add steps to clarify the amount of absorbent needed when processing Nitrate Salts. Also added Appendix 6 Administrative Control Lock Log Sheet. No additional hazards were identified during

  14. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Stephens, Zachary Dan.; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with WO3 electrodeposited homogeneously on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. A paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length on the current density and the EC contrast of the material were studied. The EC redox reaction seen in this material is diffusion- limited, having relatively fast reaction rates at the electrode surface. The composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2.

  15. Ab-initio structure determination of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambrier, M-H.; Kodjikian, S.; Ibberson, R.M.; Goutenoire, F.

    2009-02-15

    The structure of the low-temperature form of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} has been determined from laboratory X-ray, neutron time-of-flight and electron diffraction data. This tungstate crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group (no. 19) P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with Z=8, a=7.5196(1) A, b=10.3476(1) A, c=12.7944(2) A, and a measured density 7.37(1) g cm{sup -3}. The structure consists of tungsten [WO{sub 6}] octahedra and tetrahedral [OLa{sub 4}]. Tungsten polyhedra are connected such that [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup 10-} units are formed. - Graphical abstract: Projection of La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} structure along [100]. The structure could be described by [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup -10} structural unit formed by two corner-sharing octahedra.

  16. Enhancement of photocatalytic properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoparticles by Pt deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, R.M.; Aazam, E.S.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was used for photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange dye. Photocatalytic degradation was dependent on wt% of Pt reaction time, and weight of catalyst. Kinetic study revealed that the photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange dye followed the first order. Catalyst re-use revealed the present photocatalyst remain effective and active after five cycles. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoparticles were prepared using a hydrothermal method, and Pt was immobilized on the surface of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} via a photo-assisted deposition (PAD) method. The samples produced were characterized using X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence emission spectra, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and surface area measurements. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} samples was examined in the degradation of methyl orange dye (MO) under visible light. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results, which showed the presence of peaks assigned to the PtPt at approximately 2.50 ?, indicate the formation of nanoscale Pt features. The UVvis spectral analysis detected a red shift after loading the Pt into the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. The maximum degradation efficiency achieved was 100% with 0.3 Pt/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} as the photocatalyst after a 30-min reaction time. The catalyst could be reused without any loss in activity for the first five cycles.

  17. Generation of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts from solid solutions of tungsten in zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, Maria A.; Angeles-Chavez, Carlos; Bokhimi, Xim; Toledo-Antonio, J.A. . E-mail: jtoledo@imp.mx

    2006-08-15

    WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} samples were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =} species in solution from ammonium metatungstate at pH=10.0. Samples were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy filtered-TEM. The ammonia retained in the dried sample produced a reductive atmosphere to generate W{sup 5+} ions coexisting with W{sup 6+} ions to produce a solid solution of tungsten in the zirconia lattice to stabilize the zirconia tetragonal phase when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C. When the sample was annealed at 800 deg. C, the W atoms near crystallite surface were oxidized to W{sup 6+}, producing patches of WO{sub 3} on the zirconia crystallite. The HR-TEM analysis confirmed the existence of the solid solution when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C, and two types of crystalline regions were identified: One with nearly spherical morphology, an average diameter of 8 nm and the atomic distribution of tetragonal zirconia. The second one had a non-spherical morphology with well-faceted faces and dimensions larger than 30 nm, and the atom distribution of tetragonal zirconia. When samples were annealed at 800 deg. C two different zirconia crystallites were formed: Those where only part of the dissolved tungsten atoms segregated to crystallite surface producing patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on the crystallite surface of tetragonal zirconia stabilized with tungsten. The second type corresponded to monoclinic zirconia crystallites with patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on their surface. The tungsten segregation gave rise to the WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts. - Graphical abstract: WO {sub x} -ZrO{sub 2} catalysts were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =}species. Initially, the W atoms remained inside the crystallite after

  18. Epitaxial growth of high quality WO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, X.; Pereiro, J.; Strle, J.; Bollinger, A. T.; Bozovic, I.

    2015-09-09

    We have grown epitaxial WO3 films on various single-crystal substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. While pronounced surface roughness is observed in films grown on LaSrAlO4 substrates, films grown on YAlO3 substrates show atomically flat surfaces, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The crystalline structure has been confirmed to be monoclinic by symmetric and skew-symmetric XRD. Furthermore, the dependence of the growth modes and the surface morphology on the lattice mismatch is discussed.

  19. Synthesis and luminescent properties of spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yue [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China) [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Yu [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China); Hua, Ruinian, E-mail: rnhua@dlnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Na, Liyan [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)] [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process. Dependence of emission intensity on Sm{sup 3+} ions concentration in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor were also calculated via a nonlinear fitting by using the formula y = ax/(1 + bx{sup c}). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were prepared via a PVP assisted sonochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The D-D interaction is responsible for concentration quenching between Sm{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical energy transfer distances (R{sub c}) were obtained. -- Abstract: Spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process, and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The XRD results suggested that the prepared samples are single-phase. The FE-SEM images indicated that the prepared CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors are composed of many spindles with maximum average diameter of 150 nm and maximum average length of 500 nm. Under 404 nm excitation, the characteristic emissions corresponding to {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub J} (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2) transitions of Sm{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4} phosphors were observed. The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated to be (0.595, 0.404). The fluorescent concentration quenching of Sm{sup 3+} doped spindle-like phosphors was studied based on the Van Uitert's model, and it was found that the electric dipole-dipole (D-D) interaction is the dominant energy transfer mechanism between Sm{sup 3+} ions in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors. The critical energy transfer distance was

  20. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Zhang, Hongliang; Varga, Tamas; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-08

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  1. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction beam-induced structural and property changes on WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Y. Varga, T.; Zhang, K. H. L.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-08-04

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO{sub 3} as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO{sub 3}, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  2. Rapid preparation and magnetodielectric properties of trirutile Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaultois, Michael W.; Kemei, Moureen C.; Harada, Jaye K.; Seshadri, Ram

    2015-01-07

    Dense pellets of > 99% purity trirutile Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} were prepared in one step from starting oxides using spark plasma sintering, leading to simultaneous reaction and consolidation in 3 min at 1473 K. The reducing environment during processing may be partly responsible for the rapid reaction time in these oxides, with partial reduction of Cr{sup 3+} and the associated oxygen vacancies allowing rapid diffusion of cations. The low-temperature physical properties of Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} were examined, and a new transition at T = 5.9 K was observed as an anomaly in the temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity and a corresponding anomaly in the specific heat. A strong enhancement of the magnetocapacitance is observed below this transition temperature at T = 5.9 K and may be associated with a change from collinear spin order to more complex spin order.

  3. Flower-like and hollow sphere-like WO{sub 3} porous nanostructures: Selective synthesis and their photocatalysis property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jiarui; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gu, Cuiping; Fu, Gujun; Wang, Weizhi; Liu, Jinhuai

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Nanoflake-based flower-like and hollow microsphere-like hydrated tungsten oxide architectures were selectively synthesized by acidic precipitation of sodium tungstate solution at mild temperature. Several techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric-differential thermalgravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and BrunauerEmmettTeller N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption analyses, were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the products. The experimental results show that the nanoflake-based flower-like and hollow sphere-like WO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O architectures can be obtained by changing the concentration of sodium tungstate solution. The possible formation process based on the aggregationrecrystallization mechanism is proposed. The corresponding tungsten oxide three-dimensional architectures were obtained after calcination at 450 C. Finally, the obtained WO{sub 3} three-dimensional architectures were used as photocatalyst in the experiments. Compared with WO{sub 3} microflowers, the as-prepared WO{sub 3} hollow microspheres exhibit superior photocatalytic property on photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B due to their hollow porous hierarchical structures.

  4. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes-Gil, Karla R.; Stephens, Zachary D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2015-01-06

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NT) with WO3 electrodeposited on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its Ti substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. Several adhesion layers were tested, finding that a paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length and WO3 concentration on the EC performance were studied. As a result, the composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast, and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2 materials

  5. Structural peculiarities and Raman spectra of TeO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}-based glasses: A fresh look at the problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirgorodsky, Andreie; Colas, Maggy; Smirnov, Mikhael; Merle-Mejean, Therese; El-Mallawany, Raouf; Thomas, Philippe

    2012-06-15

    Ideas currently dominating the field of structural studies of TeO{sub 2}-based glasses are critically considered. A new physically and chemically consistent approach to the constitution of binary TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses is proposed, in which the reasoning coming from the Raman spectra reexamination are correlated with the basic principles of thermodynamics. Separation into two phases is suggested in such glasses. One phase is TeO{sub 2}, and another is Te(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} consisting of tetrahedral [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions and of Te{sup 4+} cations. Supplementary M{sub n}O{sub k} oxides added to the glasses are found incorporated in the former phase, thus producing solid solutions (for M=Ti, Nb) or tellurite compounds (for M=Nd). - Graphical abstract: Raman scattering spectra of TeO{sub 2}-based glasses with the following compositions (mol%): (a) pure TeO{sub 2}, (b) 85TeO{sub 2}-15WO{sub 3}, (c) 80TeO{sub 2}-15WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2} ,(d) 80TeO{sub 2}-10WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-5Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, (e) 80TeO{sub 2}-12WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-3 Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (f) 80TeO{sub 2}-10WO{sub 3}-5TiO{sub 2}-5Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural studies of TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses are critically considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxide glass formation is analyzed from Raman spectra and thermodynamic principles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Separation into two phases, TeO{sub 2} and Te(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is intrinsic in such glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition to TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses leads to produce solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition to TeO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} glasses leads to produce a tellurite compound.

  6. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3 with WO3-TiO2 Catalysts: Influence of Catalyst Synthesis Method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-02-02

    A series of supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts was prepared by a new synthesis procedure involving co-precipitation of an aqueous TiO(OH)2 and (NH4)10W12O41*5H2O slurry under controlled pH conditions. The morphological properties, molecular structures, surface acidity and surface chemistry of the supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts were determined with BET, in situ Raman, in situ IR and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) spectroscopy, respectively. Isotopic 18O-16O exchange demonstrated that tungsten oxide was exclusively present as surface WOx species on the TiO2 support with mono-oxo W=O coordination. In contrast to previous studies employing impregnation synthesis that found only surface one mono-oxo O=WO4 site on TiO2, the co-precipitationmore » procedure resulted in the formation of two distinct surface WOx species: mono-oxo O=WO4 (~1010-1017 cm-1) on low defect density patches of TiO2 and a second mono-oxo O=WO4 (~983-986 cm-1) on high defect density patches of TiO2. The concentration of the second WOx surface species increases as a function of solution pH. Both surface WOx sites, however, exhibited the same NO/NH3 SCR reactivity. The co-precipitated WO3-TiO2 catalysts synthesized in alkaline solutions exhibited enhanced performance for the NO/NH3 SCR reaction that is ascribed to the greater number of surface defects on the resulting TiO2 support. For the co-precipitated catalyst prepared at pH10, surface NH4+ species on Br nsted acid sites were found to be more reactive than surface NH3* species on Lewis acid sites for SCR of NO with NH3.« less

  7. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphor for white LED application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jingshan; CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Yin, Xin; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Huang, Fuqiang; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Jiang, Weizhong

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► NaLa{sub 1−x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. ► Compared with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} performed better luminescence properties. ► The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6} as a suitable host for RE{sup 3+}-doping. -- Abstract: Single phase of NaLa{sub 1−x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} (0 < x ≤1) (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphors were prepared by solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the morphology energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence were used to characterize the samples. Under the light excitation, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Sm{sup 3+} and NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Tb{sup 3+}, phosphors showed the characteristic emissions of Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 4,3,2,1}), Sm{sup 3+} ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 5/2,7/2,9/2}), and Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 6,5,4,3}), respectively. The intensity of the red emission for Na(La{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4})MgWO{sub 6} is 2.5 times higher than that of (Y{sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 3} under blue light irradiation. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 394 nm and 464 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}G{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} phosphors as potential candidates for white light emitting diode pumped by UV or blue chip.

  8. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ► Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ► By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ► XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ► TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  9. Highly efficient visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaiwichian, Saranyoo; Inceesungvorn, Burapat; Wetchakun, Khatcharin; Phanichphant, Sukon; Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong; Wetchakun, Natda

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were obtained using hydrothermal method. Physicochemical properties played a significant role on photocatalytic efficiency. Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterogeneous structures were greatly enhanced for degradation of MB. A tentative mechanism of charge transfer process in MB degradation was proposed. - Abstract: The Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Physical properties of the heterojunction photocatalyst samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The XRD results indicated that BiVO{sub 4} retain monoclinic and tetragonal structures, while Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} presented as orthorhombic structure. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) adsorptiondesorption of nitrogen gas for specific surface area determination at the temperature of liquid nitrogen was performed on all samples. UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra (UVvis DRS) were used to identify the absorption range and band gap energy of the heterojunction photocatalysts. The photocatalytic performance of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts was studied via the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The results indicated that the heterojunction photocatalyst at 0.5:0.5 mole ratio of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}:BiVO{sub 4} shows the highest photocatalytic activity.

  10. Photocatalytic activity and stability of TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcel, Radu Adrian; Andronic, Luminita Duta, Anca

    2012-08-15

    Photocatalysis represents a viable option for complete degrading the dye molecules resulted in the textile industry, up to products that do not represent environmental threats. The photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange has been investigated using TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3} and mixed thin films. The photodegradation efficiency is examined in correlation with the experimental parameters (irradiation time, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition and stability), along with the morphology and crystallinity data. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition increases the photodegradation efficiency by providing additional hydroxyl groups and further reducing the recombination of the electron-hole pairs by reacting with the electrons at the catalyst interface. To test the stability of the photocatalytic films in long time running processes, batch series of experiments were conducted using contact periods up to 9 days. The results show that the thin films maintained their photocatalytic properties confirming their stability and viability for up-scaling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3} and mixed thin films Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the photocatalytic activity and photocatalyst stability over a period up to 9 days of continuous irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of medium pH and oxidizing agent (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was analyzed.

  11. Visible light-induced photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3} films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imai, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Maiko; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2012-05-15

    The authors examined the photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} films (thickness 500-600 nm) deposited on a fused quartz substrate heated at 350-800 deg. C by dc reactive magnetron sputtering using a W metal target under the O{sub 2} gas pressure from 1.0 to 5.0 Pa. Films deposited at 800 deg. C under 5.0 Pa have excellent crystallinity of triclinic, P1(1) structure and a large surface area, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Exposure of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) adsorbed onto the film surface to ultraviolet, visible, or standard fluorescence light induces oxidative photocatalytic decomposition indicated by a decrease in CH{sub 3}CHO concentration and generation of CO{sub 2} gas. For all three types of irradiation, concentration ratio of decreased CH{sub 3}CHO to increased CO{sub 2} is about 1:1, suggesting the possible presence of intermediates. The sputter-deposited WO{sub 3} film can be a good candidate as a visible light-responsive photocatalyst.

  12. Electrosprayed heterojunction WO{sub 3}/BiVO{sub 4} films with nanotextured pillar structure for enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mali, Mukund G.; Yoon, Hyun; Yoon, Sam S.; Kim, Min-woo; Swihart, Mark T.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate that the addition of a tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) layer beneath a bismuth vanadate (BiVO{sub 4}) photocatalyst layer with a nanotextured pillar morphology significantly increases the photocurrent density in photoelectrochemical water splitting. The WO{sub 3}-BiVO{sub 4} bilayer films produced a photocurrent of up to 3.3 mA/cm{sup 2} under illumination at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} (AM1.5 spectrum). The bilayer film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoelectrochemical methods, which confirmed the superiority of the bilayer film in terms of its morphology and charge separation and transport ability. Both WO{sub 3} and BiVO{sub 4} were deposited by electrostatic spraying under open-air conditions, which resulted in nanotextured pillars of BiVO{sub 4} atop a smooth WO{sub 3} film. The optimal coating conditions are also reported.

  13. A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Special...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A P P E N D I X A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Report on Security Problems at the U.S. Department of Energy A Special Investigative Panel President's...

  14. Enhanced photoluminescence of SrWO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter, Anthuvan John Banu, I. B. Shameem

    2015-06-24

    Optically efficient europium activated alkaline earth metal tungstate nano phosphor (SrWO{sub 4}) with different doping concentrations have been synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid state metathesis reaction at room temperature for the first time. The XRD and Raman spectra results indicated that the prepared powders exhibit a scheelite-type tetragonal structure. FTIR spectra exhibited a high absorption band situated at around 854 cm{sup −1}, which was ascribed to the W–O antisymmetric stretching vibrations into the [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2−} tetrahedron groups. Analysis of the emission spectra with different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations revealed that the optimum dopant concentration for SrWO{sub 4}: x Eu{sup 3+} phosphor is about 8 mol% of Eu{sup 3+}.The red emission intensity of the SSM prepared SrWO{sub 4}: 0.08Eu{sup 3+} phosphors are 2 times greater than that of the commercial Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S: Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method. All the results indicate that the phosphor is a promising red phosphor pumped by NUV InGaN chip for fabricating WLED.

  15. Microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} photocatalyst and its photocatalytic activity under simulated solar light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Gyawali, Gobinda; Sekino, Tohru; Wohn Lee, Soo

    2013-01-15

    Simulated solar light responsive Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} composite photocatalyst was synthesized by microwave assisted hydrothermal process. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS), and BET surface area analyzer to investigate the crystal structure, morphology, chemical composition, optical properties and surface area of the composite photocatalyst. This photocatalyst exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B under simulated solar light irradiation. Dye degradation efficiency of composite photocatalyst was found to be increased significantly as compared to that of the commercial WO{sub 3} nanopowder. Increase in photocatalytic activity of the photocatalyst was explained on the basis of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect caused by the silver nanoparticles present in the composite photocatalyst. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful synthesis of Ag/AgCl/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic experiment was performed under simulated solar light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposite photocatalyst was very active as compared to WO{sub 3} commercial powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPR effect due to Ag nanoparticles enhanced the photocatalytic activity.

  16. Deuterium sites in the defect pyrochlore DTaWO/sub 6/: location from neutron power-diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotella, F.J.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Morosin, B.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Time-of-flight Rietveld refinement and Fourier synthesis of high-resolution powder diffraction data from DTaWO/sub 6/ led to the location of deuterium in partially occupied 48f sites of Fd3m (origin at 3m) as distances of 1.024(9) A at 300/sup 0/K and 1.021(10) A at 12/sup 0/K from each oxygen position. The deuterium sites form spirals in the interconnecting open channels parallel to (110) directions with distances between nearest neighbors of 2.653(2) A at 300/sup 0/K and 2.652(2) A at 12/sup 0/K. These results are consistent with both classical hopping and tunneling models of deuteron transport in this system.

  17. Luminescent and lasing characteristics of heavily doped Yb{sup 3+}:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisel', V E; Troshin, A E; Shcherbitskii, V G; Kuleshov, N V; Pavlyuk, A A; Brunner, F; Paschotta, R; Morier-Genoud, F; Keller, U

    2006-04-30

    The luminescence decay times are measured taking into account reabsorption for KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Yb(KYW:Yb) crystals with atomic concentrations of active ions from 0.2% to 30%. The radiative lifetime of Yb{sup 3+} ions was measured to be 233 {mu}s. The cw output power of 1.46 and 1.62 W was achieved with the slope efficiency 52% and 47% for Yb:KYW lasers with the atomic concentration of Yb{sup 3+} ions equal to 10% and 30%, respectively. Using a semiconductor mirror with a saturable absorber (SESAM) in the passive mode-locking regime, pulses of duration 194 and 180 fs were obtained at wavelengths of 1042 and 1039 nm for crystals with Yb{sup 3+} concentrations equal to 10% and 30%, respectively, the average output power being 0.63 and 0.75 W. (lasers and amplifiers)

  18. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Misewich, James A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-01-30

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.

  19. Investigation of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–WO{sub 3} ternary phase diagram: Isolation and crystal structure determination of the original La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vu, T.D.; Barre, M.; Adil, K.; Jouanneaux, A.; Suard, E.; Goutenoire, F.

    2015-09-15

    In the course of the exploration of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3}–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} ternary phase diagram, a new compound with the formula La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} was discovered. Its structure was determined from a combination of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}/nmc (no. 137) with the lattice parameters: a=10.0807(1) Å; c=12.5540(1) Å. The structure is built up from infinite ribbons of octahedra (W/Nb)O{sub 5} which are perpendicular to each other, lanthanum ions being distributed around these ribbons. The electrical properties of this compound were investigated on sintered pellets by means of complex impedance spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: Projection along the c-axis of cationic and anionic positions of a La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} unit cell. - Highlights: • The structure of La{sub 3}NbWO{sub 10} was resolved from the XRD and ND data. • The structure was described in many ways. • The ionic conduction property was studied.

  20. Origin of the improved photo-catalytic activity of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4}: A quantum mechanical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Honggang; Fan, Weiliu; Li, Yanlu; Cheng, Xiufeng; Li, Pan; Zhao, Xian

    2010-12-15

    Two different mechanisms for improving photo-catalytic activity in different types of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} are tentatively proposed, based on density function theory calculations. When the lattice O atom is substituted by one F atom, our calculations show that a reduced W{sup 5+} center adjacent to the doped F atom will act as a trap for the photo-induced electron, and will thus result in a reduction of electron-hole recombination and improvement of the photo-catalytic activity. For the interstitial F-doped model, partial F 2p states mixing with O 2p states localize above the top of the valence band and act as the frontier orbital level. Electronic transitions from these localized states induce a red shift of about 54 nm of the optical absorption edge. This work shows that F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} will be a promising photo-catalyst with favorable photo-catalytic activity in the UV region. -- Graphical Abstract: DFT calculations are used to investigate the origin of the improved photo-activity of monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4} induced by the substituted and interstitial F-doping. Two possible mechanisms are tentatively put forward according to the F-doping types. Display Omitted

  1. Novel Y doped Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst: Hydrothermal fabrication, characterization and enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity for Rhodamine B degradation and photocurrent generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Ranran; Huang, Hongwei; Tian, Na; Zhang, Yihe; Guo, Yuxi; Zhang, Tierui

    2015-03-15

    Visible-light-driven (VLD) Yttrium (Y) ion doped Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst has been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route. Incorporation of Y{sup 3} {sup +} into Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} lattice was successfully confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ICP analysis. The microstructure and optical property of the as-prepared samples have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The photocatalytic experiments indicated that the Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} showed a much higher photocatalytic activity than the pristine Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and photocurrent (PC) generation. This enhancement should be ascribed to the slightly increased band gap and the generated defects by Y{sup 3} {sup +} doping, thus resulting in a much lower recombination rate of the photoinduced electrons and holes. Such a process was verified by the photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In addition, the active species trapping experiments indicated that holes (h{sup +}) and superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) play important roles in the photocatalytic reaction. - Highlights: • Novel Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst has been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route. • Y-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} exhibits a much higher photocatalytic activity than pristine Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Holes (h{sup +}) and superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) are the two main active species. • Y{sup 3} {sup +} ion can result in a low recombination of photogenerated electron and hole.

  2. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  3. Influence of catalyst synthesis method on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 with V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-04-14

    We compared the molecular structures, surface acidity and catalytic activity for NO/NH3/O2 SCR of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts for two different synthesis methods: co-precipitation of aqueous vanadium and tungsten oxide precursors with TiO(OH)2 and by incipient wetness impregnation of the aqueous precursors on a reference crystalline TiO2 support (P25; primarily anatase phase). Bulk analysis by XRD showed that co-precipitation results in small and/or poorly ordered TiO2(anatase) particles and that VOx and WOx do not form solid solutions with the bulk titania lattice. Surface analysis of the co-precipitated catalyst by High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering (HS-LEIS) confirms that the VOx and WOx aremore » surface segregated for the co-precipitated catalysts. In situ Raman and IR spectroscopy revealed that the vanadium and tungsten oxide components are present as surface mono-oxo O = VO3 and O = WO4 sites on the TiO2 supports. Co-precipitation was shown for the first time to also form new mono-oxo surface VO4 and WO4 sites that appear to be anchored at surface defects of the TiO2 support. IR analysis of chemisorbed ammonia showed the presence of both surface NH3* on Lewis acid sites and surface NH4+* on Brønsted acid sites. TPSR spectroscopy demonstrated that the specific SCR kinetics was controlled by the redox surface VO4 species and that the surface kinetics was independent of TiO2 synthesis method or presence of surface WO5 sites. SCR reaction studies revealed that the surface WO5 sites possess minimal activity below ~325 °C and their primary function is to increase the adsorption capacity of ammonia. A relationship between the SCR activity and surface acidity was not found. The SCR reaction is controlled by the surface VO4 sites that initiate the reaction at ~200 °C. The co-precipitated catalysts were always more active than the corresponding impregnated catalysts. Finally, we ascribe the higher activity of the co-precipitated catalysts to the presence of

  4. Optimization study of solid-state electrochromic devices based on WO[sub 3]/lithium-polymer electrolyte/V[sub 2]O[sub 5] structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Deb, S.K.; Czanderna, A.W.; Crandall, R.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Transmissive solid-state electrochromic devices based on the structure of WO[sub 3]/lithium-polymer electrolyte/V[sub 2]O[sub 5] were optimized for potential large-area window applications. The electrochromic layer thicknesses, polymer molecular weights, lithium-containing electrolytes, preassembly lithium-ion injection amounts, and transparent conductor substrates were systematically investigated for large optical modulation and fast response of the devices. The transmittance of the optimized device at 633 nm can be switched between 74 and 12% in 1 min. The coloring and bleaching voltages were [minus]1.8 and 1.2 V, respectively.

  5. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-activity and of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WO 3 and HPA based system for ultra high activity and stability of Innovation for Our Energy Future ultra-high activity and stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC cathodes 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Project Kick-Off Venue: Washington D.C. Presenter: John Turner Organization: NREL Date: Sept 28th, 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. "This presentation

  6. UV absorption properties of ceria-modified compositions within the fluorite-type solid solution CeO{sub 2}-Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevire, Francois; Munoz, Francisco; Baker, Charles F.; Tessier, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Tessier@univ-rennes1.fr; Larcher, Olivier; Boujday, Souhir; Colbeau-Justin, Christophe; Marchand, Roger

    2006-10-15

    A new fluorite-type solid solution domain has been evidenced in the system (1-x) CeO{sub 2}-x/7 Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12}{open_square}{sub 2} using the amorphous citrate route. All the studied phases (0{<=}x{<=}1) crystallize in a cubic-type symmetry. Diffuse reflectance spectra reveal a strong optical absorption between 380 and 400 nm. All substituted compositions spectral selectivities are estimated suitable for application as inorganic UV absorbers. The non linear variation observed in the optical gap values between Y{sub 6}WO{sub 12} and CeO{sub 2} is attributed to the presence of the cerium 4f-block band. Additionally, Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity (TRMC) experiment and phenol photodegradation analyses carried out on the Ce{sub 0.81}Y{sub 0.16}W{sub 0.03}O{sub 1.95}{open_square}{sub 0.05} (x=0.19) composition do not indicate any photocalatytic activity for this material. - Graphical abstract: Diffuse reflectance spectra of the Ce-Y-W-O samples calcined at 1000 deg. C.

  7. Strain-induced orbital polarization and multiple phase transitions in Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Weiwei; Zhao, Bao; Yang, Zhongqin

    2013-11-28

    Electronic structures of double perovskite Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} with epitaxial strain are explored by using methods based on density functional theory. An in-plane compressive strain is found not only resulting in a semiconductor-metal transition (SMT), but also altering the magnetic structures, from different kinds of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic orders. Orbital polarization and different orbital occupancies of Mn d{sub z{sup 2}} and d{sub x{sup 2}?y{sup 2}} states, induced by the epitaxial strain, are employed to understand the SMT. The rich magnetic phase transitions are rationalized by a magnetic stabilization mechanism. Our results show that many technological applications may be carried out in the material with the control of epitaxial strain.

  8. Pumping-route-dependent concentration quenching and temperature effect of green up- and down-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingjing; Sun, Jiashi [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Jutao [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Fu, Shaobo; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key laboratory of Photo-electronic Materials, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A comparative study on the concentration quenching behaviors of green down- and up-conversion emissions was carried out for the first time, and the different concentration quenching mechanisms were analyzed. Secondly, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration. Highlights: ? Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er/Yb phosphors were prepared via a co-precipitation reaction. ? Morphology and structure of the phosphors were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? Concentration quenching mechanisms for down and up emissions were studied. ? Thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was studied via temperature sensing tech. - Abstract: Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors with various Er{sup 3+} concentrations and fixed Yb{sup 3+} concentration were synthesized via a co-precipitation method, and their crystal structure and morphology were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration quenching behaviors of green up- and down-conversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} were analyzed, and it was confirmed that the difference between quenching concentration for up- and down-conversion emissions resulted from the different population routes. The temperature sensing properties of the Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were studied, and it was found that the Er{sup 3+} doping concentration slightly affected the sensitivity, and Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors could be used in a broad temperature region for detecting temperature. Finally, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er

  9. Thermal stability and transport studies of (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upender, G.; Ramesh, Ch.; Mouli, V. Chandra

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Typical modulated DSC (NRHF and C{sub p}) results during a heating scan in the 85TeO{sub 2}-7.5Ag{sub 2}O-7.5WO{sub 3} glass sample. Research highlights: {yields} The addition of equal mol% of WO{sub 3} and Ag{sub 2}O to TeO{sub 2} increases the thermal stability. {yields} The 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5WO{sub 3}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O shows the highest thermal stability ({Delta}T = 237 {sup o}C). {yields} These glasses are more useful for drawing of optical fibers. {yields} The present glass system shows higher conductivity. -- Abstract: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR) and direct current (DC) conductivity studies have been carried out on (100 - 2x)TeO{sub 2}-xAg{sub 2}O-xWO{sub 3} (7.5 {<=} x {<=} 30) glass system. The IR studies show that the structure of glass network consists of [TeO{sub 4}], [TeO{sub 3}]/[TeO{sub 3+1}], [WO{sub 4}] units. Thermal properties such as the glass transition (T{sub g}), onset crystallization (T{sub o}), thermal stability ({Delta}T), glass transition width ({Delta}T{sub g}), heat capacities in the glassy and liquid state (C{sub pg} and C{sub pl}), heat capacity change ({Delta}C{sub p}) and ratios C{sub pl}/C{sub pg} of the glass systems were calculated. The highest thermal stability (237 {sup o}C) obtained in 55TeO{sub 2}-22.5Ag{sub 2}O-22.5WO{sub 3} glass suggests that this new glass may be a potentially useful candidate material host for rare earth doped optical fibers. The DC conductivity of glasses was measured in temperature region 27-260 {sup o}C, the activation energy (E{sub act}) values varied from 1.393 to 0.272 eV and for the temperature interval 170-260 {sup o}C, the values of conductivity ({sigma}) of glasses varied from 8.79 x 10{sup -9} to 1.47 x 10{sup -6} S cm{sup -1}.

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pentagon City Metro Station Pentagon City Metro Station Fashion Centre Fashion Centre Pentagon Row Pentagon Row Shuttle departs every 30 minutes From Hotel To Hotel 6:15 AM ...

  11. Cationic disorder and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge ordering in the B? and B? sites of Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} perovskite: a comparison with Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, C.A.; Saleta, M.E.; Pedregosa, J.C.; Snchez, R.D.; Alonso, J.A.; and others

    2014-02-15

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 2}WO{sub 9} and Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+/4+}{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P2{sub 1}/n); Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} is strongly disordered. By in-situ NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size (?MnO?) for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T?160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below T{sub C}=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime. - Graphical abstract: Comparison between the octahedron size and the magnetic behaviour for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} in the temperature region where the charge and magnetic order occur. Display Omitted - Highlights: Two novel Mn-containing double perovskites were obtained by solid-state reactions. Both double perovskites are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) determined by XRPD and NPD. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} contains Mn{sup 3+} while Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} includes mixed-valence cations Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} presents a charge-ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} evidenced by NPD. The magnetic and transport studies evidenced the charge ordering in Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}.

  12. {open_quotes}Nb{sub 2-x}P{sub 3-y}O{sub 12},{close_quotes} a novel Nb{sup v} oxophosphate with disordered cation vacancies in a Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zah-Letho, J.J.; Verbaere, A.; Jouanneaux, A.

    1995-05-01

    The title compound was prepared at 360{degrees}C, starting from Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. The orthorhombic unit-cell parameters were determined by electron and X-ray diffractions: a = 12.0819 (2) {angstrom}, b = 8.6848 (1) {angstrom}, c = 8.7452 (1) {angstrom}, space group Pbcn. Reitveld refinements from X-ray powder diffraction data, chemical analyses, and the measured density show that the basic structure consists of a three-dimensional framework of the Sc{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} structure type, with NbO{sub 6} octahedra and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra sharing corners, and that both Nb and P vacancies occur. The actual formula is close to Nb{sub 2-x}P{sub 3-y}O{sub 12}. Comparative spectroscopic studies of the title compound and of Nb{sub 3}(NbO){sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 7} confirm the occurrence of the vacancies, and thus an important local variation of the bond lengths near the defect sites. The presence of small amounts of H and N in the structure is discussed. Upon heating in air, the structure is preserved up to 900{degrees}C. The so-called {epsilon}-NbOPO{sub 4} has the same basic structure, and its existence seems questionable.

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    S., Hansen, C. W., King, B. H., Outdoor PV Performance Evaluation of Three Different Models: Single-Diode, SAPM and Loss Factor Model, in: 28th European PV Solar Energy...

  14. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

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    ... reduce heating in the direction towards Panel 7. However, for this analysis, the bulk of ... equations were integrated through time using the Runge-Kutta method 6 . Error ...

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 3 ) 2 *6H 2 O 0.6220 0.06341 HNO 3 0.01531 NaNO 3 0.1364 0.1391 NaF 0.001824 0.001860 ... 2 O 5.7 4.50 Mg(NO 3 ) 2 *6H 2 O 20.6 16.3 NaNO 3 36.7 29.0 Pb(NO 3 ) 2 1.9 1.50 (COOH) 2 ...

  17. SNL Letterhead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    utilize realistic looking letterheads and Purchase Orders with real Laboratory logos and, in some cases, claim to be a high level official within the Laboratory. Please be...

  18. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:130) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Pd/Ni-WO3 anodic double layer gasochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping

    2004-04-20

    An anodic double layer gasochromic sensor structure for optical detection of hydrogen in improved response time and with improved optical absorption real time constants, comprising: a glass substrate; a tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer coated on the glass substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer.

  3. SNL Letterhead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exceptional Service in the National Interest Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation Don J. Devoti P.O. Box 5800 Manager, Small Business Utilization Albuquerque, NM 87185- Phone: (505).284.4338 Fax: (505).845.9394 Email: djdevot@sandia.gov July 15, 2015 Sandia Supplier: Sandia National Laboratories has been advised by colleagues from other Department of Energy National Laboratories of fraudulent attempts by scam artists to procure goods from legitimate, existing

  4. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SITEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EA-1008 for CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 WR-3) Natrona County, Wyoming Prepared For U.S. Department of Energy Casper, Wyoming July 1995 OISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT is UNLIMITED& i Portions of this document be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original dOCUIIlent, c AGENCY: ACTION: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Continued Development - Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Naval Petroleum and Oil

  7. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exceptional Service in the National Interest Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration by Sandia Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 date: January 10, 2014 to: Leanna Minier, Org. 2554 from: Marvin E. Larsen, John Tencer, and Roy E. Hogan, Org. 1514 subject: Summary of MgO Bag and Room Model Team Executive Summary The salt truck fire of February 5th introduced heating to the mine air and resulted in reduction of the total airflow through the mine

  8. SNL Memohead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1454 date: January 30, 2015 to: Distribution from: Michael Kaneshige (2554), MS-1454 and Shane Snedigar (2554), MS-1454 subject: Cook-off Experiments with Surrogate WIPP Drum Contents Executive Summary A number of cook-off experiments were performed to provide understanding of potential thermal ignition of drum 68660 in the February 14, 2014 radiation release at WIPP. Testing was begun according to

  9. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from: Jeffrey A. Smith, 1555 subject: Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure. ... Redmond, J. M., 1550, jmredmo@sandia.gov Smith, J. A., 1555, jasmith@sandia.gov Rath, ...

  10. MESSAGE: WIA W/O CLOSING REF CLOSING REF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial ... Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws. X-ray services were provided by General ...

  11. Materials Data on K(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ba2WO3F4 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Fe(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on LiWO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on LiNi(WO4)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Ferroelastic twin structures in epitaxial WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Shinhee; Woo, Chang-Su; Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young; Sharma, Pankaj; Seidel, Jan; Song, Jong Hyun; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2015-12-21

    Tungsten trioxide is a binary oxide that has potential applications in electrochromic windows, gas sensors, photo-catalysts, and superconductivity. Here, we analyze the crystal structure of atomically flat epitaxial layers on YAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrates and perform nanoscale investigations of the ferroelastic twins revealing a hierarchical structure at multiple length scales. We have found that the finest stripe ferroelastic twin walls along pseudocubic 〈100〉 axes are associated with cooperative mosaic rotations of the monoclinic films and the larger stripe domains along pseudocubic 〈110〉 axes are created to reduce the misfit strain through a commensurate matching of an effective in-plane lattice parameter between film and substrate. The typical widths of the two fine and larger stripe domains increase with film thickness following a power law with scaling exponents of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4, respectively. We have also found that the twin structure can be readily influenced by illumination with an electron beam or a tip-based mechanical compression.

  17. Materials Data on CoWO4 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Sr2CoWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ba2MnWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Ca2FeWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Sc2(WO4)3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr2MnWO6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Sr2CdWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ba2SrWO6 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ba2CaWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on NaCr(WO4)2 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on KLu(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on SnWO4 (SG:198) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sr2MgWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Sr2MgWO6 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on FeWO4 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sr2CaWO6 (SG:59) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on BaWO4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Y2(WO4)3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on LiPr(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Co(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Pr(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Y6WO12 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Mn3WO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Ba2SrWO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Li2WO4 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ho6WO12 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on H2WO4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on H(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Dynamics of the photochromic effect of WO{sub 3} (Book) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the basis of this model, a simple nonlinear rate equation is presented which accounts ... ed. Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany); Granqvist, C.G. ...

  6. WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 8nrelturner.pdf (4.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis Working Group ...

  7. The W-WO[subscript 2] oxygen fugacity buffer (WWO) at high pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rebecca A. ; Wang, Yanbin ; Prakapenka, Vitali 1 ; UC) 2 + Show Author Affiliations NASA-JSC ( Publication Date: 2016-01-11 OSTI Identifier: 1234736 Resource Type: Journal ...

  8. Materials Data on Ca4Al6WO16 (SG:217) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on LiFe(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Cs(WO3)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)3 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on YbK(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Na5Nd(WO4)4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Microsoft Word - 01-3199 Rev 6 Final w_o signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and natural gas: state-level issues and perspectives July 12, 2016 RRC Mission To serve Texas by our stewardship of natural resources and the environment, our concern for personal and community safety, and our support of enhanced development and economic vitality for the benefit of Texans. History * Established in 1891 - Texas' oldest regulatory agency - Almost 100 years regulating oil and gas * Led by 3 statewide elected officials Jurisdiction * Oil and natural gas exploration and

  15. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)6 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ba2CoWO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Tl(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Na(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on NaNdMnWO6 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CoPb2WO6 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-26

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on SrLaMnWO6 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Bi2WO8 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)10 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Cr2WO6 (SG:136) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Hg2WO4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Revision 35 Final 6-27...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 7-1-2012 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  9. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R38 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 082913 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  10. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page 1 of -' Description of ... ERID-223251 * - E- WCRR-O-DOP0233, R.3: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox ...

  11. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R28 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Revision No .: 28 Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I ... stuck on the WCG drum lift, and to allow for processing waste at greater than 10 remhr. ...

  12. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R37 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 032013 NOTE This ... Review documentation is contained in the Document History File: TRU Waste Project Support ...

  13. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0034-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hand held hammer would be supplied by a 2.4 kW generator. The probe would remain in the ground for approximately one hour to ensure temperature stabilization. Upon stabilization,...

  14. DOI-BLM-NV-WO10-2014-0002-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NVN-086871 Proposed Action Ormat Nevada, Inc. (Ormat) is proposing up to five exploratory temperature gradient (TG) well locations to assess the geothermal resource of the Baltazor...

  15. Materials Data on Pb2WO5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0002-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    These facilities would be maintained by a local contractor. * Solid wastes (paper trash and garbage) generated by the operations would be transported offsite to an...

  17. Materials Data on Ba2La2Zn(WO6)2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents ...

  19. A T IT S A T IT S S C I E N C E SECURITY WO R ST B E S T A Special...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    waiting to happen. The physical security efforts of the weapons labs (often called the "guns, guards, and gates") have had some isolated shortcomings, but on balance they have...

  20. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Environmental Management, Energy and Materials Research Gro)up Smith, Richard J. (Richard J. Smith) - Department of Physics, Montana State University Stefanopoulou, Anna ...

  1. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Renewable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detector Gro)up Buscaglia, Gustavo C. (Gustavo C. Buscaglia) - Departamento de Cincia da Computao, Universidade de So Paulo Go back to Individual Researchers ...

  2. File:Breakout Session Groups.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information) File usage The following page links to this file: Energy Data InitiativeResources Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFile:BreakoutSessionGro...

  3. Growind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: GroWind provides consulting services to development companies, landowners, economic development, and municipal and public utilities interested in developing wind...

  4. Anne Arundel County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC a groSolar company EnergyWorks North America International Masonry Institute Jay Hall & Associates, Inc. Synergics UEK Corporation Places in Anne Arundel County, Maryland...

  5. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  6. 20F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a (1954WO23) > 9 (1952AL26, 1952AL30) 5.406 0.017 1.63 b 2+ (1975AL27) 99.98 c 4.97 (1954WO23) 5.419 0.013 (1954WO23) 4.99 (1959AL06) 5.416 0.015 (1975AL27) 4.972...

  7. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 | Department of Energy Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents included in this listing are additional references not included in the Phase 2 Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Attachment F: Bibliography and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the

  8. Solar House in Milton, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features a DeSantis home that sports an 8.4-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) solar electric system manufactured by Evergreen Solar of Marlboro, Massachusetts, and installed by groSolar of...

  9. Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -M-24 GROUNDWATER WELL-DRILLING CHANGE PACKAGE Dear Mr. Martin: This letter is in response to HAB's advice 152 regarding the M-24 groWldwaterwell-drilling Tri- party Agreement ...

  10. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic body comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa.

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl Photoactive Biological Systems. Small, Leo J ; Spoerke, Erik David ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Wolf, Steven ; ...

  12. I SAND95-2448C

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    self-ejecting combustible plumes for large-area heating; ignition aids for thermites; ... Generators, International Application WO 95104672, 1995. A. Gibson, L. D. Haws, and J. ...

  13. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  14. White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production WO3 and HPA Based System for Ultra-High Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts in PEMFC Cathodes Basic ...

  15. Power Business Line Decision Forums, as of March 14, 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implementation - Rate Case 6 Renewable Budget Levels (wo rate credit) PFR PFR 7 Calpine Geothermal PFR Forecast Assumption - Rate Case Actual Implementation Cancellation -...

  16. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films Du, Yingge ; Zhang, Hongliang ; Varga, Tamas ; Chambers, Scott A. Reduction of ...

  18. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    biorefineries o Cost-competitive biofuel with conventional petroleum (wo ... F2F2 13 | Bioenergy Technologies Office * Engine re-light at altitude, polar climate, in ...

  19. Fluid Submersible Sensing Device - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication WO2010151470A1.pdf (476 KB) Technology Marketing Summary The present invention relates to a fluid submersible sensing device and,...

  20. Comparison of Oncentra® Brachy IPSA and graphical optimisation techniques: a case study of HDR brachytherapy head and neck and prostate plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Michael G; Ohanessian, Lucy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Patel, Virendra; Holloway, Lois C

    2015-06-15

    There are a number of different dwell positions and time optimisation options available in the Oncentra® Brachy (Elekta Brachytherapy Solutions, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) brachytherapy treatment planning system. The purpose of this case study was to compare graphical (GRO) and inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) optimisation techniques for interstitial head and neck (HN) and prostate plans considering dosimetry, modelled radiobiology outcome and planning time. Four retrospective brachytherapy patients were chosen for this study, two recurrent HN and two prostatic boosts. Manual GRO and IPSA plans were generated for each patient. Plans were compared using dose–volume histograms (DVH) and dose coverage metrics including; conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity number (CN). Logit and relative seriality models were used to calculate tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Approximate planning time was also recorded. There was no significant difference between GRO and IPSA in terms of dose metrics with mean CI of 1.30 and 1.57 (P > 0.05) respectively. IPSA achieved an average HN TCP of 0.32 versus 0.12 for GRO while for prostate there was no significant difference. Mean GRO planning times were greater than 75 min while average IPSA planning times were less than 10 min. Planning times for IPSA were greatly reduced compared to GRO and plans were dosimetrically similar. For this reason, IPSA makes for a useful planning tool in HN and prostate brachytherapy.

  1. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  2. In-situ growth of zinc tungstate nanorods on graphene for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Junling; Ao, Yanhui; Wang, Peifang

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/ZnWO{sub 4} (GZnWO{sub 4}) nanorod composite photocatalysts were prepared by a simple one-step method. Namely, the reduction of graphene oxide and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod occurred simultaneously in one single process. An enhancement in the photocatalytic activities were observed in GZnWO{sub 4} composites compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: GrapheneZnWO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was prepared for the first time. The as-prepared composite photocatalysts show high activity for dye degradation. Effect of graphene amount on the photocatalytic activity was investigated. - Abstract: Graphenezinc tungstate (GZnWO{sub 4}) hybrid photocatalysts were prepared by an in-situ growth method in which the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals occurred simultaneously. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of dye methylene blue (MB). An enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was observed for GZnWO{sub 4} hybrids compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light. This improvement was attributed to the following two reasons: increased migration efficiency of photo-induced electrons and increased adsorption activity for dye molecules. The effect of the amount of graphene on the photocatalytic activity was also investigated. Results showed that there was an optimum amount of 2%.

  3. Export is the default pathway for soluble unfolded polypeptides that accumulate during expression in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scotto-Lavino, E.; Freimuth, P.; Bai, M.; Zhang, Y.-B.

    2011-09-01

    Several E. coli endogenous, cytoplasmic proteins that are known clients of the chaperonin GroEL were overexpressed to examine the fate of accumulated unfolded polypeptides. Substantial fractions of about half of the proteins formed insoluble aggregates, consistent with the hypothesis that these proteins were produced at rates or in amounts that exceeded the protein-folding capacity of GroEL. In addition, large fractions of three overexpressed GroEL client proteins were localized in an extra-cytoplasmic, osmotically-sensitive compartment, suggesting they had initially accumulated in the cytoplasm as soluble unfolded polypeptides and thus were able to access a protein export pathway. Consistent with this model, an intrinsically unfoldable, hydrophilic, non-secretory polypeptide was quantitatively exported from the E. coli cytoplasm into an osmotically-sensitive compartment. Our results support the conclusion that a soluble, unfolded conformation alone may be sufficient to direct non-secretory polypeptides into a protein export pathway for signal peptide-independent translocation across the inner membrane, and that export rather than degradation by cytoplasmic proteases is the preferred fate for newly-synthesized, soluble, unfolded polypeptides that accumulate in the cytoplasm. The stable folded conformation of exported GroEL client proteins further suggests that the requirement for GroEL may be conditional on protein folding in the molecularly-crowded environment of the cytoplasm.

  4. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated Molybdate–Tungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 –CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ –0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³⁺-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW₁₋xMoxO₄ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmore » our 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³⁺ activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.« less

  5. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu? 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmoreour 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.less

  6. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated MolybdateTungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ 0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition with our 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.

  7. David Turner! User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Services Group Accounts and Allocations --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 Accounts There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * ...

  8. Mr. W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II 4th Floor 26 Federal Plaza New York, ... S. Lichtman, EPA R. Guimond, EPA C. Goddard, NYS bee: wo encls. V. De Carlo, PE-243 C. ...

  9. Status of Simonds Saw and Steel Co., Lockport, New York Bob Bowles

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    wsr 4.lJ7lr.7 lE 23 Attached are the files relating to the elimination of the ... Projects Office of Nuclear Energy Attachments bee: G. Turi, wo attachs. ...

  10. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1998-06-02

    A ceramic body is disclosed comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa. 4 figs.

  11. p

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AM-T. Thim her mt bow QDO protiow4 booewo oi tlm oandltloru wbloh wo rooogrisod would k onoountond dw to tb mpllr homogealty oi tb mteerlal uul th random yr in rhloh it 11 pllod. ...

  12. Potl,,]) u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... You must receive notification of approval from the DOE Contracting Officer prior to commencing with wo beyond that currently approved. Note to Specialist: Crisllna Tyler 2.7.2012 ...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/5-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Planning Memorandum BLMFS MOU for Leasing and Permitting - WO300-2006-08 Oil and Gas Gold Book Feedback | Add a Reference Print PDF Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/5-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Planning Memorandum BLMFS MOU for Leasing and Permitting - WO300-2006-08 Oil and Gas Gold Book Feedback | Add a Reference Print PDF Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Memorandum of Understanding between DOI and DOA - Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOI and DOA - Implementation of Section 225 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Regarding Geothermal Leasing and PermittingLegal Abstract (BLM MOU WO300-2006-08; Forest Service...

  16. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflection High-Energy ...

  17. MiniBooNE Results / MicroBooNE Status! Eric Church, Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trigger ReconstructionpID: LArSoft LAr fill w.o. evacuation Surface Running UV Laser Calibration System Spring-Summer, 2014 16 February 22, 2014 MicroBooNE ...

  18. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Developmen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    homes (60 wo PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV. PDF icon Rural ...

  19. Women of Wind Energy Honor Wind Program Researchers | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This is an excerpt from the Second Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Chicago, Illinois-The Women of Wind Energy (WoWE) honored Ian Baring-Gould, Wind ...

  20. Women of Wind Energy Annual Luncheon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Women of Wind Energy (WoWE) annual luncheon, held each year during the American Wind Energy Association's WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, is a premier networking event and highly visible...

  1. OFFICZ OF OCCUPAIIOXAL EILhLlH h SAFZETY JAXRS FORRESTAL CAMPUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J* &*r, -A ti.:,?*-cl>- +ysics Gffict. s'wo mics of &jr. : hzs's retort 2nd Sqpcrr-Lng iosea for y& infCrn&ifcn 2nd Is: ThP 2, v-m -- --- , - --- ---- ---- --- . --- "c-- ...

  2. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanks, H.R.; Bevolo, A.J.; Danielson, G.C.; Weber, M.F.

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A/sub x/WO/sub 3/ where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt/sub y/WO/sub 3/ where y is at least 0.8.

  3. Fuel cell oxygen electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanks, Howard R.; Bevolo, Albert J.; Danielson, Gordon C.; Weber, Michael F.

    1980-11-04

    An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

  4. Solar photocatalytic activities of porous Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres by coupling with tungsten oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Yanqiang; Yang, Jikai; Li, Bing; Fu, Shencheng

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} was prepared by USP method combined impregnation method. Nb-doping extend the spectral absorption of TiO{sub 2} into visible spectrum. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} has a similar optical band gap as Nb-TiO{sub 2}. PL spectra indicate WO{sub 3} can accept the photoexcited electrons from Nb-TiO{sub 2}. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} shows higher activity than TiO{sub 2} and Nb-TiO{sub 2} under solar light. - Abstract: Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres modified with WO{sub 3} (Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}) was prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method combined with impregnation method. The microspheres were characterized with SEM, TEM, XRD, BET, photoluminescence and UVvis absorption spectra. The Nb-doping was observed to extend the spectral absorption of TiO{sub 2} into visible spectrum, and the absorption onset was red-shifted for about 88 nm compared to pristine TiO{sub 2} microspheres. Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} microspheres do not display a red-shifted absorption edge compared with Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres. Under solar irradiation, Nb-TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} microspheres showed higher photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation compared with that of pure TiO{sub 2} microspheres and Nb doped TiO{sub 2} microspheres, which could be ascribed to the extended light absorption range and the suppression of electron-hole pair recombination.

  5. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (?) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, ? increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, ?{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, ?{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  6. Pu-Zr alloy for high-temperature foil-type fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron reflux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  7. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  8. New scheelite-type oxynitrides in systems RWO{sub 3}N-AWO{sub 4} (R = rare-earth element; A = Ca, Sr) from precursors obtained by the citrate route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevire, Francois; Tessier, Franck; Marchand, Roger

    2004-06-08

    RWO{sub 3}N oxynitrides were isolated as single phases for R=Nd and Pr, after thermal ammonolysis of reactive precursors prepared using the citrate complexation/calcination route. Both stoichiometric compounds crystallize with a scheelite-type tetragonal unit cell, with a=5.2821(3) A, c=11.5893(8) A (NdWO{sub 3}N) and a=5.299(3) A, c=11.631(9) A (PrWO{sub 3}N). Neutron diffraction experiments performed on the Nd-phase did not evidence any oxygen/nitrogen order within the scheelite anionic subnetwork (space group: I4{sub 1}/a). (Nd,A)W(O,N){sub 4} (A=Ca, Sr) solid solution domains were identified between NdWO{sub 3}N and the AWO{sub 4} oxide composition.

  9. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  10. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  11. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2006-02-21

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  12. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.

    2001-01-01

    Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

  13. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  14. A=20N (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.770 ± 0.050 MeV (1995AU04). It has been observed in heavy-ion transfer (1989OR03) and projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1988DUZT, 1988MU08, 1990MU06, 1991OR01) and in target fragmentation reactions (1988WO09, 1991RE02, 1993WOZZ). See also the review (1988VI1D). Mass measurements were reported in (1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1989OR03, 1991OR01, 1993WOZZ). Nuclear matter rms radii have been derived from

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See also (1989PO1K, 1990LO11). 19 C (Fig. 4) 19 C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeVA argon ...

  16. A=14Be (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    +)14B reaction (1984GI09), in the interaction of 30 MeVA 18O ions with 181Ta (1986CU01) and in the spallation of thorium by 800 MeV protons (1988WO09). See also (1986AJ01). ...

  17. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    + ) 14 B reaction (1984GI09), in the interaction of 30 MeVA 18 O ions with 181 Ta (1986CU01) and in the spallation of thorium by 800 MeV protons (1988WO09). See also (1986AJ01). ...

  18. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! New User Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  19. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! NUG New User Training...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  20. 02-AccountsAllocations-Turner.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  1. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ...

  2. TO: A. B. GrenFnpr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    November 23, 1'343 . TO: A. B. GrenFnpr "rom: J. 1, Simmo;f:3 In Ra: WoLvsrine Tube ...

  3. WASHINGTON. DC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASHINGTON. DC. tzr.~Dfak nuf, Ama fall- II* 8. Atoalc l%mqy Camlealnn . . . . ,L:,. ' ,. 8ta loui Are0 offlaa " . . : ' ; ,.' ~. ._ ; . . ..!"C.. ,:. . . ..~.;~..?n:,.;,, ,_ ," .L,: ' ..: ' I I. P.O. Box 36 ,, ,,,,: ,.,.:... . . Brorarw Btotlrn . St. Louis, $105cnlr1 =- %A. WO. LB - FCA Fbn. A. Dfcklooa, V?,ao huralb$

  4. FY 1993 Projection Capability Assurance Program waste and hazard minimization. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, L.D.; Homan, D.A.

    1993-01-15

    Waste and hazard minimization efforts in the following areas are described: (1) environmentally responsive cleaning, (2) hazardous material exposure, (3) explosive processing, (4) flex circuit manufacturing, (5) tritium capture w/o conversion to water, (6) ES&H compatible pyrotechnic materials, and (7) remote explosive component assembly.

  5. Cycloaliphatic epoxide-based photocured gelled electrolytes for secondary lithium battery applications; Electrochemical kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-06-01

    Cycloaliphatic epoxide-based thin gelled films prepared by ultraviolet photocuring were characterized electrochemically. Mixtures of ethylene carbonate and various organic liquids in different volume ratios were used as solvents. General composition of the electrolyte was cycloaliphatic epoxide (being sold under the trade name ENVIBAR by Union Carbide) 10 to 28 weight percent (w/o), polyethylene oxide (200,000 Mw) 4 to 10 w/o, LiAsF[sub 6], 6 to 22 w/o, and mixed solvent (of different volume ratios) 80 to 40 w/o. Thin gelled films were formed on lithium (Li) electrodes and subjected to electrochemical studies. Typical values of bulk electrolyte specific conductivity and interfacial resistance obtained from ac impedance and dc measurements at room temperatures are 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] S/cm and 3.2 [Omega] cm[sup 2], respectively. Charge/discharge characteristics of the cells of the Li/electrolyte/TiS[sub 2] type were evaluated. Cathode utilization was only 33% of the total capacity.

  6. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Rural Development, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 w/o PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV

  8. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  9. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  10. Si composite electrode with Li metal doping for advanced lithium-ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Gao; Xun, Shidi; Battaglia, Vincent

    2015-12-15

    A silicon electrode is described, formed by combining silicon powder, a conductive binder, and SLMP.TM. powder from FMC Corporation to make a hybrid electrode system, useful in lithium-ion batteries. In one embodiment the binder is a conductive polymer such as described in PCT Published Application WO 2010/135248 A1.

  11. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  12. A=6He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987YA16, 1988AL1G, 1988LI1A, 1988ST06, 1988TA1A, 1988WO10). Applications: (1985TA1D). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1983JU01, 1984WA1J). Reactions involving pions,...

  13. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ...

  14. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  15. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  16. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  17. I,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Distributicnc cy. lA- B. 2. Kirk (w-a. cy. IA) 2A, 3A - 8. H. Brown (want. cy. :?A,sA) P. Mb. Balrrara (w'eac. cy. 4A) R. J. Smith, Jr. (w&o. cy. 5A) 4A- 6A - 6A - 7A - SA- SA ...

  18. FINAL DOE/OR/21950-1016 RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY= PRAXAIR INTERIM...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... WO 9. Air pollutionEPA ;&g,&ation (40 C.F.R. 61). lQ6Q. 0.01 rem&. 1 in3.000 10. Drinking water ...

  19. Chattan

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ...

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of reduced europium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Gerke, Birgit; Morrison, Gregory; Hsieh, Chun H.; Smith, Mark D.; Pöttgen, Rainer; Makris, Thomas M.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} were grown from molten chloride fluxes contained in vacuum-sealed fused silica and structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. All four compounds crystallize in the tetragonal space group of I4{sub 1}/a and adopt the scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) structure type. The magnetic susceptibility of the reported compounds shows paramagnetic behavior down to 2 K. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. All the compounds were further characterized by EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: TOC Caption Two new reduced europium containing quaternary oxides, K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, and two previously reported ternary reduced oxides, EuWO{sub 4} and EuMoO{sub 4}, were synthesized via an in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} under flux method using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. - Highlights: • K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} have been synthesized and characterized. • The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. • Magnetic susceptibility data were collected. • {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content.

  1. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  2. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detectedmore » were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.« less

  3. Planarized arrays of aligned, untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rochford, C.; Limmer, S. J.; Howell, S. W.; Beechem, T. E.; Siegal, M. P.

    2014-11-26

    Vertically aligned, untangled planarized arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with Ohmic back contacts were grown in nanopore templates on arbitrary substrates. The templates were prepared by sputter depositing Nd-doped Al films onto W-coated substrates, followed by anodization to form an aluminum oxide nanopore array. The W underlayer helps eliminate the aluminum oxide barrier that typically occurs at the nanopore bottoms by instead forming a thin WO3 layer. The WO3 can be selectively etched to enable electrodeposition of Co catalysts with control over the Co site density. This led to control of the site density of MWNTs grown by thermalmore » chemical vapor deposition, with the W also serving as a back electrical contact. As a result, Ohmic contact to MWNTs was confirmed, even following ultrasonic cutting of the entire array to a uniform height.« less

  4. 08-Wrapup-Wasserman.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Steps You A re N ot A lone ! A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S FINCS c ode o n Edison. T he c olors represent t he a mount o f electric c urrent a long the magne'c field, and the b lack l ines s how magne'c fi eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful ! Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a c orner o f the e vent. C olors

  5. A=13B (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13B) GENERAL: See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 13.1 preview 13.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1988WO04, 1989PO1K, 1989WO1E). Complex reactions involving 13B: (1985BO1A, 1986AV1B, 1986BI1A, 1986UT01, 1987AN1A, 1987BA38, 1987SA25, 1987VI02, 1988CA06, 1988RU01, 1988SA19, 1989KI13, 1989SA10, 1989YO02, 1990HA46). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1985KO39). Pion capture and reactions (See also reactions 5

  6. A=13C (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 13.4 preview 13.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models:(1985KW02, 1987KI1C, 1988MI1J, 1988WO04, 1989AM02, 1989PO1K, 1989WO1E, 1990FE01, 1990HO01, 1990VA01). Special states:(1984KO40, 1985GO1A, 1985RO1J, 1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1986XU02, 1987KI1C, 1988KW02, 1988MI1J, 1988RO1R, 1988ZH1B, 1989AM02, 1989OR02, 1989RO03, 1990HO01). Electromagnetic transitions and giant

  7. Doctor Hugh Elliot Montgomery Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 1 3 4 6 / J U N E 2 011 by Marco J. Lombardi and Ine Van Robays DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 13 4 6 / J U N E 2011 DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? 1 by Marco J. Lombardi 2 and Ine Van Robays 3 1 This paper was initiated when the second author was with the European Central Bank. Without implicating, we would like to thank Bahattin Büyüksahin, Gert Peersman, Jaap Bos, Julio

  8. 17F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949BR27: 17F. 1954KO54: 17F. 1954WO20: 17F. 1958AR15: 17F. 1960JA12: 17F; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1969GA05: 17F; measured Iγ; deduced log ft, β-branching. 17O deduced levels. 1969WO09: 17F; measured T1/2. 1972AL42: 17F; measured T1/2. 1977AL20: 17F; measured T1/2. 1977AZ01: 17F; measured T1/2. 1987SEZL, 1987SEZR, 1988SE11: 17F(β+); measured β-anisotropy. 1989SE07: 17F(β+); measured β(θ), oriented nuclei. 1990FUZQ,

  9. A=19C (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19C) 19C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeV/A argon ions (1987GI05) and in 44 MeV/A 22Ne on 181Ta, and in 112 MeV/A 20Ne on 12C (1994RAZW, 1995OZ02). The mass excess adopted by (1993AU05) is 32.23 ± 0.11 MeV. See also (1986VI09, 1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1991OR01). 19C is then stable with respect to decay into 18C + n by 0.16 MeV and into 17C + 2n by 4.35 MeV. The half-life was

  10. A=9Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1988AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983VA31, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1987KI1C, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1983MI1E, 1983SH38, 1985HA1P, 1985KW02, 1986CR1B, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1981PL1A, 1983AU1B, 1983GO28, 1983MI08, 1983VA31, 1984BA49, 1984KO40, 1984VA06, 1984WO09, 1984ZW1A, 1985GO1A, 1985HA1J, 1985PO19, 1985SH24,

  11. Structure determination of {alpha}-La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambrier, M-H.; Ibberson, R.M.; Goutenoire, F.

    2010-06-15

    The structure of the high temperature alpha form of La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15} has been determined ab-initio from high temperature laboratory X-ray and neutron time-of-flight data. This tungstate crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group (No. 20) C222{sub 1}, with Z=2, a=12.6250(2) A, b=9.1875(1) A, c=5.9688(1) A. The structure comprises [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}] infinite ribbons and is better described by the structural formula [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}]{sub 2}[WO{sub 5.5}]{sub 2}. Using this description we can understand the strong structural similarity of the present compound with compounds of the general composition BiM{sub 2}AO{sub 6} (M=Cu, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ca, Pb; A=P, As, V) described as [O{sub 2}M{sub 2}Bi][AO{sub 4}]. The [WO{sub 5.5}] entity implies oxygen disorder in the material. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the polyhedra around the tungsten atom. Atoms labelled in grey are occupied at 50%. Short oxygen-oxygen distances are marked. The polyhedra represents WO{sub 5.5} that is related to the structural unit W{sub 2}O{sub 11} unit. Alpha-La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15} could be described as [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}]{sub 2}[WO{sub 5.5}]{sub 2}.

  12. H ANDB OOK

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oc t o b e r 2 0 1 2 X - B a n d S c a n n i n g A R M P r e c i p i t a t i o n R a d a r ( X - S A P R ) H ANDB OOK Wo r k S u p p o r t e d b y t h e U . S . D e p a r t me n t ...

  13. MPI Multicore Torus Communication Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-05

    The MPI Multicore Torus Communications Benchmark (TorusTest) measues the aggegate bandwidth across all six links from/to any multicore node in a logical torus. It can run in wo modi: using a static or a random mapping of tasks to torus locations. The former can be used to achieve optimal mappings and aggregate bandwidths that can be achieved with varying node mappings.

  14. Compact power reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  15. T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wo major new components power the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade: A widened center stack that doubles the magnetic field strength and plasma current and quintuples the length of fusion experiments, and a second neutral beam injector that doubles the tokamak's heating power. Taken together, the new parts boost the NSTX-U operating conditions closer to those that will be found in a commercial fusion power plant. "This project was more complex than building the NSTX in the first

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weizsaecker Formula * Nuclear Binding energy * Two strong force terms, one electrostatic, one asymmetry and one pairing term Paired Spin * Half integral spins * Usually spin pairing between proton-proton, neutron-neutron but also proton-neutron * Asymmetry term based on Pauli so some neutrons must be in higher energy state * Even-even number of protons and neutrons are favorable * Same number of protons and neutrons have larger binding energy because they have paired spin TIARA My Project * WO3

  17. Section 67

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fast Atmospheric Signature Code for the Environment (FASE) H.E. Snell, W.O. Gallery, D.B. Hogan, and J.-L. Moncet Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G.P. Anderson, J.H. Chetwynd, and S. Miller Geophysics Directorate, Phillips Laboratory Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts J. Wang Atmospheric Chemistry Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Abstract Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric FASCODE for the Environment

  18. Semi-Autonomous Multi-Use Robot System and Method of Operation - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Semi-Autonomous Multi-Use Robot System and Method of Operation Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication WO2011056633A1.pdf (1,190 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThis invention relates in general to robotic systems and in particular to a semi- autonomous multi-use robot system and a method for

  19. DOE ZERH Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24” on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4” polysio rigid foam; basement with 2” XPS interior, 4” under slab, 4” exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  20. DOE ZERH Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders, The Adaptation Home, Geneva, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24” on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4” polysio rigid foam; basement with 2” XPS interior, 4” under slab, 4” exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  1. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Development,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts | Department of Energy Rural Development, Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Development, Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts Case study of Rural Development Inc. who worked with Building America research partner CARB to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 w/o PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV. Rural

  2. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic composition composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to aobut 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  3. Method of extracting iodine from liquid mixtures of iodine, water and hydrogen iodide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mysels, Karol J.

    1979-01-01

    The components of a liquid mixture consisting essentially of HI, water and at least about 50 w/o iodine are separated in a countercurrent extraction zone by treating with phosphoric acid containing at least about 90 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. The bottom stream from the extraction zone is substantially completely molten iodine, and the overhead stream contains water, HI, H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 and a small fraction of the amount of original iodine. When the water and HI are present in near-azeotropic proportions, there is particular advantage in feeding the overhead stream to an extractive distillation zone wherein it is treated with additional concentrated phosphoric acid to create an anhydrous HI vapor stream and bottoms which contain at least about 85 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. Concentration of these bottoms provides phosphoric acid infeed for both the countercurrent extraction zone and for the extractive distillation zone.

  4. Titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition and a process for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  5. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  6. Characterization of SAES St198 zirconium-iron-tin alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-10-13

    A waste minimization program to develop a non-oxidative stripper system based on metallic getters is being conducted. Initial development is being performed using a Zr-Fe-Sn intermetallic alloy getter procured as Stl98 from SAES Gefters/USA., Inc. This memorandum describes characterizations of physical and compositional properties of SAES Stl98. SAES Stl98 getter was supplied as very durable, cylindrical pellets made by compaction of. granules of Zr-Fe-Sn alloy up to 150 {mu}m in size. Pellet density was 5.2 g/mL corresponding to 24.8% open porosity and very little closed porosity. Bulk composition of Stl98 was 73.6 weight percent (w/o) Zr, 23.3 w/o Fe and 1.2 w/o Sn. Stl98 consists of Zr{sub 2}Fe primary phase along with four secondary phases (ZrFe{sub 2}, Zr{sub 5}FeSn, {alpha}-zirconium, and {eta}-Zr{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 0.6}). Hydriding characteristics of Stl98 are expected to differ slightly from those of Zr{sub 2}Fe because {alpha}-zirconium and, possibly, Zr{sub 5}FeSn also react with hydrogen.

  7. Characterization of SAES St198 zirconium-iron-tin alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-10-13

    A waste minimization program to develop a non-oxidative stripper system based on metallic getters is being conducted. Initial development is being performed using a Zr-Fe-Sn intermetallic alloy getter procured as Stl98 from SAES Gefters/USA., Inc. This memorandum describes characterizations of physical and compositional properties of SAES Stl98. SAES Stl98 getter was supplied as very durable, cylindrical pellets made by compaction of. granules of Zr-Fe-Sn alloy up to 150 [mu]m in size. Pellet density was 5.2 g/mL corresponding to 24.8% open porosity and very little closed porosity. Bulk composition of Stl98 was 73.6 weight percent (w/o) Zr, 23.3 w/o Fe and 1.2 w/o Sn. Stl98 consists of Zr[sub 2]Fe primary phase along with four secondary phases (ZrFe[sub 2], Zr[sub 5]FeSn, [alpha]-zirconium, and [eta]-Zr[sub 4]Fe[sub 2]O[sub 0.6]). Hydriding characteristics of Stl98 are expected to differ slightly from those of Zr[sub 2]Fe because [alpha]-zirconium and, possibly, Zr[sub 5]FeSn also react with hydrogen.

  8. Characterization of surface-modified austenitic alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G.S.; McIntyre, M.E.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes the results of research to characterize the physical, mechanical and fouling properties of Pd, W and WO{sub 3} coatings on stainless steel substrates. Deposition of colloidal corrosion products on stainless steel surfaces (fouling) adversely affects the performance of a number of light water reactor systems. Surface charge measurements have recently found that W and Pd oxide powders can resist such fouling. To assess their potential as {open_quotes}fouling resistant{close_quotes} coatings, metallic W, Pd and WO{sub 3} were deposited onto 304 SS coupons by various techniques including electroplating, physical vapor deposition, magnetron sputtering, ion plating, ion beam assisted deposition, metal plasma ion immersion, ion implantation, metal-organic deposition and sol gel processing. The deposited coatings, nominally 1-3 microns in thickness, were evaluated for mechanical integrity and resistance to fouling. Scratch and pull testing revealed that Pd coatings exhibited better adhesion, better scratch resistance and fewer surface defects than W coatings. W coatings contained higher impurity levels, exhibited brittle failure in scratch tests and poorer adhesion to the 304 SS substrate than the Pd coatings. Pd coatings also exhibited superior resistance to fouling in 235{degrees}C water at pH=4.0 containing I g/l magnetite, after a 72 hour exposure. On the basis of impurity control, mechanical integrity and fouling resistance, Pd coatings were judged to be superior to W or WO{sub 3} coatings.

  9. PAMAM dendrimers and graphene: Materials for removing aromatic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Ding, Feng; Ke, Pu Chun; Sarupria, Sapna

    2015-04-07

    We present results from experiments and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the association of naphthalene with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and graphene oxide (GrO). Specifically, we investigate 3rd-6th generation (G3-G6) PAMAM dendrimers and GrO with different levels of oxidation. The work is motivated by the potential applications of these materials in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants from water. Our experimental results indicate that graphene oxide outperforms dendrimers in removing naphthalene from water. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the prominent factors driving naphthalene association to these seemingly disparate materials are similar. Interestingly, we find that cooperative interactions between the naphthalene molecules play a significant role in enhancing their association to the dendrimers and graphene oxide. Our findings highlight that while selection of appropriate materials is important, the interactions between the contaminants themselves can also be important in governing the effectiveness of a given material. The combined use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations allows us to comment on the possible factors resulting in better performance of graphene oxide in removing naphthalene from water.

  10. Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of titanium-tungstate-tellurite glasses doped with dysprosium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jyothi, L. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Upender, G. [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-CGCRI, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kuladeep, R. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: CIE coordinate diagram of different concentrations of the Dy{sup 3+}-doped TTWD glasses with coordinates in the white light region. - Highlights: Radiative lifetime of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ions is longer in the tellurite glass. Quantum efficiency is found to be high. These glasses are suitable materials for generating white light. - Abstract: Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of Dy{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glasses of composition TTWD: (75 ? x)TeO{sub 2} ? 10TiO{sub 2} ? 15WO{sub 3} ? xDy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol%) were investigated. Raman spectra revealed that the glass contains TeO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, WO{sub 4} and WO{sub 6} units. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were carried out to measure the glass transition temperature of all the glasses. From the optical absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and using the JuddOfelt (JO) analysis, we estimated the radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The decay curves at lower concentrations are exponential while they show a non-exponential behavior at higher concentrations (?0.5 mol%) due to energy transfer processes. The effective lifetime for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level decreases with increase in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration for the glasses under investigation. The non-exponential decay curves could fit well to the InokutiHirayama (IH) model with S = 6, indicating that the nature of interaction responsible for energy transfer is of dipoledipole type. Simulation of white light is examined with varying concentration and the results indicate that these glasses are suitable for white light emitting diode applications.

  11. Electrochromism in sol-gel deposited TiO(sub 2) films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J.M.; Barczynska, J.; Evans, L.A.; MacDonald, K.A.; Wang, J.; Green, D.C.; Smith, G.B.

    1994-12-31

    Electrochromism in sol-gel deposited TiO{sub 2} films and films containing TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} has been observed. The films are deposited by dip-coating from a precursor containing titanium isopropoxide in ethanol or titanium propoxide in ethanol, and after deposition the films are heat treated to between 250 C and 300 C. The films do not show any signs of crystallinity. However substantial coloration is observed using Li{sup +} ions in a non-aqueous electrolyte, both in pure TiO{sub 2} films and in mixed metal oxide films (WO{sub 3}:TiO{sub 2}), although the voltage required to produce coloration is different in the two cases. Results will be presented detailing the optical switching and charge transport properties of the films during cyclic voltammetry. These results will be used to compare the performance of the TiO{sub 2} films with other electrochromics. The TiO{sub 2} and mixed metal films all color cathodically, and the colored state is a neutral greyish color for TiO{sub 2}, while the bleached state is transparent and colorless. Results on coloration efficiency and the stability under repeated electrochemical cycling will also be presented. The neutral color of the TiO{sub 2} films and mixed-metal films means that electrochromic windows based on TiO{sub 2} may have significant advantages over WO{sub 3}-based windows. A detailed analysis of the optical properties of the colored state of the films will be presented. The dynamics of coloration for these films is also under investigation, and preliminary results will be presented.

  12. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  13. Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wa Schem DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Balanc Activity of this techno facilitie are su WTP d Readin The as along w Level ( * Tw 1. 2. The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States aste Trea Labo Why DOE matic of Laser Ab s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including an ces of Facilities y Waste (LAW assessment w ology elements es (LAB, BOF, fficiently matur design, which n ness Level of 6 What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the L wo LAB system . Autosamplin

  14. Development and Optimization of Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Development and Optimization of Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and Optimization of Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor INL developed a bench-scale, modular hybrid plasma system for gas-phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was optimized for WO{sub 3} nanoparticle production and scale-model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development, many modifications were made to the system to

  15. Ejoin

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-08-06

    ejoin is a three-dimensional mesh combination program. ejoin combines two or more meshes written in the exodusII mesh database format into a single exodusII mesh. Selected nodes in the wo meshes that are closer than a specified distance can be combined The geometry of the mesh databases an be modified by offsetting. Any results data on one or more of the input mesh files will be copied to the appropriate nodes/elements/nodesets/sidesets on the output file.Preparationmore » of input mesh files for finite element analysis programs using the exodusII format.« less

  16. Development of new materials and approaches to photocatalytic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linkous, C.A.; Slattery, D.K.

    1998-08-01

    This work describes the authors efforts in developing a dual bed photocatalytic system for water-splitting to make H{sub 2}. Several potential improvements were investigated: the use of carbonate ion in facilitating the O{sub 2} evolution process, the use of NiO{sub x} as a substitute for Ir on TiO{sub 2}, the use of WO{sub 3} as a substitute for TiO{sub 2}, and a study of various classes of organic pigments for photocatalytic application. They have also generated some prototype designs for future dual photocatalyst systems that should enable higher efficiencies.

  17. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E.L.; Marsen, B.; Paluselli, D.; Rocheleau, R.

    2004-11-17

    The scope of this photoelectrochemical hydrogen research project is defined by multijunction photoelectrode concepts for solar-powered water splitting, with the goal of efficient, stable, and economic operation. From an initial selection of several planar photoelectrode designs, the Hybrid Photoelectrode (HPE) has been identified as the most promising candidate technology. This photoelectrode consists of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) junction and a solid-state photovoltaic (PV) junction. Immersed in aqueous electrolyte and exposed to sunlight, these two junctions provide the necessary voltage to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The efficiency of the conversion process is determined by the performance of the PEC- and the PV-junctions and on their spectral match. Based on their stability and cost effectiveness, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and tungsten oxide (WO3) films have been studied and developed as candidate semiconductor materials for the PEC junction (photoanode). High-temperature synthesis methods, as reported for some high-performance metal oxides, have been found incompatible with multijunction device fabrication. A low-temperature reactive sputtering process has been developed instead. In the parameter space investigated so far, the optoelectronic properties of WO3 films were superior to those of Fe2O3 films, which showed high recombination of photo-generated carriers. For the PV-junction, amorphous-silicon-based multijunction devices have been studied. Tandem junctions were preferred over triple junctions for better stability and spectral matching with the PEC junction. Based on a tandem a-SiGe/a-SiGe device and a tungsten trioxide film, a prototype hybrid photoelectrode has been demonstrated at 0.7% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency. The PEC junction performance has been identified as the most critical element for higher-efficiency devices. Research into sputter-deposited tungsten trioxide films has yielded samples with higher photocurrents of

  18. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Headquarters Procurement Services Patricia Davies Deputy Director * Small Business Spend * Contracts Currently Performed by Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses * Future Opportunities Overview 2 2013 2012 2011 SB $394,875,939 $478,535,779 $479,094,827 SDB $189,196,523 $207,116,780 $112,648,462 8 (a) $22,695,097 $27,942,927 $31,559,357 VO $63,683,969 $81,359,782 $81,713,670 SDVO $34,054,116 $54,612,690 $58,727,391 WO $112,923,269 $109,349,481 $29,280,845 HUBZone $745,043

  19. OAK RIDGE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    or _^ *ORNL/RASA-89/1 I : OAK RIDGE _NATIONAL LABORATORY |*H~~~~~ -~~Results of the I'I-------_____ ~ Preliminary Radiological * "~ i, .irri uSurvey at B&T Metals, _" 425 West Town Street, i * !' V Columbus, Ohio (C0001) I i. U Wo. 0aa-. r m ~~~~~~~~~ if? _ ~ W. D. Cottrell J. L Quillen J. W. Crutcher , I OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNL/RASA-89/1 3*1~~ ~HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and

  20. Batteries - Beyond Lithium Ion Breakout session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BEYOND LITHIUM ION BREAKOUT Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * 1 - Zn-Air possible either w/ or w/o electric-hybridization; also possible with a solid electrolyte variant * 2 - Multivalent systems (e.g Mg), potentially needing hybrid-battery * 3 - Advanced Li-ion with hybridization @ cell / molecular level for high-energy and high- power * 4 - MH-air, Li-air, Li-S, all show promise * 5 - High-energy density (e.g.

  1. UET

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UET 4.1[6][B] 6.2[4] 4.1[6][B] 4.1[6][B] 4.1[6][B] 4.1 [7] WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Document No.: EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Revision: 38 Effective Date: 08/29/13 Page: 101 of110 ATTACHMENT 1 Page I of4 WCRRF WCG WASTE PROCESSING DATA SHEET Parent Waste Container No.: S!'tS ()72 Date Processed: II-II/-{!/ Processing Activity (EP-DIV-AP-0107): D > 190 mremlhr D PID D Split Prohibited Items: " c;:;r' Repack [;('Sealed Containers> 4L [!('Liquids D Pressurized Containers

  2. OP-PR-0003-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OP-PR-0003-001.doc Lights Out (w/o Wiggler) Date: 2000/12/08 1. In the Operations Room, (room 202), the workstation to the right, as you enter the room, is set up to accept the shutdown (Lights Out) process. 2. If the workstation is dark, press the "space" key. This action will awaken the screen. 3. The screen will have a window named "SHUTDOWN PAGE". It will contain red and possibly a few green buttons. At the bottom there will be one button marked "SHUTDOWN". 4.

  3. OP-PR-0012-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSU/CAMD Procedure Doc. ID: OP-PR-0012-001.doc Re-injection Cycle (w/o Wiggler) Date: 2000/10/24 When refilling the ring, all operators will follow the procedure outlined in this document. 1. Approximately 10 minutes prior to re-injection announce over the PA system, "Injection will occur in 10 minutes. Please close your shutters prior to this time." 2. Turn on the LINAC filament. 3. At the designated time for re-injection, have the voice enunciator say "Prepare for

  4. A=18Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980ZH01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1977HA1Z, 1979SA31, 1982LA26). Special states: (1977HE18, 1978KR1G, 1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980OK01, 1982ZH1D). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 18Ne: (1979HE1D). Pion-induced capture and reactions (See also reaction 6.): (1977PE12, 1977SP1B, 1978BU09,

  5. Charles D. Young Project Engineer Government Support Directorate

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Please call if you have questions regarding the attached recommendation. i?&,o-o; ~~~pApv $l$I Charles D. Young Project Engineer Government Support Directorate Architecture Planning and Technology Division CDY/smb Attachment cc: J. Fiore ;;,ewis (w/o) TH' E AEROSPACE CORPORATION i ' 0 A Suite 7900, 955 L' Enfam Plaza. S. W., Woshingron. D.C. 20024-2174. Tekphonc (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decosunissioning

  6. DISTRIBU'~ICN:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DISTRIBU'~ICN: Document R-3. w/encl. State Health (Lit. only) JUN 2 19&---%Lq@. W/enCl. flCompliance, Reg. III, w/end. N. Ibulos, DXL, v/end. (3) Br. Reading File w/encl, Div. Reading File w/o encl. D.lillois 60604 .' m. J, J. mnovaa Emcutive Vice hmiaent ' , ,. __ . - 14 of Form IiEfc-2* plerise provide ._". . ..-^- UNITED STATES ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMPilISSION , . .' -- .'. SaUnCE l!fi~T%~IBI lriEmSE : . . Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10 Code of Federal

  7. Role of stoichiometric ratio of components during the formation of oxide and hydroxide layers on aluminum in oxoanion solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailovskii, Y.N.; Derdzenishvili, G.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper investigates the corrosion-electrochemical behavior of aluminum in chloride-fluoride solutions containing oxoanions of the oxidizing type (CrO/sup 2 -//sub 4/, MnO/sup -//sub 4/, MoO/sup 2 -//sub 4/, VO/sup 3 -//sub 4/, WO/sup 2 -//sub 4/). It is shown that, depending on the ratio of the concentrations of the oxoanions and hydroxonium ions, the oxidizing agent may activate or inhibit the corrosion process on the metal. The conditions of formation of surface phases is studied, which can impart good protective properties (conversion coatings), on aluminum during its self-solution.

  8. Supplemental macronutrients and microbial fermentation products improve the uptake and transport of foliar applied zinc in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Studies utilizing micro X-ray florescence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Xie, Ruohan; Zhang, Minzhe; Jernstedt, Judith A.; Hou, Dandi; Ramsier, Cliff; Brown, Patrick H.

    2015-01-21

    Enhancing nutrient uptake and the subsequent elemental transport from the sites of application to sites of utilization is of great importance to the science and practical field application of foliar fertilizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the mobility of various foliar applied zinc (Zn) formulations in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and to evaluate the effects of the addition of an organic biostimulant on phloem loading and elemental mobility. This was achieved by application of foliar formulations to the blade of sunflower (H. annuus L.) and high-resolution elemental imaging with micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) to visualize Zn withinmore » the vascular system of the leaf petiole. Although no significant increase of total Zn in petioles was determined by inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometer, μ-XRF elemental imaging showed a clear enrichment of Zn in the vascular tissues within the sunflower petioles treated with foliar fertilizers containing Zn. The concentration of Zn in the vascular of sunflower petioles was increased when Zn was applied with other microelements with EDTA (commercial product Kick-Off) as compared with an equimolar concentration of ZnSO₄ alone. The addition of macronutrients N, P, K (commercial product CleanStart) to the Kick-Off Zn fertilizer, further increased vascular system Zn concentrations while the addition of the microbially derived organic biostimulant “GroZyme” resulted in a remarkable enhancement of Zn concentrations in the petiole vascular system. The study provides direct visualized evidence for phloem transport of foliar applied Zn out of sites of application in plants by using μ-XRF technique, and suggests that the formulation of the foliar applied Zn and the addition of the organic biostimulant GroZyme increases the mobility of Zn following its absorption by the leaf of sunflower.« less

  9. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  10. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    . With the metal oxide compounds, we have demonstrated that a WO{sub 3}-based hybrid photoelectrode was feasible. Specifically, we showed that WO{sub 3} paired with an a-Si tandem solar cell can generate short circuit photocurrent density of 2.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, equivalent to STH efficiency of 3.1%. Long-term durability tests demonstrated WO{sub 3} ability to split water over extended periods, for up to 600 hours at current density levels of 2.0-2.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Efforts have been done to decrease WO{sub 3} bandgap using foreign elements incorporation. We did not manage to reduce the bandgap of WO{sub 3} with this method. However, more promising results have been achieved with bilayered systems, where only the top part of WO{sub 3} films was modified. Also, we have demonstrated that alloying WO{sub 3} with CuO can form 2.2eV bandgap CuWO{sub 4}. Incorporating conductive carbon nanotubes in CuWO{sub 4} reduced its intrinsic bulk resistance. Saturation photocurrent densities in the 0.4-0.5 mA/cm{sub 2} range were achieved. Recently, in collaboration with University of Texas at Arlington, we have identified new quaternary metal oxides with CuWO{sub 4} as primary material host. Our experimental work on ceramics confirmed the theoretical calculations that crowned bismuth as a possible candidate to improve CuWO{sub 4} water splitting efficiency.

  11. Oxidation kinetics of calcium-doped palladium powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, S.; Kodas, T.T.; Hampden-Smith, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The oxidation kinetics of submicron Ca-containing Pd powders produced by spray pyrolysis were studied in the temperature range 600 to 675 C using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation of pure Pd powder had an activation energy of {approximately}230 kJ/mol in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% and 65 kJ/mol for oxidation > 70%. The activation energies for Pd particles containing 0.01 weight percent (w/o) and 0.4 w/o Ca in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% were {approximately}230 kJ/mol and {approximately}50 kJ/mol, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that the conversion of Pd to Pd{sup II}O (stoichiometric PdO) proceeds from the particle surface into the interior and not homogeneously throughout the particle. The predictions of a variety of models and rate laws (shrinking core, parabolic, cubic, logarithmic, and inverse logarithmic) were compared with the data. The comparison suggested a mechanism in which oxidation of pure Pd proceeds by chemisorption and diffusion of oxygen to form a substoichiometric oxide, followed by the conversion of substoichiometric PdO to Pd{sup II}O. Oxidation of pure Pd is then probably limited by the diffusion of oxygen through the substoichiometric PdO and/or Pd{sup II}O. The addition of Ca increased the oxidation resistance of Pd most likely by inhibiting oxygen diffusion through the metal oxide layers surrounding the Pd.

  12. Ferroelastic switching in a layered-perovskite thin film

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Chuanshou; Ke, Xiaoxing; Wang, Jianjun; Liang, Renrong; Luo, Zhenlin; Tian, Yu; Yi, Di; Zhang, Qintong; Wang, Jing; Han, Xiu -Feng; et al

    2016-02-03

    Here, a controllable ferroelastic switching in ferroelectric/multiferroic oxides is highly desirable due to the non-volatile strain and possible coupling between lattice and other order parameter in heterostructures. However, a substrate clamping usually inhibits their elastic deformation in thin films without micro/nano-patterned structure so that the integration of the non-volatile strain with thin film devices is challenging. Here, we report that reversible in-plane elastic switching with a non-volatile strain of approximately 0.4% can be achieved in layeredperovskite Bi2WO6 thin films, where the ferroelectric polarization rotates by 90 within four in-plane preferred orientations. Phase-field simulation indicates that the energy barrier of ferroelasticmore » switching in orthorhombic Bi2WO6 film is ten times lower than the one in PbTiO3 films, revealing the origin of the switching with negligible substrate constraint. The reversible control of the in-plane strain in this layered-perovskite thin film demonstrates a new pathway to integrate mechanical deformation with nanoscale electronic and/or magnetoelectronic applications.« less

  13. Etching high aspect ratio (110) silicon grooves in CsOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, S.; Hesketh, P.J.; Macrander, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    In a previous study the authors developed a fabrication process for a single-crystal silicon X-ray analyzer for use at the Advanced Photon Source, a 6 GeV synchrotron accelerator ring under construction at Argonne National Laboratories. The bent silicon crystal will be used as an analyzer to collect and focus a monochromatic beam of X-rays by Bragg reflection with an energy resolution better than 10 meV for the (hhh) planes (H>6) for diffraction near backscattering. The cross-sectional geometry produced by anisotropic etching high aspect ratio (height/width = 115) silicon grooves with CSOH was studied as a function of the solution concentration. At 50 weight percent (w/o) CSOH straight sidewalls are produced, but at 15 and 25 w/o re-entrant tapered profiles are produced. The etch rates are increased in the groove by 25--100% indicating diffusion effects. The etch rate of the surface was in agreement with previous studies of CSOH etching, but unable to predict the dimensional changes in the grooves.

  14. Template synthesis of Ag/AgCl microrods and their efficient visible light-driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hua; Xiao, Liang; Huang, Jianhua

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: Preparation ofAg/AgCl microrods by reaction of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} microrods with NaCl solution. Generation of metallic Ag is induced by the ambient light in the synthesis process. Ag/AgCl shows excellent visible light-driven photodegradation of organic dyes. - Abstract: Ag/AgCl microrods, aggregated by nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 100 nm to 2 ?m, were prepared by an ion-exchange reaction at 80 C between Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} template and NaCl solution. The existence of metallic Ag species was confirmed by XRD, DRS and XPS measurements. Ag/AgCl microrods showed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B and methylene blue under visible light irradiation. The degradation rate constants of rhodamine B and methylene blue are 0.176 and 0.114 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The cycling photodegradation experiments suggest that Ag/AgCl microds could be employed as stable plasmonic photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes under visible light irradiation.

  15. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, André L.; Fewo, Serge I.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  16. Nanoscale building blocks in a novel lithium arsenotungsten bronze: Synthesis and characterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Pei; Mangir Murshed, M.; Huq, Ashfia; Grossmann, Henrike K.; Mädler, Lutz; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2015-02-19

    Here we report on a novel compound Li3AsW7O25 obtained by solid-state reaction and characterized by diffraction and spectroscopic methods. The bronze-type compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with a=724.38(3) pm, b=1008.15(4) pm, c=4906.16(17) pm and Z=8. The structure is built up by chains of WO6 octahedra interconnected by AsO4 tetrahedra and WO6 octahedra forming a polyhedral arrangement as seen in intergrowth tungsten bronzes. The X-ray single crystal structure refinement allows solving the complex arsenotungstate framework. The powder neutron diffraction data analysis locates the lithium atoms. Thermal analysis showed that Li3AsW7O25 is stable up to its melting at 1135(3)more » K followed by a decomposition at 1182(5) K. Finally, the Kubelka-Munk treatment of the UV-vis spectrum revealed a wide band gap in the range of 2.84-3.40 eV depending on the presumed electron transition type.« less

  17. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  18. High-performance, low Pt content catalysts for the electroreduction of oxygen in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, J.; Faubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.; Cote, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts have been synthesized using graphite and carbon black supports of various specific areas. The graphites are KS6 (20 m{sup 2}/g), HS100 (110 m{sup 2}/g), and HS300 (305 m{sup 2}/g) from Lonza, and the carbon blacks are Vulcan (254 m{sup 2}/g) and Black Pearls (1475 m{sup 2}/g) from Cabot. The Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts were used at the cathode of a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell, and their polarization curves were compared to each other and to those of various Pt-supported catalysts from E-TEK. In the high current region of interest to fuel cell developers, it is shown that Pt-supported catalysts perform better than Pt-included ones when the specific area of the support is small. The contrary is true when the specific area of the support is large. The best catalysts are HS300-Pti [8.3 weight percent (w/o) Pt included in HS300 graphite] and Vu-Pti (6.1 w/o Pt included in Vulcan XC-72R). These catalysts display very high mass and specific activities for O{sub 2} reduction. Furthermore, the iR-corrected polarization curves of both HS300-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.110 mg/cm{sup 2}) and Vu-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.070 mg/cm{sup 2}) cross at high current the polarization curve of the electrode prepared with E-TEK20 (20 w/o of supported Pt, with a Pt loading of 0.287 mg/cm{sup 2}). Pt inclusion in graphite or carbon black is therefore an interesting way of reducing the Pt loading of fuel cell cathodes without lowering electrochemical performance. HS300-Pti have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These analyses indicate that they both contain metallic Pt and Pt(II and IV) oxides and/or hydroxides.

  19. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Emma

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search Experiment (HPS) seeks to detect a hypothesised hidden sector boson, the A', predicted to be produced in dark matter decay or annihilation. Theories suggest that the A' couples weakly to electric charge through kinetic mixing, allowing it, as a result, to decay to Standard Matter (SM) lepton pair, which may explain the electron and positron excess recently observed in cosmic rays. Measuring the lepton pair decay of the A' could lead to indirect detection of dark matter. The HPS experiment is a fixed target experiment that will utilize the electron beam produced at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The detector set-up includes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) and an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal). The ECal will provide the trigger and detect e+e- pairs and its construction and testing forms the focus of this thesis. The ECal consists of 442 PbWO4- tapered crystals with a length 16cm and a 1.6x1.6cm2 cross-section, stacked into a rectangular array and are coupled to Large Area APDs and corresponding pre-amplifiers. Supplementary to the ECal is a Light Monitoring System (LMS) consisting of bi-coloured LEDs that will monitor changes in APD gain and crystal transparency due to radiation damage. Before construction of the ECal each of the components were required to be individually tested to determine a number of different characteristics. Irradiation tests were performed on PbWO4 ECal crystals and, as a comparison, one grown by a different manufacturer to determine their radiation hardness. A technique for annealing the radiation damage by optical bleaching, which involves injecting light of various wavelengths into the crystal, was tested using the blue LED from the LMS as a potential candidate. The light yield dependence on temperature was also measured for one of the PbWO4 crystal types. Each APD was individually tested to determine if they functioned correctly and

  20. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  1. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  2. Micro structural studies of PVA doped with metal oxide nanocomposites films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N. B. Rithin [Dept. of Physics, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Crasta, Vincent, E-mail: vcrasta@yahoo.com; Viju, F. [Dept. of Physics, St. Joseph Engineering College, Vamanjoor, Mangalore-575028, Karnataka (India); Praveen, B. M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Shreeprakash, B. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nanostructured PVA polymer composites are of rapidly growing interest because of their sized-coupled properties. The present article deals with both ZnO and WO{sub 3} embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix using a solvent casting method. These films were characterized using FTIR, XRD, and SEM techniques. The FTIR spectra of the doped PVA shows shift in the bands, which can be understood on the basis of intra/inter molecular hydrogen bonding with the adjacent OH group of PVA. The phase homogeneity and morphology of the polymer composites have been analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The crystal structure and crystallinity of polymer nanocomposites were studied by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). Thus due to the interaction of dopant and complex formation, the structural repositioning takes place and crystallinity of the nanocomposites decreases.

  3. WIPP Update 3_29_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2 014 Seven a ctivities t o r ecovery a nd r e---entry NWP h as d eveloped a nd i mplemented a r ecovery p lan t hat i ncorporates s even a ctivities n ecessary t o keep the p ublic, e nvironment, a nd employees s afe, m itigate t he r adiation s ource, a nd r estore operations. T he s even a ctivities i nclude: * Activity 1 - I solate v entilation f low---through: T wo 1 0---foot w ide b ypass d ampers, t hat c ould a llow limited a irflow t o b ypass H EPA f ilters, w ere s ealed w ith h

  4. WIPP Update 4_23_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2 014 Re---entry t eams a ccess R oom 7 WIPP e mployees r e---entered R oom 7 o f P anel 7 t oday i n a n a ttempt t o d etermine t he location a nd source o f t he F ebruary 1 4 r adiological r elease i n t he u nderground f acility. R oom 7 i s w here t he most recent contact---handled transuranic w aste d isposal a ctivities o ccurred, m aking i t t he m ost l ikely location of t he e vent. The d ay b egan w ith t wo a dvance support t eams e ntering t he W IPP u nderground f acility t o e

  5. PDSF User Meeting 06-10-14.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 1 0, 2 014 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past Outages * 5/13/14 ( all d ay): Q uarterly m aintenance * 6/02/14 - 6 /16/14 ( ish): G lobal s cratch a t 6 0% o f peak d ue t o r olling u pgrade Planned Outages * None Other Topics from PDSF Staff * NERSC i s m oving * Four s tory, 1 40,000 G SF - 300 o ffices o n t wo fl oors - 20K --- > 2 9Ksf H PC fl oor - 12.5MW --- > 4 2 M W t o b uilding * Located for collaboraOon - CRD a nd E Snet - UC B erkeley * ExcepOonal energy efficiency

  6. Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-12-31

    An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

  7. 02-AccountsAllocations-HB.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ame * Provides authen/ca/on (personal i den:ty) a nd a uthoriza/on (which resources a re a ccessible) * Your p roject's P rincipal I nves:gator ( PI) r equests a n a ccount f or y ou * Four p rimary a ccount r oles - PI, P I P roxy, P roject M anager, U ser 2. An a lloca:on a ccount, o r r epository ( aka r epo) * Like

  8. 02-AccountsAllocations-Turner.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts and Allocations Accounts vs. Allocations There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ame * Provides authen/ca/on (personal i den:ty) a nd a uthoriza/on (which resources a re a ccessible) * Your p roject's P rincipal I nves:gator ( PI) r equests a n a ccount f or y ou * Four p rimary a ccount r oles - PI, P I P roxy, P roject M anager, U ser 2. An a lloca:on a ccount, o r r epository ( aka r epo) * Like

  9. Work Order Generation Macros for Word Perfect 6.X for Windows

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-02

    Included are three general WP macros (two independent and one multiple) and a template used at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) for the generation of the Work Orders (WO's) used to perform corrective and preventative maintenance, as well as modifications of existing systems and installation of new systems. They incorporate facility specific requirements as well as selected federal/state orders. These macros are used to generate a WP document which is then converted into ASCII textmore » for import to the maintenance software. Currently we are using MCRS but should be compatible with other platforms such as Passport. Reference the included file Wogen.txt for installation and usage instructions.« less

  10. Light dark matter in the light of CRESST-II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4Σ significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results andmore » with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.« less

  11. A=10B (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 10.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell and deformed models: (1983VA31, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1987KI1C, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1983SH38, 1984NI12, 1985KW02). Special states: (1983BI1C, 1983FE07, 1983VA31, 1984NI12, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985GO1A, 1985HA18, 1985HA1J, 1986BA1X, 1986XU02, 1987AB1H, 1987BA2J, 1987KI1C, 1988KW02). Electromagnetic transitions and giant resonances:

  12. A=11C (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 11.16 [Table of Energy Levels] (PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1988WO04) Special states: (1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1988KW02) Astrophysical Questions: (1987RA1D) Complex reactions involving 11C:(1981AS04, 1985AR09, 1985HI1C, 1985MO08, 1986AV1B, 1986AV07, 1986BA3G, 1986HA1B, 1986HI1D, 1986UT01, 1987AR19, 1987BA38, 1987DE37, 1987NA01, 1987RI03, 1987SN01, 1987ST01, 1987YA16, 1988CA06, 1988KI05, 1988KI06, 1988SA19,

  13. A=12C (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1967SV1A, 1968BA1L, 1968DR1B, 1968FA1B, 1968FU1B, 1968GO01, 1968GU1C, 1968HA11, 1968RO1G, 1969GU1E, 1969GU03, 1969IK1A, 1969LA26, 1969MO1F, 1969SA1A, 1969SV1A, 1969WA06, 1969WO05, 1970AR21, 1970BE26, 1970BO33, 1970BO1J, 1970CO1H, 1970DE1F, 1970DO1A, 1970EI06, 1970GI11, 1970GU11, 1970KH01, 1970KO04, 1970KR1D, 1970LO1C, 1970RE1G, 1970RU1A, 1970RY1A,

  14. A=12C (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 12.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1984CA1N, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1985AR07, 1985CA23, 1985KO2B, 1985MI23, 1986YO1F, 1987DZ1A, 1987GU1C, 1987KI1C, 1987PR01, 1987SC1J, 1988GU13, 1988JA13, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04, 1989KW1A). Deformed Models: (1984LO05, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G, 1986KU1P, 1986LE16, 1987HO1C, 1987PR03, 1988KH07). Cluster Model: (1983DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1984KR10, 1985DE05, 1985KO2B,

  15. A=13O (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 13O) GENERAL: (1985AN28, 1986AN07, 1987SA15, 1989AYZU). See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 13.21 preview 13.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Mass of 13O: We adopt the atomic mass excess of 23113 ± 10 keV of (1988WO1C). See also (1981AJ01). 13O is then bound with respect to 12N + p and 11C + 2p by 1.514 and 2.115 MeV, respectively. 1. 13O(β+)13N Qm = 17.767 The half-life of 13O has been reported to be 8.7 ± 0.4 ms (1965MC09), 8.95 ±

  16. A=14O (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14O) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 14.25 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nulcear models: (1982SA1U, 1983SH38, 1984SA37). Electromagentic transitions: (1982LA26, 1982RI04, 1984MA2J, 1985LA06). Astrophysical questions: (1981GU1D, 1981WA1Q, 1984MA2J, 1985LA06). Applied work: (1982HI1H). Complex reactions involving 14C: (1985WO1B). Reactions involving pions (See also reactions 5, 7 and 10.): (1979ME2A, 1980BE35, 1981AU1C, 1981DU1H,

  17. A=15C (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15C) GENERAL: See also (1986AJ01) and Table Prev. Table 15.1 preview 15.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1988MI1J, 1989PO1K, 1989WO1E). Electromagnetic transitions:(1984VA06). Astrophysical questions:(1989KA1K). Complex reactions involving 15C:(1985PO11, 1986AV1B, 1986BI1A, 1986DU11, 1986HA1P, 1986HA1B, 1986PO06, 1987RI03, 1987SA25, 1987SN01, 1987VI02, 1988CA06, 1988JO1B, 1988MI28, 1988RU01, 1988SA19, 1989AS1B, 1989OG1B,

  18. A=15O (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    81AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See also (1976AJ04) and Table 15.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1976LI16, 1976SA37, 1977EM01, 1977PO16). Special states: (1976LI16, 1977RI08). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976LI16, 1976SH04, 1977HO04, 1978KR19). Astrophysical questions: (1977BA1V, 1977SI1D, 1978BU1B, 1978WO1E, 1979PE1E). Special reactions involving 15O: (1976AB04, 1976BU16, 1976HE1H, 1976HI05, 1976LE1F, 1977AR06, 1977SC1G, 1978AB08, 1978BO1W,

  19. A=16F (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16F) GENERAL: See also (1977AJ02) and Table 16.25 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (1977LA04, 1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1980HA35, 1981OS04). 1. (a) 14N(3He, n)16F Qm = -0.969 (b) 14N(3He, np)15O Qm = -0.421 Observed neutron groups and L-values derived from angular distribution measurements are displayed in Table 16.26 (in PDF or PS) (1973BO50). For the results from reaction (b) see Table 16.26 (in PDF or PS) (1976OT02). See also (1977AJ02). 2.

  20. A=16Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. See (1981SE1B, 1983ANZQ, 1985AN28, 1985MA1X). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is 23.989 ± 0.020 MeV which is

  1. A=16Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.29 preview 16.29 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.32 preview 16.32 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is

  2. A=17Ne (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See (1977AJ02) and Table 17.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews:(1975BE56, 1977CE05, 1978GU10, 1978WO1E, 1979BE1H). Other topics:(1981GR08). Mass of 17Ne: The mass excess adopted by (1977WA08) is 16.478 ± 0.026 MeV, based on unpublished data. We retain the mass excess 16.48 ± 0.05 MeV based on the evidence reviewed in (1977AJ02). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.53 The half-life of

  3. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  4. U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liang Yang University of Illinois at Urbana---Champaign May 1 6, 2 014 ATLAS U ser G roup M eeEng Double B eta D ecay a nd C ARIBU 1 Double B eta D ecay Two n eutrino d ouble b eta d ecay Neutrinoless d ouble b eta d ecay ObservaEon o f 0 νββ: l Majorana neutrino l Neutrino mass scale l Lepton number violation 2 Observable i f s ingle b eta decay i s f orbidden 2 ββ spectrum (normalized t o 1 ) 0 ββ peak ( 2% F WHM) (normalized t o 1 0 ---6 ) The t wo p eaks c an b e separated i

  5. 11C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1940MO09, 1954WO23: 11C. 1941SM11: 11C; measured T1/2. 1941SO01: 11C; measured T1/2. 1944SI30: 11C; measured T1/2. 1951DI12: 11C; measured T1/2. 1953KU08: 11C; measured T1/2. 1955BA63: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957PR53: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957SC29, 1967CA09: 11C; measured K/β+. 1958AR15: 11C; measured T1/2. 1964KA31: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965PA10: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1969AW02: 11C;

  6. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-06-21

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

  7. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1WO-WtEK LOAN COPY This i s t i Libruri~ Circulnlirlg Copy which may be borrowed \or t w o weeks. For o personnl retention copy, call Tech. Info. Diuision, Ext. 5545 BERKELEY, C A L I F O R N I A uI?NE;FSITY OF C A I IFORNIA RADIATION LABOR 4TORY Cover Sheet D o not remove INDEX E0. k ~ f l 4 L - 3 This d o c u n w a n d ~ p h t e s ef f i g u r e s . This i s c o p y r $ f ~ ~ e r i e s & I s s u e d te: % dd , Each person who received t h i s document must sign t h e cover s h e e t i n t

  8. Katie Antypas, Richard Gerber, Jack Deslippe NUG Monthly Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard Gerber, Jack Deslippe NUG Monthly Meeting --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng June 5 , 2 014 NERSC is moving to our new building in 2015!! * Four s tory, 1 40,000 G SF - 300 o ffices o n t wo fl oors - 20K --- > 2 9Ksf H PC fl oor - 12.5MW --- > 4 2 M W t o b uilding * Located for collabora-on - CRD a nd E Snet - UC B erkeley * Excep-onal energy efficiency - Natural a ir a nd w ater c ooling - Heat r ecovery - PUE < 1 .1 - LEED g old d esign 2 ComputaRonal R esearch a nd T heory B

  9. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    2001-01-01

    A method of cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, TiO.sub.2 and SnO.sub.2, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn & Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO.sub.4, WO.sub.3, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  10. Synthesis, Consolidation and Characterization of Sol-gel Derived Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O

    2010-06-01

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel (SG) derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g·cm-3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

  11. Light dark matter in the light of CRESST-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4Σ significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

  12. Edge-states ferromagnetism of WS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Nengjie; Li, Yan; Kang, Jun; Li, Renxiong; Xia, Qinglin; Li, Jingbo

    2014-05-19

    The multilayer WS{sub 2} nanosheets prepared from WO{sub 3} nanowires exhibit strong ferromagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 0.0058 emu/g and coercive field (H{sub C}) of 92 Oe at room temperature. By decreasing the temperature down to 3 K the H{sub c} is increased up to 1115 Oe, revealing the existence of long-range magnetic ordering. Density functional theory spin-polarized calculations predict that strong ferromagnetic moments in WS{sub 2} nanosheets are attributed to the zigzag edge sulphur S and tungsten W atoms. Our findings also suggest that the WS{sub 2} nanosheets with a high density of edge spins could be used to fabricate spintronics devices, which are circuits utilizing the spin of the electron to process and store information.

  13. A=18F (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1959AJ76) and Table 18.10 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1957WI1E, 1959BR1E, 1960TA1C, 1961TR1B, 1962TA1D, 1964FE02, 1964IN03, 1964PA1D, 1964YO1B, 1965BA1J, 1965DE1H, 1965GI1B, 1966BA2E, 1966BA2C, 1966HU09, 1966IN01, 1966KU05, 1966RI1F, 1967EN01, 1967EV1C, 1967FE01, 1967FL01, 1967HO11, 1967IN03, 1967KU09, 1967KU13, 1967LY02, 1967MO1J, 1967PA1K, 1967PI1B, 1967VI1B, 1967WO1C, 1968AR02, 1968BE1T, 1968BH1B,

  14. A=19Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1979DA15, 1979MA27, 1979PE16, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1978PE09, 1978SC19, 1979MA27, 1979PE16). Special states: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1978SC19, 1979DA15, 1980OK01, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1979RA1C). Applied topics: (1979AL1Q). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:

  15. A=19O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1978KR19, 1980KU05). Special states: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979DA15, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 19O: (1978KO01, 1979AL22, 1981GR08). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979BE1H, 1979CO09, 1980SH1H, 1982KI02). Ground-state properties

  16. A=20F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978MA2H, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G). Special states: (1978MA2H, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02). Complex reactions involving 20F: (1978SH18, 1982FR03). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Muon and pion capture and reactions: (1979KN1G, 1980TR1A). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1978MA2H, 1978RA1J, 1979BE1H, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982QUZY).

  17. A=20Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.36 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). (1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1979BE1H, 1980OK01, 1981AY01). J = 2 (1975SC20); μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table 20.33 (in PDF or PS) and reaction 63 in 20Ne. The half-life of 20Na is 446 ± 3 msec; Jπ = 2+: see (1978AJ03). 2. 16O(12C,

  18. A=20O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1977GR16). Special states: (1977GR16). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1978RA1J, 1979BE1H). 1. 20O(β-)20F Qm = 3.816 20O decays to 20F*(1.06) [Jπ = 1+] with a half-life of 13.51 ± 0.05 sec (weighted mean of (1970MA42, 1974AL09)), log ft = 3.75 ± 0.01. Upper limits for the branching to other states of 20F are shown

  19. A=5He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5He) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 5.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model discussions: (1983JA09, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985FI1E, 1985GE06, 1985KW02, 1986KR12, 1988WO04). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983VO02, 1984BE1B, 1984FI20, 1984GL1C, 1984VA06, 1984VA1C, 1984ZW1A, 1985BA68, 1985FI1E, 1987SV1A, 1988BA75, 1988KW02, 1988US1B). Electromagnetic transitions: (1985FI1E). Astrophysical questions: (1984SU1A, 1985BO1E). Complex reactions

  20. A=6Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1966BA26, 1966GA1E, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967CO32, 1967PI1B, 1967WO1B, 1968BO1N, 1968CO13, 1968GO01, 1968LO1C, 1968VA1H, 1969GU10, 1969RA1C, 1969SA1C, 1969VA1C, 1970LA1D, 1970SU13, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1971JA06, 1971LO03, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1972LO1M, 1972VE07, 1973HA49, 1973JO1K, 1973KU03). Cluster and α-particle model:

  1. A=6Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1974KA11, 1975DI04, 1975GO1B, 1975VE01, 1976CE03, 1976GH1A). Collective, rotational and deformed models: (1974BO25). Cluster and α-particle models: (1972KR1A, 1973DO09, 1973LI23, 1974BA30, 1974GR24, 1974JA1K, 1974KA11, 1974NO03, 1974PA1B, 1974SH08, 1974WO1B, 1975BL1C, 1975GO08, 1975GR26, 1975HA48, 1975KR1A, 1975LE1A, 1975LI1C, 1975MI09, 1975NO03,

  2. A=6Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983LE14, 1983VA31, 1984AS07, 1984PA08, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985ER06, 1985FI1E, 1985LO1A, 1986AV08, 1986LE21, 1987KI1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982WE15, 1983CA13, 1983DZ1A, 1983FO03, 1983GA12, 1983GO17, 1983SA39, 1983SM04, 1984BE37, 1984CO08, 1984DU17, 1984GL02, 1984JO1A, 1984KH05, 1984KR10, 1984KU03, 1984LA33,

  3. A=7Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1983BU1B, 1983KU17, 1983SH1D, 1983VA31, 1984CH24, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985FI1E, 1985GO11, 1986AV08, 1987KA09, 1987KI1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1983FU1D, 1983HO22, 1983PA06, 1983SH1D, 1983SR1C, 1984BA53, 1984DA07, 1984DU13, 1984DU17, 1984JO1A, 1984KA06, 1984KA04, 1984LO09, 1984MI1F, 1984SH26, 1985FI1E, 1985FU01,

  4. A=8Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1984PA04, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985FI1E, 1987BL18, 1987KI1C, 1988WO04). Collective, rotational and deformed models: (1984PA04, 1985RO1G). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1983CA12, 1983DR09, 1983FU1D, 1983HA41, 1983JA09, 1983SH38, 1984DE24, 1984DU17, 1984LU1A, 1984LU1B, 1985FI1E, 1986GU1F, 1986KR12, 1986SU06, 1988KR01). Special states:

  5. A=8Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983KU17, 1983SH38, 1984MO1H, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1988WO04). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983KU17, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1986XU02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1983KU17). Astrophysics: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1983FR1A, 1983GU1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984LA27, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MA13, 1985MO17, 1986AV1B,

  6. A=9C (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See (55AJ61, SW56A, GR64C, WI64E, JA65C, WO65). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.99 ± 0.07 MeV: see 12C(3He, 6He)9C (CE65). 1. 9C(β+)9B → 8Be + p Qm = 16.76 Two groups of delayed protons are observed, indicating a component of the β+ decay to a level of 9B at 12.05 ± 0.2 MeV with Γ = 800 ± 100 keV which then decays to p + 8Be(0) and 8Be*(2.9). The half-life is 127 ± 3 msec. The allowed character of the decay suggests Jπ =

  7. Influence of pH on electrochemical and corrosion behavior of aluminum in media containing oxo anions of the oxidizing type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailovskii, Y.N.; Berdzenishvili, G.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, MnO/sub 4//sup -/, VO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ on the potential and corrosion rate of aluminum in chloride-fluoride solutions with pH from 2 to 12. In neutral solutions on aluminum there is formed a mixed oxide-hydroxide layer with excess hydroxides which inhibits the corrosion of aluminum. Vanadates, molybdates, and tungstates in neutral solutions also formed mixed oxide-hydroxide layers with excess OH/sup -/ on the surface of the aluminum. This paper clearly displays the general laws of variation of the corrosion-electrochemical properties of aluminum in relation to pH in the presence of oxoanions of the oxidizing type.

  8. One-photon band gap engineering of borate glass doped with ZnO for photonics applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Baki, Manal; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy A.; El-Diasty, Fouad

    2012-04-01

    Lithium tungsten borate glass of the composition (0.56-x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Li{sub 2}O-xZnO-0.04WO{sub 3} (0 {<=}x{<=} 0.1 mol. %) is prepared for photonics applications. The glass is doped with ZnO to tune the glass absorption characteristics in a wide spectrum range (200-2500 nm). Chemical bond approach, including chemical structure, electronegativity, bond ionicity, nearest-neighbor coordination, and other chemical bonding aspect, is used to analyze and to explain the obtained glass properties such as: transmittance, absorption, electronic structure parameters (bandgap, Fermi level, and Urbach exciton-phonon coupling), Wannier free excitons excitation (applying Elliott's model), and two-photon absorption coefficient as a result of replacement of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} by ZnO.

  9. Multifunctional oxides for integrated manufacturing of efficient graphene electrodes for organic electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan; Weijtens, Christ; Meyer, Jens

    2015-02-09

    Using multi-functional oxide films, we report on the development of an integration strategy for scalable manufacturing of graphene-based transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) for organic electronics. A number of fundamental and process challenges exists for efficient graphene-based TCEs, in particular, environmentally and thermally stable doping, interfacial band engineering for efficient charge injection/extraction, effective wetting, and process compatibility including masking and patterning. Here, we show that all of these challenges can be effectively addressed at once by coating graphene with a thin (>10 nm) metal oxide (MoO{sub 3} or WO{sub 3}) layer. We demonstrate graphene electrode patterning without the need for conventional lithography and thereby achieve organic light emitting diodes with efficiencies exceeding those of standard indium tin oxide reference devices.

  10. Development of a fiber-optic sensor for hydrogen leak detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    The real and perceived risks of hydrogen fuel use, particularly in passenger vehicles, will require extensive safety precautions including hydrogen leak detection. Conventional hydrogen gas sensors require electrical wiring and may be too expensive for deployment in multiple locations within a vehicle. In this recently initiated project, we are attempting to develop a reversible, thin-film, chemochromic sensor that can be applied to the end of a polymer optical fiber. The presence of hydrogen gas causes the film to become darker. A light beam transmitted from a central instrument in the vehicle along the sensor fibers will be reflected from the ends of the fiber back to individual light detectors. A decrease in the reflected light signal will indicate the presence and concentration of hydrogen in the vicinity of the fiber sensor. The typical thin film sensor consists of a layer of transparent, amorphous tungsten oxide covered by a very thin reflective layer of palladium. When the sensor is exposed to hydrogen, a portion of the hydrogen is dissociated, diffuses through the palladium and reacts with the tungsten oxide to form a blue insertion compound, H{sub X}WO{sub 3}- When the hydrogen gas is no longer present, the hydrogen will diffuse out of the H{sub X}WO{sub 3} and oxidize at the palladium/air interface, restoring the tungsten oxide film and the light signal to normal. The principle of this detection scheme has already been demonstrated by scientists in Japan. However, the design of the sensor has not been optimized for speed of response nor tested for its hydrogen selectivity in the presence of hydrocarbon gases. The challenge of this project is to modify the basic sensor design to achieve the required rapid response and assure sufficient selectivity to avoid false readings.

  11. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, Jan; Özkan, Cigdem; Coppola, Nicola; Farahani, Shafagh Dastjani; et al

    2015-01-07

    An irreversible response of inorganic scintillators to intense soft x-ray laser radiation was investigated at the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) facility. Three ionic crystals, namely, Ce:YAG (cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), PbWO4 (lead tungstate), and ZnO (zinc oxide), were exposed to single 4.6 nm ultra-short laser pulses of variable pulse energy (up to 12 μJ) under normal incidence conditions with tight focus. Damaged areas produced with various levels of pulse fluences, were analyzed on the surface of irradiated samples using differential interference contrast (DIC) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effective beam area of 22.2 ± 2.2 μm2 was determinedmore » by means of the ablation imprints method with the use of poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA. Applied to the three inorganic materials, this procedure gave almost the same values of an effective area. The single-shot damage threshold fluence was determined for each of these inorganic materials. The Ce:YAG sample seems to be the most radiation resistant under the given irradiation conditions, its damage threshold was determined to be as high as 660.8 ± 71.2 mJ/cm2. Contrary to that, the PbWO4 sample exhibited the lowest radiation resistance with a threshold fluence of 62.6 ± 11.9 mJ/cm2. The threshold for ZnO was found to be 167.8 ± 30.8 mJ/cm2. Both interaction and material characteristics responsible for the damage threshold difference are discussed in the article.« less

  12. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, Jan; Özkan, Cigdem; Coppola, Nicola; Farahani, Shafagh Dastjani; Schulz, Joachim; Sinn, Harald; Tschentscher, Thomas; Gaudin, Jérôme; Bajt, Saša; Tiedtke, Kai; Toleikis, Sven; Chapman, Henry N.; Loch, Rolf A.; Jurek, Marek; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Krzywinski, Jacek; Moeller, Stefan; Harmand, Marion; Galasso, Germano; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Saskl, Karel; Sovák, Pavol; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-07

    An irreversible response of inorganic scintillators to intense soft x-ray laser radiation was investigated at the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) facility. Three ionic crystals, namely, Ce:YAG (cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), PbWO4 (lead tungstate), and ZnO (zinc oxide), were exposed to single 4.6 nm ultra-short laser pulses of variable pulse energy (up to 12 μJ) under normal incidence conditions with tight focus. Damaged areas produced with various levels of pulse fluences, were analyzed on the surface of irradiated samples using differential interference contrast (DIC) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effective beam area of 22.2 ± 2.2 μm2 was determined by means of the ablation imprints method with the use of poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA. Applied to the three inorganic materials, this procedure gave almost the same values of an effective area. The single-shot damage threshold fluence was determined for each of these inorganic materials. The Ce:YAG sample seems to be the most radiation resistant under the given irradiation conditions, its damage threshold was determined to be as high as 660.8 ± 71.2 mJ/cm2. Contrary to that, the PbWO4 sample exhibited the lowest radiation resistance with a threshold fluence of 62.6 ± 11.9 mJ/cm2. The threshold for ZnO was found to be 167.8 ± 30.8 mJ/cm2. Both interaction and material characteristics responsible for the damage threshold difference are discussed in the article.

  13. The Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 does not require an activator accessory protein for expression in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, Misty L.; Martinez, Salette; Gumataotao, Natalie; Bornscheuer, Uwe; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C.

    2012-10-10

    We report herein the functional expression of an Fe-type nitrile hydratase (NHase) without the co-expression of an activator protein or the Escherichia coli chaperone proteins GroES/EL. Soluble protein was obtained when the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunit genes of the Fe-type NHase Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase) were synthesized with optimized E. coli codon usage and co-expressed. As a control, the Fe-type NHase from Rhodococcus equi TG328-2 (ReNHase) was expressed with (ReNHase{sup +Act}) and without (ReNHase{sup -Act}) its activator protein, establishing that expression of a fully functional, metallated ReNHase enzyme requires the co-expression of its activator protein, similar to all other Fe-type NHase enzymes reported to date, whereas the CtNHase does not. The X-ray crystal structure of CtNHase was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealing an {alpha}{beta} heterodimer, similar to other Fe-type NHase enzymes, except for two important differences. First, two His residues reside in the CtNHase active site that are not observed in other Fe-type NHase enzymes and second, the active site Fe(III) ion resides at the bottom of a wide solvent exposed channel. The solvent exposed active site, along with the two active site histidine residues, are hypothesized to play a role in iron incorporation in the absence of an activator protein.

  14. EMatch: an efficient method for aligning atomic resolution subunits into intermediate-resolution cryo-EM maps of large macromolecular assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dror, Oranit Lasker, Keren; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim

    2007-01-01

    A method for detecting structural homologs of components in an intermediate resolution cryo-EM map and their spatial configuration is presented. Structural analysis of biological machines is essential for inferring their function and mechanism. Nevertheless, owing to their large size and instability, deciphering the atomic structure of macromolecular assemblies is still considered as a challenging task that cannot keep up with the rapid advances in the protein-identification process. In contrast, structural data at lower resolution is becoming more and more available owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques. Once a cryo-EM map is acquired, one of the basic questions asked is what are the folds of the components in the assembly and what is their configuration. Here, a novel knowledge-based computational method, named EMatch, towards tackling this task for cryo-EM maps at 6–10 Å resolution is presented. The method recognizes and locates possible atomic resolution structural homologues of protein domains in the assembly. The strengths of EMatch are demonstrated on a cryo-EM map of native GroEL at 6 Å resolution.

  15. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-03-21

    Sensing properties of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. The relative responses of the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based sensor under varied concentrations of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were studied. The results showed a very high sensitivity to CO and NO{sub 2} at 450 C in 3% O{sub 2}, whereas the response to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases was negligible. The NO response at 400-500 C agreed with the NO adsorption behavior. The high NO{sub 2} sensitivity at 450 C was probably related to heterogeneous catalytic activity of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The adsorption of NO was not affected by the change of O{sub 2} concentration and thus the sensor showed selective detection of NO over O{sub 2}. However, the NO sensitivity was strongly influenced by the existence of CO, H{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, as the adsorption behavior of NO was influenced by these gases. The WO{sub 3}-based sensor was able to selectively detect NO in the presence of CO{sub 2} in 3% O{sub 2} and at 650 C. The NO sensitivity, however, was affected by the variation of the NO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O concentration. No gas-solid reactions were observed using TPR in the NO containing gas mixture, indicating that the NO response was not obtained by the conventionally accepted mixed-potential mechanism. At the same condition the sensor had high sensitivity to {approx}10 ppm NO{sub 2} and selectivity in the presence of CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, showing it to be applicable to the monitoring of NO{sub 2}. Significantly different sensing properties of NO in simulated exhaust gas suggested the occurrence of gas composition change

  16. Solid-state syntheses and single-crystal characterizations of three tetravalent thorium and uranium silicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Geng Bang Soderholm, L.

    2015-01-15

    Colorless crystals of ThSiO{sub 4} (huttonite) (1) and (Ca{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 2}NaThSi{sub 8}O{sub 20} (2) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of ThO{sub 2}, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} at 1073 K. Green crystals of (Ca{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 2}NaUSi{sub 8}O{sub 20} (3) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of UO{sub 2}, CaSiO{sub 3}, and Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} at 1003 K. All three compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 adopts a monazite-type three-dimensional condensed structure, which is built from edge- and corner-shared ThO{sub 9} polyhedra and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural and they crystallize in a steacyite-type structure. The structure consists of discrete pseudocubic [Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}]{sup 8−} polyanions, which are connected by An{sup 4+} cations into a three-dimensional framework. Each An atom coordinates to eight monodentate [Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}]{sup 8−} moieties in a square antiprismatic geometry. Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions reside in the void within the framework. Raman spectra of 1, 2, and 3 were collected on single crystal samples. 1 displays more complex vibrational bands than thorite. Raman spectra of 2 and 3 are analogous with most of vibrational bands located at almost the same regions. - Graphical abstract: A Raman spectrum and crystal structures of (Ca{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 2}NaAnSi{sub 8}O{sub 20} (An=Th, U), which contain pseudocubic [Si{sub 8}O{sub 20}]{sup 8−} polyanions and eight-coordinate An{sup 4+} cations. - Highlights: • Single crystal growth of three tetravalent actinide silicates from melts. • Single-crystal structures and Raman spectra of (Ca{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 2}NaAnSi{sub 8}O{sub 20} (An=Th, U). • First report of Raman spectrum of huttonite on single crystal samples.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of Ni-based alloy nanoparticles by radiolysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Berry, Donald T.; Lu, Ping; Leung, Kevin; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2009-09-01

    Room temperature radiolysis, density functional theory, and various nanoscale characterization methods were used to synthesize and fully describe Ni-based alloy nanoparticles (NPs) that were synthesized at room temperature. These complementary methods provide a strong basis in understanding and describing metastable phase regimes of alloy NPs whose reaction formation is determined by kinetic rather than thermodynamic reaction processes. Four series of NPs, (Ag-Ni, Pd-Ni, Co-Ni, and W-Ni) were analyzed and characterized by a variety of methods, including UV-vis, TEM/HRTEM, HAADF-STEM and EFTEM mapping. In the first focus of research, AgNi and PdNi were studied. Different ratios of Ag{sub x}- Ni{sub 1-x} alloy NPs and Pd{sub 0.5}- Ni{sub 0.5} alloy NP were prepared using a high dose rate from gamma irradiation. Images from high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) show that the Ag-Ni NPs are not core-shell structure but are homogeneous alloys in composition. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) maps show the homogeneity of the metals in each alloy NP. Of particular interest are the normally immiscible Ag-Ni NPs. All evidence confirmed that homogeneous Ag-Ni and Pd-Ni alloy NPs presented here were successfully synthesized by high dose rate radiolytic methodology. A mechanism is provided to explain the homogeneous formation of the alloy NPs. Furthermore, studies of Pd-Ni NPs by in situ TEM (with heated stage) shows the ability to sinter these NPs at temperatures below 800 C. In the second set of work, CoNi and WNi superalloy NPs were attempted at 50/50 concentration ratios using high dose rates from gamma irradiation. Preliminary results on synthesis and characterization have been completed and are presented. As with the earlier alloy NPs, no evidence of core-shell NP formation occurs. Microscopy results seem to indicate alloying occurred with the CoNi alloys. However, there appears to be incomplete reduction of the Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} to form the W

  18. Assessment of Possible Cycle Lengths for Fully Encapsulated Microstructure fueled light water reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2013-02-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with failure-proof fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel as-is into existing LWRs while retaining their thermalhydraulic characteristics. Another mandatory constraint is use of low enriched uranium (at or below 20 w/o). The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at two factors: cycle lengths and fuel material failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters such as reactivity coefficients, feedback, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of increases in the TRISO kernel sizes without changing the thickness of any of the coating layers. In addition, cases where the buffer layer thickness is allowed to vary are also considered. The study shows that a nave use of UO2 (even up to 20 w/o enrichment) results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. The increase of fissile inventory can be accomplished through multiple means, including higher particle packing fraction, higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels (that contain a higher number of U atoms per unit volume). In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), combinations of the other means have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In

  19. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The

  20. Temperature threshold for nanorod structuring of metal and oxide films grown by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deniz, Derya; Lad, Robert J.

    2011-01-15

    Thin films of tin (Sn), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W), ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}), tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}), and tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) were grown by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to determine the nanostructuring temperature threshold, {Theta}{sub T}, above which adatom surface diffusion becomes large enough such that nanorod morphology is no longer formed during growth. The threshold was found to be lower in metals compared to oxides. Films were grown using both dc and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering with continuous substrate rotation over the temperature range from 291 to 866 K. Film morphologies, structures, and compositions were characterized by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films were also grown in a conventional configuration for comparison. For elemental metals, nanorod structuring occurs for films with melting points higher than that of Al (933 K) when grown at room temperature with a rotation rate of {approx}5 rpm, corresponding to a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.33{+-}0.01. For the oxide films, a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.5 was found, above which GLAD nanorod structuring does not occur. The existence of a nanostructuring temperature threshold in both metal and oxide GLAD films can be attributed to greater adatom mobilities as temperature is increased resulting in nonkinetically limited film nucleation and growth processes.

  1. Development of a 5 kW Prototype Coal-Based Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.; Mirzababaei, Jelvehnaz; Rismanchian, Azadeh

    2014-01-20

    The University of Akron Fuel Cell Laboratory pioneered the development of a laboratory scale coal-based fuel cell, which allows the direct use of high sulfur content coal as fuel. The initial research and coal fuel cell technology development (“Coal-based Fuel Cell,” S. S. C. Chuang, PCT Int. Appl. 2006, i.e., European Patent Application, 35 pp. CODEN: PIXXD2 WO 2006028502 A2 20060316) have demonstrated that it is feasible to electrochemically oxidize carbon to CO2, producing electricity. The key innovative concept of this coal-based fuel cell technology is that carbon in coal can be converted through an electrochemical oxidation reaction into manageable carbon dioxide, efficiently generating electricity without involving coal gasification, reforming, and water-gas shift reaction. This study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reaction. A carbon injection system was developed to inject the solid fuel without bringing air into the anode chamber; a fuel cell stack was developed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the fuel cell stack. Further improvement of anode catalyst activity and durability is needed to bring this novel coal fuel cell to a highly efficient, super clean, multi-use electric generation technology, which promises to provide low cost electricity by expanding the utilization of U.S. coal supplies and relieving our dependence on foreign oil.

  2. Scalable salt-templated synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Xu; Song, Huaibing; Lin, Shizhe; Zhou, Ying; Zhan, Xiaojun; Hu, Zhimi; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Jiyu; Yang, Bo; Li, Tianqi; et al

    2016-04-22

    Two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as two-dimensional oxides, have attracted much attention in energy storage because nearly all of the atoms can be exposed to the electrolyte and involved in redox reactions. However, current strategies are largely limited to intrinsically layered compounds. Here we report a general strategy that uses the surfaces of water-soluble salt crystals as growth templates and is applicable to not only layered compounds but also various transition metal oxides, such as hexagonal-MoO3, MoO2, MnO and hexagonal-WO3. The planar growth is hypothesized to occur via a match between the crystal lattices of the salt and the growing oxide.more » Restacked two-dimensional hexagonal-MoO3 exhibits high pseudocapacitive performances (for example, 300Fcm-3 in an Al2(SO4)3 electrolyte). Furthermore, the synthesis of various two-dimensional transition metal oxides and the demonstration of high capacitance are expected to enable fundamental studies of dimensionality effects on their properties and facilitate their use in energy storage and other applications.« less

  3. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N. R.; Brown, N. R.; Baek, J. S; Hanson, A. L.; Cuadra, A.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D. J.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  4. Gastropod (Otala lactea) shell nanomechanical and structural characterization as a biomonitoring tool for dermal and dietary exposure to a model metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Paul G.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Diaz, Alfredo; Lindsay, James H.; Moser, Robert D.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Kennedy, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic tungsten (W) was initially assumed to be environmentally benign and a green alternative to lead. However, subsequent investigations showed that fishing weights and munitions containing elemental W can fragment and oxidize into complex monomeric and polymeric tungstate (WO4) species in the environment; this led to increased solubility and mobility in soils and increased bioaccumulation potential in plant and animal tissues. Here we expand on the results of our previous research, which examined tungsten toxicity, bioaccumulation, and compartmentalization into organisms, and present in this research that the bioaccumulation of W was related to greater than 50% reduction in the mechanical properties of the snail (Otala lactea), based on depth-sensing nanoindentation. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence maps and X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the integration of W in newly formed layers of the shell matrix with the observed changes in shell biomechanical properties, mineralogical composition, and crystal orientation. With further development, this technology could be employed as a biomonitoring tool for historic metals contamination since unlike the more heavily studied bioaccumulation into soft tissue, shell tissue does not actively eliminate contaminants.

  5. Sunlight-Driven Hydrogen Formation by Membrane-Supported Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Nathan S.

    2014-03-26

    This report describes the significant advances in the development of the polymer-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system that was proposed under DOE grant number DE-FG02-05ER15754. We developed Si microwire-array photoelectrodes, demonstrated control over the material and light-absorption properties of the microwire-array photoelectrodes, developed inexpensive processes for synthesizing the arrays, and doped the arrays p-type for use as photocathodes. We also developed techniques for depositing metal-nanoparticle catalysts of the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on the wire arrays, investigated the stability and catalytic performance of the nanoparticles, and demonstrated that Ni-Mo alloys are promising earth-abundant catalysts of the HER. We also developed methods that allow reuse of the single-crystalline Si substrates used for microwire growth and methods of embedding the microwire photocathodes in plastic to enable large-scale processing and deployment of the technology. Furthermore we developed techniques for controlling the structure of WO3 films, and demonstrated that structural control can improve the quantum yield of photoanodes. Thus, by the conclusion of this project, we demonstrated significant advances in the development of all components of a sunlight-driven membrane-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system. This final report provides descriptions of some of the scientific accomplishments that were achieved under the support of this project and also provides references to the peer-reviewed publications that resulted from this effort.

  6. Predicting a quaternary tungsten oxide for sustainable photovoltaic application by density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarker, Pranab; Huda, Muhammad N.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2015-12-07

    A quaternary oxide, CuSnW{sub 2}O{sub 8} (CTTO), has been predicted by density functional theory (DFT) to be a suitable material for sustainable photovoltaic applications. CTTO possesses band gaps of 1.25 eV (indirect) and 1.37 eV (direct), which were evaluated using the hybrid functional (HSE06) as a post-DFT method. The hole mobility of CTTO was higher than that of silicon. Further, optical absorption calculations demonstrate that CTTO is a better absorber of sunlight than Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} (x = 0.5). In addition, CTTO exhibits rigorous thermodynamic stability comparable to WO{sub 3}, as investigated by different thermodynamic approaches such as bonding cohesion, fragmentation tendency, and chemical potential analysis. Chemical potential analysis further revealed that CTTO can be synthesized at flexible experimental growth conditions, although the co-existence of at least one secondary phase is likely. Finally, like other Cu-based compounds, the formation of Cu vacancies is highly probable, even at Cu-rich growth condition, which could introduce p-type activity in CTTO.

  7. Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-12-01

    (WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

  8. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  9. Microstructure and thermal properties of copper–diamond composites with tungsten carbide coating on diamond particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qiping; He, Xinbo Ren, Shubin; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Wu, Mao; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-07-15

    An effective method for preparing tungsten carbide coating on diamond surfaces was proposed to improve the interface bonding between diamond and copper. The WC coating was formed on the diamond surfaces with a reaction medium of WO{sub 3} in mixed molten NaCl–KCl salts and the copper–diamond composites were obtained by vacuum pressure infiltration of WC-coated diamond particles with pure copper. The microstructure of interface bonding between diamond and copper was discussed. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the obtained copper–diamond composites were investigated. Results indicated that the thermal conductivity of as-fabricated composite reached 658 W m{sup −} {sup 1} K{sup −} {sup 1}. Significant reduction in coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite compared with that of pure copper was obtained. - Highlights: • WC coating was successfully synthesized on diamond particles in molten salts. • WC coating obviously promoted the wettability of diamond and copper matrix. • WC coating greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of Cu–diamond composite. • The composites are suitable candidates for heat sink applications.

  10. Blue diode-pumped solid-state-laser based on ytterbium doped laser crystals operating on the resonance zero-phonon transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides an efficient, compact means of generating blue laser light at a wavelength near .about.493+/-3 nm, based on the use of a laser diode-pumped Yb-doped laser crystal emitting on its zero phonon line (ZPL) resonance transition at a wavelength near .about.986+/-6 nm, whose fundamental infrared output radiation is harmonically doubled into the blue spectral region. The invention is applied to the excitation of biofluorescent dyes (in the .about.490-496 nm spectral region) utilized in flow cytometry, immunoassay, DNA sequencing, and other biofluorescence instruments. The preferred host crystals have strong ZPL fluorecence (laser) transitions lying in the spectral range from .about.980 to .about.992 nm (so that when frequency-doubled, they produce output radiation in the spectral range from 490 to 496 nm). Alternate preferred Yb doped tungstate crystals, such as Yb:KY(WO.sub.4).sub.2, may be configured to lase on the resonant ZPL transition near 981 nm (in lieu of the normal 1025 nm transition). The laser light is then doubled in the blue at 490.5 nm.

  11. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-05-29

    We have made great progress in both developing solid state sensors for coal combustion control and understanding the mechanism by which they operate. We have fabricated and tested numerous sensors and identified the role electrode microstructure plays in sensor response. We have developed both p-type (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) and n-type (WO{sub 3}) semiconducting NO{sub x} sensing electrodes. We have demonstrated their respective sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities), related this behavior to their gas adsorption/desorption behavior and catalytic activity, and in so doing verified that our proposed Differential Electrode Equilibria is a more comprehensive sensing mechanism. These investigations and their results are summarized below. The composition and microstructure of the sensing electrode is the key parameters that influence the sensing performance. We investigated the effect of electrode microstructure on the NO{sub x} sensitivity and response time using a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based potentiometric sensor. Temperature dependence, cross-sensitivity and selectivities of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. In order to optimize the sensor electrode microstructure, powders were prepared using four different powder synthesis routes, resulting in different particle size distributions and BET surface areas. Different sintering conditions were also applied. The microstructure of electrodes, synthesized with the same composition, has a dramatic effect on both sensitivity and response time of potentiometric NO sensors, showing that large surface areas generate a porous morphology with smaller

  12. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  13. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  14. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  15. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  16. Theoretical study of collinear optical frequency comb generation under multi-wave, transient stimulated Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanin, S N [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Using mathematical modelling we have studied the conditions of low-threshold collinear optical frequency comb generation under transient (picosecond) stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and parametric four-wave coupling of SRS components in crystals. It is shown that Raman-parametric generation of an octave-spanning optical frequency comb occurs most effectively under intermediate, transient SRS at a pump pulse duration exceeding the dephasing time by five-to-twenty times. We have found the optimal values of not only the laser pump pulse duration, but also of the Raman crystal lengths corresponding to highly efficient generation of an optical frequency comb from the second anti-Stokes to the fourth Stokes Raman components. For the KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (high dispersion) and Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (low dispersion) crystals pumped at a wavelength of 1.064 ?m and a pulse duration five or more times greater than the dephasing time, the optimum length of the crystal was 0.3 and 0.6 cm, respectively, which is consistent with the condition of the most effective Stokes anti-Stokes coupling ?kL ? 15, where ?k is the wave detuning from phase matching of Stokes anti-Stokes coupling, determined by the refractive index dispersion of the SRS medium. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  17. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  18. A Comparison of Hyperelastic Warping of PET Images with Tagged MRI for the Analysis of Cardiac Deformation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Klein, Gregory; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he objectives of the following research were to evaluate the utility of a deformable image registration technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle through the analysis of clinical, gated PET image datasets.wo normal human male subjects were sequentially imaged with PET and tagged MRI imaging. Strain predictions were made for systolic contraction using warping analyses of the PET images and HARP based strain analyses of the MRI images. Coefficient of determination R 2 values were computed for the comparison of circumferential and radial strain predictions produced by each methodology.here was good correspondence between the methodologies, with R 2 values of 0.78 for the radial strains of both hearts and from an R 2 = 0.81 and R 2 = 0.83 for the circumferential strains.he strain predictions were not statistically different ( P ≤ 0.01 ) . A series of sensitivity results indicated that the methodology was relatively insensitive to alterations in image intensity, random image noise, and alterations in fiber structure.his study demonstrated that warping was able to provide strain predictions of systolic contraction of the LV consistent with those provided by tagged MRI Warping.« less

  19. Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Mokina, V. M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Nikolaiko, A. S.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, H. J.; Kostezh, A. B.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Voronov, S. A.

    2007-03-28

    In June-August 2006 an expedition with the aim to look for low-radioactive archaeological lead at the bottom of the Black Sea, near the Crimean peninsula (Ukraine) was organised by a Korean-Ukrainian collaboration. The first samples with {approx}0.2 tons of total mass were found at a depth of 28 m among the relics of an ancient Greek ship. Their age has been dated to the first century B.C. This lead was used as ballast in the keel of the ship. The element composition of the samples was measured by means of X-ray fluorescence and ICP-MS analyses. The first preliminary limits on the 210Pb contamination of the samples are less than a few hundreds mBq/kg. The measurements were performed using gamma spectroscopy with HPGe-detectors and alpha spectroscopy with commercial {alpha}-detectors. Measurements of 40K, Th/U in the lead samples were undertaken in Kiev and in the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS, Italy). If it was found to be radio-clean this lead could be used as high efficiency shield for ultra low-level detectors, and as raw material for growing radio-pure scintillation crystals such as PbMoO4 or PbWO4 for the search for rare processes.

  20. Interactions between drops of molten Al-Li alloys and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L.; Nelson, L.S.; Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, at the request of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), studied the interactions between single drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys and water. Most experiments were performed with ``B`` alloy (3.1 w/o Li, balance A1). Objectives were to develop experimental procedures for preparing and delivering the melt drops and diagnostics for characterizing the interactions, measure hydrogen generated by the reaction between melt and water, examine debris recovered after the interaction, determine changes in the aqueous phase produced by the melt-water chemical reactions, and determine whether steam explosions occur spontaneously under the conditions studied. Although many H{sub 2} bubbles were generated after the drops entered the water, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred when globules of the ``B`` alloy at temperatures between 700 and 1000C fell freely through water at room temperature, or upon or during subsequent contact with submerged aluminum or stainless steel surfaces. Total amounts of H{sub 2} (STP) increased from about 2 to 9 cm{sup 3}/per gram of melt as initial melt temperature increased over this range of temperatures.

  1. Wireless sensor systems for sense/decide/act/communicate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Nina M.; Cushner, Adam; Baker, James A.; Davis, Jesse Zehring; Stark, Douglas P.; Ko, Teresa H.; Kyker, Ronald D.; Stinnett, Regan White; Pate, Ronald C.; Van Dyke, Colin; Kyckelhahn, Brian

    2003-12-01

    After 9/11, the United States (U.S.) was suddenly pushed into challenging situations they could no longer ignore as simple spectators. The War on Terrorism (WoT) was suddenly ignited and no one knows when this war will end. While the government is exploring many existing and potential technologies, the area of wireless Sensor networks (WSN) has emerged as a foundation for establish future national security. Unlike other technologies, WSN could provide virtual presence capabilities needed for precision awareness and response in military, intelligence, and homeland security applications. The Advance Concept Group (ACG) vision of Sense/Decide/Act/Communicate (SDAC) sensor system is an instantiation of the WSN concept that takes a 'systems of systems' view. Each sensing nodes will exhibit the ability to: Sense the environment around them, Decide as a collective what the situation of their environment is, Act in an intelligent and coordinated manner in response to this situational determination, and Communicate their actions amongst each other and to a human command. This LDRD report provides a review of the research and development done to bring the SDAC vision closer to reality.

  2. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  3. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Vissers, Donald R; Lu, Wenquan

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In certain electrolytes, the alkali metal salt is a bis(chelato)borate and the additives include substituted or unsubstituted linear, branched or cyclic hydrocarbons comprising at least one oxygen atom and at least one aryl, alkenyl or alkynyl group. In other electrolytes, the additives include a substituted aryl compound or a substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl compound wherein the additive comprises at least one oxygen atom. There are also provided methods of making the electrolytes and batteries employing the electrolytes. The invention also provides for electrode materials. Cathodes of the present invention may be further stabilized by surface coating the particles of the spinel or olivine with a material that can neutralize acid or otherwise lessen or prevent leaching of the manganese or iron ions. In some embodiments the coating is polymeric and in other embodiments the coating is a metal oxide such as ZrO.sub.2, TiO.sub.2, ZnO, WO.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, MgO, SiO.sub.2, SnO.sub.2 AlPO.sub.4, Al(OH).sub.3, a mixture of any two or more thereof.

  4. Key residues for the oligomerization of A{beta}42 protein in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, Sam; Guo, Zhefeng

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} oligomers are neurotoxins and likely the causing agents for Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein form globular oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein oligomers contain SDS-resistant tetramers and hexamers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cysteine substitutions at residues 31, 32, 34, 39-41 disrupt A{beta}42 oligomerization. -- Abstract: Deposition of amyloid fibrils consisting of amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) protein as senile plaques in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. However, a growing body of evidence shows that soluble A{beta} oligomers correlate better with dementia than fibrils, suggesting that A{beta} oligomers may be the primary toxic species. The structure and oligomerization mechanism of these A{beta} oligomers are crucial for developing effective therapeutics. Here we investigated the oligomerization of A{beta}42 in the context of a fusion protein containing GroES and ubiquitin fused to the N-terminus of A{beta} sequence. The presence of fusion protein partners, in combination with a denaturing buffer containing 8 M urea at pH 10, is unfavorable for A{beta}42 aggregation, thus allowing only the most stable structures to be observed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed globular oligomers, which bound weakly to thioflavin T and Congo red. SDS-PAGE shows that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed SDS-resistant hexamers and tetramers. In contrast, A{beta}40 fusion protein remained as monomers on SDS gel, suggesting that the oligomerization of A{beta}42 fusion protein is not due to the fusion protein partners. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis at 22 residue positions further revealed that single cysteine substitutions of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues (I31, I32, L34, V39, V40, and I41) led to disruption of hexamer and tetramer formation, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions between these

  5. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25 diameter and 4.875 tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25 diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70F ( 5F) and 50% ( 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the cans falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once

  6. Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, D.M.; Rogers, R.A.; Sepulveda, R.; Kunzendorf, P.; Bellmann, B.; Ernst, H.; Creutzenberg, O.; Phillips, J.I.

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology in the lung and pleura following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake-dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake-dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake-dust or crocidolite asbestos. The chrysotile fibers were relatively biosoluble whereas the crocidolite asbestos fibers persisted through the life-time of the animal. This was reflected in the lung and the pleura where no significant pathological response was observed at any time point in the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups through 365 days post exposure. In contrast, crocidolite asbestos produced a rapid inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma and the pleura, inducing a significant increase in fibrotic response in both of these compartments. Crocidolite fibers were observed embedded in the diaphragm with activated mesothelial cells immediately after cessation of exposure. While no chrysotile fibers were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes, crocidolite fibers of up to 35 μm were observed. These results provide support that brake-dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung or the pleural cavity following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • Evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology in lung or pleural cavity observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite quickly

  7. Evaluation of the deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake dust with and without added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation: Interim results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, David M.; Rogers, Rick; Sepulveda, Rosalina; Kunzendorf, Peter; Bellmann, Bernd; Ernst, Heinrich; Phillips, James I.

    2014-04-01

    Chrysotile has been frequently used in the past in manufacturing brakes and continues to be used in brakes in many countries. This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake dust or crocidolite asbestos. No significant pathological response was observed at any time point in either the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups. The long chrysotile fibers (> 20 μm) cleared quickly with T{sub 1/2} estimated as 30 and 33 days, respectively in the brake dust and the chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups. In contrast, the long crocidolite fibers had a T{sub 1/2} > 1000 days and initiated a rapid inflammatory response in the lung following exposure resulting in a 5-fold increase in fibrotic response within 91 days. These results provide support that brake dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • We evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite produced pathological response - Wagner 4 interstitial fibrosis by 32d.

  8. Photochemical solar cells based on dye-sensitization of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, S.K.; Ellingson, R.; Ferrere, S.; Frank, A.J.; Gregg, B.A.; Nozik, A.J.; Park, N.; Schlichthoerl, G.; Zaban, A.

    1999-03-01

    A photoelectrochemical solar cell that is based on the dye-sensitization of thin nanocrystalline films of TiO{sub 2} (anatase) nanoparticles in contact with a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte is described. The cell, fabricated at NREL, shows a conversion efficiency of {approximately}9.2{percent} at AM1.5, which approaches the best reported value of 10{percent}-11{percent} by Gr{umlt a}tzel at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Femtosecond (fs) pump-probe spectroscopy has been used to time resolve the injection of electrons into the conduction band of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films under ambient conditions following photoexcitation of the adsorbed Ru(II)-complex dye. The measurement indicates an instrument-limited {minus}50 fs upper limit on the electron injection time. We also report the sensitization of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} by a novel iron-based dye. cis-[Fe{sup II}(2,2{sup {prime}}-bipyridine-4,4{sup {prime}}-dicarboxylic&hthinsp;acid){sub 2}(CN){sub 2}], a chromophore with an extremely short-lived, nonemissive excited state. The dye also exhibits a unique {open_quotes}band selective{close_quotes} sensitization through one of its two absorption bands. The operational principle of the device has been studied through the measurement of electric field distribution within the device structure and studies on the pH dependence of dye-redox potential. The incorporation of a WO{sub 3}-based electrochromic layer into this device has led to a novel photoelectrochromic device structure for {open_quotes}smart window{close_quotes} applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  10. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  11. Atomic layer deposition grown MO{sub x} thin films for solar water splitting: Prospects and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Trilok; Lehnen, Thomas; Leuning, Tessa; Mathur, Sanjay

    2015-01-15

    The magnitude of energy challenge not only calls for efficient devices but also for abundant, inexpensive, and stable photoactive materials that can enable efficient light harvesting, charge separation and collection, as well as chemical transformations. Photoelectrochemical systems based on semiconductor materials have the possibility to transform solar energy directly into chemical energy the so-called “solar hydrogen.” The current challenge lies in the harvesting of a larger fraction of electromagnetic spectrum by enhancing the absorbance of electrode materials. In this context, atomically precise thin films of metal oxide semiconductors and their multilayered junctions are promising candidates to integrate high surface areas with well-defined electrode–substrate interface. Given its self-limited growth mechanism, the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique offers a wide range of capabilities to deposit and modify materials at the nanoscale. In addition, it opens new frontiers for developing precursor chemistry that is inevitable to design new processes. Herein, the authors review the properties and potential of metal oxide thin films deposited by ALD for their application in photoelectrochemical water splitting application. The first part of the review covers the basics of ALD processes followed by a brief discussion on the electrochemistry of water splitting reaction. The second part focuses on different MO{sub x} films deposited by atomic layer deposition for water splitting applications; in this section, The authors discuss the most explored MO{sub x} semiconductors, namely, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3}, and ZnO, as active materials and refer to their application as protective coatings, conductive scaffolds, or in heterojunctions. The third part deals with the current challenges and future prospects of ALD processed MO{sub x} thin films for water splitting reactions.

  12. Study of new states in visible light active W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajjad, Ahmed Khan Leghari; Shamaila, Sajjad; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel. ? Oxygen vacancies are detected in the form of new linkages as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. ? W, N co-doped titania has new energy states which narrows the band gap effectively. ? Oxygen vacancies are proved to be the cause for high photo catalytic activity. ? W and N co-doping plays the major role to make the composite thermally stable. -- Abstract: The visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel method. New linkages of N, W and O are formed as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. Electron paramagnetic resonance illustrates the presence of oxygen vacancies in W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} acting as trapping agencies for electrons to produce active species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of new energy states. New linkages and oxygen vacancies are proved to be the main cause for the improved photo catalytic performances. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} has new energy states which narrow the band gap effectively. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} is thermally stable and retains its anatase phase up to 900 C. 4.5% W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} showed superior activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B and 2,4-dichlorophenol as compared to pure titania, Degussa P-25, traditional N-doped TiO{sub 2} and pure WO{sub 3}.

  13. Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for novel bifunctional photocatalyst: One-pot synthesis, magnetically recyclable and enhanced photocatalytic property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jinxue; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xiao Zhou, Xiaoyu; Hou, Wanguo

    2013-09-15

    Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites were prepared for application of novel bifunctional photocatalyst via simple one-pot hydrothermal method, employing graphene oxide (GO), Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, FeSO{sub 4} and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as the precursors. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results indicate that the well-dispersed Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of RGO sheets homogeneously. Magnetic characterization reveals that Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/RGO show ferromagnetic behaviors. So this novel bifunctional photocatalyst could achieve magnetic separation and collection with the aid of external magnet. The composites exhibit enhanced photocatalytic performance on degradation of methyl orange (MO) compared with pure Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} under low-power ultraviolet light irradiation due to the introduction of RGO. Moreover, this hybrid catalyst possesses long-term excellent photocatalytic performance due to its good thermal stability. This bifunctional photocatalyst, which combines magnetic property and excellent photocatalytic activity, would be a perfect candidate in applications of catalytic elimination of environmental pollutants and other areas. - Graphical abstract: Magnetically recyclable Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic property Display Omitted - Highlights: ?Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} growth, deposition and GO reduction occurred simultaneously. ?Composite possessed ferromagnetic and enhanced photocatalytic properties. ?Composite is utilized as a magnetically separable and high-efficient photocatalyst. ?Photocatalyst showed good photocatalytic and thermal stability during cyclic use.

  14. A modern search for Wolf-Rayet stars in the Magellanic Clouds: First results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Morrell, Nidia; Hillier, D. John E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu E-mail: hillier@pitt.edu

    2014-06-10

    Over the years, directed surveys and incidental spectroscopy have identified 12 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 139 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), numbers which are often described as 'essentially complete'. Yet, new WRs are discovered in the LMC almost yearly. We have therefore initiated a new survey of both Magellanic Clouds using the same interference-filter imaging technique previously applied to M31 and M33. We report on our first observing season, in which we have successfully surveyed ∼15% of our intended area of the SMC and LMC. Spectroscopy has confirmed nine newly found WRs in the LMC (a 6% increase), including one of WO-type, only the third known in that galaxy and the second to be discovered recently. The other eight are WN3 stars that include an absorption component. In two, the absorption is likely from an O-type companion, but the other six are quite unusual. Five would be classified naively as 'WN3+O3 V', but such a pairing is unlikely given the rarity of O3 stars, the short duration of this phase (which is incommensurate with the evolution of a companion to a WN star), and because these stars are considerably fainter than O3 V stars. The sixth star may also fall into this category. CMFGEN modeling suggests these stars are hot, bolometrically luminous, and N-rich like other WN3 stars, but lack the strong winds that characterize WNs. Finally, we discuss two rare Of?p stars and four Of supergiants we found, and propose that the B[e] star HD 38489 may have a WN companion.

  15. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  16. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  17. ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE CYCLE LENGTHS FOR FULLY-CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL-BASED LIGHT WATER REACTOR CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu; Francesco Venneri

    2012-04-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with failure-proof fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such a low enriched uranium fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel 'as-is' into existing LWRs while retaining their thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at cycle lengths and fuel failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of different TRISO kernel diameters without changing the coating layer thicknesses. The study shows that a naive use of UO{sub 2} results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In contrast, the designs that do not depart too drastically from those of the nominal NGNP HTR fuel TRISO particles are shown to perform satisfactorily and display a high rates of survival under all considered scenarios. Finally, it is recognized that relaxing the geometry constraint will result in satisfactory cycle lengths even using UO{sub 2}-loaded TRISO particles-based fuel with enrichment at or below 20 w/o.

  18. Assessment of possible cycle lengths for fully-ceramic micro-encapsulated fuel-based light water reactor concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, R. S.; Pope, M. A.; Ougouag, A. M.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Venneri, F.

    2012-07-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with accident-tolerant fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such a low enriched uranium fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel 'as-is' into existing LWRs while retaining their thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at cycle lengths and fuel failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of different TRISO kernel diameters without changing the coating layer thicknesses. The study shows that a naive use of UO{sub 2} results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In contrast, the designs that do not depart too drastically from those of the nominal NGNP HTR fuel TRISO particles are shown to perform satisfactorily and display a high rate of survival under all considered scenarios. Finally, it is recognized that relaxing the geometry constraint will result in satisfactory cycle lengths even using UO{sub 2}-loaded TRISO particles-based fuel with enrichment at or below 20 w/o. (authors)

  19. Use of phosphoranimines to reduce organic carbonate content in Li-ion battery electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dufek, Eric J.; Klaehn, John R.; McNally, Joshua S.; Rollins, Harry W.; Jamison, David K.

    2016-05-09

    In this study, the use of phosphoranimines (PAs), a class of linear, monomeric phosphazenes, as electrolytes for Li-ion battery applications has been investigated as a route to improve safety and stability for Li-ion batteries. Of the potential PAs for use in battery applications, this work focuses on the initial synthetic preparation and analysis of N-trimethylsilyl-P,P-bis((2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)-P-ethylphosphoranimine (PA-5). PA-5 has high LiPF6 solubility in excess of 2 M, high thermal stability with a melting point below -80°C and high thermal stability as a neat compound to at least 250°C. As part of electrolyte blends, the inclusion of PA-5 shifts the onset ofmore » thermal degradation by close to 40°C at 35% loading and by 20°C at a 10% loading, improves the low temperature performance of the electrolyte, and when used as a primary solvent leads to increases in the flash point (by 20°C) when compared to more traditional EC:EMC blends. Cycling capabilities of full-coin cells with graphite negative electrodes and Li1+w[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]1-wO2 positive electrodes using PA-5:EC:EMC electrolyte blends are comparable with the performance seen for traditional EC:EMC blends. Analysis of the impact of the use of additives such as vinylene carbonate in PA-5:EC:EMC blended electrolyte results in enhanced capacity retention and improved coulombic efficiency.« less

  20. RELAP5-3D Restart and Backup Verification Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2013-09-01

    Existing testing methodology for RELAP5-3D employs a set of test cases collected over two decades to test a variety of code features and run on a Linux or Windows platform. However, this set has numerous deficiencies in terms of code coverage, detail of comparison, running time, and testing fidelity of RELAP5-3D restart and backup capabilities. The test suite covers less than three quarters of the lines of code in the relap directory and just over half those in the environmental library. Even in terms of code features, many are not covered. Moreover, the test set runs many problems long past the point necessary to test the relevant features. It requires standard problems to run to completion. This is unnecessary for features can be tested in a short-running problem. For example, many trips and controls can be tested in the first few time steps, as can a number of fluid flow options. The testing system is also inaccurate. For the past decade, the diffem script has been the primary tool for checking that printouts from two different RELAP5-3D executables agree. This tool compares two output files to verify that all characters are the same except for those relating to date, time and a few other excluded items. The variable values printed on the output file are accurate to no more than eight decimal places. Therefore, calculations with errors in decimal places beyond those printed remain undetected. Finally, fidelity of restart is not tested except in the PVM sub-suite and backup is not specifically tested at all. When a restart is made from any midway point of the base-case transient, the restart must produce the same values. When a backup condition occurs, the code repeats advancements with the same time step. A perfect backup can be tested by forcing RELAP5 to perform a backup by falsely setting a backup condition flag at a user-specified-time. Comparison of the calculations of that run and those produced by the same input w/o the spurious condition should be

  1. Visible light absorption of TiO{sub 2} materials impregnated with tungstophosphoric acid ethanol–aqueous solution at different pH values. Evidence about the formation of a surface complex between Keggin anion and TiO{sub 2} surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rengifo-Herrera, Julián A. Blanco, Mirta N.; Pizzio, Luis R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TPA impregnation on TiO{sub 2} particles was done at different initial pH values. • Powders characterization evidenced the possible existence of TPA–TiO{sub 2} complexes. • Keggin anion complexed on TiO{sub 2} would be responsible of visible light absorption. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} particles prepared by the sol–gel method were impregnated at different pH values (1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0) with a water–ethanol solution (50% V/V) of tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) (0.012 M). Similar preparation was carried out to synthesize TiO{sub 2} impregnated with [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2−} (TiW). These materials were characterized by different techniques such as UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS), magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance of {sup 31}P ({sup 31}P MAS NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman). Results revealed that TPA–TiO{sub 2} materials exhibit visible light absorption only when impregnation was done at pH 1.0 (TiTPA1) and 2.0 (TiTPA2). TiW powder did not show visible light absorption. XRD patterns show the presence of peaks at 2θ = 25.4° (1 0 1), 37.9° (0 0 4), 47.8° (2 0 0) and 54.3° associated to the anatase phase. Solid NMR, FT-IR and FT-Raman characterization showed that TiTPA1 and TiTPA2 samples contain Keggin ([PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3−}) and lacunary anions ([PW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 7−}) respectively. On the other hand, FT-Raman results revealed a blue shifting and broadening of the band at 141 cm{sup −1} corresponding to anatase TiO{sub 2} and moreover, a broadening of bands at 900–1100 cm{sup −1} attributed to Keggin structures of TPA. Both spectral changes could be related to the formation of a surface complex between the Keggin anion of TPA and TiO{sub 2} surfaces. This interaction should be responsible for visible light absorption.

  2. Technetium (VII) Co-precipitation with Framework Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harsh, James B.; Dickson, Johnbull Otah; Pierce, Eric M.; Bargar, John

    2015-07-13

    Technetium-99 (99Tc), a long-lived radionuclide, is one of the most widespread contaminants within the Hanford subsurface. At some depths, it is only extractable with strong acids, suggesting incorporation into a solid phase. We hypothesized that Tc may have coprecipitated with feldspathoid aluminosilicates under waste tanks that had leaked caustic solutions into the vadose zone. Our objectives were to determine if Tc could be incorporated into the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite and under what conditions coprecipitation could occur. Our hypothesis was that sodalite was more likely to incorporate and retain Tc. Our approach was to use known methods of feldspathoid formation in solutions resembling those in Hanford waste tanks contacting sediments in terms of major ion (Na, NO3, OH, Al(OH)4, and Si(OH)4 concentrations. In some cases, Al and Si were supplied from zeolite. We used perrhenate (ReO4) as a surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4) to avoid the radioactivity. The major findings of this study were 1) ReO4 could be incorporated into either sodalite or cancrinite but the concentration in the solid was < 1% of the competing ion Cl, NO3, or NO2. 2) The small amount of ReO4 incorporated was not exchangeable with NO3 or NO2. 3) In sodalite, NO3 was highly preferred over ReO4 but significant Re-sodalite was formed when the mole fraction in solution (Re/Re+N) exceeded 0.8. 4) A nonlinear relation between the unit cell parameter and amount of Re incorporated suggested that a separate Re-sodalite phase was formed rather than a solid solution. 5) We determined that sodalite preference for sodalite in the presence of different anions increased with the ionic size of the competing anion: Cl < CO3 < NO3 < SO4 < MnO4 < WO4 and significant incorporation did not occur unless the difference in anion radii was less than 12%. 6) Re(VII) was not significantly reduced to Re(IV) under the conditions of this experiment and Re appeared to be a good surrogate for Tc under oxidizing

  3. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are

  4. Alternative Electrochemical Salt Waste Forms, Summary of FY2010 Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-08-01

    In FY2009, PNNL performed scoping studies to qualify two waste form candidates, tellurite (TeO2-based) glasses and halide minerals, for the electrochemical waste stream for further investigation. Both candidates showed promise with acceptable PCT release rates and effective incorporation of the 10% fission product waste stream. Both candidates received reprisal for FY2010 and were further investigated. At the beginning of FY2010, an in-depth literature review kicked off the tellurite glasses study. The review was aimed at ascertaining the state-of-the-art for chemical durability testing and mixed chloride incorporation for tellurite glasses. The literature review led the authors to 4 unique binary and 1 unique ternary systems for further investigation which include TeO2 plus the following: PbO, Al2O3-B2O3, WO3, P2O5, and ZnO. Each system was studied with and without a mixed chloride simulated electrochemical waste stream and the literature review provided the starting points for the baseline compositions as well as starting points for melting temperature, compatible crucible types, etc. The most promising glasses in each system were scaled up in production and were analyzed with the Product Consistency Test, a chemical durability test. Baseline and PCT glasses were analyzed to determine their state, i.e., amorphous, crystalline, phase separated, had undissolved material within the bulk, etc. Conclusions were made as well as the proposed direction for FY2011 plans. Sodalite was successfully synthesized by the sol-gel method. The vast majority of the dried sol-gel consisted of sodalite with small amounts of alumino-silicates and unreacted salt. Upon firing the powders made by sol-gel, the primary phase observed was sodalite with the addition of varying amounts of nepheline, carnegieite, lithium silicate, and lanthanide oxide. The amount of sodalite, nepheline, and carnegieite as well as the bulk density of the fired pellets varied with firing temperature, sol

  5. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  6. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot

  7. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no

  8. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The

  9. Advanced Automotive Fuels Research, Development, and Commercialization Cluster (OH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linkous, Clovis; Hripko, Michael; Abraham, Martin; Balendiran, Ganesaratnam; Hunter, Allen; Lovelace-Cameron, Sherri; Mette, Howard; Price, Douglas; Walker, Gary; Wang, Ruigang

    2013-08-31

    enzymes are generally not available commercially, however, and those that are can be quite expensive. Accordingly, the genes responsible for enzyme synthesis were inserted into other microorganisms in order to accelerate enzyme production. This was demonstrated for two of the required enzymes in the overall series. In the MOF project, a number of new MOF compounds were synthesized and characterized, as well as some common MOFs well-known for their adsorption properties. Selectivity for specific gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} was demonstrated, although it was seen that water vapor would frequently act as an interferent. This work underscored the need to test MOF compounds under real world conditions, i.e., room temperature and above instead of liquid N{sub 2} temperature, and testing adsorption using blends of gases instead of pure components. In the solar membrane project, thin films of CdTe and WO{sub 3} were applied to steel substrates and used as p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively, in the production of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. Testing with {sup 2}H and {sup 18}O isotopically labeled water enabled substantiation of net water-splitting.

  10. Reduced Cu(InGa)Se2 Thickness in Solar Cells Using a Superstrate Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-03-30

    is incident through the substrate into the back of the absorber layer. The primary junction is then formed after Cu(InGa)Se2 deposition. This allows the potential benefits of superstrate cells for optical enhancement while maintaining processing advantages of the substrate configuration and avoiding the harmful effects of high temperature deposition on p-n junction formation. Backwall devices have outperformed substrate cells at absorber thicknesses of 0.1-0.5 µm through enhanced JSC due to easy incorporation of a Ag reflector and, with light incident on the absorber, the elimination of parasitic absorption in the CdS buffer. An efficiency of 9.7% has been achieved for a backwall Cu(InGa)Se2 device with absorber thickness ~0.4 μm. A critical achievement that enabled implementation of the backwall cell was the development of a transparent back contact using MoO3 or WO3. Processes for controlled deposition of each material by reactive rf sputtering from metal targets were developed. These contacts have wide bandgaps making them well-suited for application as contacts for backwall devices as well as potential use in bifacial cells and as the top cell of tandem CuInSe2-based devices. Optical enhancement will be critical for further improvements. Wet chemical texturing of ZnO films has been developed for a simple, low cost light-trapping scheme for backwall superstrate devices to enhance long wavelength quantum efficiency. An aqueous oxalic acid etch was developed and found to strongly texture sputtered ZnO with high haze ≈ 0.9 observed across the whole spectrum. And finally, advanced optical models have been developed to assist the characterization and optimization of Cu(InGa)Se2 cells with thin absorbers