Sample records for grid coupled climate

  1. Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Fourth Quarter 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JH Mather; DA Randall; CJ Flynn

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. The first quarter milestone was the initial formulation of the algorithm for retrieval of these properties. The second quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved cloud properties and a year-long CCPP control simulation. The third quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved aerosol optical depth and a three-year CCPP control simulation. This final fourth quarter milestone includes the time-series of aerosol and dust properties and a decade-long CCPP control simulation.

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE High-resolution climate change mapping with gridded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    RESEARCH ARTICLE High-resolution climate change mapping with gridded historical climate products of climate research and adaptation efforts around the world. High-resolution gridded historical climate (GHC products to produce high-resolution temperature trend maps for the US Northeast from 1980 to 2009

  3. UNCORRECTED Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlbrodt, Till

    UNCORRECTED PROOF Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models: a conceptual study is the 12 improvement of convection parameterization schemes, but the question of grid geometry also plays to an at- 14 mosphere model. Such ocean climate models have mostly structured, coarsely resolved grids. 15

  4. The Los Alamos coupled climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.W.; Malone, R.C.; Lai, C.A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a full understanding of the Earth`s climate system, it is necessary to understand physical processes in the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice. In addition, interactions between components are very important and models which couple all of the components into a single coupled climate model are required. A climate model which couples ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land components is described. The component models are run as autonomous processes coupled to a flux coupler through a flexible communications library. Performance considerations of the model are examined, particularly for running the model on distributed-shared-memory machine architectures.

  5. Earth System Grid II, Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Don

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth System Grid (ESG) II project, funded by the Department of Energy’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program, has transformed climate data into community resources. ESG II has accomplished this goal by creating a virtual collaborative environment that links climate centers and users around the world to models and data via a computing Grid, which is based on the Department of Energy’s supercomputing resources and the Internet. Our project’s success stems from partnerships between climate researchers and computer scientists to advance basic and applied research in the terrestrial, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences. By interfacing with other climate science projects, we have learned that commonly used methods to manage and remotely distribute data among related groups lack infrastructure and under-utilize existing technologies. Knowledge and expertise gained from ESG II have helped the climate community plan strategies to manage a rapidly growing data environment more effectively. Moreover, approaches and technologies developed under the ESG project have impacted datasimulation integration in other disciplines, such as astrophysics, molecular biology and materials science.

  6. A comprehensive set of high-resolution grids of monthly climate for Europe and the globe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    on biomass potential in western Europe; Rotmans A comprehensive set of high-resolution grids of monthly climate for Europe and the globe;1 A comprehensive set of high-resolution grids of monthly climate for Europe and the globe: the observed record

  7. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    and international climate projects (e.g., Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model

  8. Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate problems with the modeling of well-mixed-greenhouse-gas changes. The simple diagnoses we present provide an important and useful first step for understanding differences in AOGCM integrations, indicating that some of the differences in model projections can be attributed to different prescribed climate forcing, even for so-called standard climate change scenarios.

  9. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. Continued ESGF progress will result in a production ultrascale data system for empowering scientists who attempt new and exciting data exchanges that could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate-science discoveries.

  10. The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Focusing Technologies on Climate Datasets and Resource Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses a project that used prototyping technology to access and analyze climate data. This project was initially funded under the DOE’s Next Generation Internet (NGI) program, with follow-on support from BER and the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) office. In this prototype, we developed Data Grid technologies for managing the movement and replication of large datasets, and applied these technologies in a practical setting (i.e., an ESG-enabled data browser based on current climate data analysis tools), achieving cross-country transfer rates of more than 500 Mb/s. Having demonstrated the potential for remotely accessing and analyzing climate data located at sites across the U.S., we won the “Hottest Infrastructure” award in the Network Challenge event. While the ESG I prototype project substantiated a proof of concept (“Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources”), the SciDAC Earth System Grid (ESG) II project made this a reality. Our efforts targeted the development of metadata technologies (standard schema, XML metadata extraction based on netCDF, and a Metadata Catalog Service), security technologies (Web-based user registration and authentication, and community authorization), data transport technologies (GridFTPenabled OPeNDAP-G for high-performance access, robust multiple file transport and integration with mass storage systems, and support for dataset aggregation and subsetting), as well as web portal technologies to provide interactive access to climate data holdings. At this point, the technology was in place and assembled, and ESG II was poised to make a substantial impact on the climate modelling community.

  11. Couplings between changes in the climate system and biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Denman, Kenneth L.; Brasseur , Guy; Chidthaisong, Amnat; Ciais, Philippe; Cox, Peter M.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Hauglustaine, Didier; Heinze, Christoph; Holland, Elisabeth; Jacob , Daniel; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ramachandran, Srikanthan; Leite da Silva Dias, Pedro; Wofsy, Steven C.; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's climate is determined by a number of complex connected physical, chemical and biological processes occurring in the atmosphere, land and ocean. The radiative properties of the atmosphere, a major controlling factor of the Earth's climate, are strongly affected by the biophysical state of the Earth's surface and by the atmospheric abundance of a variety of trace constituents. These constituents include long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), as well as other radiatively active constituents such as ozone and different types of aerosol particles. The composition of the atmosphere is determined by processes such as natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols, transport at a variety of scales, chemical and microphysical transformations, wet scavenging and surface uptake by the land and terrestrial ecosystems, and by the ocean and its ecosystems. These processes and, more generally the rates of biogeochemical cycling, are affected by climate change, and involve interactions between and within the different components of the Earth system. These interactions are generally nonlinear and may produce negative or positive feedbacks to the climate system. An important aspect of climate research is to identify potential feedbacks and assess if such feedbacks could produce large and undesired responses to perturbations resulting from human activities. Studies of past climate evolution on different time scales can elucidate mechanisms that could trigger nonlinear responses to external forcing. The purpose of this chapter is to identify the major biogeochemical feedbacks of significance to the climate system, and to assess current knowledge of their magnitudes and trends. Specifically, this chapter will examine the relationships between the physical climate system and the land surface, the carbon cycle, chemically reactive atmospheric gases and aerosol particles. It also presents the current state of knowledge on budgets of important trace gases. Large uncertainties remain in many issues discussed in this chapter, so that quantitative estimates of the importance of the coupling mechanisms discussed in the following sections are not always available. In addition, regional differences in the role of some cycles and the complex interactions between them limit our present ability to provide a simple quantitative description of the interactions between biogeochemical processes and climate change.

  12. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  13. Coupling Electric Vehicles and Power Grid through Charging-In-Motion and Connected Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jan-Mou [ORNL; Jones, Perry T [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A traffic-assignment-based framework is proposed to model the coupling of transportation network and power grid for analyzing impacts of energy demand from electric vehicles on the operation of power distribution. Although the reverse can be investigated with the proposed framework as well, electricity flowing from a power grid to electric vehicles is the focus of this paper. Major variables in transportation network (including link flows) and power grid (including electricity transmitted) are introduced for the coupling. Roles of charging-in-motion technology and connected vehicle technology have been identified in the framework of supernetwork. A linkage (i.e. individual energy demand) between the two networks is defined to construct the supernetwork. To determine equilibrium of the supernetwork can also answer how many drivers are going to use the charging-in-motion services, in which locations, and at what time frame. An optimal operation plan of power distribution will be decided along the determination simultaneously by which we have a picture about what level of power demand from the grid is expected in locations during an analyzed period. Caveat of the framework and possible applications have also been discussed.

  14. Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

  15. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  16. Century Climate Change Scenario for the Mediterranean using a coupled Atmosphere-Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    21st Century Climate Change Scenario for the Mediterranean using a coupled Atmosphere The SAMM (Sea Atmosphere Mediterranean Model) has been developed to study the climate evolution significantly amplifies the climate change signal over large parts of Europe with respect to the corresponding

  17. Mechanisms of interdecadal climate variability and the role of oceanatmosphere coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    . If the ocean is forced by imposed stochastic heat fluxes, instead of a fully interacting atmosphereMechanisms of interdecadal climate variability and the role of ocean­atmosphere coupling Riccardo are investigated with coupled and uncoupled integrations of a three- dimensional ocean­atmosphere­land­ice climate

  18. Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Xie, YuLong; Leung, Lai R.; Correia, James; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Paget, Maria L.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a multi-disciplinary modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. Our results have shown that by the mid-century, building yearly energy consumption and peak load will increase in the Southwest. Moreover, the peak load months will spread out to not only the summer months but also spring and autumn months. The Pacific Northwest will experience more hot days in the summer months. The penetration of the air conditioning (a/c) system in this area is likely to increase significantly over the years. As a result, some locations in the Pacific Northwest may be shifted from winter peaking to summer peaking. Overall, the Western U.S. grid may see more simultaneous peaks across the North and South in summer months. Increased cooling load will result in a significant increase in the motor load, which consumes more reactive power and requires stronger voltage support from the grid. This study suggests an increasing need for the industry to implement new technology to increase the efficiency of temperature-sensitive loads and apply proper protection and control to prevent possible adverse impacts of a/c motor loads.

  19. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  20. The impact of centennial-scale solar forcing on the Holocene climate: simulations with a coupled climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    lasts about 50-year longer than the TSI anomaly. This is caused by extensive sea-ice build- up, which. During shorter TSI anomalies, such as event B centered at 2300 BP, sea-ice build-up is insufficientThe impact of centennial-scale solar forcing on the Holocene climate: simulations with a coupled

  1. Studies of climate variability in a simple coupled model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abiven, Claude

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms of variability of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model are investigated through the study of two coupled configurations: an aquaplanet in which gyres are absent, and an aquaplanet in which a ridge extending from ...

  2. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  3. Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

  4. A mathematical basis for automated structured grid generation with close coupling to the flow solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnette, D.W.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first two truncation error terms resulting from finite differencing the convection terms in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are examined for the purpose of constructing two-dimensional grid generation schemes. These schemes are constructed such that the resulting grid distributions drive the error terms to zero. Two sets of equations result, one for each error term, that show promise in generating grids that provide more accurate flow solutions and possibly faster convergence. One set results in an algebraic scheme that drives the first truncation term to zero, and the other a hyperbolic scheme that drives the second term to zero. Also discussed is the possibility of using the schemes in sequentially constructing a grid in an iterative algorithm involving the flow solver. In essence, the process is envisioned to generate not only a flow field solution but the grid as well, rendering the approach a hands-off method for grid generation

  5. Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

  6. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

  7. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  8. Simulation of Off-Grid, Off-Pipe, Single-Family Detached Residences in US Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

    use could be reduced by using measures for maximizing winter-time solar gains and minimizing heat losses in cold climates. The reduction in hot water use resulted in an equivalent DHW energy savings. Figure 2: Space heating and DHW energy use... scenario with the DOE-2 system type RESYS and specifying an air- conditioner with a heat-pump/electric resistance heating system. The figure shows that in a cold climate up to 47% electricity use could be reduced by combining all the energy...

  9. Coupled fluid structure simulations for application to grid-to-rod fretting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan-Torres, Sasha Angela

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) has been the major cause of fuel leakage in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the past ten years. It is responsible for over 70% of the fuel leaking in PWRs in the United States. The Consortium ...

  10. An Analysis of Off-grid, Off-pipe Housing in Six U.S. Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, Mini

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    as the base case. The six U.S. climate locations included: Minneapolis, MN, Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, Houston, TX, Phoenix, AZ, and Los Angeles, CA. The renewable resources considered for this study included: solar radiation, wind, biomass for building energy...

  11. Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

  12. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  13. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  14. Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures: Gas-Grid Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chertkov, Michael; Backhaus, Scott

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipeli...

  15. AUSTRIAN GRID AUSTRIAN GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUSTRIAN GRID 1/18 AUSTRIAN GRID THE INITIAL VERSION OF SEE-GRID Document Identifier: AG-DA1c-1) #12;AUSTRIAN GRID 2/18 Delivery Slip Name Partner Date Signature From Károly Bósa RISC 31 See cover on page 3 #12;AUSTRIAN GRID 3/18 THE INITIAL VERSION OF SEE-GRID Karoly Bosa Wolfgang

  16. 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Face-to-Face Meeting Report December 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate and weather data science community gathered December 3–5, 2013, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in Livermore, California, for the third annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Meeting, which was hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UV-CDAT are global collaborations designed to develop a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to observed and simulated data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure developed under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change, while the F2F meetings help to build a stronger climate and weather data science community and stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2013 F2F meeting determined requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects; enhancements needed for data distribution, analysis, and visualization infrastructure; and standards and resources needed for better collaborations.

  17. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scarcity and climate change in the Mediterranean. Watermediterranean-climate regions, and species often respond to changes

  18. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scarcity and climate change in the Mediterranean. Watermediterranean-climate regions, and species often respond to changes

  19. LED Lighting Off the Grid

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D. & Kammen, D. M. Decentralized energy systems for clean electricity access. Nature Climate Change accepted, in press, (2015). Off-Grid Status Quo : Fuel Based Lighting...

  20. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  1. World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

  2. Dynamics of the Coupled Human-climate System Resulting from Closed-loop Control of Solar Geoengineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacMartin, Douglas; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Keith, David; Jarvis, Andrew

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    If solar radiation management (SRM) were ever implemented, feedback of the observed climate state might be used to adjust the radiative forcing of SRM, in order to compensate for uncertainty in either the forcing or the climate response; this would also compensate for unexpected changes in the system, e.g. a nonlinear change in climate sensitivity. This feedback creates an emergent coupled human-climate system, with entirely new dynamics. In addition to the intended response to greenhouse-gas induced changes, the use of feedback would also result in a geoengineering response to natural climate variability. We use a simple box-diffusion dynamic model to understand how changing feedback-control parameters and time delay affect the behavior of this coupled natural-human system, and verify these predictions using the HadCM3L general circulation model. In particular, some amplification of natural variability is unavoidable; any time delay (e.g., to average out natural variability, or due to decision-making) exacerbates this amplification, with oscillatory behavior possible if there is a desire for rapid correction (high feedback gain), but a delayed response needed for decision making. Conversely, the need for feedback to compensate for uncertainty, combined with a desire to avoid excessive amplification, results in a limit on how rapidly SRM could respond to uncertain changes.

  3. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  4. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change:alteration within ecosystems. Conservation Biology 10: 1163-Paruelo, 1998. The value of ecosystem services: putting the

  5. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  6. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  7. Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations of climate following volcanic eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    the incoming shortwave radiation (SW) and also absorbs solar near infrared (NIR) radiation and upwelling long] For a volcano to have a significant long-term impact on the climate it must inject a sufficient amount of sulfur wave (LW) radiation from the surface and atmosphere below [Stenchikov et al., 1998; Ramachandran et al

  8. Applications (Grid Tools)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Grid Fabric Software Grid Applications Core Grid Middleware User-Level Middleware (Grid Tools) !"# $ %& ' ( ) * #& + '& ' , - . / # ) ) 0 # * 1 PDB CDB Grid Fabric Hardware &+ '' + ) , '1 '1 ' % - * # ( Grid Fabric Software Grid Applications Core Grid Middleware User-Level Middleware (Grid Tools) !"# $ %& ' ( ) * #& + '& ' , - . / # ) ) 0

  9. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  10. Towards a Fine-Resolution Global Coupled Climate System for Prediction on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II:7.1 7.0

  11. Grassland/atmosphere response to changing climate: Coupling regional and local scales. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughenour, M.B.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Pielke, R.A.; Eastman, J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were: to evaluate the response of grassland ecosystems to atmospheric change at regional and site scales, and to develop multiscaled modeling systems to relate ecological and atmospheric models with different spatial and temporal resolutions. A menu-driven shell was developed to facilitate use of models at different temporal scales and to facilitate exchange information between models at different temporal scales. A detailed ecosystem model predicted that C{sub 3} temperate grasslands wig respond more strongly to elevated CO{sub 2} than temperate C{sub 4} grasslands in the short-term while a large positive N-PP response was predicted for a C{sub 4} Kenyan grassland. Long-term climate change scenarios produced either decreases or increases in Colorado plant productivity (NPP) depending on rainfall, but uniform increases in N-PP were predicted in Kenya. Elevated CO{sub 2} is likely to have little effect on ecosystem carbon storage in Colorado while it will increase carbon storage in Kenya. A synoptic climate classification processor (SCP) was developed to evaluate results of GCM climate sensitivity experiments. Roughly 80% agreement was achieved with manual classifications. Comparison of lx and 2xCO{sub 2} GCM Simulations revealed relatively small differences.

  12. The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

  13. Climate Regime Effects on Pacific Herring Growth Using Coupled NutrientPhytoplanktonZooplankton and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Phytoplankton­Zooplankton and Bioenergetics Models KENNETH A. ROSE* Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State coupled to a fish bioenergetics model to simulate the weight-at-age responses of Pacific herring Clupea interactions of multiple functional groups of phytoplankton and zooplankton. The bioenergetics model simulates

  14. Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    - Land-sea differences - Surface parameters Applications (besides regional climate variability and change, Russia #12;OUTLINE 1. INTRODUCTION: Exploring the variable- resolution stretched-grid approach (for grid- point models: Staniforth and Mitchell 1978, and for spectral models: Schmidt 1977) to regional climate

  15. Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

  16. Grid Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnott, R.O.

    Sinnott,R.O. National Centre for e-Social Science book, Grid Computing: Technology, Service and Application, CRC Press, November 2008.

  17. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  18. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in running RCM’s over Greenland to produce high-qualityoutlet glaciers. For Greenland, this detail is specificallyCurrently, no coupled Greenland Ice Sheet model experiment

  19. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November...

  20. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  1. SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT FALL 2014 PREPARED BY: OLGA MARTYUSHEVA IN PARTIAL of water resources is currently under stress due to climatic changes, and continuous increase in water demand linked to the global population increase. A Smart Water Grid (SWG) is a two-way real time network

  2. Grid Architecture

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Integration of Distributed Generation", John McDonald, et.al. Electrical Transmission and Smart Grids, Springer, 2013. 4.25 Figure 4.17. Common Distribution Looping Arrangements In...

  3. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced Computational Kernels OBJECTIVE The U of the power grid will also have to evolve to insure accurate and timely simulations. On the other hand, the software tools available for power grid simulation today are primarily sequential single core programs

  4. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal ClimateGrid

  5. NATL Grid Map 50-Meter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    NATL-east NATL Grid Map 50-Meter Grid Locations in NATL can be specified by reference to a grid intervals. Each gridline intersection ("grid point") is identified by its two gridlines (e.g., E5). Each 50x50-m block formed by the gridlines is identified by the grid point in its northwest corner (e

  6. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal ClimateGridGrid

  7. The long-term change of El Niño Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chunxue 1984-

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    from pre-industrial control integrations. The near term integrations, also called decadal prediction experiments, are initialized with observations. It is also the first time that Earth System Models (ESMs) were incorporated into coupled model...

  8. The long-term change of El Niño Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chunxue 1984-

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    from pre-industrial control integrations. The near term integrations, also called decadal prediction experiments, are initialized with observations. It is also the first time that Earth System Models (ESMs) were incorporated into coupled model...

  9. Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

  10. Start | Grid View | Browse by Day OR Group/Topical | Author Index | Keyword Index | Personal Scheduler Active Vapor Split Control for Fully Coupled Columns: Experimental Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract The idea of a 4-product fully coupled distillation column has existed, is rather rudimentary. However, even with such a simple valve design, we can ensure a stable column distillation columns." AIChE Journal 44(11): 2565-2568. Dejanovic, I., L. Matijasevic, et al. (2010). "Dividing

  11. Transdisciplinary electric power grid science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brummitt, Charles D; Dobson, Ian; Moore, Cristopher; D'Souza, Raissa M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 20th-century engineering feat that most improved the quality of human life, the electric power system, now faces discipline-spanning challenges that threaten that distinction. So multilayered and complex that they resemble ecosystems, power grids face risks from their interdependent cyber, physical, social and economic layers. Only with a holistic understanding of the dynamics of electricity infrastructure and human operators, automatic controls, electricity markets, weather, climate and policy can we fortify worldwide access to electricity.

  12. Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and...

  13. Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project SUCCESS STORIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project, now complete FOR MORE INFORMATION: Rick Knori (307) 739-6038 www.lvenergy.com Cold-climate co-op heats up with smart grid Lower Valley Energy provides electricity to...

  14. EnergyPlus vs DOE-2: The Effect of Ground Coupling on Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption of a Slab-On-Grade Code House in a Cold Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.

    ENERGYPLUS VS DOE-2: THE EFFECT OF GROUND COUPLING ON HEATING AND COOLING ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF A SLAB-ON-GRADE CODE HOUSE IN A COLD CLIMATE Simge Andolsun, Charles H. Culp, Jeff Haberl Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA...-on-grade constructions. This paper extends the previous comparative work by comparing EnergyPlus and DOE-2.1e results for GCHT based on a slab-on- grade code house in a cold climate. Three GCHT models were used in the study. These models were Winkelmann?s (2002...

  15. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

  16. Faces of the Recovery Act: The Impact of Smart Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    President Obama

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 27th, Baltimore Gas & Electric was selected to receive $200 million for Smart Grid innovation projects under the Recovery Act. Watch as members of their team, along with President Obama, explain how building a smarter grid will help consumers cut their utility bills, battle climate change and create jobs.

  17. Faces of the Recovery Act: The Impact of Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    President Obama

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 27th, Baltimore Gas & Electric was selected to receive $200 million for Smart Grid innovation projects under the Recovery Act. Watch as members of their team, along with President Obama, explain how building a smarter grid will help consumers cut their utility bills, battle climate change and create jobs.

  18. Global and Sahel Regional Biophysical Processes, Vegetation Dynamics, and Climate Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Guoqiong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling processes . 137 A.2 Dynamicand dynamic VBP over global land, but the climate-carbon coupling process,

  19. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Grid Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecasting NREL researchersGrid

  20. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ESGF software is distinguished from other collaborative knowledge systems in the climate community by its widespread adoption, federation capabilities, and broad developer base. It is the leading source for present climate data holdings, including the most important and largest data sets in the global-climate community, and - assuming its development continues - we expect it to be the leading source for future climate data holdings as well. Recently, ESG-CET extended its services beyond data-file access and delivery to include more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis. The latter capabilities allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. The ESG-CET team also faces substantial technical challenges due to the rapidly increasing scale of climate simulation and observational data, which will grow, for example, from less than 50 terabytes for the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to multiple Petabytes for the next IPCC assessment. In a world of exponential technological change and rapidly growing sophistication in climate data analysis, an infrastructure such as ESGF must constantly evolve if it is to remain relevant and useful. Regretfully, we submit our final report at the end of project funding. To continue to serve the climate-science community, we are

  1. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and...

  2. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  3. 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Grid Panel Discussion 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid Panel Discussion The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held its...

  4. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of individual software products November 2012 PNNL-SA-90162 Ian Gorton Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 375-3850 ian.gorton@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) will deliver next National Laboratory's (PNNL) national electric grid research facility, the FPGI will advance the science

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency, Grid Integration, Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, Partnership, SMART Grid Vermont-a leader in energy efficiency and deployment of so-called smart-grid...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency, Grid Integration, Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, Partnership, SMART Grid Vermont-a leader in energy efficiency and deployment of so-called smart-grid...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration Energy Supply Transformation Needed On February 20, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration,...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence On July 31, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy...

  9. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tierney, Brian L

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision date: March 1, 2008 Grid Logging: Best Practicesis to help developers of Grid middleware and applicationlog files that will be useful to Grid administrators, users,

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offers Approach to Help Utilities Understand Effects of PV Variability on the Grid On March 7, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid...

  11. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Injection Attacks on Power Grids”, IEEE Transactionson Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2, June [21] O. Kosut, L.Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation: Attack

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: electric grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  13. Smart Grid Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid Overview Ben Kroposki, PhD, PE Director, Energy Systems IntegraLon NaLonal Renewable Energy Laboratory What is t he S mart Grid? and DER Source: NISTEPRI Architecture...

  14. Fuel rod support grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid for the support of nuclear fuel rods arranged in a triangular array. The grid is formed by concentric rings of strap joined by radially arranged web sections.

  15. The soft grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kardasis, Ari (Ari David)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The grid in architecture is a systematic organization of space. The means that architects use to organize space are, almost by definition, rigid and totalizing. The Cartesian grid, which will serve as the antagonist of the ...

  16. Method of grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  17. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  18. A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

    We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

  19. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  20. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology providers involved in the Smart Grid and provides profiles on them including contact information, company overviews, technology reviews, and key Smart Grid activities.

  1. Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids Toan Nguyen-based computing environments and deploys, tests and analyzes multiphysics codes. A second approach executes model coupling, error correlations, alert definitions, best usage practices, code verification and code

  2. Verification of the coupled fluid/solid transfer in a CASL grid-to-rod-fretting simulation : a technical brief on the analysis of convergence behavior and demonstration of software tools for verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copps, Kevin D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a CASL grid-to-rod fretting problem, Sandia's Percept software was used in conjunction with the Sierra Mechanics suite to analyze the convergence behavior of the data transfer from a fluid simulation to a solid mechanics simulation. An analytic function, with properties relatively close to numerically computed fluid approximations, was chosen to represent the pressure solution in the fluid domain. The analytic pressure was interpolated on a sequence of grids on the fluid domain, and transferred onto a separate sequence of grids in the solid domain. The error in the resulting pressure in the solid domain was measured with respect to the analytic pressure. The error in pressure approached zero as both the fluid and solids meshes were refined. The convergence of the transfer algorithm was limited by whether the source grid resolution was the same or finer than the target grid resolution. In addition, using a feature coverage analysis, we found gaps in the solid mechanics code verification test suite directly relevant to the prototype CASL GTRF simulations.

  3. Data Management and Analysis for the Earth System Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, D N; Ananthakrishnan, R; Bernholdt, D; Bharathi, S; Brown, D; Chen, M; Chervenak, A L; Cinquini, L; Drach, R; Foster, I T; Fox, P; Hankin, S; Henson, V; Jones, P; Middleton, D E; Schwidder, J; Schweitzer, R; Schuler, R; Shoshani, A; Siebenlist, F; Sim, A; Strand, W G; Wilhelmi, N; Su, M

    2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The international climate community is expected to generate hundreds of petabytes of simulation data within the next five to seven years. This data must be accessed and analyzed by thousands of analysts worldwide in order to provide accurate and timely estimates of the likely impact of climate change on physical, biological, and human systems. Climate change is thus not only a scientific challenge of the first order but also a major technological challenge. To address this technological challenge, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) has been established within the U.S. Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)-2 program, with support from the offices of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Biological and Environmental Research. ESG-CET's mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with access to the data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate simulation datasets. Its specific goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing Grid technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet specific distributed database, data access, and data movement needs of national and international climate projects; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide-range of Grid-enabled climate data analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. Building on the successes of the previous Earth System Grid (ESG) project, which has enabled thousands of researchers to access tens of terabytes of data from a small number of ESG sites, ESG-CET is working to integrate a far larger number of distributed data providers, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and remote computers in a highly collaborative problem-solving environment.

  4. Grid Transformation Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-03-Grid-Transformation-Workshop Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  5. Comparison of DOE-2.1E with Energyplus and TRNSYS for Ground Coupled Residential Buildings in Hot anf Humid Climates Stage 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -on- grade heat transfer for International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) compliant low-rise 20m x 20m x 3m residential buildings with unconditioned attics in four U.S. climates (hot-humid, hot-dry, cold, and temperate). For the modeling of the slab... the requirements of IECC 2009. As a result, four energy code compliant fully loaded houses located in hot-humid (Austin), hot-dry (Phoenix), temperate (Chicago) and cold (Columbia Falls) climates were obtained. First, these houses were modeled with an adiabatic...

  6. Comparison of DOE-2.1E with Energyplus and TRNSYS for Ground Coupled Residential Buildings in Hot anf Humid Climates Stage 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -on- grade heat transfer for International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) compliant low-rise 20m x 20m x 3m residential buildings with unconditioned attics in four U.S. climates (hot-humid, hot-dry, cold, and temperate). For the modeling of the slab... the requirements of IECC 2009. As a result, four energy code compliant fully loaded houses located in hot-humid (Austin), hot-dry (Phoenix), temperate (Chicago) and cold (Columbia Falls) climates were obtained. First, these houses were modeled with an adiabatic...

  7. Exploiting the Computational Grid Lecture 1 Globus and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploiting the Computational Grid Lecture 1 ­ Globus and the Grid · The grid needs middleware to enable things such as logins etc · The toolkit model for the grid is to define a set of standards for the grid and then develop applications on top. The low level stuff is then hidden from the user · Globus

  8. Mapping Unstructured Grids to Structured Grids and Multigrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 4 Mapping Unstructured Grids to Structured Grids and Multigrid Many problems based solution is to map the unstructured grid onto a structured grid and then apply multigrid to a sequence). We 65 #12; CHAPTER 4. MAPPING UNSTRUCTURED GRIDS 66 show that unless great care is taken

  9. Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Raissa

    storm damage or build distributed generation?). The "smart grid," which monitors and controls electrical to cities couples distant regions. Connections among regions of a power grid spread risk, like in otherOPINION Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1 , Paul D. H. Hinesc

  10. Polar amplification of climate change in coupled models Received: 21 November 2002 / Accepted: 11 March 2003 / Published online: 17 June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    the models. The range of simulated polar warming in the Arctic is from 1.5 to 4.5 times the global mean among models that the Arctic warms more than subpolar regions when subject to increasing levels hemispheres the range of warming across global climate models is considerable, with the range of warm- ing

  11. Sandia Energy - Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal ClimateGridGridGrid

  12. Grid Architecture William E. Johnston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grid Architecture William E. Johnston Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and NASA Ames Research Center wejohnston@lbl.gov (These slides are available at grid.lbl.gov/~wej/Grids) #12;Distributed Resources Condor Internet optical networks space-based networks Grid Communication Functions Communications BasicGrid

  13. Smart Grid: Transforming the Electric System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces smart grid concepts, summarizes the status of current smart grid related efforts, and explains smart grid priorities.

  14. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  15. Sandia Energy - Smart Grid Tools and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Tools and Technology Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Renewable Energy Integration Smart Grid Tools and Technology Smart Grid Tools and TechnologyTara...

  16. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2, June [21] O.Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Stan-

  17. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2, June [21] O.Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Attack and Detection in Smart Grid,” to appear in IEEE

  18. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Meters, Conductor, Surge Protection Devices, Connectors, Lighting Controls, Grid-Scale Battery Storage, Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy for Frequency Regulation, Automation...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Transmission Grid Integration, Wind Energy Sandia finalized and submitted the updated "WECC Wind Power Plant...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEC 61400-26 Availability Standard On June 12, 2014, in Analysis, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events,...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: grid modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid modernization Renewables, Other Energy Issues To Be Focus of Enhanced Sandia-SINTEF Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Safety Workshop On April 7, 2014, in Capabilities, CINT, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Grid...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Offers Approach to Help Utilities Understand Effects of PV Variability on the Grid On March 7, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Specialists (PVSC) Conference On August 14, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InfrastructureEnergy AssuranceGrid Capabilities Grid Capabilities Goal: To develop and implement a comprehensive Sandia program to support the modernization of the U.S. electric...

  6. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Future Grid: The Environment Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U

  7. Climate System Model Plan (2000-2005)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Community Climate System Model Plan (2000-2005) Prepared by the CCSM Scientific Steering Committee Development of the Climate System Model B. 300-Year Fully Coupled Control Simulation C. Simulation System Model Plan (2000-2005). The evolution of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) from an atmosphere

  8. Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

  9. GridWise Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the GRIDWISE ALLIANCE including its mission, today and tomorrow's grid, membership, work groups, and key policy initiatives.

  10. Real Time Simulation of Power Grid Disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinthavali, Supriya [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Groer, Christopher S [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Spafford, Kyle L [ORNL; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-OE and DOE-SC workshops (Reference 1-3) identified the key power grid problem that requires insight addressable by the next generation of exascale computing is coupling of real-time data streams (1-2 TB per hour) as the streams are ingested to dynamic models. These models would then identify predicted disruptions in time (2-4 seconds) to trigger the smart grid s self healing functions. This project attempted to establish the feasibility of this approach and defined the scientific issues, and demonstrated example solutions to important smart grid simulation problems. These objectives were accomplished by 1) using the existing frequency recorders on the national grid to establish a representative and scalable real-time data stream; 2) invoking ORNL signature identification algorithms; 3) modeling dynamically a representative region of the Eastern interconnect using an institutional cluster, measuring the scalability and computational benchmarks for a national capability; and 4) constructing a prototype simulation for the system s concept of smart grid deployment. The delivered ORNL enduring capability included: 1) data processing and simulation metrics to design a national capability justifying exascale applications; 2) Software and intellectual property built around the example solutions; 3) demonstrated dynamic models to design few second self-healing.

  11. Random array grid collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  12. Cyber Security & Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the impacts of long-term power shortages from the destruction of critical electric infrastructure. ? A Hitachi factory north of Tokyo that makes 60% of the world?s supply of airflow sensors was shut down. This caused General Motors to shut a plant... at The University of Texas at Dallas ? Next Generation Control Systems ? Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid ? Active Defense Systems ? System Vulnerability Assessments ? Grid Test Bed ? Integrated Risk Analysis ? Modeling and Simulation...

  13. The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  14. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  15. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  16. Coupling an icosahedral model with OASIS E . Maisonnave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling an icosahedral model with OASIS E . Maisonnave WN/CMGC/14/8 #12;Abstract An icosahedral grid atmosphere (NICAM) was coupled to NEMO ocean using OASIS3-MCT. The implemented interface..........................................................................................................................4 OASIS auxiliary files

  17. Sandia Energy - Grid Cyber Vulnerability & Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal Climate ModelsGrid

  18. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  19. Sharing Smart Grid Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wholesale markets and regional transmission organizations * Regulatory programs such as Demand Response, interruptible rates, net metering, "de- coupling", etc. * Consumer...

  20. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  1. Sandia Energy - Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcomeLong Lifetime of KeyCarbonSandiaClimate

  2. Sandia Energy - SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments Home StationaryFAQs HomeProgramSCADASMART Grid

  3. Detection of CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Progress report, 1 December 1985-15 July 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to assemble and analyze present and past instrumental climate data as a basis for detecting CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change and for validation of climate models. This report describes progress in the following areas: (1) southern hemisphere temperature data; (2) updating of gridded temperature data; (3) satellite data; (4) marine temperature data sets; (5) analysis of gridded mean sea level pressure data; (6) regional validation of climate models; and (7) detection studies. (ACR)

  4. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  5. Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors...

  6. Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors...

  7. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  8. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: International Smart Grid Action...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Action Network Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence On July 31, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration,...

  10. GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems (Smart Grid Project) (Spain) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected...

  11. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Muthukumar, Vishak; Scaglione, Anna; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lu, and Deborah A. Frincke. Smart-Grid Security Issues. IEEELoads in the Distribution Grid Zhifang Wang ? , Xiao Li † ,Transformer   sensors   Grid   Cyber  system   Cooling    

  12. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New England Outlook: Smart Grid is About Consumers,” Apr. [Transmission in the Smart Grid By Kory Walter Hedman ATransmission in the Smart Grid by Kory Walter Hedman Doctor

  13. The model coupling toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, J. W.; Jacob, R. L.; Foster, I.; Guo, J.

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of coupled earth system models has raised an important question in parallel computing: What is the most effective method for coupling many parallel models to form a high-performance coupled modeling system? We present our solution to this problem--The Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). We explain how our effort to construct the Next-Generation Coupler for NCAR Community Climate System Model motivated us to create this toolkit. We describe in detail the conceptual design of the MCT and explain its usage in constructing parallel coupled models. We present preliminary performance results for the toolkit's parallel data transfer facilities. Finally, we outline an agenda for future development of the MCT.

  14. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Usage Smart Grid Smart Grid October 21, 2014 Line workers get hands-on experience with an electrical pole as part of their training. | Photo courtesy of David Weaver....

  15. Stability of elastic grid shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesnil, Romain, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic grid shell is a solution that combines double curvature and ease of mounting. This structural system, based on the deformation of an initially at grid without shear stiffness was invented more than fifty years ...

  16. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

  17. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  18. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Initiative GridWise Alliance GridWise Architecture Council European SmartGrid Technology Platform 19 MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y Questions? Office of Electricity...

  19. GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid, in this paper, we present a new Matlab toolbox (GridMat) to integrate the capabilities of domain-specific modeling & simulation tools from power system (GridLAB-D) and control (Matlab). The GridMat tool supports

  20. Grid Transfer Remark 4.1 Contents of this chapter. Consider a grid with grid size h and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Volker

    Chapter 4 Grid Transfer Remark 4.1 Contents of this chapter. Consider a grid with grid size h that there might be an iterative method for solving this system efficiently, which uses also coarser grids way between the grids. 2 4.1 The Coarse Grid System and the Residual Equa- tion Remark 4.2 Basic idea

  1. Sandia Energy - SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley RuehlReportPeter H.Rohit Prasankumar

  2. On the Role of Power-Grid and Communication-System Interdependencies on Cascading Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    the fact that today's power grids are reliable and the control and communication systems have been deployed involved in the modeling of interactions between interdependent systems, modeling the coupled powerOn the Role of Power-Grid and Communication- System Interdependencies on Cascading Failures Mahshid

  3. 5 Examination of Persistence Associated with Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    -1), in which the MLM is forced with heat and momentum fluxes from the fully coupled simulation. The examination94 5 Examination of Persistence Associated with Coupling The results of Chapter 4 suggest on mechanisms that act to increase the persistence of climate variability in the coupled system. The vertical

  4. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  5. Changing Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a wide range of academic areas are investigating the different compo- nents. More recently, they are taking information gleaned from the global climate models and applying them to research questions pertaining to Texas. Dr. Bruce Mc...Carl, Regents Professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University, has researched the economics of climate change for the last 20 years. McCarl, as a lead CHANGING CLIMATES tx H2O | pg. McCarl ] tx H2O | pg. 4 Changing Climates author...

  6. Data Management in the GridRPC GridRPC Data Management API

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caniou, Yves

    Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion GridRPC Data Management API Implementations, Le Mahec, Nakada GridRPC DM API: Implem. and Interop. Issues (1/13) #12;Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion Goal GridRPC DM types: Reminder 1 Data Management in the GridRPC Goal GridRPC DM types

  7. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Provider BAHNHOF POTSDAMER PLATZ Home Area Network (HAN) Grid Operations Coal Natural Gas Nuclear Hydro Renewable Fuel Oil Misc Generation Energy Service Interface (ESI)...

  8. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergyGeothermal HomeGrid

  9. Grid-based Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite ReactorGregGrid-Connected

  10. Sharing Smart Grid Experiences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting the StageCanon! Shared Solar:Sharing

  11. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower SystemsCarbon CaptureBiofuels

  12. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower SystemsCarbon

  13. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower SystemsCarbonEnergy Sandia

  14. Sandia Energy - SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley RuehlReportPeter H.Rohit Prasankumar HomeEnergy

  15. GridPV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed Services U.S.GregoryGrid6733

  16. GridPV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed Services U.S.GregoryGrid6733141

  17. NERSC Grid Certificates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal: Submit2014 NERSCFranklinGrid

  18. Smart Grid - Transforming Power System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Kirkham, Harold

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Electric power systems are entering a new realm of operations. Large amounts of variable generation tax our ability to reliably operate the system. Couple this with a greater reliance on the electricity network to serve consumer demand that is likely to rise significantly even as we drive for greater efficiency. Trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated, while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in a world where threats of disruption have risen. Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help address the challenges confronting system operations. This paper reviews the impact of smart grid functionality on transforming power system operations. It explores models for distributed energy resources (DER – generation, storage, and load) that are appearing on the system. It reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be addressed as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  19. Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

  20. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  1. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  2. Smart Grid | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power...

  3. Buildings to Grid Integration & Interoperability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings to Grid Integration & Interoperability Joe Hagerman, Senior Advisor DOE Building Technologies Office March 11, 2013 EERE: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  4. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Against Data Injection Attacks on Power Grids”, IEEER. Thomas, and L. Tong, “Malicious Data Attacks on SmartState Estimation: Attack Strategies and Countermeasures,”

  5. National Grid Energy Efficiency Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the National Grid Energy Efficiency plans and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia-Electric Power Research Institute Partnership Publishes Photovoltaic Reliability Report On January 21, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, Modeling & Analysis,...

  7. National Grid Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the National Grid Energy Efficiency programs and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  8. Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a substantial number of pollutants. This paper focuses on the particulate and gaseous emission pollutants that are byproducts of electricity generation, and on how the Smart Grid...

  9. Sandia Energy - Smart Grid Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reliability, efficiency, flexibility, and cost effectiveness. Smart-grid features include demand-response capabilities, advanced controls, DER integration, increased situational...

  10. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  11. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  12. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged to the sharing of sensor resources in wireless sensor networks. There are several issues and challenges

  13. Enhancing Power Grid Stability through Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoba, Taras I.

    the "Smart" Grid? · Premise #1: the grid has long been pretty smart (Edison, Tesla, Steinmetz et al were of Vermont Seminar October 23, 2013 3 What Drives the "Smart" Grid? · Premise #2: As well operated as grid of Vermont Seminar October 23, 2013 4 What Drives the "Smart" Grid? · Premise #3: new technology is providing

  14. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal Climate

  15. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of GridWise Alliance 1 SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York Smart Grid: Enabler of the...

  16. Grid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the U.S. Grid to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Grid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the U.S. Grid to Incorporate Variable Renewable Energy Grid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the U.S. Grid to Incorporate...

  17. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  18. From the Grid to the Smart Grid, Topologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smart Grid is not just about the digitalization of the Power Grid. In its more visionary acceptation, it is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the Smart Grid a reality will the Distribution Grid have to be updated? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of Medium and Low Voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we have analyzed samples of the Dutch Distribution Grid in our previous work and we have considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains in another previous work. In this paper, we take an extra important further step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical Power Grid to a good Smart Grid model th...

  19. Sub-Rossby and Sub-Grid in Global Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    this talk) Internal Waves, Deep Convection, Energy Sinks, PV Sinks & Sources Wednesday, September 22, 2010 Wednesday, September 22, 2010 #12;Sym Part=Anisotropic* Redi Blue factors in Redi (1982) are symmetric involving the neutral to z coordinate conversion (in S&G theory, at least) The eigenvectors give

  20. Energy Department Announces Funding to Improve Grid Resiliency and Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of EnergyDepartment ofHVAC Systems | Department

  1. Energy Department Announces Funding to Improve Grid Resiliency and Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | DepartmentDepartment ofDepartment ofFuelResearch

  2. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  3. INFOGRAPHIC: Understanding the Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    can I participate? Send us your questions about how the grid works using GridWeek on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. Join the GridWeek Twitter chat on Thursday, November 20 at 2PM...

  4. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life Cycle Assessment of Off-Grid Lighting Applications:Testing for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination SystemsBudget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small

  5. Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing technology to automate costs. The Future · Cover more of Smart Grid control (diagnosis, reconfiguration, protection, voltage) products for the Smart Grid. Contact Details: Technical Jussi Rintanen Canberra Research Laboratory Tel

  6. Parametrization-independent elliptic surface grid generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Britt Bille

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of computational grids on surfaces of three-dimensional configurations is an important component of many areas of computational research, both as a boundary grid for volume grid generation or to perform ...

  7. Considering Prefabulous and Almost Off the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenier, Lotus; Beba, Zoe; Gray, Art

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prefabulous and Almost Off the Grid Introduction Two recentPrefabulous and Almost Off the Grid by Sheri Koones In herand Almost O?fz‘/Je Grid (Abrams, 2012), Sheri Koones pro?

  8. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  9. Numerical solution of plasma fluid equations using locally refined grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, P., LLNL

    1997-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a numerical method for the solution of plasma fluid equations on block-structured, locally refined grids. The plasma under consideration is typical of those used for the processing of semiconductors. The governing equations consist of a drift-diffusion model of the electrons and an isothermal model of the ions coupled by Poisson's equation. A discretization of the equations is given for a uniform spatial grid, and a time-split integration scheme is developed. The algorithm is then extended to accommodate locally refined grids. This extension involves the advancement of the discrete system on a hierarchy of levels, each of which represents a degree of refinement, together with synchronization steps to ensure consistency across levels. A brief discussion of a software implementation is followed by a presentation of numerical results.

  10. Sandia Energy - Grid Cyber Vulnerability & Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consequences and Impacts It's important to recognize that adopting these advanced grid-control technologies doesn't just have the potential to increase power grid reliability...

  11. Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against Cyber...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will help protect intelligent distributed power grids from cyber attacks. Intelligent power grids are interdependent energy management systems-encompassing generation,...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: smart-grid technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    smart-grid technologies New Jersey Transit FutureGrid MOU Signing On October 4, 2013, in Analysis, Energy Surety, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis,...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: energy resilient smart grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resilient smart grid Hoboken Hopes To Reduce Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System On June 20, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  14. Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Grid Through Integration Conservation and Optimization via VoltVar Control Systems Driving the Integrated Grid - Including DMS, DA, DERMS, DRMS Communications and Cyber...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Grid Integration Wind Generator Modeling On June 26, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security,...

  16. Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Grid Basics Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar...

  17. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self heals - acts as the grid's "immune system" Supports grid reliability, security, and power quality Today Tomorrow Protects assets following disruption (e.g. trip relay)...

  18. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modern Grid Wisconsin Public Utility Institute and UW Energy Institute Joe Miller, Steve Pullins, Steve Bossart - Modern Grid Team April 29, 2008 1 Conducted by the National Energy...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Supply Transformation Needed On February 20, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Its Phase 1 Operational Demonstration in Late January On April 5, 2013, in Distribution Grid Integration, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration,...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration Recent Sandia Secure, Scalable Microgrid Advanced Controls Research Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration,...

  2. National Grid (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Grid’s Commercial Energy Efficiency Program provides support services and incentives to commercial customers who install energy efficient natural gas related measures. Prescriptive...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  4. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are here HomeSmart Grid Smart Grid Smart

  5. Grid Orientation Effect in coupled Finite Volume Schemes , C. Guichard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), in the framework of oil reservoir simulation. This effect is occurring in the simulation of viscous oil recovery by the injection of a very mobile fluid (water, steam water, miscible gas. . . ). In order to more precisely - K,L M(u) p·nK,Lds at the interface K,L at time step n (where nK,L is the unit normal vec

  6. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)/NOAA, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), and University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute (USC/ISI). All ESG-CET work is accomplished under DOE open-source guidelines and in close collaboration with the project's stakeholders, domain researchers, and scientists. Through the ESG project, the ESG-CET team has developed and delivered a production environment for climate data from multiple climate model sources (e.g., CMIP (IPCC), CESM, ocean model data (e.g., Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (e.g., Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Microwave Limb Sounder), and analysis and visualization tools) that serves a worldwide climate research community. Data holdings are distributed across multiple sites including LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL as well as unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University (ANU) National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ), and NASA/JPL. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users who want to understand it, process it, extract value from it, visualize it, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort is extremely large and complex, but it will be incredibly valuable for building 'science gateways' to critical climate resources (such as CESM, CMIP5, ARM, NARCCAP, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), etc.) for processing the next IPCC assessment report. Continued ESG progress will result in a production-scale system that will empower scientists to attempt new and exciting data exchanges, which could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate science discoveries.

  7. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  8. The Space Power Grid: Synergy Between Space, Energy and Security Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @gatech.edu Abstract - The dream of abundant solar-powered electricity from Space can be realized through global ­ Space solar power, renewable energy, climate policy, global warming, infrastructure, power grid electric power can be generated "24/365" in Space, and conveyed down to Earth. Many concepts have been

  9. Introduction to FireGrid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Stephen; Usmani, Asif; Upadhyay, Rochan; Berry, Dave; Potter, Stephen; Torero, Jose L

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    FireGrid is an ambitious and innovative project, seeking to develop the technology to support a new way of managing emergency response in the modern built environment. Specific novel aspects include the integration of ...

  10. Grid Pricing of Fed Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Ted C.; Hogan, Robert J.; Anderson, David P.

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several value-based fed cattle pricing systems, including formula pricing, price grids and alliances. This publication describes the different cattle pricing methods and helps you decide which is best for you....

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid relies on power transmission from the production source-be it a coal-fired plant, solar array, or wind farm-to the consumer. Long-distance transmission results in sizeable...

  12. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  13. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  14. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  15. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  16. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Forecasting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecasting NREL researchers use

  17. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecastingNews The following news

  18. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecastingNews The

  19. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecastingNews ThePublications

  20. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Webinars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmission Planning and Analysis

  1. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmission Planning and AnalysisWebmaster

  2. Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Gill-Ran

    The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

  3. NGOs & climate change campaigns : understanding variations in motivations and activities of environmental and development organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeve, Kara E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unequal distribution of climate change impacts exploits the existing vulnerabilities of developing nations. This inequity, coupled with an inadequate, climate mitigation-focused response, has prompted a growing movement ...

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 2, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2011 835 Cyber Attack Exposure Evaluation Framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manimaran, Govindarasu

    . The coupling of the power infrastructure with complex computer networks substantially expand current cyber, that is, threats, vulnerabilities, and attack consequences for current and emerging power grid systems. The substantial attack surface presented by the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) along

  5. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  6. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  7. Networks, smart grids: new model for synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Networks, smart grids: new model for synchronization May 21, 2013 Networks of individual scenarios and in smart grid applications. "Smart grid" refers to technology to modernize utility electricity in a volatile smart grid scenario that included fluctuating loads with random power demand, renewable energy

  8. Benchmarking Grid Information Systems Laurence Field1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    Benchmarking Grid Information Systems Laurence Field1 and Rizos Sakellariou2 1 CERN, Geneva. Grid information systems play a central role in today's pro- duction Grid infrastructures, enabling the discovery of a range of in- formation about the Grid services that exist in an infrastructure. As the number

  9. Grid Architecture Release 2.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November 2014 Draft #12;Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November..................................................................................................... 2.1 3.0 Brief Introduction to Grid Architecture........................................................................................ 3.2 3.1 How Grid Architecture Can Be Used

  10. Evidential Grids Information Management in Dynamic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of Compiègne CNRS Heudiasyc UMR 7253, France Email: surname.name@utc.fr Abstract--An occupancy grid map conditions. The perception strategy involves map and scan grids [9], [10]. Indeed, an instantaneous scan grid-detections. The map grid acts as a filter that accumulate information and allows to detect moving objects. In dynamic

  11. Smart Grid e-Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Smart Grid Task Force Smart Grid e-Forum Smart Grid e-Forum DOE conducted a series of Smart Grid E-Forums to discuss various issues surrounding Smart Grid including...

  12. Simulated Building Energy Performance of Single Family Detached Residences Designed for Off-Grid, Off-Pipe Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

    (Malhotra 2009) that investigated the feasibility of off-grid, off-pipe design approach in single-family detached houses in six U.S. climates: Minneapolis, MN (very cold), Boulder, CO (cold), Atlanta, GA (mixed- humid), Houston, TX (hot-humid), Phoenix... Climate Characteristics Table 2 Climate Characteristics Minneapolis, MN Atlanta, GA Phoenix, AZ Climate region Cold Mixed-Humid Hot-Dry Latitude 44?87' 33?65' 33?42' HDD65 (?F-days) 7,735 3,013 1,129 CDD50 (?F-days) 2,716 4,790 8,327 Dry...

  13. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

  14. EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

  15. A Core Grid Ontology for the Semantic Grid Wei Xing Marios D. Dikaiakos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallis, George

    A Core Grid Ontology for the Semantic Grid Wei Xing Marios D. Dikaiakos Department of Computer, we propose a Core Grid Ontology (CGO) that defines fundamental Grid-specific concepts, and the re- lationships between them. One of the key goals is to make this Core Grid Ontology general enough and easily

  16. Modeling and Grid impedance Variation Analysis of Parallel Connected Grid Connected Inverter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Modeling and Grid impedance Variation Analysis of Parallel Connected Grid Connected Inverter based in the same grid interface conditions by means of impedance-based analysis and modeling. Unlike the single grid connected inverter, it is found that multiple parallel connected inverters and grid impedance can

  17. What is a Grid? Grid Today, AUGUST 12, 2002: VOL. 1 NO. 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is a Grid? Grid Today, AUGUST 12, 2002: VOL. 1 NO. 9 (http://www.gridtoday.com/02/0812/020812.html) I would like to provide perspective on the question of what is a Grid - a perspective derived from several years of building production Grids. For a significant segment of the Grid community, most

  18. Analysis of grid imprinting on geodesic spherical icosahedral grids Pedro S. Peixoto, Saulo R. M. Barros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of grid imprinting on geodesic spherical icosahedral grids Pedro S. Peixoto, Saulo R. M-090 S~ao Paulo, Brazil Abstract Numerical grid imprinting errors have often been observed in global atmospheric models on icosahedral grids. In this paper we analyse the sources of grid imprinting error related

  19. Voltage grid support of DFIG wind turbines during grid faults Anca D. Hansen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voltage grid support of DFIG wind turbines during grid faults Anca D. Hansen1 , Gabriele Michalke2 Abstract The fault ride-through and grid support capabilities of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG and their contribution to support the grid, i.e. to the voltage control in the power system, during grid faults

  20. International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    to be able to communicate with smart meters via a Home Area Network (HAN) facilitating efficient powerInternational Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities is currently evolving into the smart grid. Smart grid integrates the traditional electrical power grid

  1. GRID-Launcher v.1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Deniskina; M. Brescia; S. Cavuoti; G. d'Angelo; O. Laurino; G. Longo

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    GRID-launcher-1.0 was built within the VO-Tech framework, as a software interface between the UK-ASTROGRID and a generic GRID infrastructures in order to allow any ASTROGRID user to launch on the GRID computing intensive tasks from the ASTROGRID Workbench or Desktop. Even though of general application, so far the Grid-Launcher has been tested on a few selected softwares (VONeural-MLP, VONeural-SVM, Sextractor and SWARP) and on the SCOPE-GRID.

  2. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  3. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  4. Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Saifur

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was enacted, there has been a large number of websites that discusses smart grid and relevant information, including those from government, academia, industry, private sector and regulatory. These websites collect information independently. Therefore, smart grid information was quite scattered and dispersed. The objective of this work was to develop, populate, manage and maintain the public Smart Grid Information Clearinghouse (SGIC) web portal. The information in the SGIC website is comprehensive that includes smart grid information, research & development, demonstration projects, technical standards, costs & benefit analyses, business cases, legislation, policy & regulation, and other information on lesson learned and best practices. The content in the SGIC website is logically grouped to allow easily browse, search and sort. In addition to providing the browse and search feature, the SGIC web portal also allow users to share their smart grid information with others though our online content submission platform. The Clearinghouse web portal, therefore, serves as the first stop shop for smart grid information that collects smart grid information in a non-bias, non-promotional manner and can provide a missing link from information sources to end users and better serve users’ needs. The web portal is available at www.sgiclearinghouse.org. This report summarizes the work performed during the course of the project (September 2009 – August 2014). Section 2.0 lists SGIC Advisory Committee and User Group members. Section 3.0 discusses SGIC information architecture and web-based database application functionalities. Section 4.0 summarizes SGIC features and functionalities, including its search, browse and sort capabilities, web portal social networking, online content submission platform and security measures implemented. Section 5.0 discusses SGIC web portal contents, including smart grid 101, smart grid projects, deployment experience (i.e., use cases, lessons learned, cost-benefit analyses and business cases), in-depth information (i.e., standards, technology, cyber security, legislation, education and training and demand response), as well as international information. Section 6.0 summarizes SGIC statistics from the launch of the portal on July 07, 2010 to August 31, 2014. Section 7.0 summarizes publicly available information as a result of this work.

  5. POWER GRID RELIABILITY AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Anjan; Venkatasubramanian, Vaithianathan; Hauser, Carl; Bakken, David; Anderson, David; Zhao, Chuanlin; Liu, Dong; Yang, Tao; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Lin; Ning, Jiawei; Tashman, Zaid

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has led to the development of a real-time simulation platform for electric power grids called Grid Simulator or GridSim for simulating the dynamic and information network interactions of large- scale power systems. The platform consists of physical models of power system components including synchronous generators, loads and control, which are simulated using a modified commercial power simulator namely Transient Stability Analysis Tool (TSAT) [1] together with data cleanup components, as well as an emulated substation level and wide-area power analysis components. The platform also includes realistic representations of communication network middleware that can emulate the real-time information flow back and forth between substations and control centers in wide-area power systems. The platform has been validated on a realistic 6000-bus model of the western American power system. The simulator GridSim developed in this project is the first of its kind in its ability to simulate real-time response of large-scale power grids, and serves as a cost effective real-time stability and control simulation platform for power industry.

  6. Helix coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  7. Helix coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  8. The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid Partnership Powering the Future: The Vermont Smart Grid and Beyond BURLINGTON SHERATON HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER MAY Laboratories 9:10-10:15 a.m. Opening Plenary: The Vermont-Sandia Smart Grid

  9. GENI: Grid Hardware and Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: The 15 projects in ARPA-E’s GENI program, short for “Green Electricity Network Integration,” aim to modernize the way electricity is transmitted in the U.S. through advances in hardware and software for the electric grid. These advances will improve the efficiency and reliability of electricity transmission, increase the amount of renewable energy the grid can utilize, and provide energy suppliers and consumers with greater control over their power flows in order to better manage peak power demand and cost.

  10. Convectively cooled electrical grid structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

    1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

  11. Sandia Energy - Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstituteThree-DimensionalTransmission Grid

  12. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  13. Smart Grid Newsletter ? The Regulators Role in Grid Modernization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: "The Regulator's Role in Grid Modernization" Sponsor: The Modern Grid Strategy is a DOE-funded project conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Leadership from...

  14. DRAFT NISTIR 7628 Revision 1 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cybersecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT NISTIR 7628 Revision 1 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cybersecurity: Vol. 2, Privacy and the Smart Grid The Smart Grid Interoperability Panel ­ Smart Grid Cybersecurity Committee #12;DRAFT NISTIR 7628 Revision 1 Guidelines for Smart Grid Cybersecurity: Vol. 2, Privacy and the Smart Grid The Smart Grid

  15. LANL physicists discuss electrical grid in journal article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - LANL physicists discuss electrical grid in journal article October 17, 2013 Electrical grids of distribution grids. Revolutionary changes to the electric grid will lead to grids that are more random that could make a major impact on the future grid: · probabilistic measures of electrical grid reliability

  16. Quantifiably secure power grid operation, management, and evolution : a study of uncertainties affecting the grid integration of renewables.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Watson, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Gramacy, Robert B. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes findings and results of the Quantifiably Secure Power Grid Operation, Management, and Evolution LDRD. The focus of the LDRD was to develop decisionsupport technologies to enable rational and quantifiable risk management for two key grid operational timescales: scheduling (day-ahead) and planning (month-to-year-ahead). Risk or resiliency metrics are foundational in this effort. The 2003 Northeast Blackout investigative report stressed the criticality of enforceable metrics for system resiliency - the grid's ability to satisfy demands subject to perturbation. However, we neither have well-defined risk metrics for addressing the pervasive uncertainties in a renewable energy era, nor decision-support tools for their enforcement, which severely impacts efforts to rationally improve grid security. For day-ahead unit commitment, decision-support tools must account for topological security constraints, loss-of-load (economic) costs, and supply and demand variability - especially given high renewables penetration. For long-term planning, transmission and generation expansion must ensure realized demand is satisfied for various projected technological, climate, and growth scenarios. The decision-support tools investigated in this project paid particular attention to tailoriented risk metrics for explicitly addressing high-consequence events. Historically, decisionsupport tools for the grid consider expected cost minimization, largely ignoring risk and instead penalizing loss-of-load through artificial parameters. The technical focus of this work was the development of scalable solvers for enforcing risk metrics. Advanced stochastic programming solvers were developed to address generation and transmission expansion and unit commitment, minimizing cost subject to pre-specified risk thresholds. Particular attention was paid to renewables where security critically depends on production and demand prediction accuracy. To address this concern, powerful filtering techniques for spatio-temporal measurement assimilation were used to develop short-term predictive stochastic models. To achieve uncertaintytolerant solutions, very large numbers of scenarios must be simultaneously considered. One focus of this work was investigating ways of reasonably reducing this number.

  17. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MonitoringClimate Security Climate Security Climate Security Global reductions in greenhouse gases will eventually be motivated by an international climate treaty and will entail...

  19. A regional model coupling with OASIS3-MCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A regional model coupling with OASIS3-MCT Eric Maisonnave WN/CMGC/13/34 #12;Table of Contents of an OASIS3-MCT based coupled model must be set up providing input informations (grid definition.base.define_clm_limits ), reducing to 1 the number of sub-domain dedicated to DATM, OASIS interpolates the COSMO domain limits

  20. Climate sensitivity is investigated for 10 models that are participating in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report.We consider the temporal evolution of climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Climate sensitivity is investigated for 10 models that are participating in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report.We consider the temporal evolution of climate sensitivity and we analyze the transient climate sensitivity from fully coupled simulations with a 1% per year increase in CO2 in terms

  1. Grid Applications Dr Gabrielle Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    of chemistry and other codes (www.gridchem.org) ! Petroleum Engineering " UCoMS: Grid-enabling reservoir ! Requires incredible mix of technologies & expertise! ! Many scientific/engineering components " Physics? Finite elements? " Elliptic equations: multigrid, Krylov subspace,... " Mesh refinement ! Many different

  2. ELECTRIC GRID PROTECTION THE INTERNATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    interference, Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), or Intentional Electromagnetic Interference (IEMI). See below the status of national electric grid evaluation and protection against electromagnetic threats in 11 counties sensitivity to the full range of electromagnetic threats1 . This historic and ongoing situation has resulted

  3. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, Brian L; Tierney, Brian L; Gunter, Dan

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to help developers of Grid middleware and application software generate log files that will be useful to Grid administrators, users, developers and Grid middleware itself. Currently, most of the currently generated log files are only useful to the author of the program. Good logging practices are instrumental to performance analysis, problem diagnosis, and security auditing tasks such as incident tracing and damage assessment. This document does not discuss the issue of a logging API. It is assumed that a standard log API such as syslog (C), log4j (Java), or logger (Python) is being used. Other custom logging API or even printf could be used. The key point is that the logs must contain the required information in the required format. At a high level of abstraction, the best practices for Grid logging are: (1) Consistently structured, typed, log events; (2) A standard high-resolution timestamp; (3) Use of logging levels and categories to separate logs by detail and purpose; (4) Consistent use of global and local identifiers; and (5) Use of some regular, newline-delimited ASCII text format. The rest of this document describes each of these recommendations in detail.

  4. FermiGrid - experience and future plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid and the WLCG. FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the Open Science Grid (OSG), EGEE and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure--the successes and the problems.

  5. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  6. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  7. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  8. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  9. EV-Smart Grid Research & Interoperability Activities 2014 DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Codes & Standards Support, Grid Connectivity R&D, International Cooperation and EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center (funding began in FY 2013) Grid Integration * PEV J1772...

  10. Product Quality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan; World Bank

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    services in many off-grid applications, come with first costassurance for off- grid applications in developing countriesand design for off-grid applications. • Train laboratory

  11. alloy battery grid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power supply challenges Adverse trends associated with the grid- Costs, reliability, peak loads, asset underutilization, TLRs, grid divorce The benefits of a modernized grid...

  12. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data  integration  for  Smart  Grid”,  B 2010  3rd  IEEE simulation  integration,  the  next generation smart grid the Smart Grid vision requires the efficient integration of 

  13. Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Imagine a grid...

  14. Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  15. Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y.; Erwine, B.; Leonard, P.; Pease, B.; Dole, A.; Lee, A.

    Hot and humid climates present some of the most complex challenges for sustainable building designs. High temperatures coupled with high humidity create extreme comfort problems and exacerbate the potential for condensation, mold and mildew...

  16. Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

  17. Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

  18. Articles about Grid Integration and Transmission | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    grid integration and transmission featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. May 18, 2015 New Report Says Western Grid Can Weather Disturbances with High Wind,...

  19. Structural Vulnerability Assessment of Electric Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koç, Yakup; Kooij, Robert E; Brazier, Frances M T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cascading failures are the typical reasons of black- outs in power grids. The grid topology plays an important role in determining the dynamics of cascading failures in power grids. Measures for vulnerability analysis are crucial to assure a higher level of robustness of power grids. Metrics from Complex Networks are widely used to investigate the grid vulnerability. Yet, these purely topological metrics fail to capture the real behaviour of power grids. This paper proposes a metric, the effective graph resistance, as a vulnerability measure to de- termine the critical components in a power grid. Differently than the existing purely topological measures, the effective graph resistance accounts for the electrical properties of power grids such as power flow allocation according to Kirchoff laws. To demonstrate the applicability of the effective graph resistance, a quantitative vulnerability assessment of the IEEE 118 buses power system is performed. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the effect...

  20. Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid (2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An article by OE’s Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid reliable and secure.

  1. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self heals - acts as the grid's "immune system" Supports grid reliability, security, and power quality The blackout of August 2003 took hours to build up. Once it breached the...

  2. Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E TV Assistant Secretary Hoffman Discusses Grid Modernization with the New York Times and E&E...

  3. Vids4Grids- Controls, Connectors & Surge Protectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modernizing our grid means exciting new devices in the power sector. Find out how new lighting controls, connectors and surge protection will bring out electric grid to the next level.

  4. Past and future of grid shell structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paoli, Céline (Céline Aude)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their original organic shape and the column free space that they provide, the design of grid shell structures challenges architects and structural engineers in more than one way. Very few grid shell building ...

  5. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a point of comparison with LED lighting product embodieda fairer comparison between off- grid LED lighting and other

  6. Articles about Grid Integration and Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stories about grid integration and transmission featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

  7. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning . 102 vi Transmission Line Maintenance Scheduling 103 Just-in-time Transmission 103 Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

  8. Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  9. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  10. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  11. Climate Action Plan (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To better understand the current and future vulnerabilities and risks to climate change, DNREC Secretary Collin O’Mara directed the Division of Energy and Climate to conduct a statewide climate...

  12. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  13. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  14. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  15. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Boardman, R.; Ruth, M.; Zinaman, O.; Forsberg, C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, to meet both grid demand and thermal energy needs in the industrial sector. One concept under consideration by the DOE-NE and DOE-EERE is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a 'hybrid system' that is capable of apportioning thermal and electrical energy to first meet the grid demand (with appropriate power conversion systems), then utilizing excess thermal and, in some cases, electrical energy to drive a process that results in an additional product.

  16. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    designed by PNNL and currently being deployed in the AEP gridSMART Demonstration Project, and » developed that will position PNNL as the leader in modeling and planning power grid data communication networks. External users scenarios and testing of communication requirements with smart grid investments. November 2012 PNNL-SA-90012

  17. Criticality of the European Electricity Grid Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrowsmith, David

    1 Criticality of the European Electricity Grid Network MANMADE EU NEST FUNDING D.K. Arrowsmith (catastrophic failure of network components), functional (electricity grid blackouts, supply chain), volatility the qualitative characteristics of power disruptions from a large synchronously-connected electricity grid

  18. Cyber Security in Smart Grid Substations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Cyber Security in Smart Grid Substations Thijs Baars Lucas van den Bemd Michail Theuns Robin van.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;CYBER SECURITY IN SMART GRID SUBSTATIONS Thijs Baars T.Brinkkemper@uu.nl Abstract. This report describes the state of smart grid security in Europe, specifically the Netherlands

  19. Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures ­ Analysis and Control Implications such as telecommunications networks [14]. The power grid is vulnerable to natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes [17], [34]. Thus, we focus on the vulnerability of the power grid to an outage of several lines

  20. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  1. "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid Workshop" Save the Date April 3 and 4 at mohlsen@bnl.gov "The Resilient Smart Grid" to be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island://www.bnl.gov/maps/. This is the 5th workshop that BNL is hosting on the Smart Grid. This Workshop will build on the previous

  2. Grid adaptation for multiscale plasma simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    Grid adaptation for multiscale plasma simulations Gian Luca Delzanno Los Alamos National Laboratory In collaboration with L. Chacon and J.M. Finn #12;delzanno@lanl.gov Outline · Introduction and motivation · Grid tests · New directions · Conclusions #12;delzanno@lanl.gov Outline · Introduction and motivation · Grid

  3. GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Michalis Xenos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GRID Technologies => `Education' = `Distance Education' Michalis Xenos 1,2 , Bill Vassiliadis 1 possibilities that Grid technologies create in education, presents current learning paradigms and makes a prediction about the way in which Grid technologies may affect the future of education. The case

  4. Distributing MCell Simulations on the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    Distributing MCell Simulations on the Grid Henri Casanova casanova@cs.ucsd.edu Tom Bartol The Computational Grid [21] is a promising platform for the deployment of large-scale scientific and engineering that structure, PSAs are particularly well suited to the Grid infrastructure and can be deployed on very large

  5. Programming, Composing, Deploying for the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Programming, Composing, Deploying for the Grid Laurent Baduel, Fran¸coise Baude, Denis Caromel FirstName.LastName@sophia.inria.fr Abstract. Grids raise new challenges in the following way: heterogene objects and components. We especially target Grid computing, but our approach also applies to application

  6. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs David A. Venditti and David L Anisotropic grid­adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate estimation and Hessian-based anisotropic grid adaptation. Airfoil test cases are presented to demonstrate

  7. Multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM); Ober, Curtis C. (Los Lunas, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiprocessor computer overset grid method and apparatus comprises associating points in each overset grid with processors and using mapped interpolation transformations to communicate intermediate values between processors assigned base and target points of the interpolation transformations. The method allows a multiprocessor computer to operate with effective load balance on overset grid applications.

  8. Algorithms in grid classes Ruth Hoffmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    signs c1, . . . , cs and row signs, r1, . . . , rt and let = {(k, ) : Mk, = 0}. The map : GridAlgorithms in grid classes Ruth Hoffmann University of St Andrews, School of Computer Science Permutation Patterns 2013 Universit´e Paris Diderot 2nd July 2013 Ruth Hoffmann Algorithms in grid classes 1

  9. Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's CO{sub 2} Climate Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set; the development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change; the further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing; validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and the use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. The present project addresses all of these questions. This document contains information of the progress in each area. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Smart Grids: Fact or Fiction? A Discussion of Smart Grids in New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    May 2013 1 Smart Grids: Fact or Fiction? A Discussion of Smart Grids in New Zealand Dr Allan Miller. Introduction The term `smart grid' is used extensively today, even though there are diverse opinions on what to some extent, and the key questions should not be about what constitutes a `smart grid', but what

  11. EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: David Wollman, Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: David Wollman, Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program Office, Associate Program Manager: Dean Prochaska, Smart Grid and Cyber- Physical Systems Program [updated August 23, 2013] Summary: This program develops and demonstrates smart grid measurement science

  12. Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

  13. Honeywell Parallon Grid-connect Tests Honeywell Grid-connect Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Honeywell Parallon Grid-connect Tests 12/20/2000 #12;Honeywell Grid-connect Tests 12 power Engine Speed Figure C-1: Ramp Down Tests ­ Power and Shaft Speed ­ 15 kW Steps #12;Honeywell Grid Figure C-2: Ramp Down Tests ­ Power and Turbine Exit Temperature ­ 15 kW Steps #12;Honeywell Grid

  14. The Adjustable Grid: A Grid-Based Cursor Control Solution using Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    The Adjustable Grid: A Grid-Based Cursor Control Solution using Speech Recognition Tarif Haque1 of grid-based cursor control systems using speech recognition have been developed. These systems typically overlay a numbered 3x3 grid on the screen and allow the user to recursively drill the cursor down

  15. Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World .Bogonikolos Zeus Ontology Grid) project, an EU project funded under the Information Society Technologies programme and EAI Tools is discussed. The COG (Corporate Ontology Grid) project addresses the problem of accessing

  16. GridBank: A Grid Accounting Services Architecture (GASA) for Distributed Systems Sharing and Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    GridBank: A Grid Accounting Services Architecture (GASA) for Distributed Systems Sharing Australia Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 barmouta@csse.uwa.edu.au Rajkumar Buyya Grid Computing and Distributed Systems (GRIDS) Lab Dept. of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University of Melbourne

  17. GRID superscalar and SAGA: forming a high-level and platform-independent Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kielmann, Thilo

    GRID superscalar and SAGA: forming a high-level and platform-independent Grid programming Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands {merzky|kielmann}@cs.vu.nl Abstract. The Simple API for Grid Applications (SAGA), as currently standardized within GGF, aims to provide a simple yet powerful Grid API; its

  18. A Multi-solver Scheme for Viscous Flows Using Adaptive Cartesian Grids and Meshless Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    A Multi-solver Scheme for Viscous Flows Using Adaptive Cartesian Grids and Meshless Grid of an adaptive multi-solver approach for CFD sim- ulation of viscous flows. Curvilinear grids are used near solid bodies to capture boundary layers, and stuctured adaptive Cartesian grids are used away from the body

  19. Semantic-based Grid Resource Discovery and its Integration with the Grid Service Broker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    1 Semantic-based Grid Resource Discovery and its Integration with the Grid Service Broker Thamarai Chromepet, Chennai ­ 600044, India Email : stselvi@annauniv.edu 2 Grid Computing and Distributed Systems :mohanram@cdacb.ernet.in Abstract: This paper addresses the need of semantic component in the grid

  20. Using the GridSim Toolkit for Enabling Grid Computing Education Manzur Murshed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    with (Grid-enabled) resources or their agents using middleware services, map tasks to resources (schedulingUsing the GridSim Toolkit for Enabling Grid Computing Education Manzur Murshed Gippsland School: Grid Simulation; Education; Scheduling; Resource Management. Abstract Numerous research groups

  1. Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletzer, Alexander

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

  2. Climate VISION: Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50) 202-586-8339 Mining - Contacts Association Climate VISION Lead Constance Holmes Senior Economist, Director...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  4. Climate Action Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Montana, the Climate Change Advisory Committee (CCAC)...

  5. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  7. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  8. Grid Technology Overview and Status Geoffrey Fox1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grid Technology Overview and Status Geoffrey Fox1,2 , Alex Ho2 , Marlon Pierce1 1 Community Grids...................................................................................................................... 1 2 What is a Grid? ................................................................................................................ 1 3 Grid Technologies and Capabilities

  9. Vehicle to Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willett Kempton; Meryl Gardner; Michael Hidrue; Fouad Kamilev; Sachin Kamboj; Jon Lilley; Rodney McGee; George Parsons; Nat Pearre; Keith Trnka

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of a two-year DOE-funded project on Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIV) with vehicle to grid power (V2G). The project included several research and development components: an analysis of US driving patterns; an analysis of the market for EVs and V2G-capable EVs; development and testing of GIV components (in-car and in-EVSE); interconnect law and policy; and development and filing of patents. In addition, development activities included GIV manufacturing and licensing of technologies developed under this grant. Also, five vehicles were built and deployed, four for the fleet of the State of Delaware, plus one for the University of Delaware fleet.

  10. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  11. A Prototype Two-Decade Fully-Coupled Fine-Resolution CCSM Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClean, Julie L. [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Bader, David C [ORNL; Bryan, Frank O. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Maltrud, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mirin, Arthur A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Ivanova, Detelina P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Kim, Yoo Yin [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Boyle, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jacob, Robert L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Norton, Nancy [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research; Craig, Anthony [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Worley, Patrick H [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully coupled global simulation using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) was configured using grid resolutions of 0.1{sup o} for the ocean and sea-ice, and 0.25{sup o} for the atmosphere and land, and was run under present-day greenhouse gas conditions for 20 years. It represents one of the first efforts to simulate the planetary system at such high horizontal resolution. The climatology of the circulation of the atmosphere and the upper ocean were compared with observational data and reanalysis products to identify persistent mean climate biases. Intensified and contracted polar vortices, and too cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the subpolar and mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere were the dominant biases produced by the model. Intense category 4 cyclones formed spontaneously in the tropical North Pacific. A case study of the ocean response to one such event shows the realistic formation of a cold SST wake, mixed layer deepening, and warming below the mixed layer. Too many tropical cyclones formed in the North Pacific however, due to too high SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific. In the North Atlantic anomalously low SSTs lead to a dearth of hurricanes. Agulhas eddy pathways are more realistic than in equivalent stand-alone ocean simulations forced with atmospheric reanalysis.

  12. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcomeLongEnergy StorageB.

  13. Sandia Energy - Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectsonSandia's Stan AtcittyRenewables

  14. Sandia Energy » Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitche This authorEnergy &EC,Team

  15. Sandia Energy » SMART Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitche ThisStrategicThird AnnualSandia

  16. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Beckett; B. Joo; C. M. Maynard; D. Pleiter; O. Tatebe; T. Yoshie

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid of grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the first full year of production.

  17. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA); Veca, Anthony R. (San Diego, CA); Donck, Harry A. (San Diego, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  18. The CLIVAR C20C project: selected twentieth century climate events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory, St. Petersburg, Russia J. Syktus Queensland Climate Change Centre) 33:603­614 DOI 10.1007/s00382-008-0451-1 #12;climate change. Models used in comparisons for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Solomon et al. 2007) require fully coupled ocean­atmosphere for- mulation

  19. High resolution RCM simulation of eastern Mediterranean climate and its expected changes to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    High resolution RCM simulation of eastern Mediterranean climate and its expected changes to 2050. Modern global climate change evaluations usually based on application of coupled atmosphere-ocean global by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A number of different anthropogenic emission scenarios have been

  20. Fact Sheet: Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and hierarchical security layer specific to intelligent grid design Intelligent power grids are interdependent energy management systems- encompassing generation,...

  1. Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    twiki- sggrid/bin/view/SmartGrid/PriorityActionPlanssggrid/bin/view/SmartGrid/TTMeetingOnPriceCommunications The

  2. Integration of Computing and Information on Grids Geoffrey Fox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Fran Berman, Tony Hey and myself. (http://www.grid2002.org/ ) · Grids support e-Science representing

  3. New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection Capabilities New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection Capabilities September 3,...

  4. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  5. North RTL grid scan'' studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emma, P.

    1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was made in response to screen measurements which indicated an emittance growth of nearly a factor of two within the North RTL or linac girder-1. Betatron oscillations are induced at the beginning of the North RTL to search for gross geometric aberrations arising within the RTL or sector-2 of the linac. The oscillations are induced horizontally and vertically with two X or two Y dipole correctors stepped in a nested loop fashion. In both cases the full set of RTL and first girder sector-2 linac beam position monitors (BPMs) are sampled in X and Y for each corrector setting. Horizontal (or vertical) data from pairs of BPMs are then transformed to phase space coordinates by the linear transformation constructed assuming the transport optics between the BPMs is known. A second transformation is then made to normalized phase space coordinates by using Twiss parameters consistent with the assumed transport optics. By careful choice of initial Twiss parameters the initial grid can be made square for convenience in graphical interpretation. A linear grid'' is then fitted to the transformed data points for each pair of BPMs. The area of each grid is calculated and linearity qualitatively evaluated. Furthermore, although not the focus of this study, the beta match at each BPM can be quantified. 6 figs.

  6. The CMS integration grid testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  7. Grid artifact reduction for direct digital radiography detectors based on rotated stationary grids with homomorphic filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong Sik [Department of Electronics Engineering, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Gyeonggi-do 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sanggyun [R and D Center, DRTECH Co., Gyeonggi-do 463-782 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Grid artifacts are caused when using the antiscatter grid in obtaining digital x-ray images. In this paper, research on grid artifact reduction techniques is conducted especially for the direct detectors, which are based on amorphous selenium. Methods: In order to analyze and reduce the grid artifacts, the authors consider a multiplicative grid image model and propose a homomorphic filtering technique. For minimal damage due to filters, which are used to suppress the grid artifacts, rotated grids with respect to the sampling direction are employed, and min-max optimization problems for searching optimal grid frequencies and angles for given sampling frequencies are established. The authors then propose algorithms for the grid artifact reduction based on the band-stop filters as well as low-pass filters. Results: The proposed algorithms are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from direct detectors with the rotated grids, and are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that the proposed algorithms can successfully reduce the grid artifacts for direct detectors. Conclusions: By employing the homomorphic filtering technique, the authors can considerably suppress the strong grid artifacts with relatively narrow-bandwidth filters compared to the normal filtering case. Using rotated grids also significantly reduces the ringing artifact. Furthermore, for specific grid frequencies and angles, the authors can use simple homomorphic low-pass filters in the spatial domain, and thus alleviate the grid artifacts with very low implementation complexity.

  8. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  9. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  10. Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2 Mingang Jin1. Introduction33 Whole-building airflow simulations are required in applications such as natural ventilation34 design, coupled building airflow and energy simulation, smoke control, and air quality diagnosis35

  11. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartment ofBUILDING-TO-GRID TECHNICAL OPPORTUNITIES From

  12. Smart Grid Week: Working to Modernize the Nation's Electric Grid |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,Smart Grid RFI PublicDepartmentDepartment

  13. Smart Grid Primer (Smart Grid Books) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are here Home »SmallNew

  14. EcoGrid EU (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport, Maine:EauEcoFactor Inc Jump(Smart Grid

  15. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the

  16. Smart Grid Savings and Grid Integration of Renewables in Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWork Force withNonprofit---5---12DOESmartthe 1 Smart Grid

  17. Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya By Katherine Deaton Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power inKenya Energy System Development inAfrica: The case of grid and off-grid power in Kenya by Katherine Steel Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division

  18. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted and organized by the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the Climate Registry, the three-day conference will showcase how new business opportunities, current policies, technologies, climate solutions and energy transformation will drive our low-carbon future.

  19. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  20. Improved design of a direct-coupled electronic titrimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lonzie Albert

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1. DIRECT-COUPLED AMPLIFIER The cathode and grid of a tube (Fig. 1) may be employed as input terminals. Ths single-ends 1 output volta-s is much more sensitive to changes in difference of cathode and grid potent1als than to changes 1n... 21Q volts, and vill change by only 4 volts as the level of the inputs to the grids is changed from 0 to lSQ volts, thc chan c bein caused by a 5, 5 per cent va. iation of the total current, The volts. , e sensitivity, using the meter as a null...

  1. Shifts in ENSO coupling processes under global warming Sjoukje Philip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    state of the Pacific Ocean between the current climate and a high CO2 climate. Next, shifts in ENSO warming may shift the properties and dynamics of El Nin~o. We study the shifts in ENSO couplings in IPCC couplings between sea surface temperature (SST), thermocline depth and wind stress are discussed. Although

  2. EnergyPlus vs DOE-2: The Effect of Ground Coupling on Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption of a Slab-On-Grade Code House in a Cold Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption of the house is determined for different loading conditions both in DOE-2 and EPlus. METHODOLOGY This study included three sets of simulations. The first set simulated a base-case house in Montana with no load component other than exterior... walls. The second set identified the individual and combined effects of the building load components on HVAC electricity use. The third set identified the effect of ground coupling on the HVAC electricity use of the test cases simulated...

  3. Insightful Workflow For Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Charles Earl

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a workflow adaptation and scheduling system for Grid workflow. The system currently interfaces with and uses the Karajan workflow system. We developed machine learning agents that provide the planner/scheduler with information needed to make decisions about when and how to replan. The Kubrick restructures workflow at runtime, making it unique among workflow scheduling systems. The existing Kubrick system provides a platform on which to integrate additional quality of service constraints and in which to explore the use of an ensemble of scheduling and planning algorithms. This will be the principle thrust of our Phase II work.

  4. Mapping on the HEALPix grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Calabretta

    2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural spherical projection associated with the Hierarchical Equal Area and isoLatitude Pixelisation, HEALPix, is described and shown to be one of an infinite class not previously documented in the cartographic literature. Projection equations are derived for the class in general and it is shown that the HEALPix projection suggests a simple method (a) of storing, and (b) visualising data sampled on the grid of the HEALPix pixelisation, and also suggests an extension of the pixelisation that is better suited for these purposes. Potentially useful properties of other members of the class are described. Finally, the formalism is defined for representing any member of the class in the FITS data format.

  5. Grid Integration | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,Glen WattmanInvestigationsandGrid Integration The

  6. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcomeLongEnergy StorageB.DETL Permalink

  7. Sandia Energy - Smart Grid Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstitute ofSiting and Barrier MitigationSmart

  8. Sandia Energy - Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstituteThree-Dimensional

  9. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatings Initiated at PNNL's SequimReactors ToDecisionDistribution Grid

  10. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125EnergyIdaho | Department of Energy SmallSmart Grid

  11. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  12. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  13. The ClimaGrowing Footprint of Climate Change: Can Systems Built Today Cope with Tomorrow's Weather Extremes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kraucunas, Ian P.

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how current climate conditions--with increasingly extreme storms, droughts, and heat waves and their ensuing effects on water quality and levels--are adding stress to an already aging power grid. Moreover, it explains how evaluations of said grid, built upon past weather patterns, are inaqeduate for measuring if the nation's energy systems can cope with future climate changes. The authors make the case for investing in the development of robust, integrated electricity planning tools that account for these climate change factors as a means for enhancing electricity infrastructure resilience.

  14. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  15. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  16. FINAL REPORT - CENTER FOR GRID MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Daniel R

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CGM was to develop high-priority grid modernization technologies in advanced sensors, communications, controls and smart systems to enable use of real-time or near real-time information for monitoring, analyzing and managing distribution and transmission grid conditions. The key strategic approach to carry out individual CGM research and development (R&D) projects was through partnerships, primarily with the GridApp™ Consortium utility members.

  17. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  18. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  19. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  20. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  1. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  2. Energy Storage for the Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

  3. What is the Smart Grid Anyway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers what is the smart grid at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  4. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Time of Use Rates Customer Information System IT upgrades Customer Education Demand Response CE empowers the customer and supports grid operations Office of...

  5. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time of Use Rates Customer Information System IT upgrades and SOA Customer Education Demand Response and DER CE empowers the customer and supports grid operations Office of...

  6. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y AMI Demand Response Distribution Management Systems Advanced OMS Distribution Automation...

  7. Platform for a modern grid: customer engagement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stories engaging the customer when deploying new technologies in the nation's largest smart grid demonstration. Related Articles (by tag) Energy Smart Industrial: five years of...

  8. Value of a Smart Grid System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 - Section 1: Smart Grid Opportunities Remarkable things happen when economic forces and new technology converge. Consider how the the Internet -- combined with new, affordable...

  9. The Quest for Sustainable Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardelli, Pedro H J; Cardieri, Paulo; Latva-aho, Matti

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a reply to the opinion paper: Transdisciplinary electric power grid science (PNAS), 2013 [arXiv:1307.7305].

  10. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND CLEAN FUEL PRODUCTION ITM POWER INC. ITM...

  11. Energy Storage for the Power Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Imhoff, Carl; Vaishnav, Dave

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron vanadium redox flow battery was developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a solution to large-scale energy storage for the power grid.

  12. Spherical Harmonic Decomposition on a Cubic Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. Misner

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described by which a function defined on a cubic grid (as from a finite difference solution of a partial differential equation) can be resolved into spherical harmonic components at some fixed radius. This has applications to the treatment of boundary conditions imposed at radii larger than the size of the grid, following Abrahams, Rezzola, Rupright et al.(gr-qc/9709082}. In the method described here, the interpolation of the grid data to the integration 2-sphere is combined in the same step as the integrations to extract the spherical harmonic amplitudes, which become sums over grid points. Coordinates adapted to the integration sphere are not needed.

  13. The Virtual Observatory and Grid in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Santander-Vela

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) is nearing maturity, and in Spain the Spanish VO (SVO) exists since June 2004. There have also been numerous attempts at providing more or less encompassing grid initiatives at the national level, and finally Spain has an official National Grid Initiative (NGI). In this article we will show the VO and Grid development status of nationally funded initiatives in Spain, and we will hint at potential joint VO-Grid use-cases to be developed in Spain in the near future.

  14. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some Technical Challenges Symposium on Modeling & Control of Alternative Energy Systems Joe Miller - Modern Grid Team Lead April 2, 2009 1 Conducted by the National Energy...

  15. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Viability and Business Case of Alternative Smart Grid Scenarios 1 Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of...

  16. Microsoft Word - Smart Grid Economic Impact Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    benefits include real estate, wholesale trade, financial services, restaurants, and health care. Smart Grid ARRA investments also supported employment in personal service...

  17. Effects of grids in drift tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura M.; Yamauchi, H.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011, we upgraded a 201 MHz buncher in the proton injector for the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) - relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) complex. In the buncher we installed four grids made of tungsten to improve the transit time factor. The grid installed drift tubes have 32 mm of inner diameter and the each grid consists of four quadrants. The quadrants were cut out precisely from 1mm thick tungsten plates by a computerized numerically controlled (CNC) wire cutting electrical discharge machining (EDM). The 3D electric field of the grid was simulated.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Second Annual Electric Power Research InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy,...

  19. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an essential component of the modern grid: IC creates a dynamic, interactive "mega-infrastructure" for real-time information and power exchange IC allows the various...

  20. Vehicle-Grid Interoperability | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle-Grid Interoperability Charging a test vehicle using the laboratory's solar-powered charging station. Charging a test vehicle using the laboratory's solar-powered charging...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Distributed Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Grid Integration Federal Electric Regulatory Commission Revised Its Small Generator Interconnection Procedure and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement On March 4,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: electric grid resilience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering Mayor Says New System Will 'Keep Everyone...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: electric grid stabilization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering Mayor Says New System Will 'Keep Everyone...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: modernize the electric grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering Mayor Says New System Will 'Keep Everyone...

  5. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  6. Smart Grid Demonstration Funding Opportunity Announcement DE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Frequently asked questions about the Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Funding Opportunity Announcement released as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act,...

  7. Optimization Online - Compressed Sensing Off the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongguo Tang

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 13, 2012 ... Compressed Sensing Off the Grid. Gongguo Tang(gtang5 ***at*** wisc.edu) Badri Narayan Bhaskar(bnbhaskar ***at*** wisc.edu) Parikshit ...

  8. Opening Remarks, Grid Integration Initiative Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loads Power Systems Integration Lab PV and Grid Simulators Energy Systems Integration Lab Fuel Cells, Electrolyzers Outdoor Test Area EVs, MV equipment Rooftop PV & Wind Energy...

  9. What will the Smart Grid Look Like?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and education they need to effectively utilize the new options provided by the Smart Grid. CE includes solutions such as Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), home...

  10. Smart Grid Publications Archive | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 2009 The Smart Grid Stakeholder Roundtable Group Perspectives (September 2009) Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A...

  11. file://P:\\Smart Grid\\Smart Grid RFI Policy and Logistical Comme

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Status: Tracking No. Comments Due: Submission Type: Page 1 of 2 1182010 file:P:Smart GridSmart Grid RFI Policy and Logistical CommentsDraft Comments for DOE-H... I...

  12. Quantifying the Impact of Adverse Events on the Electricity Grid as a Function of Grid Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Du, Pengwei

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract--Traditional approaches to the study of grid vulnerability have taken an asset based approach, which seeks to identify those assets most likely to result in grid-wide failures or disruptions in the event that they are compromised. We propose an alternative approach to the study of grid vulnerability, one based on the topological structure of the entire grid. We propose a method that will identify topological parameters most closely related to the ability of the grid to withstand an adverse event. We compare these topological parameters in terms of their impact on the vulnerability metric we have defined, referred to as the grid’s “survivability”. Our approach is motivated by Paul Baran’s work on communications networks, which also studied vulnerability in terms of network-wide parameters. Our approach is useful both as a planning model for evaluating proposed changes to a grid and as a risk assessment tool.

  13. Mitigating Climate Change Through Green Buildings and Smart Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL; Southworth, Frank [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-efficient buildings are seen by climate change experts as one of the least-cost approaches to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarizes a study done for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change that takes a broader look at the potential role of a climate-friendly built environment including not only considerations of how buildings are constructed and used, but also how they interface with the electric grid and where they are located in terms of urban densities and access to employment and services. In addition to summarizing mechanisms of change (barriers and drivers), the paper reviews a set of policies that could bring carbon emissions in the building sector in 2025 back almost to 2004 levels. By mid-century, the combination of green buildings and smart growth could deliver the deeper reductions that many believe are needed to mitigate climate change.

  14. Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the strong circumstantial evidence that the greenhouse effect has contributed significantly to the observed global warming, we are still unable to state unequivocally that the effect has been detected. Either we must eliminate all other possibilities, or we must identify one or more multivariate characteristics of the observed changes in climate that are unique signature of the greenhouse effect. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: Updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set, The development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, The further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing, Validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and The use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. 63 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;Visible Light Energy in = Energy out Absorbed

  16. Developing Models for Predictive Climate Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, John B [ORNL; Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Climate System Model results from a multi-agency collaboration designed to construct cutting-edge climate science simulation models for a broad research community. Predictive climate simulations are currently being prepared for the petascale computers of the near future. Modeling capabilities are continuously being improved in order to provide better answers to critical questions about Earth's climate. Climate change and its implications are front page news in today's world. Could global warming be responsible for the July 2006 heat waves in Europe and the United States? Should more resources be devoted to preparing for an increase in the frequency of strong tropical storms and hurricanes like Katrina? Will coastal cities be flooded due to a rise in sea level? The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), which archives all weather data for the nation, reports that global surface temperatures have increased over the last century, and that the rate of increase is three times greater since 1976. Will temperatures continue to climb at this rate, will they decline again, or will the rate of increase become even steeper? To address such a flurry of questions, scientists must adopt a systematic approach and develop a predictive framework. With responsibility for advising on energy and technology strategies, the DOE is dedicated to advancing climate research in order to elucidate the causes of climate change, including the role of carbon loading from fossil fuel use. Thus, climate science--which by nature involves advanced computing technology and methods--has been the focus of a number of DOE's SciDAC research projects. Dr. John Drake (ORNL) and Dr. Philip Jones (LANL) served as principal investigators on the SciDAC project, 'Collaborative Design and Development of the Community Climate System Model for Terascale Computers.' The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a fully-coupled global system that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. The collaborative SciDAC team--including over a dozen researchers at institutions around the country--developed, validated, documented, and optimized the performance of CCSM using the latest software engineering approaches, computational technology, and scientific knowledge. Many of the factors that must be accounted for in a comprehensive model of the climate system are illustrated in figure 1.

  17. An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid. Line Pouchard.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The Earth System Grid, 5 Carl Kesselman,5 Arie Shoshani, 6 Alex Sim6 [1] Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [2] Argonne

  18. Browse > Journals> Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions ...> Top Accessed Articles 1. Smart Transmission Grid: Vision and Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Browse > Journals> Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions ...> Top Accessed Articles 1. Smart Transmission.2080328 3. A Reliability Perspective of the Smart Grid Moslehi, K. Kumar, R. Page(s): 57 - 64 Digital Object Consumption Scheduling for the Future Smart Grid Mohsenian-Rad, A. Wong, V.W.S. Jatskevich, J. Schober, R

  19. SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1 and Rajkumar Buyya2 Keywords: Sensors, Sensor Networks, Grid computing, SensorML, SensorWeb. 1. Introduction Recent advances in electronic circuit miniaturization and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the creation

  20. Pacific Northwest Smart GridPacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectDemonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    customers to choose to control their energy usage ­ Smart meters ­ Home/building/industrial energy controls and displays · Automated home energy use 4 #12;The End-user is the Centerpiece of the Smart Grid 5Pacific Northwest Smart GridPacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectDemonstration Project

  1. Green Energy Workshop Student Posters Semantic Complex Event Processing for Smart Grid Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    for Smart Grid Information Integration and Demand Management Qunzhi Zhou, Yogesh of the power grid to a Smart Grid. The benefits of Smart Grid include demand Grid Demonstration Project. We define an ontology model for Smart Grid

  2. Grid-independent Issue in Numerical Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Wei; Wang Jian; Liao Guangxuan

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid independent is associated with the accuracy or even rationality of numerical results. This paper takes two-dimensional steady heat transfer for example to reveal the effect of grid resolution on numerical results. The law of grid dependence is obtained and a simple mathematical formula is presented. The production acquired here can be used as the guidance in choosing grid density in numerical simulation and get exact grid independent value without using infinite fine grid. Through analyzing grid independent, we can find the minimum number of grid cells that is needed to get grid-independent results. Such strategy can save computational resource while ensure a rational computational result.

  3. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG softwareâ??now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)â??has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  4. Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy as one of nine white papers in the project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems

  5. Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyber-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems-Physical Systems Security for Smart Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Acknowledgements This white paper was developed as one of nine white papers in the project "The Future Grid

  6. Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power;#12;Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable This white paper was developed as one of nine white papers in the project "The Future Grid to Enable

  7. Towards a Grid Information Knowledge Base , Marios D. Dikaiakos1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallis, George

    Towards a Grid Information Knowledge Base Wei Xing1 , Marios D. Dikaiakos1 , and Rizos Sakellariou2 present our work on building a Grid infor- mation knowledge base, which is a key component of a semantic Grid information system. A Core Grid Ontology (CGO) is developed for build- ing a Grid knowledge base

  8. A CHARACTERIZATION OF MAPPING UNSTRUCTURED GRIDS ONTO STRUCTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Craig C.

    BIT 1997 A CHARACTERIZATION OF MAPPING UNSTRUCTURED GRIDS ONTO STRUCTURED GRIDS AND USING MULTIGRID solution is to map the unstructured grid onto a structured grid and then apply multigrid to a sequence 06520-8285, USA. email: schultz-martin@cs.yale.edu Abstract. Many problems based on unstructured grids

  9. A Gaussian graphical model approach to climate networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerenner, Tanja, E-mail: tanjaz@uni-bonn.de [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Friederichs, Petra; Hense, Andreas [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany) [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brühler Straße 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany); Lehnertz, Klaus [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany) [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brühler Straße 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Distinguishing between direct and indirect connections is essential when interpreting network structures in terms of dynamical interactions and stability. When constructing networks from climate data the nodes are usually defined on a spatial grid. The edges are usually derived from a bivariate dependency measure, such as Pearson correlation coefficients or mutual information. Thus, the edges indistinguishably represent direct and indirect dependencies. Interpreting climate data fields as realizations of Gaussian Random Fields (GRFs), we have constructed networks according to the Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM) approach. In contrast to the widely used method, the edges of GGM networks are based on partial correlations denoting direct dependencies. Furthermore, GRFs can be represented not only on points in space, but also by expansion coefficients of orthogonal basis functions, such as spherical harmonics. This leads to a modified definition of network nodes and edges in spectral space, which is motivated from an atmospheric dynamics perspective. We construct and analyze networks from climate data in grid point space as well as in spectral space, and derive the edges from both Pearson and partial correlations. Network characteristics, such as mean degree, average shortest path length, and clustering coefficient, reveal that the networks posses an ordered and strongly locally interconnected structure rather than small-world properties. Despite this, the network structures differ strongly depending on the construction method. Straightforward approaches to infer networks from climate data while not regarding any physical processes may contain too strong simplifications to describe the dynamics of the climate system appropriately.

  10. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  11. Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattles, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory Smarter Grid Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    1. Sustainable Chemical Conversion 2. Electric Grid Infrastructure · De-carbonized Generation Distribution Infrastructure - How does Smarter Electric Grid Research, Innovation, Development, Demonstration ­ SGRID3 SGRID3 Goals · Lower the cost of electric power by 5-10% · Improve the quality and reliability

  13. Decentralized Grid Scheduling with Evolutionary Fuzzy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    - increasing demand for computing power and storage space. While well-established approaches such as the EGEEDecentralized Grid Scheduling with Evolutionary Fuzzy Systems Alexander F¨olling, Christian Grimme of finding workload exchange policies for decentralized Computational Grids using an Evo- lutionary Fuzzy

  14. Grid Security: Expecting the Mingchao Ma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University College London

    of a communications line; Power failure; Internet connection failure; Mis-configuration; · Security incidents ­ SystemGrid Security: Expecting the Unexpected Mingchao Ma STFC ­ Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK #12;Slide 2 Overview · Security Service Challenges (SSC) Review · Grid Security Incident ­ What had happened

  15. Algorithmic Decision Theory and the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Algorithmic Decision Theory and the Smart Grid Fred Roberts Rutgers University #12;2 Algorithmic Conference on ADT ­ probably Belgium in Fall 2013. #12;9 ADT and Smart Grid ·Many of the following ideas and planning dating at least to World War II. ·But: algorithms to speed up and improve real-time decision

  16. Polish grid infrastructure for science and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryszard Gokieli; Krzysztof Nawrocki; Adam Padee; Dorota Stojda; Karol Wawrzyniak; Wojciech Wislicki

    2007-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure, functionality, parameters and organization of the computing Grid in Poland is described, mainly from the perspective of high-energy particle physics community, currently its largest consumer and developer. It represents distributed Tier-2 in the worldwide Grid infrastructure. It also provides services and resources for data-intensive applications in other sciences.

  17. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  18. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  19. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

  1. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  2. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  3. Data security on the national fusion grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  4. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  5. Physics from Angular Projection of Rectangular Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ashmeet

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple, yet interesting problem, has both a scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work can interest undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential ap...

  6. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, D N; Foster, I T; Middleton, D E; Ananthakrishnan, R; Siebenlist, F; Shoshani, A; Sim, A; Bell, G; Drach, R; Ahrens, J; Jones, P; Brown, D; Chastang, J; Cinquini, L; Fox, P; Harper, D; Hook, N; Nienhouse, E; Strand, G; West, P; Wilcox, H; Wilhelmi, N; Zednik, S; Hankin, S; Schweitzer, R; Bernholdt, D; Chen, M; Miller, R; Shipman, G; Wang, F; Bharathi, S; Chervenak, A; Schuler, R; Su, M

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  7. GridOPTICS(TM): A Design for Plug-and-Play Smart Grid Software Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As the smart grid becomes reality, software architectures for integrating legacy systems with new innovative approaches for grid management are needed. These architectures must exhibit flexibility, extensibility, interoperability and scalability. In this position paper, we describe our preliminary work to design such an architecture, known as GridOPTICS, that will enable the deployment and integration of new software tools in smart grid operations. Our preliminary design is based upon use cases from PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative, which is a developing a collection of advanced software technologies for smart grid management and control. We describe the motivations for GridOPTICS, and the preliminary design that we are currently prototyping for several distinct use cases.

  8. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  9. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warming into the foundation of the world economy and into the everyday things we do (driving) and use (electricity). Thus

  10. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  11. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  12. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  13. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  14. Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

  15. The Regional Impact of Climate Change on Public Infrastructure and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjune, Stephen; Briscoe, H. Dorrell; Cruickshanks, Brian; McElroy, Amy; Nickeson, Daniel; Richardson, Adam; Schmid, Matt; Wang, Fangfang "Jessie"

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studying the impact of climate change on public infrastructure. The following section summarizes some of the reports that outline public infrastructure vulnerabilities to climate change impacts, as well as some of their general findings that might also... decreasing estimated costs (Hazleton, 2008). Increased demand is not the only vulnerability in the H-GAC electricity grid; storms have costly impacts on energy systems as well. From 1994 to 2004, the average cost of storm damage to electric utilities...

  16. Barriers to Electrification for "Under Grid" Households in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the unelectrified are “off grid,” or too far away toand small, stand-alone off-grid solutions will be requiredgrowing support for off-grid, distributed energy approaches,

  17. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for SmallA. Jacobson. 2007. "The Off-Grid Lighting Market in WesternTesting for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination Systems

  18. Product Quality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan; World Bank

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of technological options for off-grid light provision thatQuality Assurance for Off-Grid Lighting in Africa Conferencemarkets for high efficiency off-grid lighting technologies

  19. Barriers to Electrification for "Under Grid" Households in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    small, stand-alone off-grid solutions will be required forand commercialize off-grid solutions that can provide ruralof organizations promote off-grid solutions—such as solar

  20. In the OSTI Collections: Keeping Power Grids Stable | OSTI, US...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -pp. 14-15 (pp. 18-19 of 48), "The Smart Grid: An Introduction"U. S. Department of Energy Figure 2. Test model of a transmission grid. (a) The model grid is composed of 81...

  1. Are You a Smart Grid Champion? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    just of the grid, but of our entire energy economy. Watch this video from Con Edison of New York (recipient of two DOE Smart Grid Recovery grants) on the Smart Grid (it's about 2...

  2. Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid Alex Sim 1 ,CA 94720, USA Abstract The Earth System Grid (ESG) communityNetLogger 1. Introduction The Earth System Grid (ESG) [1

  3. West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Assessment of As-Is Grid by Non-Utility Stakeholders Introduction One goal of this grid...

  4. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system planning, renewable energy, smart grids, storage planning projects will become even more critical as the smart grid planning  models.   Some  of  these  objectives  are  not  well  defined,  like  smart?grid 

  5. Assessing the Usefulness of Distributed Measurements in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framhein, Theodore Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kezunovic, M. ; , "Smart Fault Location for Smart Grids,"Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on , vol.2, no.1, pp.11-22,Measurements in the Smart Grid A thesis submitted in partial

  6. Integrating Grid Services into the Cray XT4 Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cholia, Shreyas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the system side of the grid work. Before joining NERSC,Franklin login node for grid access. This will simplify thethe feasibility of grid VO based project accounts to share

  7. Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Earth System Grid Alex Sim 1 , Dan Gunter 1 , VijayaUSA Abstract The Earth System Grid (ESG) community faces theIntroduction The Earth System Grid (ESG) [1] community faces

  8. WISDOM: A Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery Initiative Against Malaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    14 WISDOM: A Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery Initiative Against Malaria Vincent Breton, Doman Kim ................................................................................ 354 14.2 Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery .................................................. 354 14.2.1 In Silico Drug Discovery: Requirements and Grid Added Value

  9. Nested-grid simulation of mercury over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry and Physics Nested-grid simulation of mercury overY. Zhang et al. : Nested-grid simulation of mercury overand Chen, S. -Y. : Plume-in-grid modeling of atmospheric

  10. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the context of regional grid structure and operations,and Regional U.S. Power Grids. Part 1: Technical Analysis;ccyang@ucdavis.edu. Electricity Grid Impacts of Plug-In

  11. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  12. Scalable Real Time Data Management for Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Purohit, Sumit; Gorton, Ian; Akyol, Bora A.

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents GridMW, a scalable and reliable data middleware for smart grids. Smart grids promise to improve the efficiency of power grid systems and reduce green house emissions through incorporating power generation from renewable sources and shaping demand to match the supply. As a result, power grid systems will become much more dynamic and require constant adjustments, which requires analysis and decision making applications to improve the efficiency and reliability of smart grid systems.

  13. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  14. ECE 437/537 -Smart Grid Catalog Description: Fundamentals of smart power grids. Technology advances in transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Smart generation. Energy storage. Microgrids. · Substation intelligence. · Transmission systems. PhasorECE 437/537 - Smart Grid Catalog Description: Fundamentals of smart power grids. Technology Cotilla-Sanchez Course content: · Introduction to smart power grids. Technology and policy background

  15. Smart Grid Outreach and Communication Strategy: Next Steps -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    grid techniques and technologies to quickly find the results and benefits of smart grid case studies that are comparable to their situation. Data needs to be classified and...

  16. Basis for the US Modern Grid Strategy - A Changing World

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Metering Infrastructure, distributed generation, wind turbine farms, and a few Demand Response programs. Value of the Electricity Grid The electric grid plays an...

  17. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency of grid operations and more optimal deployment of generation resources. Demand response activities may be able to improve grid efficiency as well. On the consumer...

  18. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State - Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By State - Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  19. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Category Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By Category Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  20. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementati...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of...