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Sample records for grid automation distribution

  1. Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

  2. ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable...

  3. Increasing Automated Vulnerability Assessment Accuracy on Cloud and Grid Middleware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    systems, i.e. SCADA systems. The use of automated tools for vulnerability assessment is quite attractive in most existing Grid and Cloud projects, and even in "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA]. Nowadays security is one of the most desirable features of the computational Grid, Cloud, and SCADA systems

  4. Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against Cyber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distribution, IT networks, and control systems-that use automated data analysis and demand response capabilities to increase system functionality, efficiency, and...

  5. A DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR ELECTROPHYSICAL INSTALLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    A DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR ELECTROPHYSICAL INSTALLATIONS V.R. Kozak Budker Institute There was designed a set of devices for automation systems of physical installations. On this basis approach. KEY WORDS Automation, systems, applications, CANBUS, embedded, controller. 1. Introduction Budker

  6. Grid integrated distributed PV (GridPV).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2013-08-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function in the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  7. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The software that the utility industry currently uses may be insufficient to analyze the distribution grid as it rapidly modernizes to include active resources such as distributed generation, switch and voltage control, automation, and increasingly complex loads. Although planners and operators have traditionally viewed the distribution grid as a passive load, utilities and consultants increasingly need enhanced analysis that incorporates active distribution grid loads in order to ensure grid reliability. Numerous commercial and open-source tools are available for analyzing distribution grid systems. These tools vary in complexity from providing basic load-flow and capacity analysis under steady-state conditions to time-series analysis and even geographical representations of dynamic and transient events. The need for each type of analysis is not well understood in the industry, nor are the reasons that distribution analysis requires different techniques and tools both from those now available and from those used for transmission analysis. In addition, there is limited understanding of basic capability of the tools and how they should be practically applied to the evolving distribution system. The study reviews the features and state of the art capability of current tools, including usability and visualization, basic analysis functionality, advanced analysis including inverters, and renewable generation and load modeling. We also discuss the need for each type of distribution grid system analysis. In addition to reviewing basic functionality current models, we discuss dynamics and transient simulation in detail and draw conclusions about existing software?s ability to address the needs of the future distribution grid as well as the barriers to modernization of the distribution grid that are posed by the current state of software and model development. Among our conclusions are that accuracy, data transfer, and data processing abilities are key to future distribution grid modeling, and measured data sources are a key missing element . Modeling tools need to be calibrated based on measured grid data to validate their output in varied conditions such as high renewables penetration and rapidly changing topology. In addition, establishing a standardized data modeling format would enable users to transfer data among tools to take advantage of different analysis features. ?

  8. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resulting data Modeling and analyzing short-term PV variability Developing PV system models for grid planning and interconnection studies Evaluating related PV system...

  9. COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATED ADVANCED INTEROPERABILITY CERTIFICATION TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PV SMART GRID INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    renewable energy sources are connected to the electric power system, the ability of grid operators inverters and energy storage systems (ESS), have the ability to assist grid operators control feederCOLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATED ADVANCED INTEROPERABILITY CERTIFICATION TEST PROTOCOLS

  10. Scalable Distributed Automation System: Scalable Real-time Decentralized Volt/VAR Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    GENI Project: Caltech is developing a distributed automation system that allows distributed generators—solar panels, wind farms, thermal co-generation systems—to effectively manage their own power. To date, the main stumbling block for distributed automation systems has been the inability to develop software that can handle more than 100,000 distributed generators and be implemented in real time. Caltech’s software could allow millions of generators to self-manage through local sensing, computation, and communication. Taken together, localized algorithms can support certain global objectives, such as maintaining the balance of energy supply and demand, regulating voltage and frequency, and minimizing cost. An automated, grid-wide power control system would ease the integration of renewable energy sources like solar power into the grid by quickly transmitting power when it is created, eliminating the energy loss associated with the lack of renewable energy storage capacity of the grid.

  11. Interoperable PKI Data Distribution in Computational Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pala, Massimiliano; Cholia, Shreyas; Rea, Scott A.; Smith, Sean W.

    2008-07-25

    One of the most successful working examples of virtual organizations, computational grids need authentication mechanisms that inter-operate across domain boundaries. Public Key Infrastructures(PKIs) provide sufficient flexibility to allow resource managers to securely grant access to their systems in such distributed environments. However, as PKIs grow and services are added to enhance both security and usability, users and applications must struggle to discover available resources-particularly when the Certification Authority (CA) is alien to the relying party. This article presents how to overcome these limitations of the current grid authentication model by integrating the PKI Resource Query Protocol (PRQP) into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).

  12. Modern Grid Initiative Distribution Taxonomy Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Chen, Yousu; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Engel, David W.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-11-01

    This is the final report for the development of a toxonomy of prototypical electrical distribution feeders. Two of the primary goals of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Modern Grid Initiative (MGI) are 'to accelerate the modernization of our nation's electricity grid' and to 'support demonstrations of systems of key technologies that can serve as the foundation for an integrated, modern power grid'. A key component to the realization of these goals is the effective implementation of new, as well as existing, 'smart grid technologies'. Possibly the largest barrier that has been identified in the deployment of smart grid technologies is the inability to evaluate how their deployment will affect the electricity infrastructure, both locally and on a regional scale. The inability to evaluate the impacts of these technologies is primarily due to the lack of detailed electrical distribution feeder information. While detailed distribution feeder information does reside with the various distribution utilities, there is no central repository of information that can be openly accessed. The role of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the MGI for FY08 was to collect distribution feeder models, in the SynerGEE{reg_sign} format, from electric utilities around the nation so that they could be analyzed to identify regional differences in feeder design and operation. Based on this analysis PNNL developed a taxonomy of 24 prototypical feeder models in the GridLAB-D simulations environment that contain the fundamental characteristics of non-urban core, radial distribution feeders from the various regions of the U.S. Weighting factors for these feeders are also presented so that they can be used to generate a representative sample for various regions within the United States. The final product presented in this report is a toolset that enables the evaluation of new smart grid technologies, with the ability to aggregate their effects to regional and national levels. The distribution feeder models presented in this report are based on actual utility models but do not contain any proprietary or system specific information. As a result, the models discussed in this report can be openly distributed to industry, academia, or any interested entity, in order to facilitate the ability to evaluate smart grid technologies.

  13. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    home energy manage- ment systems (HEMS) and the distribution feeder. One such simulation tool is Grid1 Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations Timothy M to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management

  14. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjectsCyberNot Chemistry DiamondDistribution

  15. Interoperable PKI Data Distribution in Computational Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Massimiliano

    2010-01-01

    2008), “Overview of the Grid Security Infrastructure. ” [Protocol (PRQP) into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).its integration into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).

  16. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Modeling of Distributed Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Modeling of Distributed Energy Resources in the Smart Grid OBJECTIVE can be used in the studies for the design, operation and control of the future smart grid. Our project National Laboratory (509) 375-2235 shuai.lu@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI

  17. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Muthukumar, Vishak; Scaglione, Anna; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    A. Frincke. Smart-Grid Security Issues. IEEE Security &review on smart grid cyber security. Technical Report

  18. An advanced power distribution automation model system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Shigeharu; Kanoi, Minoru; Nishijima, Kazuo; Hayami, Mitsuo

    1995-12-31

    An advanced power distribution automation (APDA) model system has been developed on the present basis of the automated distribution systems in Japan, which have been used for remote switching operations and for urgent supply restorations during faults. The increased use of electronic apparatuses sensitive to supply interruption requires very high supply reliability, and the final developed system is expected to be useful for this purpose. The developed model system adopts pole circuit breakers and remote termination units connected through 64kbps optical fibers to the computer of the automated system in the control center. Immediate switching operations for supply restorations during faults are possible through the restoration procedures, prepared beforehand, by the computer and by fast telecommunications using optical fibers. So, protection by the feeder circuit breaker in the substation can be avoided, which would otherwise cause the blackout of the whole distribution line. The test results show the effectiveness of model the system: successful fault locations and reconfiguration for supply restoration including separation of the fault sections (without blackout for the ground faults and with a short period (within 1 s) of blackout for the short-circuit faults).

  19. Remote performance check and automated failure identification for grid-connected PV systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Remote performance check and automated failure identification for grid-connected PV systems cloudy skies. This determines the quality of the PV simulation and finally the period of time, satellite data, PVSAT-2 1. Introduction Failure-free operation of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems

  20. An automated energy management system in a smart grid context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopes, M.

    The ongoing transformation of electric grids into smart grids provides the technological basis to implement demand-sensitive pricing strategies aimed at using the electric power infrastructure more efficiently. These ...

  1. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability MODERN GRID S T R A T E G Y AMI Demand Response Distribution Management Systems Advanced OMS Distribution Automation...

  2. Structural Vulnerability Analysis of Electric Power Distribution Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koc, Yakup; Warnier, Martijn; Kumar, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Power grid outages cause huge economical and societal costs. Disruptions in the power distribution grid are responsible for a significant fraction of electric power unavailability to customers. The impact of extreme weather conditions, continuously increasing demand, and the over-ageing of assets in the grid, deteriorates the safety of electric power delivery in the near future. It is this dependence on electric power that necessitates further research in the power distribution grid security assessment. Thus measures to analyze the robustness characteristics and to identify vulnerabilities as they exist in the grid are of utmost importance. This research investigates exactly those concepts- the vulnerability and robustness of power distribution grids from a topological point of view, and proposes a metric to quantify them with respect to assets in a distribution grid. Real-world data is used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed metric as a tool to assess the criticality of assets in a distribution...

  3. Fact Sheet: Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids Against...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distribution, IT networks, and control systems-that use automated data analysis and demand response capabilities to increase system functionality, efficiency, and...

  4. Automation-considered Logic of Authentication and Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Taekyoung

    methods are focused on the automation-based model checking that relies on building a finite modelAutomation-considered Logic of Authentication and Key Distribution Taekyoung Kwon1 and Seongan Lim2 Abstract. This paper presents an automation-considered logic of au- thentication for reasoning about

  5. Automated Grid Disruption Response System: Robust Adaptive Topology Control (RATC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    GENI Project: The RATC research team is using topology control as a mechanism to improve system operations and manage disruptions within the electric grid. The grid is subject to interruption from cascading faults caused by extreme operating conditions, malicious external attacks, and intermittent electricity generation from renewable energy sources. The RATC system is capable of detecting, classifying, and responding to grid disturbances by reconfiguring the grid in order to maintain economically efficient operations while guaranteeing reliability. The RATC system would help prevent future power outages, which account for roughly $80 billion in losses for businesses and consumers each year. Minimizing the time it takes for the grid to respond to expensive interruptions will also make it easier to integrate intermittent renewable energy sources into the grid.

  6. Integration of Distributed Energy The CERTS MicroGrid Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources The MicroGrid Concept Appendices Prepared for Transmission Reliability Program Office of PowerIntegration of Distributed Energy Resources The CERTS MicroGrid Concept CALIFORNIA ENERGY;Preface The U.S. Electricity Grid Today The U.S. electric power system is in the midst of a fundamental

  7. Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop - June 11,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Breakout Sessions Notes and Reports Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop - June 11, 2014 - Breakout Sessions Notes and Reports On June 11, 2014, the Department of...

  8. Assessment of (mu)grid distributed energy resource potential using DER-CAM and GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris; Bartholomew, Emily; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; LaCommare, Kristina S.H.

    2002-01-01

    of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources. ”Assessment of µGrid Distributed Energy Potential Using DER-Assessment of µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential

  9. Protecting Intelligent Distributed Power Grids against Cyber Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Wei; Yan Lu; Mohsen Jafari; Paul Skare; Kenneth Rohde

    2010-12-31

    Like other industrial sectors, the electrical power industry is facing challenges involved with the increasing demand for interconnected operations and control. The electrical industry has largely been restructured due to deregulation of the electrical market and the trend of the Smart Grid. This moves new automation systems from being proprietary and closed to the current state of Information Technology (IT) being highly interconnected and open. However, while gaining all of the scale and performance benefits of IT, existing IT security challenges are acquired as well. The power grid automation network has inherent security risks due to the fact that the systems and applications for the power grid were not originally designed for the general IT environment. In this paper, we propose a conceptual layered framework for protecting power grid automation systems against cyber attacks. The following factors are taken into account: (1) integration with existing, legacy systems in a non-intrusive fashion; (2) desirable performance in terms of modularity, scalability, extendibility, and manageability; (3) alignment to the 'Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector' and the future smart grid. The on-site system test of the developed prototype security system is briefly presented as well.

  10. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19

    of Energy (DOE) “Grid 2030” initiatives for grid modernization by improving reliability indices of the network. Improving customer average interruption duration index (CAIDI) and system average interruption duration index (SAIDI) are direct advantages...

  11. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipmentmore »investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.« less

  12. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipment investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.

  13. A Distributed Facilities Automation System For IBM Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houle, W. D. Sr.

    1985-01-01

    and to provide the plant oper ator with data to allow more effi cient operations. The most widely used program, General Purpose Automation Executive (GPAX), uses the IBM Series/1 to provide moni toring, optimization, and control for facilities automation... FACILITIES AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR IBM BUILDINGS Walter D. Houle, Sr. IBM Corporation Atlanta, Georgia INTRODUCTION Automatic building control systems have rapidly evolved from time-based on-off energy management controllers to distributed...

  14. Cascade Failures from Distributed Generation in Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scala, Antonio; Scoglio, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Power grids are nowadays experiencing a transformation due to the introduction of Distributed Generation based on Renewable Sources. At difference with classical Distributed Generation, where local power sources mitigate anomalous user consumption peaks, Renewable Sources introduce in the grid intrinsically erratic power inputs. By introducing a simple schematic (but realistic) model for power grids with stochastic distributed generation, we study the effects of erratic sources on the robustness of several IEEE power grid test networks with up to 2000 buses. We find that increasing the penetration of erratic sources causes the grid to fail with a sharp transition. We compare such results with the case of failures caused by the natural increasing power demand.

  15. Alleviating Solar Energy Congestion in the Distribution Grid via Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansari, Nirwan

    generator supplies power to multiple groups of end users through transmission and distribution lines energy is generated and injected into the grid; this is attributed to a lack of transmission lines metering. Ç 1 INTRODUCTION THE electric power grid is one of the national critical infrastructures

  16. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  17. Automated Vulnerability Detection for Compiled Smart Grid Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prowell, Stacy J; Pleszkoch, Mark G; Sayre, Kirk D; Linger, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    While testing performed with proper experimental controls can provide scientifically quantifiable evidence that software does not contain unintentional vulnerabilities (bugs), it is insufficient to show that intentional vulnerabilities exist, and impractical to certify devices for the expected long lifetimes of use. For both of these needs, rigorous analysis of the software itself is essential. Automated software behavior computation applies rigorous static software analysis methods based on function extraction (FX) to compiled software to detect vulnerabilities, intentional or unintentional, and to verify critical functionality. This analysis is based on the compiled firmware, takes into account machine precision, and does not rely on heuristics or approximations early in the analysis.

  18. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  19. Grid Integrated Distributed PV (GridPV) Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-12-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functio ns are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in th e OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function i n the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  20. Smard Grid Software Applications for Distribution Network Load Forecasting Eugene A. Feinberg, Jun Fei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Eugene A.

    of the distribution network. Keywords: load forecasting, feeder, transformer, load pocket, SmartGrid I. INTRODUCTION

  1. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  2. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    Protocol for Building Automation and Control Networks. ”existing open building automation and control networkingbuildings using open communications and automation

  3. Topic 7 : Smart Grid Privacy and Security 1Networking and Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Topic 7 : Smart Grid Privacy and Security 1Networking and Distributed Systems Department Tech UniversityCommunications and Control in Smart Grid 2 · Smart Meter Privacy · Concerns · Possible Solutions · Smart Grid Security · Load Altering Attacks · False Data Injection Attacks · Impact

  4. RTDS-Based Design and Simulation of Distributed P-Q Power Resources in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Zachariah David

    2014-01-01

    Danish island of Bornholm power grid," in Proc. of the IEEEsimulate the operation of power grid more accurately. In [performance of the power distribution grid in at least four

  5. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-12-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  6. Smart Grid Investment Grant Program - Progress Report July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure and Smart Grid Development Program includes smart meters, distribution automation equipment, building energy management pilot programs, and an electric vehicle...

  7. Case Study - Con Edison Smart Grid Investment Grant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    underground system. Case Study - Con Edison Smart Grid Investment Grant 2 Distribution Automation for the Long Haul Getting the entire system in place is a "heavy lift," says...

  8. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-06-02

    We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

  9. Scaling Distributed Energy Storage for Grid Peak Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Scaling Distributed Energy Storage for Grid Peak Reduction Aditya Mishra, David Irwin, Prashant efforts have shown how variable rate pricing can incentivize consumers to use energy storage to cut to describe the issues with incentivizing energy storage us- ing variable rates. We then propose a simple way

  10. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  11. Foundational Report Series. Advanced Distribution management Systems for Grid Modernization (Importance of DMS for Distribution Grid Modernization)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jianhui

    2015-09-01

    Grid modernization is transforming the operation and management of electric distribution systems from manual, paper-driven business processes to electronic, computer-assisted decisionmaking. At the center of this business transformation is the distribution management system (DMS), which provides a foundation from which optimal levels of performance can be achieved in an increasingly complex business and operating environment. Electric distribution utilities are facing many new challenges that are dramatically increasing the complexity of operating and managing the electric distribution system: growing customer expectations for service reliability and power quality, pressure to achieve better efficiency and utilization of existing distribution system assets, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by accommodating high penetration levels of distributed generating resources powered by renewable energy sources (wind, solar, etc.). Recent “storm of the century” events in the northeastern United States and the lengthy power outages and customer hardships that followed have greatly elevated the need to make power delivery systems more resilient to major storm events and to provide a more effective electric utility response during such regional power grid emergencies. Despite these newly emerging challenges for electric distribution system operators, only a small percentage of electric utilities have actually implemented a DMS. This paper discusses reasons why a DMS is needed and why the DMS may emerge as a mission-critical system that will soon be considered essential as electric utilities roll out their grid modernization strategies.

  12. HEADLINE: DOE Pursues Automation in West Virginia Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a Smart Grid. So, what exactly does this Smart Grid distribution automation system look like? As always, interoperability is a factor. First, it's vital for a utility to...

  13. Provably secure time distribution for the electric grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Williams, Brian P; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a quantum time distribution (QTD) method that combines the precision of optical timing techniques with the integrity of quantum key distribution (QKD). Critical infrastructure is dependent on microprocessor- and programmable logic-based monitoring and control systems. The distribution of timing information across the electric grid is accomplished by GPS signals which are known to be vulnerable to spoofing. We demonstrate a method for synchronizing remote clocks based on the arrival time of photons in a modifed QKD system. This has the advantage that the signal can be veried by examining the quantum states of the photons similar to QKD.

  14. Aalborg Universitet Distributed Secondary Control for Islanded MicroGrids A Networked Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Distributed Secondary Control for Islanded MicroGrids ­ A Networked Control, Q., Vasquez, J. C., & Guerrero, J. M. (2012). Distributed Secondary Control for Islanded MicroGrids M.; , "Distributed secondary control for islanded MicroGrids - A networked control systems approach

  15. Electrical Characteristics of Multi-Layer Power Distribution Grids Andrey V. Mezhiba and Eby G. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Electrical Characteristics of Multi-Layer Power Distribution Grids Andrey V. Mezhiba and Eby G a multi- layer power distribution grid typically has significantly different elec- trical properties distribution grids built exclusively in the up- per, low resistance metal layers, a multi-layer power

  16. Inductive Characteristics of Power Distribution Grids in High Speed Integrated Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Inductive Characteristics of Power Distribution Grids in High Speed Integrated Circuits Andrey V characteristics of several types of gridded power distribution networks are described in this paper interconnect. In power distribution grids with alternating power and ground lines, the inductance is shown

  17. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” In2010. “Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  18. Automating Climate Science: Large Ensemble Simulations on the TeraGrid with the GriPhyN Virtual Data System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deelman, Ewa

    Laboratory 2 Computation Institute, Argonne National Laboratory & University of Chicago 3 Center for Climatic hindered the efforts of the climate community to understand climate variability and climate change fromAutomating Climate Science: Large Ensemble Simulations on the TeraGrid with the GriPhyN Virtual

  19. DA (Distribution Automation) (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc Jump to: navigation,(RECP) in DevelopingOils Plc JumpDA

  20. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    and DER Signals. ” SGIP NIST Smart Grid Collaboration Site.emix/. Last accessed: Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADROpenADR technologies and Smart Grid standards activities.

  1. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01

    Signals. ” SGIP NIST Smart Grid Collaboration Site. http://emix/. Last accessed: Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADROpenADR technologies and Smart Grid standards activities.

  2. A planning scheme for penetrating embedded generation in power distribution grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Penetrating Embedded Generation, or Distributed Generation (DG), in power distribution grids presents great benefits and substantial positive social impacts to utilities, system operators and electricity consumers. Existing ...

  3. Software Based Barriers To Integration Of Renewables To The Future Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Emma

    2014-01-01

    To  Integration  of   Renewables  To  The  Future  TO INTEGRATION OF RENEWABLES TO THE FUTURE DISTRIBUTION GRIDto the integration of renewables to the distribution grid.

  4. Distribution Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distributed generation Electric vehicle charging and electrolyzers Energy storage Building and industrial loads and demand response Smart grid sensing, automation, and...

  5. Distributed Internet-based Load Altering Attacks against Smart Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    management, cost-efficient load protection. I. INTRODUCTION The recent advancements in smart grid systemsDistributed Internet-based Load Altering Attacks against Smart Power Grids Amir-Hamed Mohsenian distribution system. Keywords: Smart grid security, Internet-based load altering attacks, demand side

  6. Toward Distributed Intelligent: A Case Study of Peer to Peer Communication in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    Toward Distributed Intelligent: A Case Study of Peer to Peer Communication in Smart Grid Mingkui, Raleigh, NC, USA Email: {mwei2, wwang}@ncsu.edu Abstract--Smart grid is an emerging cyber-physical system. As a result, traditional centralized control is not always effective in smart grid, and distributed control

  7. Coordination of the Smart Grid and Distributed Data Centers: A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Coordination of the Smart Grid and Distributed Data Centers: A Nested Game-Based Optimization pricing policies in the recently proposed smart grid technology can incentivize the cloud computing. On the other hand, distributed data centers also provide opportunities to help the smart grid to improve load

  8. On the Capacity of a Wireless Backhaul for the Distribution Level of the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    1 On the Capacity of a Wireless Backhaul for the Distribution Level of the Smart Grid Babak Karimi limitations imposed by the proposed communication architecture. Index Terms--Smart Grids, Distribution Level of the Smart Grid approach. Title XIII of the En- ergy Independent and Security Act 2007 [1] requires improved

  9. Assessing the Usefulness of Distributed Measurements in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framhein, Theodore Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Kezunovic, M. ; , "Smart Fault Location for Smart Grids,"Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on , vol.2, no.1, pp.11-22,Measurements in the Smart Grid A thesis submitted in partial

  10. Distributed Demand Response and User Adaptation in Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed framework for demand response and user adaptation in smart grid networks. In particular, we borrow the concept of congestion pricing in Internet traffic control and show that pricing information is very useful to regulate user demand and hence balance network load. User preference is modeled as a willingness to pay parameter which can be seen as an indicator of differential quality of service. Both analysis and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the dynamics and convergence behavior of the algorithm.

  11. Distributed Smart Grid Asset Control Strategies for Providing Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Moya, Christian; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2013-10-30

    With large-scale plans to integrate renewable generation driven mainly by state-level renewable portfolio requirements, more resources will be needed to compensate for the uncertainty and variability associated with intermittent generation resources. Distributed assets can be used to mitigate the concerns associated with renewable energy resources and to keep costs down. Under such conditions, performing primary frequency control using only supply-side resources becomes not only prohibitively expensive but also technically difficult. It is therefore important to explore how a sufficient proportion of the loads could assume a routine role in primary frequency control to maintain the stability of the system at an acceptable cost. The main objective of this project is to develop a novel hierarchical distributed framework for frequency based load control. The framework involves two decision layers. The top decision layer determines the optimal gain for aggregated loads for each load bus. The gains are computed using decentralized robust control methods, and will be broadcast to the corresponding participating loads every control period. The second layer consists of a large number of heterogeneous devices, which switch probabilistically during contingencies so that aggregated power change matches the desired amount according to the most recently received gains. The simulation results show great potential to enable systematic design of demand-side primary frequency control with stability guarantees on the overall power system. The proposed design systematically accounts for the interactions between the total load response and bulk power system frequency dynamics. It also guarantees frequency stability under a wide range of time varying operating conditions. The local device-level load response rules fully respect the device constraints (such as temperature setpoint, compressor time delays of HVACs, or arrival and departure of the deferrable loads), which are crucial for implementing real load control programs. The promise of autonomous, Grid Friendly™ response by smart appliances in the form of under-frequency load shedding was demonstrated in the GridWise Olympic Peninsula Demonstration in 2006. Each controller monitored the power grid voltage signal and requested that electrical load be shed by its appliance whenever electric power-grid frequency fell below 59.95 Hz. The controllers and their appliances responded reliably to each shallow under-frequency event, which was an average of one event per day and shed their loads for the durations of these events. Another objective of this project was to perform extensive simulation studies to investigate the impact of a population of Grid Friendly™ Appliances (GFAs) on the bulk power system frequency stability. The GFAs considered in this report are represented as demonstration units with water heaters individually modeled.

  12. Assessing the Usefulness of Distributed Measurements in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framhein, Theodore Anthony

    2012-01-01

    pp. 1188-1192, 2010. [13] Kezunovic, M. ; , "Smart FaultLocation for SmartGrids," Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on , vol.2, no.1,

  13. Teaching the Grid: Learning Distributed Computing with the M-grid Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Robert

    . This situation arises in a number of different scenarios, including Grid computing which is a secure, service how to use as real Grid software requires extensive setting up and complex security processes. M-grid it is executed. Established Grid systems have extensive security infrastructures associated with them

  14. Demo Abstract: Distributed Control of a Swarm of Buildings Connected to a Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Demo Abstract: Distributed Control of a Swarm of Buildings Connected to a Smart Grid Baris Aksanli1 simulator, called Smart Grid Swarm Simulator (S2Sim). S2Sim simulates the grid dynam- ics (power, voltage cost function. Some exam- ples of cost functions are reduced energy consumption, re- duced electricity

  15. Distributed Smart-home Decision-making in a Hierarchical Interactive Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    1 Distributed Smart-home Decision-making in a Hierarchical Interactive Smart Grid Architecture Ding develop a comprehensive real-time interactive framework for the Utility and customers in a smart grid complicated smart grid architectures beyond the assumed abstract model. Index Terms--Bayesian Nash equilibria

  16. VOLTTRON - An Intelligent Agent Platform for the Smart Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-12

    The distributed nature of the Smart Grid, such as responsive loads, solar and wind generation, and automation in the distribution system present a complex environment not easily controlled in a centralized manner.

  17. VOLTTRON - An Intelligent Agent Platform for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-23

    The distributed nature of the Smart Grid, such as responsive loads, solar and wind generation, and automation in the distribution system present a complex environment not easily controlled in a centralized manner.

  18. Assessing the Usefulness of Distributed Measurements in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framhein, Theodore Anthony

    2012-01-01

    smart grid technology shows some promise; before this, however, the first hurdle to overcome has been cost.

  19. Aalborg Universitet Economic Power Dispatch of Distributed Generators in a Grid-Connected Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Economic Power Dispatch of Distributed Generators in a Grid-Connected Microgrid., & Vasquez, J. C. (2015). Economic Power Dispatch of Distributed Generators in a Grid-Connected Microgrid-Connected Microgrid Adriana C. Luna, Nelson L. Diaz, Fabio Andrade, Mois`es Graells§, Josep M. Guerrero, and Juan C

  20. Micro-grid operation of inverter based distributed generation with voltage and frequency dependent loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeineldin, H. H.

    Distribution systems are experiencing increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG). One attractive option is to use the available DG capacity during utility outages by forming planned micro-grids. Load sharing ...

  1. Software Based Barriers To Integration Of Renewables To The Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-06-01

    The future distribution grid has complex analysis needs, which may not be met with the existing processes and tools. In addition there is a growing number of measured and grid model data sources becoming available. For these sources to be useful they must be accurate, and interpreted correctly. Data accuracy is a key barrier to the growth of the future distribution grid. A key goal for California, and the United States, is increasing the renewable penetration on the distribution grid. To increase this penetration measured and modeled representations of generation must be accurate and validated, giving distribution planners and operators confidence in their performance. This study will review the current state of these software and modeling barriers and opportunities for the future distribution grid.

  2. Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations October 2011 - Microgrids Smart Grid R&D Multi-Year Program Plan (2010-2014) - September 2012 Update Smart...

  3. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    to Grid by Paul Naud Renewable electrical power sourcessystem based on various renewable energy resources. InCRUZ Smoothing the Effects of Renewable Generation on the

  4. 1464 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2013 Distributed Optimal Power Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    --Distributed optimization, distribution feeders, microgrids, optimal power flow, semidefinite relaxation. I. INTRODUCTION MICROGRIDS are portions of a power distribution net- work located downstream of the distribution substation) and energy storage devices [1]. A microgrid can operate in either grid-connected, islanded, or hybrid modes

  5. Modeling and Simulation of the EV Charging in a Residential Distribution Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    by changing the transformers and adding more power plants to provide more energy to the residential grid [5Modeling and Simulation of the EV Charging in a Residential Distribution Power Grid Fereidoun of California, Irvine Irvine, California, USA {fahourai, ibhuang, mohammad.alfaruque} @ uci.edu Abstract

  6. Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue of electricity consumers is an effective way to alleviate the peak power demand on the elec- tricity grid- ple users cooperate to perform load demand scheduling in order to minimize the electricity generation

  7. Distributed Asymmetric Verification in Computational Grids Michael Kuhn, Stefan Schmid, Roger Wattenhofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Asymmetric Verification in Computational Grids Michael Kuhn, Stefan Schmid, Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory (TIK) ETH Zurich CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland {kuhnmi,schmiste,wattenhofer}@tik.ee.ethz.ch Abstract Lucrative incentives in grid computing do not only at- tract honest participants, but also

  8. Topic 3: Smart Grid Communications A.H. MohsenianRad (U of T) 1Networking and Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Topic 3: Smart Grid Communications A.H. MohsenianRad (U of T) 1Networking and Distributed Systems Reference Model for Smart Grid Dr. Hamed Mohsenian-Rad Texas Tech UniversityCommunications and Control in Smart Grid 2 · Each domain involves its own actors and applications. · Interactions across 7 Smart Grid

  9. Distributed Energy Alternative to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute; Kelly, John [Endurant Energy LLC

    2008-08-01

    The nation's power grid, specifically the New York region, faces burgeoning energy demand and suffers from congested corridors and aging equipment that cost New York consumers millions of dollars. Compounding the problem is high-density buildup in urban areas that limits available space to expand grid capacity. Coincidently, these urban areas are precisely where additional power is required. DER in this study refers to combined heat and power (CHP) technology, which simultaneously generates heat and electricity at or near the point where the energy will be consumed. There are multiple CHP options available that, combined with a portfolio of other building energy efficiency (EE) strategies, can help achieve a more efficient supply-demand balance than what the grid can currently provide. As an alternative to expanding grid capacity, CHP and EE strategies can be deployed in a flexible manner at virtually any point on the grid to relieve load. What's more, utilities and customers can install them in a variety of potentially profitable applications that are more environmentally friendly. Under the auspices of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory representing the Office of Electricity of the U.S. Department of Energy, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) conducted this study in cooperation with Consolidated Edison to help broaden the market penetration of EE and DER. This study provides realistic load models and identifies the impacts that EE and DER can have on the electrical distribution grid; specifically within the current economic and regulatory environment of a high load growth area of New York City called Hudson Yards in Midtown Manhattan. These models can be used to guide new policies that improve market penetration of appropriate CHP and EE technologies in new buildings. The following load modeling scenarios were investigated: (1) Baseline: All buildings are built per the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (No CHP applied and no EE above the code); (2) Current Policy: This is a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario that incorporates some EE and DER based on market potential in the current economic and regulatory environment; (3) Modified Rate 14RA: This economic strategy is meant to decrease CHP payback by removing the contract demand from, and adding the delivery charge to the Con Edison Standby Rate PSC2, SC14-RA; (4) Carbon Trade at $20/metric tonne (mt): This policy establishes a robust carbon trading system in NY that would allow building owners to see the carbon reduction resulting from CHP and EE.

  10. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Chinthavali, Supriya [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  11. Energy-efficient control of a smart grid with sustainable homes based on distributing risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ono, Masahiro, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed control system for a smart grid with sustainable homes. A central challenge is how to enhance energy efficiency in the presence of uncertainty. A major source of uncertainty ...

  12. Innovative Distributed Power Grid Interconnection and Control Systems: Final Report, December 11, 2000 - August 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePodesta, K.; Birlingmair, D.; West, R.

    2006-03-01

    The contract goal was to further advance distributed generation in the marketplace by making installations more cost-effective and compatible with existing systems. This was achieved by developing innovative grid interconnection and control systems.

  13. Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended to serve both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the distribution utility for the security. REMPLI (Remote Energy Management over Power Lines and Internet) system of distribution network. They should be monitored and controlled in DA system. The load monitoring and estimationAbstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended

  14. Some characteristics of emerging distribution systems considering the smart grid initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Hilary E.; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Heydt, Gerald T.

    2010-06-15

    Modernization of the electric power system in the United States is driven by the Smart Grid Initiative. Many changes are planned in the coming years to the distribution side of the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure to embody the idea of ''smart distribution systems.'' However, no functional or technical definition of a smart distribution system has yet been accepted by all. (author)

  15. Distributed Monitoring for Prevention of Cascading Failures in Operational Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnier, Martijn; Koç, Yakup; Pauwels, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Electrical power grids are vulnerable to cascading failures that can lead to large blackouts. Detection and prevention of cascading failures in power grids is impor- tant. Currently, grid operators mainly monitor the state (loading level) of individual components in power grids. The complex architecture of power grids, with many interdependencies, makes it difficult to aggregate data provided by local compo- nents in a timely manner and meaningful way: monitoring the resilience with re- spect to cascading failures of an operational power grid is a challenge. This paper addresses this challenge. The main ideas behind the paper are that (i) a robustness metric based on both the topology and the operative state of the power grid can be used to quantify power grid robustness and (ii) a new proposed a distributed computation method with self-stabilizing properties can be used to achieving near real-time monitoring of the robustness of the power grid. Our con- tributions thus provide insight into the resilience wit...

  16. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

  17. A grid-enabled MPI : message passing in heterogeneous distributed computing systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Karonis, N. T.

    2000-11-30

    Application development for high-performance distributed computing systems, or computational grids as they are sometimes called, requires grid-enabled tools that hide mundate aspects of the heterogeneous grid environment without compromising performance. As part of an investigation of these issues, they have developed MPICH-G, a grid-enabled implementation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) that allows a user to run MPI programs across multiple computers at different sites using the same commands that would be used on a parallel computer. This library extends the Argonne MPICH implementation of MPI to use services provided by the globus grid toolkit. In this paper, they describe the MPICH-G implementation and present preliminary performance results.

  18. Dynamic Market for Distributed Energy Resourcesin the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Edwin; Boon-Hee, Soong; Duy La, Quang

    2014-01-01

    3] M. G. Molina, “Distributed energy storage systems forDynamic Market for Distributed Energy Resources in the Smartntu.edu.sg Abstract—Distributed Energy Resources (DER) are

  19. Wireless Communications and Networking Technologies for Smart Grid: Paradigms and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xi; Xue, Guoliang

    2011-01-01

    Smart grid, regarded as the next generation power grid, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a widely distributed automated energy delivery network. In this work we present our vision on smart grid from the perspective of wireless communications and networking technologies. We present wireless communication and networking paradigms for four typical scenarios in the future smart grid and also point out the research challenges of the wireless communication and networking technologies used in smart grid

  20. Abstract -This paper presents the coordinated control of distributed energy storage systems (DESSs) in DC micro-grids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    ) in DC micro-grids. In order to balance the state-of-charge (SoC) of each energy storage unit (ESU--Droop control; distributed energy storage system (DESS); DC micro-grids; state-of-charge (SoC) I. INTRODUCTION and more popularity [1]. Nowadays DC micro-grids are becoming more attractive with the raise of DC power

  1. The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A. Carreras M. Kirchner I. Dobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A on the robustness of the power transmission grid using a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA of the transmission grid. This intuitive improvement comes simply from the realization that less power would need

  2. An impedance profile of a commercial power grid and a tester power distribution system is developed in this paper.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plusquellic, James

    Abstract An impedance profile of a commercial power grid and a tester power distribution system transient signals generated by a chip. Several resistance-capacitance (RC) models of the power grid testing environment is then developed. The impedance profile of the combined probe card and the power grid

  3. High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid, Workshop Report, February 24-25, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Outcomes from the EERE Solar Energy Technologies Program workshop on high penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems into the distribution grid, Feb. 24-25, 2009, Ontario, Calif.

  4. PVUSA: The value of photovoltaics in the distribution system. The Kerman Grid-Support Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, H.J.; Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    As part of the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications Applications (PVUSA) Project Pacific Gas Electric Company (PG&E) built the Kerman 500-kW photovoltaic power plant. Located near the end of a distribution feeder in a rural section of Fresno County, the plant was not built so much to demonstrate PV technology, but to evaluate its interaction with the local distribution grid and quantify available nontraditional grid-support benefits (those other than energy and capacity). As demand for new generation began to languish in the 1980s, and siting and permitting of power plants and transmission lines became more involved, utilities began considering smaller, distributed power sources. Potential benefits include shorter construction lead time, less capital outlay, and better utilization of existing assets. The results of a PG&E study in 1990/1991 of the benefits from a PV system to the distribution grid prompted the PVUSA Project to construct a plant at Kerman. Completed in 1993, the plant is believed to be the first one specifically built to evaluate the multiple benefits to the grid of a strategically sited plant. Each of nine discrete benefits were evaluated in detail by first establishing the technical impact, then translating the results into present economic value. Benefits span the entire system from distribution feeder to the generation fleet. This work breaks new ground in evaluation of distributed resources, and suggests that resource planning practices be expanded to account for these non-traditional benefits.

  5. Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop - June 11,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from two concurrent breakout sessions are also available. Electric Power Distribution System Resilience: Federal Government and National Lab Perspective - R. Bent, LANL Electric...

  6. Dynamic Market for Distributed Energy Resourcesin the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Edwin; Boon-Hee, Soong; Duy La, Quang

    2014-01-01

    distribution: Coupled microgrids,” Proceedings of the IEEE,Hatziargyriou, “Making microgrids work,” IEEE Power Energysystem for stand-alone microgrids in day-ahead markets,”

  7. Stochastic Programming Formulation for Integrating Renewables into the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    #12;Distribution Networks Distribution networks had been designed to carry power from the transmis. The set of scenarios sizing the network infrastructure might not be frequent. Much more kilometers of electricity markets : .... Day-ahead market Intraday market Time ... Period 1 Period 2 Period T ... Real

  8. Analytics for Power Grid Distribution Reliability in New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    We summarize the first major effort to use analytics for preemptive maintenance and repair of an electrical distribution network. This is a large-scale multiyear effort between scientists and students at Columbia University ...

  9. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System: Validation Integration - Results of Future Architecture Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects. This report is second in a series of reports detailing this effort.

  10. Secure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehab, Mohamed

    periods. The peak value of electricity consumption data is extremely important for electric companiesSecure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid Mohammad usage. The scheduling of the energy consumption is often formulated as a game- theoretic problem, where

  11. Sub-grid parameterization of snow distribution for an energy and mass balance snow cover model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-grid parameterization of snow distribution for an energy and mass balance snow cover model-element scale variability in snow accumulation and ablation is increasingly recognized as important spatial variability in snow accumulation and melt. Model state variables are snow-covered area average

  12. Distributing Power to Electric Vehicles on a Smart Grid Yingjie Zhou*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxemchuk, Nicholas F.

    Distributing Power to Electric Vehicles on a Smart Grid Yingjie Zhou*, , Student Member, IEEE.edu Abstract--Electric vehicles create a demand for additional electrical power. As the popularity of electric. However, in the interim the rate at which electric vehicles can be deployed will depend on our ability

  13. When Smart Grid Meets Geo-distributed Cloud: An Auction Approach to Datacenter Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zongpeng

    When Smart Grid Meets Geo-distributed Cloud: An Auction Approach to Datacenter Demand Response Zhi--Datacenter demand response is envisioned as a promising tool for mitigating operational stability issues faced in escalating electricity cost. However, the current demand response paradigm is inefficient towards

  14. A Sequential Game Perspective and Optimization of the Smart Grid with Distributed Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    and are working on building the world's largest data centers with enormous energy consumption. For example established a trend towards building massive, energy-hungry, and geographically distributed data centers. Due to their enormous energy consumption, data centers are expected to have major impact on the electric grid

  15. Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity and energy benefits. The Solar Buildings Program provides design assistance and incentivesUtility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96-effective in these applications by about the year 2000. In the first three years, SMUD has installed over 340 residential

  16. SmartHG: Energy Demand Aware Open Services for Smart Grid Intelligent Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    : to minimise energy usage and cost for each home, and to support the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) in optimising operation of the Electric Distribution Network (EDN). SmartHG goals are achieved solar panels)], for each time slot (say each hour) the DNO price policy defines an interval of energy

  17. Recovery Act-SmartGrid regional demonstration transmission and distribution (T&D) Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, Edward T.

    2015-01-31

    This document represents the Final Technical Report for the Kansas City Power & Light Company (KCP&L) Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration Project (SGDP). The KCP&L project is partially funded by Department of Energy (DOE) Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project cooperative agreement DE-OE0000221 in the Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure application area. This Final Technical Report summarizes the KCP&L SGDP as of April 30, 2015 and includes summaries of the project design, implementation, operations, and analysis performed as of that date.

  18. Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

    2011-08-26

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

  19. Foundational Report Series: Advanced Distribution Management Systems for Grid Modernization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jianhui

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the application functions for distribution management systems (DMS). The application functions are those surveyed by the IEEE Power and Energy Society’s Task Force on Distribution Management Systems. The description of each DMS application includes functional requirements and the key features and characteristics in current and future deployments, as well as a summary of the major benefits provided by each function to stakeholders — from customers to shareholders. Due consideration is paid to the fact that the realizable benefits of each function may differ by type of utility, whether investor-owned, cooperative, or municipal. This report is sufficient to define the functional requirements of each application for system procurement (request-for-proposal [RFP]) purposes and for developing preliminary high-level use cases for those functions. However, it should not be considered a design document that will enable a vendor or software developer to design and build actual DMS applications.

  20. Distributed connected wind farms (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,DepartmentCalculator Jump to:Distributed

  1. Is the Distribution Grid Ready to Accept Large Scale Photovoltaic Deployment? - State of the Art, Progress and Future Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, M.; Stetz, T.; Brundlinger, R.; Mayr, C.; Hatta, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogimoto, K.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Coddington, M.; Lynn, K.; Graditi, G.; Woyte, A.; MacGill, I.

    2011-01-01

    The installed capacity of photovoltaic systems has recently increased at a much faster rate than the development of grid codes to effectively and efficiently manage high penetrations of PV within the distribution system. In a number of countries, PV penetrations in some regions are now raising growing concerns regarding integration. Management strategies vary considerably by country - some still have an approach that photovoltaic systems should behave as passive as possible while others demand an active participation in grid control. This variety of grid codes also causes challenges in learning from 'best practice'. This paper provides a review of current grid codes in some countries with high PV penetrations. In addition, the paper presents a number of country-specific case studies on different approaches for improved integration of photovoltaic systems in the distribution grid. In particular, we consider integration approaches using active and reactive power control that can reduce or defer expensive grid reinforcement while supporting higher PV penetrations.

  2. IEEE 1547 and 2030 Standards for Distributed Energy Resources Interconnection and Interoperability with the Electricity Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, T.

    2014-12-01

    Public-private partnerships have been a mainstay of the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) approach to research and development. These partnerships also include technology development that enables grid modernization and distributed energy resources (DER) advancement, especially renewable energy systems integration with the grid. Through DOE/NREL and industry support of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards has helped shape the way utilities and other businesses have worked together to realize increasing amounts of DER interconnected with the distribution grid. And more recently, the IEEE 2030 series of standards is helping to further realize greater implementation of communications and information technologies that provide interoperability solutions for enhanced integration of DER and loads with the grid. For these standards development partnerships, for approximately $1 of federal funding, industry partnering has contributed $5. In this report, the status update is presented for the American National Standards IEEE 1547 and IEEE 2030 series of standards. A short synopsis of the history of the 1547 standards is first presented, then the current status and future direction of the ongoing standards development activities are discussed.

  3. 908 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 7, JULY 2008 On-Chip Power Distribution Grids With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodny, Avinoam

    -Chip Power Distribution Grids With Multiple Supply Voltages for High-Performance Integrated Circuits Mikhail Abstract--On-chip power distribution grids with multiple supply voltages are discussed in this paper. Two types of interdig- itated and paired power distribution grids with multiple supply voltages and multiple

  4. Houston's Smart Grid: Transforming the Future of Electric Distribution & Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartel, W.

    2012-01-01

    integration of distributed generation and renewables ? Future ? Automatic Outage Notification, Support for Plug in Hybrid Vehicles, Consumer Control of Thermostats/Appliances, etc. AMS Successes 6 ? Service orders completed electronically... pipelines ? Natural gas gathering and processing ? 150 separate systems in major producing fields in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas 2 Who is CenterPoint Energy? A domestic energy delivery company Three Components of a Smart Grid Smart...

  5. 2508 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2014 Optimal, Nonlinear, and Distributed Designs of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Zhihua

    -organizing microgrids, and smart grid. DGs may be heterogeneous as PV systems, wind turbines, fuel cells, and diesel and wind energy generation. This has lead to the emergence of distributed generators (DGs), self

  6. Characterization of the Grain-Boundary Character and Energy Distributions of Yttria Using Automated Serial Sectioning and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Characterization of the Grain-Boundary Character and Energy Distributions of Yttria Using Automated (GBCD) and grain-boundary energy distribution (GBED). The GBCD de- rived from the three-dimensional data- entation parameters.10 In parallel with the GBCD, one can define the grain-boundary energy distribution

  7. A Game-Theoretic Framework for Control of Distributed Renewable-Based Energy Resources in Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    A Game-Theoretic Framework for Control of Distributed Renewable-Based Energy Resources in Smart¸ar Abstract-- Renewable energy plays an important role in distributed energy resources in smart grid systems. Deployment and integration of renewable energy resources require an intelligent management to optimize

  8. A Game-Theoretic Framework for Control of Distributed Renewable-Based Energy Resources in Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    increasing renewable energy legislation, incentives and commercialization. Motivated by this, we proposeA Game-Theoretic Framework for Control of Distributed Renewable-Based Energy Resources in Smart¸ar Abstract-- Renewable energy plays an important role in distributed energy resources in smart grid systems

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 4, JULY 2014 2075 A Distributed Demand Response Control Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Lin

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 4, JULY 2014 2075 A Distributed Demand Response) systems in demand response (DR), we propose a distributed DR control strategy to dispatch the HVAC loads and demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed control algorithm. Index Terms--Demand response

  10. Distributed and/or grid-oriented approach to BTeV data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel N. Butler

    2002-12-23

    The BTeV collaboration will record approximately 2 petabytes of raw data per year. It plans to analyze this data using the distributed resources of the collaboration as well as dedicated resources, primarily residing in the very large BTeV trigger farm, and resources accessible through the developing world-wide data grid. The data analysis system is being designed from the very start with this approach in mind. In particular, we plan a fully disk-based data storage system with multiple copies of the data distributed across the collaboration to provide redundancy and to optimize access. We will also position ourself to take maximum advantage of shared systems, as well as dedicated systems, at our collaborating institutions.

  11. Maui Smart Grid Demonstration Project Managing Distribution System Resources for Improved Service Quality and Reliability, Transmission Congestion Relief, and Grid Support Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-30

    The Maui Smart Grid Project (MSGP) is under the leadership of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The project team includes Maui Electric Company, Ltd. (MECO), Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO), Sentech (a division of SRA International, Inc.), Silver Spring Networks (SSN), Alstom Grid, Maui Economic Development Board (MEDB), University of Hawaii-Maui College (UHMC), and the County of Maui. MSGP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC26-08NT02871, with approximately 50% co-funding supplied by MECO. The project was designed to develop and demonstrate an integrated monitoring, communications, database, applications, and decision support solution that aggregates renewable energy (RE), other distributed generation (DG), energy storage, and demand response technologies in a distribution system to achieve both distribution and transmission-level benefits. The application of these new technologies and procedures will increase MECO’s visibility into system conditions, with the expected benefits of enabling more renewable energy resources to be integrated into the grid, improving service quality, increasing overall reliability of the power system, and ultimately reducing costs to both MECO and its customers.

  12. Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing technology to automate costs. The Future · Cover more of Smart Grid control (diagnosis, reconfiguration, protection, voltage) products for the Smart Grid. Contact Details: Technical Jussi Rintanen Canberra Research Laboratory Tel

  13. Voltage multi-stability in distribution grids with power flow reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung D. Nguyen; Konstantin Turitsyn

    2014-07-08

    High levels of penetration of distributed generation and aggressive reactive power compensation with modern power electronics may result in the reversal of active and reactive power flows in future distribution grids. The voltage stability of these operating conditions may be very different from the more traditional power consumption regime. We study the stability characteristics of distribution networks with reversed power flow. After introducing a universal algebraic approach to characterize all the solutions of the power flow equations, we show that new solutions appear in the reversed power flow regime even in the simplest three bus systems. We show that the some of these solutions are stable and the system may exhibit a phenomenon of multistability, where multiple stable equilibria co-exist at the given set of parameters, and the system may converge to an undesirable equilibrium after a disturbance. These predictions are validated with dynamic simulations of two different systems. Under certain conditions the new states are viable and may be characterized by relatively high voltages. Possible approaches towards reactive power/voltage regulation as well as permissible distributed generation capacity in future power systems are proposed and discussed in the end of the paper.

  14. The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-07-28

    This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated.

  15. RTDS-Based Design and Simulation of Distributed P-Q Power Resources in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Zachariah David

    2014-01-01

    micro-wind turbines are connected to grid by cascading rectifier stages with an inverter stage. Energy storage

  16. 770 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 2, JUNE 2012 Residential Load Control: Distributed Scheduling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    been termed demand response or load response, among others; see, e.g., [2], [3]. Residential loads have770 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 3, NO. 2, JUNE 2012 Residential Load Control: Distributed residential end-user has a base load, two types of adjustable loads, and pos- sibly a storage device

  17. The Evolution of the Internet Community and the "Yet-to-Evolve" Smart Grid Community: Parallels and Lessons-to-be-Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01

    between the Smart Grid and home automation systems is beingof the co-located Smart Grid and home automation network5.1.3. Juncture of Home Automation and Smart Grid As this

  18. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  19. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Bell, Gavin; Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Danvil, Sebastian; Drach, Bob; Fiore, Sandro; Gonzalez, Estanislao; Harney, John F; Mattmann, Chris; Kershaw, Philip; Morgan, Mark; Pascoe, Stephen; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2013-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  20. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geo-Spatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Miller, Neill; Mattmann, Chris; Harney, John F; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi; Bell, Gavin; Drach, Bob; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Pascoe, Stephen; Fiore, Sandro; Schweitzer, Roland; Danvil, Sebastian; Morgan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  1. Smoothing effect for spatially distributed renewable resources and its impact on power grid robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagata, Motoki; Fujiwara, Naoya; Tanaka, Gouhei; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show that spatial correlation of renewable energy outputs greatly influences the robustness of power grids. First, we propose a new index for the spatial correlation among renewable energy outputs. We find that the spatial correlation of renewable energy outputs in a short time-scale is as weak as that caused by independent random variables and that in a long time-scale is as strong as that under perfect synchronization. Then, by employing the topology of the power grid in eastern Japan, we analyze the robustness of the power grid with spatial correlation of renewable energy outputs. The analysis is performed by using a realistic differential-algebraic equations model and the result shows that the spatial correlation of the energy resources strongly degrades the robustness of the power grid. Our result suggests that the spatial correlation of the renewable energy outputs should be taken into account when estimating the stability of power grids.

  2. 1228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 3, MAY 2014 Optimal Operation of Active Distribution Grids: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    . Wholesale market price. Price of power exchange between DISCO and MG. Retail energy price by the DISCO contracts. Real power demand of load . , Active and reactive power provided by distributed energy resource . Power transferred from DISCO to ISO. Manuscript received May 04, 2013; revised August 21, 2013; accepted

  3. Grid Data Access on Widely Distributed Worker Nodes Using Scalla and SRM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakl, Pavel; /Prague, Inst. Phys.; Lauret, Jerome; /Brookhaven; Hanushevsky, Andrew; /SLAC; Shoshani, Arie; /LBL, Berkeley; Sim, Alex; /LBL, Berkeley; Gu, Junmin; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-10

    Facing the reality of storage economics, NP experiments such as RHIC/STAR have been engaged in a shift of the analysis model, and now heavily rely on using cheap disks attached to processing nodes, as such a model is extremely beneficial over expensive centralized storage. Additionally, exploiting storage aggregates with enhanced distributed computing capabilities such as dynamic space allocation (lifetime of spaces), file management on shared storages (lifetime of files, pinning file), storage policies or a uniform access to heterogeneous storage solutions is not an easy task. The Xrootd/Scalla system allows for storage aggregation. We will present an overview of the largest deployment of Scalla (Structured Cluster Architecture for Low Latency Access) in the world spanning over 1000 CPUs co-sharing the 350 TB Storage Elements and the experience on how to make such a model work in the RHIC/STAR standard analysis framework. We will explain the key features and approach on how to make access to mass storage (HPSS) possible in such a large deployment context. Furthermore, we will give an overview of a fully 'gridified' solution using the plug-and-play features of Scalla architecture, replacing standard storage access with grid middleware SRM (Storage Resource Manager) components designed for space management and will compare the solution with the standard Scalla approach in use in STAR for the past 2 years. Integration details, future plans and status of development will be explained in the area of best transfer strategy between multiple-choice data pools and best placement with respect of load balancing and interoperability with other SRM aware tools or implementations.

  4. PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

  5. Distributed Real-Time Power Balancing in Renewable-Integrated Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Ben

    , taking into account the uncertainty of the renewable generation, loads, and energy prices. We and more renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are expected to be integrated into the power grids balancing. Real-time control is mainly motivated by the unpredictability of renewable sources, which can

  6. Cactus and Visapult: An Ultra-High Performance Grid-Distributed Visualization Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connectionless Protocols E. Wes Bethel and John Shalf Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Energy in the memory and data storage capabilities of the largest supercomputing installations in the world has operated network/Grid-connected observatories and experimental equipment come online [1]. While statistical

  7. Performance Evaluation of Flocking-Based Distributed Cyber-Physical Control for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    generation, transmission and delivery. The two way information and power flow facilitated in smart grid proposed to stabilize power systems during transient insta- bility. The flocking paradigm offers a rich, communication sys- tems and control to help improve the efficiency, reliability and resilience of power

  8. Distributed Demand-Side Management in Smart Grid: how Imitation improves Power Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proportional to the cost difference between the actual and cheapest schedules of the previous iteration. We. Similarly, DSM systems can also be employed to mitigate other issues related to electric grids in the literature, aiming at controlling the electric loads of groups of collaborative customers [3], [4]. However

  9. Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    and of the electric power grid, yet analysts, industries,be realized only if the power grid operator has control overplugged in when the power grid needs them. A. The California

  10. Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how NREL operated both commercially available low-temperature electrolyzer technologies (PEM and alkaline) to evaluate their response to commands to increase and decrease stack power that shorten frequency disturbances on an alternating current (AC) mini-grid. Results show that both the PEM and alkaline electrolyzers are capable of adding or removing stack power to provide sub-second response that reduced the duration of frequency disturbances.

  11. Methodology for combined Integration of electric vehicles and distributed resources into the electric grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunter, Samantha Joellyn

    2011-01-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles and distributed generation are expected to appear in growing numbers over the next few decades. Large scale unregulated penetration of plug-in electric vehicles and distributed generation can each ...

  12. Abstract--The distribution system provides major opportunities for smart grid concepts. One way to approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, fuel cells and AC storage have an inverter to interface with the electrical distribution system the distribution system down into small clusters or microgrids, with distributed optimizing controls coordinating technologies, such as internal combustion (IC) engines, gas turbines, microturbines, photovoltaic systems, fuel

  13. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    that are vital for grid security.     The cost of  these problems involving grid security  at  bulk  transmission/problems  involving  grid  security  at  distribution  or 

  14. ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: ETEC GmbH Place: Germany Sector:Grid

  15. Aalborg Universitet SiC heat pump converters with support for voltage unbalance in distribution grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    Aalborg Universitet SiC heat pump converters with support for voltage unbalance in distribution (APA): Trintis, I., Douglass, P., Maheshwari, R., & Munk-Nielsen, S. (2015). SiC heat pump converters.aau.dk on: november 29, 2015 #12;SiC heat pump converters with support for voltage unbalance in distribution

  16. Optimal Design of Grid-Connected PEV Charging Systems With Integrated Distributed Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, David J.

    The penetration of plug-in electric vehicles and renewable distributed generation is expected to increase over the next few decades. Large scale unregulated deployment of either technology can have a detrimental impact on ...

  17. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology providers involved in the Smart Grid and provides profiles on them including contact information, company overviews, technology reviews, and key Smart Grid activities.

  18. Final Scientific/ Technical Report. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Van; Weinkauf, Don; Khan, Mushtaq; Helgeson, Wes; Weedeward, Kevin; LeClerc, Corey; Fuierer, Paul

    2012-06-30

    The future looks bright for solar and renewable energies in the United States. Recent studies claim that by 2050, solar power could supply a third of all electricity demand in the country’s western states. Technology advances, soft policy changes, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve this goal. But the larger question is, what would it take to do more throughout the United States? The studies tie future solar and renewable growth in the United States to programs that aim to lower the soft costs of solar adoption, streamline utility interconnections, and increase technology advances through research and development. At the state and local levels, the most important steps are; Net metering: Net metering policies lets customers offset their electric bills with onsite solar and receive reliable and fair compensation for the excess electricity they provide to the grid. Not surprisingly, what utilities consider fair is not necessarily a rate that’s favorable to solar customers; Renewable portfolio standards (RPS): RPS policies require utilities to provide a certain amount of their power from renewable sources; some set specific targets for solar and other renewables. California’s aggressive RPS of 33% renewable energy by 2020 is not bankrupting the state, or its residents; Strong statewide interconnection policies: Solar projects can experience significant delays and hassles just to get connected to the grid. Streamlined feasibility and impact analysis are needed. Good interconnection policies are crucial to the success of solar or renewable energy development; Financing options: Financing is often the biggest obstacle to solar adoption. Those obstacles can be surmounted with policies that support creative financing options like third-party ownership (TPO) and property assessed clean energy (PACE). Attesting to the significance of TPO is the fact that in Arizona, it accounted for 86% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in Q1 2013. Policies beyond those at the state level are also important for solar. The federal government must play a role including continuation of the federal Investment tax credit, responsible development of solar resources on public lands, and support for research and development (R&D) to reduce the cost of solar and help incorporate large amounts of solar into the grid. The local level can’t be ignored. Local governments should support: solar rights laws, feed-in tariffs (FITs), and solar-friendly zoning rules. A great example of how effective local policies can be is a city like Gainesville, Florida , whose FIT policy has put it on the map as a solar leader. This is particularly noteworthy because the Sunshine State does not appear anywhere on the list of top solar states, despite its abundant solar resource. Lancaster, California, began by streamlining the solar permitting process and now requires solar on every new home. Cities like these point to the power of local policies, and the ability of local governments to get things done. A conspicuously absent policy is Community Choice energy, also called community choice aggregation (CCA). This model allows local governments to pool residential, business, and municipal electricity loads and to purchase or generate on their behalf. It provides rate stability and savings and allows more consumer choice and local control. The model need not be focused on clean energy, but it has been in California, where Marin Clean Energy, the first CCA in California, was enabled by a state law -- highlighting the interplay of state and local action. Basic net metering8 has been getting a lot of attention. Utilities are attacking it in a number of states, claiming it’s unfair to ratepayers who don’t go solar. On the other hand, proponents of net metering say utilities’ fighting stance is driven by worries about their bottom line, not concern for their customers. Studies in California, Vermont , New York and Texas have found that the benefits of net metering (like savings on investments in infrastructure and on meeti

  19. Identifying emerging smart grid impacts to upstream and midstream natural gas operations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-09-01

    The Smart Grid has come to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of communications and information technology in the generation, delivery and consumption of electrical energy. Much of the present Smart Grid analysis focuses on utility and consumer interaction. i.e. smart appliances, home automation systems, rate structures, consumer demand response, etc. An identified need is to assess the upstream and midstream operations of natural gas as a result of the smart grid. The nature of Smart Grid, including the demand response and role of information, may require changes in upstream and midstream natural gas operations to ensure availability and efficiency. Utility reliance on natural gas will continue and likely increase, given the backup requirements for intermittent renewable energy sources. Efficient generation and delivery of electricity on Smart Grid could affect how natural gas is utilized. Things that we already know about Smart Grid are: (1) The role of information and data integrity is increasingly important. (2) Smart Grid includes a fully distributed system with two-way communication. (3) Smart Grid, a complex network, may change the way energy is supplied, stored, and in demand. (4) Smart Grid has evolved through consumer driven decisions. (5) Smart Grid and the US critical infrastructure will include many intermittent renewables.

  20. AUSTRIAN GRID AUSTRIAN GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author 1.0 2005-07-28 Initial Version See cover on page 3 #12;AUSTRIAN GRID 3/18 A PROTOTYPE OF THE SEE

  1. Pensacola Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistical Challenges. Providing comment on: Consumer facing programs such as feedback, demand response, energy efficiency, and automation strategies. Pensacola Smart Grid RFI...

  2. A Distributed Computer Automation and Control System for IBM's GTD Process Plant at Austin Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getter, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    chemical day tank in the manufacturing building is full, a messaee is sent over the data highway to the Tank Farm PLC instruc ting it to discontinue chemical feed and seal the pumping system. CDC/i:anl: :':'arm The Chemical Distribution Center manaees...

  3. Distributed Integrated Scheduling in Automated Manufacturing Systems with Transient Machine Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedde, Horst F.

    as for a larger variety of products. At the same time better adaptability of transportation planning, electronic negotiations 1. Introduction Distributed Computer Control for Just-in- Time Production and production flows. The Just-in-Time method has not yet been used in computer-controlled manufacturing systems

  4. Development of renewable energy Challenges for the electrical grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    (U 20 kV) · Grids initially constructed and operated to distribute electricity · New Role technology cost reduction #12;Challenges for the grids 4. Grid Codes · Grid Codes: Regulation for production challenges ­ New capacities & grid connection : RES grid connection schemes (S3RENR) ­ RES and distribution

  5. Automated Fresnel lens tester system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, G.S.

    1981-07-01

    An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

  6. Automated Data Collection for Determining Statistical Distributions of Module Power Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Spataru, S.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for increasing the frequency of data collection and reducing the time and cost of accelerated lifetime testing of photovoltaic modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID). This consists of in-situ measurements of dark current-voltage curves of the modules at elevated stress temperature, their use to determine the maximum power at 25 degrees C standard test conditions (STC), and distribution statistics for determining degradation rates as a function of stress level. The semi-continuous data obtained by this method clearly show degradation curves of the maximum power, including an incubation phase, rates and extent of degradation, precise time to failure, and partial recovery. Stress tests were performed on crystalline silicon modules at 85% relative humidity and 60 degrees C, 72 degrees C, and 85 degrees C. Activation energy for the mean time to failure (1% relative) of 0.85 eV was determined and a mean time to failure of 8,000 h at 25 degrees C and 85% relative humidity is predicted. No clear trend in maximum degradation as a function of stress temperature was observed.

  7. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  8. Building the Distribution Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge ofEnergy Program PeerAStudy

  9. Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps Automates et l'inni Automates avec contrôle auxiliaire Généralisations Philippe Quéinnec 3 janvier 2011 1 / 26 #12;Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps Automates et l'inni Automates avec contrôle auxiliaire Plan 1 Automate avec sortie 2 Automates et le temps 3

  10. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed...

  11. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  12. Future of Grid-Tied PV Business Models: What Will Happen When PV Penetration on the Distribution Grid is Significant? Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, S.; Katofsky, R.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Margolis, R.

    2008-05-01

    Eventually, distributed PV will become a more significant part of the generation mix. When this happens, it is expected that utilities will have to take on a more active role in the placement, operation and control of these systems. There are operational complexities and concerns of revenue erosion that will drive utilities into greater involvement of distributed PV and will create new business models. This report summarizes work done by Navigant Consulting Inc. for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's work on Renewable System Integration. The objective of the work was to better understand the structure of these future business models and the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) required to support their deployment. This report describes potential future PV business models in terms of combinations of utility ownership and control of the PV assets, and the various relationships between end-users and third-party owners.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 861 An Optimal and Distributed Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    of demand response management for the future smart grid that integrates plug-in electric vehicles for augmented Lagrangian. I. INTRODUCTION I N THE electricity market, demand response [1] is a mech- anism to manage users' consumption behavior under spe- cific supply conditions. The goal of demand response

  14. Multi-Agent Based Techniques for Coordinating the Distribution of Electricity in a Micro-Grid Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    . 2 Background Research To reduce carbon emissions and ensure that the UK low car- bon emissions plan to the current national grid, the in- creasing demand for electricity will only result in more car- bon emissions carbon emissions. In order to ensure that this challenging low carbon emissions plan is met, not only

  15. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  16. Distribution Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation Electric vehicle charging and electrolyzers Energy storage Building and industrial loads and demand response Smart grid sensing, automation, and microgrids...

  17. Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Demand Response Federal Smart Grid Task Force Distributed Energy Microgrids Recovery Act Interoperability Recovery Act SGDP Recovery Act SGIG Recovery Act...

  18. Request for Information on the Electric Grid Resilience Self...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Electric Grid Resilience Self-Assessment Tool for Distribution Systems: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 126 - Jul. 1, 2015 Request for Information on the Electric Grid...

  19. Exploiting Home Automation Protocols for Load Monitoring in Smart Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Jeannie

    's efficiency.1 Smart grids are important due to a long-term upward trend in energy costs and a growing control for many years, and are be- ing widely deployed in early smart grid field trials. While HA General Terms Design, Measurement, Management Keywords Home Automation, Load Monitoring, Smart Grid 1

  20. Automated two-dimensional Acanthamoeba polyphaga tracking and calculation of Salmonella typhimurium distribution in spatio-temporal images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsibidis, George D; Gaze, William; Wellington, Elizabeth M H

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and protozoa is an increasing area of interest, however there are a few systems that allow extensive observation of the interactions. We examined a surface system consisting of non nutrient agar with a uniform bacterial lawn that extended over the agar surface, and a spatially localised central population of amoebae. The amoeba fed on bacteria and migrated over the plate. Automated image analysis techniques were used to locate and count amoebae, cysts and bacteria coverage in a series of spatial images. Most algorithms were based on intensity thresholding, or a modification of this idea with probabilistic models. Our strategy was two tiered, we performed an automated analysis for object classification and bacteria counting followed by user intervention/reclassification using custom written Graphical User Interfaces.

  1. Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

  2. Microsoft Word - RedSeal_Smart Grid Policy Logistics RFI-sd.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    smart grid technologies that will significantly increase the number and availability of digital access points for hackers to cause harm through smart meters, automated control...

  3. Microsoft Word - Understanding Smart Grid Benefits_final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CV Conventional Vehicle DER Distributed Energy Resources DMS Distribution Management SystemDistribution Automation DR Demand Response EPRI Electric Power Research Institute...

  4. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-11-18

    Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

  5. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  6. Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.Berkeley National Laboratory. Demand Response ResearchCenter, Demand Response Research Center PIER Team Briefing,

  7. Autonomous, Decentralized Grid Architecture: Prosumer-Based Distributed Autonomous Cyber-Physical Architecture for Ultra-Reliable Green Electricity Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-11

    GENI Project: Georgia Tech is developing a decentralized, autonomous, internet-like control architecture and control software system for the electric power grid. Georgia Tech’s new architecture is based on the emerging concept of electricity prosumers—economically motivated actors that can produce, consume, or store electricity. Under Georgia Tech’s architecture, all of the actors in an energy system are empowered to offer associated energy services based on their capabilities. The actors achieve their sustainability, efficiency, reliability, and economic objectives, while contributing to system-wide reliability and efficiency goals. This is in marked contrast to the current one-way, centralized control paradigm.

  8. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  9. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  10. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  11. Grid Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnott, R.O.

    Sinnott,R.O. National Centre for e-Social Science book, Grid Computing: Technology, Service and Application, CRC Press, November 2008.

  12. Electric vehicle smart charging and vehicle-to-grid operation, International Journal of Parallel, Emergent and Distributed Systems, vol. 27, no. 3. March 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Electric vehicle smart charging and vehicle-to-grid operation, International Journal of Parallel operator. Index Terms-- Charge Scheduling, EV, Smart Grid, V2G I. INTRODUCTION One million electric@gmail.com) techniques which minimize charging cost to the consumer and grid load at peak hours. Shao et al. [7] proposed

  13. identification Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart. Sandro Zampieri #12;Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart Grids Conclusions Issues

  14. Noncooperative Games for Autonomous Consumer Load Balancing Over Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Tarun

    2011-10-21

    implementation cost. With the advancement of Smart Grid technologies, large scale implementation of variable-rate metering will be more practical. Consumers will be able to control their electricity consumption in an automated fashion, where one possible scheme...

  15. GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    GridMat: Matlab Toolbox for GridLAB-D to Analyse Grid Impact and Validate Residential Microgrid.alfaruque, fahourai} @ uci.edu Abstract-- Residential microgrid has the capability to participate in the distribution level) advanced control algorithms need to be developed and validated for such residential microgrids

  16. 282 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 A Distributed Algorithm of Appliance Scheduling for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    , Student Member, IEEE, and Arye Nehorai, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Demand side management encourages the users of Appliance Scheduling for Home Energy Management System Phani Chavali, Student Member, IEEE, Peng Yang. In this paper, we propose a distributed framework for the demand response based on cost minimiza- tion. Each

  17. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid Zhifang Wang, Xiao Li, Vishak Muthukumar, Anna Scaglione, Sean Peisert, Chuck McParland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peisert, Sean

    that they can be accessed remotely, and the network in these plants is structured according to the SCADA model examine a prototypical instance of SCADA network in the distribution network that handles central cooling (PLCs), electrical meters, and networks that deliver data to and from servers that are part of a SCADA

  18. Evaluating Machine Learning for Improving Power Grid Reliability Leon Wu leon@cs.columbia.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    as the electrical grid morphs into the "smart grid" will require innovations in how we assess the state of the grid and intelligent electricity distribution and trans- mission system, i.e., power grid. The smart grid has been (Force, 2010). Without the smart grid, many emerging clean energy technologies such as electric ve

  19. Customer Engagement in AEP gridSMART Residential Transactive System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fuller, Jason C.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-12-31

    — In 2013, AEP Ohio (AEP) operated a 5-minute real-time price (RTP) electricity market system on 4 distribution feeders as part of their gridSMART® demonstration project. The RTP households were billed for their electricity usage according to an RTP tariff approved by the Public Utility Commission of Ohio. They were given the incentive that their annual bill would be no greater than if they were on the flat-rate tariff, but they had financial incentives to shift consumption from high price periods to low price periods. Incentives were also available for response under high prices from local events, such as reaching the distribution feeder capacity or a critical peak pricing event. An analysis of this transactive system experiment was completed in early 2014. This paper describes the incentive provided to the customer, the nature of their interaction with the smart thermostat that provided automated response to the transactive signal, and their level of satisfaction with the program.

  20. Smart Grid Newsletter ? The Regulators Role in Grid Modernization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more effectively utilize the distribution system as a "resource". ATO includes substation automation, advanced protection and control, modeling, simulation and visualization tools,...

  1. Modeling Smart Grid using Generalized Stochastic Petri Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dey, Amrita; Sanyal, Sugata

    2011-01-01

    Building smart grid for power system is a major challenge for safe, automated and energy efficient usage of electricity. The full implementation of the smart grid will evolve over time. However, before a new set of infrastructures are invested to build the smart grid, proper modeling and analysis is needed to avoid wastage of resources. Modeling also helps to identify and prioritize appropriate systems parameters. In this paper, an all comprehensive model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The model is used to analyze the constraints and deliverables of the smart power grid of future.

  2. `Heat pumps in Smart Grids' IEA Annex 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Annex 42 `Heat pumps in Smart Grids' #12;IEA Annex 42 `Heat Pumps in Smart Grids' by Peter P.M. Wagener Managing Consultant OPERATING AGENT: #12;GAS HEAT PUMPS COMMERCIAL SECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGY AUTOMATION HEAT PUMPS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WORKING GROUP THERMAL DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS TARGET

  3. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    15 4.1. LightingEvaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, andcomparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Cooling Pumps/C

  4. Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5555E Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources David S The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded ABSTRACT This study examines how fast automated demand response (AutoDR) can help mitigate grid balancing

  5. Automation Status

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    member August 11, 2011 Automation Status ing NREL Manufacturing R&D Workshop Fuel Cell Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Manufacturing Lines and test...

  6. NASA's Information Power Grid William E. Johnston, Project Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA's Information Power Grid William E. Johnston, Project Manager Arsi Vaziri, Deputy Project that Grids and Web Services combined represent as powerful a new tool for accessing and managing distributed and Data Grids? · Grids are technology and an emerging architecture that involve several types

  7. ECE 5332 Communications and Control in Smart Grid Syllabus Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    , distributed storage, vehicle-to-grid systems, wide area measurement, smart grid cyber security, etc. Course Cyber Security Challenges in Smart Grid o Load Altering Attacks o False Data Injection Attacks o DefenseECE 5332 Communications and Control in Smart Grid Syllabus Instructor: Dr. Hamed Mohsenian

  8. Fuzzy Trust Integration for Security Enforcement in Grid Computing*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    Fuzzy Trust Integration for Security Enforcement in Grid Computing* Shanshan Song, Kai Hwang sites is crucial to secure distributed Grid applications. We suggest enhancing the trust index running on the platforms. We propose a new fuzzy-logic trust model for securing Grid resources. Grid

  9. Multigridlike Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Multigrid­like Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya University of Illinois, Urbana­micron VLSI designs include huge power grids that are required to distribute large amounts of current, at in a novel multigrid­like technique for the analysis of power grids. The grid is reduced to a coarser

  10. ECE 437/537 -Smart Grid Catalog Description: Fundamentals of smart power grids. Technology advances in transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECE 437/537 - Smart Grid Catalog Description: Fundamentals of smart power grids. Technology advances in transmission and distribution systems. Policy drivers. Assets and demand management. Smart grid Cotilla-Sanchez Course content: · Introduction to smart power grids. Technology and policy background

  11. Coordinating Access Control in Grid Services David W Chadwick, Linying Su, Romain Laborde1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    to the coordinated PDPs. Access to the databases is secured by the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI) and its own PDP database. Keywords: PDP, coordinated access control, grid security 1. INTRODUCTION Automated Teller1 Coordinating Access Control in Grid Services David W Chadwick, Linying Su, Romain Laborde1

  12. A geometric approach for early power grid verification using current constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    A geometric approach for early power grid verification using current constraints Imad A. Ferzli Automation Eindhoven, The Netherlands lars@magma-da.com ABSTRACT The verification of power grids in modern programs as there are power grid nodes, to an- other involving a user-limited number of solutions of one

  13. research update : grid structures 5 February 2008 The Structural Engineer|19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    structures Fig 4. Basic procedure / Fig 5. Grid optimisation algorithm / Fig 6. Trade-off plots structuresresearch update : grid structures 5 February 2008 ­ The Structural Engineer|19 Fig 1. Great Court (credit: Automated Dynamics) / Fig 3. Principal stress grid, on Panopticon surface, UK T he advent

  14. Security for grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-01-01

    differences between Grid security and host or site securityof requirements for Grid security in order to achieve thecompletely. Index Terms — Grid security, authentication,

  15. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM : A Software Framework for Power System Operations technologies needed to support the operations and planning of the future power grid » provide a framework to the GridPACK numerical library that is being developed in the Future Power Grid Initiative APPROACH

  16. From the Grid to the Smart Grid, Topologically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The Smart Grid is not just about the digitalization of the Power Grid. In its more visionary acceptation, it is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the Smart Grid a reality will the Distribution Grid have to be updated? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of Medium and Low Voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we have analyzed samples of the Dutch Distribution Grid in our previous work and we have considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains in another previous work. In this paper, we take an extra important further step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical Power Grid to a good Smart Grid model th...

  17. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  18. Statistical Computations with AstroGrid and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert C Nichol; Garry Smith; Christopher J Miller; Chris Genovese; Larry Wasserman; Brent Bryan; Alexander Gray; Jeff Schneider; Andrew W Moore

    2005-11-15

    We outline our first steps towards marrying two new and emerging technologies; the Virtual Observatory (e.g, AstroGrid) and the computational grid. We discuss the construction of VOTechBroker, which is a modular software tool designed to abstract the tasks of submission and management of a large number of computational jobs to a distributed computer system. The broker will also interact with the AstroGrid workflow and MySpace environments. We present our planned usage of the VOTechBroker in computing a huge number of n-point correlation functions from the SDSS, as well as fitting over a million CMBfast models to the WMAP data.

  19. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  20. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-05-29

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  1. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced Computational Kernels OBJECTIVE The U Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 375-3899 bruce.palmer@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power and ensure a more secure, efficient and reliable future grid. Building on the Electricity Infrastructure

  2. Grid Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage #12;Competitive Electric Market Structure Power Generation Distributed Generation Grid Management Power Mkts. & Reliability Micro-Grids Power Quality Grid Reliability Competitive State Regulated FERCGrid Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7

  3. Assessing I-Grid(TM) web-based monitoring for power quality and reliability benchmarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divan, Deepak; Brumsickle, William; Eto, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    not affect the regional power grid. Page 7 of 10 January 23,Paradigm in Distribution Grid Power Quality And ReliabilitySheehan 2002]. The I-Grid power quality and reliability

  4. Central Networks Low Carbon Hub Optimizing renewable energy resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Categories: Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Other...

  5. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  6. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin Humphreys

  7. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin HumphreysDETL Permalink Gallery

  8. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjectsCyberNot Chemistry Diamond

  9. Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Dionysios of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid with "smart-grid functionality." By smart-grid functionality we mean service-oriented grid enhancements

  10. Data Quality Assurance and Performance Measurement of Data Mining for Preventive Maintenance of Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    Ensuring reliability as the electrical grid morphs into the "smart grid" will require innovations in how we version of NOVA has been deployed for the power grid in New York City, and it is able to eval- uate- able and intelligent electricity distribution and transmission system, i.e., power grid. The smart grid

  11. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Clements, Samuel L.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kirkham, Harold; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Smith, David L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gardner, Chris; Varney, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A smart grid uses digital power control and communication technology to improve the reliability, security, flexibility, and efficiency of the electric system, from large generation through the delivery systems to electricity consumers and a growing number of distributed generation and storage resources. To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. The Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report defines and examines 21 metrics that collectively provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This appendix presents papers covering each of the 21 metrics identified in Section 2.1 of the Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report. These metric papers were prepared in advance of the main body of the report and collectively form its informational backbone.

  12. Analysis of microelectronic power distribution networks and exploration of 3D ICs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A. Distributed Power Grid Model . . . . . . . .B. Currentimpedances between lumped model and distributed power gridmodel and distributed power grid model with inductance

  13. FINAL REPORT - CENTER FOR GRID MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Daniel R

    2008-06-30

    The objective of the CGM was to develop high-priority grid modernization technologies in advanced sensors, communications, controls and smart systems to enable use of real-time or near real-time information for monitoring, analyzing and managing distribution and transmission grid conditions. The key strategic approach to carry out individual CGM research and development (R&D) projects was through partnerships, primarily with the GridApp™ Consortium utility members.

  14. Grid Certificates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-Delwiche SignGrid

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: UCLA Smart Grid Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research on the topics of Electric Vehicle Integration Automated Demand Response Microgrids, and Distributed and Renewable Integration, and Energy Storage Integration. The...

  16. West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level visualization system deployed and integrated with AMI, GIS, OMS (Order management System) , DA (Distribution Automation), DR, DER, work management, etc. 5. *High level...

  17. Benchmarking Grid Information Systems Laurence Field1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    service itself and hence the Grid service, in terms of Grid computing, is the primary information source these information sources, which can be numerous and widely distributed geographically. From the perspective, taking into consideration all the information sources, is an implementation detail for the specific

  18. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Scalable Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the characteristic power grid data and application » Distributed over multiple machines for further scalability on the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) national electric grid research facility, the FPGI will advance the science and develop the technologies

  19. Smart Grid Impact on Intelligent Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    ?and?applications?that?go?well? beyond??smart??meters?for?homes?and?business Source:?NIST?Framework?and?Roadmap?for? Smart?Grid?Interoperability?Standards? Release?1.0?(Draft),?September?2009. Source:?CABA?s?Smart?Grid?Impact?on? Intelligent?Buildings 7 Building Management System...?profile? ? The?energy?consumption?will?be? monitored?and?system?faults?identified? ? Usage?data?will?be?available?every?5?? 30? minutes ? Many?different?software?packages?are? available?to?be?linked?to?the?client?s?BMS? ? DR2?is?mostly?automated? ? There...

  20. Tips: Smart Meters and a Smarter Power Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 27, 2014 - 8:13pm Addthis The Smart Grid will consist of controls, computers, automation, and new technologies and equipment -- including a smart meter at your home --...

  1. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and posted for universal access at www.nreca.coop/smartgrid. This research is available for widespread distribution to both cooperative members and non-members. These reports are listed in Table 1.2. Interoperability: The deliverable in this area was the advancement of the MultiSpeak™ interoperability standard from version 4.0 to version 5.0, and improvement in the MultiSpeak™ documentation to include more than 100 use cases. This deliverable substantially expanded the scope and usability of MultiSpeak, ™ the most widely deployed utility interoperability standard, now in use by more than 900 utilities. MultiSpeak™ documentation can be accessed only at www.multispeak.org. Cyber Security: NRECA’s starting point was to develop cyber security tools that incorporated succinct guidance on best practices. The deliverables were: cyber security extensions to MultiSpeak,™ which allow more security message exchanges; a Guide to Developing a Cyber Security and Risk Mitigation Plan; a Cyber Security Risk Mitigation Checklist; a Cyber Security Plan Template that co-ops can use to create their own cyber security plans; and Security Questions for Smart Grid Vendors.

  2. Smart Grid Voltage Sag Detection using Instantaneous Features Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    encountered power quality disturbances. Index Terms--Smart grid, voltage sag detection, power quality (PQ as the generation system is moved nearby the distribution level and this is achieved by using a set of micro grids grids are their availability, reliability, and profitability; in order to fulfill power demand according

  3. Today's Grid Dr. Gregory Reed Swanson School of Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Generation Storage Generation Storage Consumer MicrogridCHP Distributed Energy Resources 5 The Smart Grid will... 1. Enable active participation by consumers 2....

  4. Smart-Grid Ready PV Inverter with Utility Communication

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    standards, operations center visibility and management, and optimized coordination of smart PV inverters with existing distribution control devices. Smart-Grid Ready PV Inverter...

  5. Grid Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.

    2015-03-02

    This work was done at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically with respect to issues relevant to U.S. electric transmission, storage and distribution infrastructure.

  6. Grid Architecture

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as problematic. In the vertically integrated case, the functions exist within a single company or set of integrated companies, but distribution may still be isolated. Figure 4.23....

  7. The Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre; Wurthwein, Frank; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  8. MARTHA: Architecture for Control and Emulation of Power Electronics and Smart Grid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devadas, Srinivas

    an efficient interface between variable speed wind turbines and the grid that enables maximum wind power consumption by more than 30% [2]. B. Electronic Design Automation (EDA) of Power Electronics The level of automation in the design, prototyping, verifi- cation and testing of power electronics systems is, in many

  9. Large-Scale Software Unit Testing on the Grid Yaohang Li, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yaohang

    Large-Scale Software Unit Testing on the Grid 1 Yaohang Li, 2 Tao Dong, 3 Xinyu Zhang, 4 Yongduan-scale and cost-efficient computational grid resources as a software testing test bed to support automated software unit test in a complicated system. Within this test framework, a dynamic bag-of-tasks model

  10. Grids: The Top Ten Questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schopf, Jennifer M.; Nitzberg, Bill

    2002-01-01

    The design and implementation of a national computing system and data grid has become a reachable goal from both the computer science and computational science point of view. A distributed infrastructure capable of sophisticated computational functions can bring many benefits to scientific work, but poses many challenges, both technical and socio-political. Technical challenges include having basic software tools, higher-level services, functioning and pervasive security, and standards, while socio-political issues include building a user community, adding incentives for sites to be part of a user-centric environment, and educating funding sources about the needs of this community. This paper details the areasmore »relating to Grid research that we feel still need to be addressed to fully leverage the advantages of the Grid.« less

  11. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & Publications SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York New York Independent System...

  12. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  13. A MultiPhase Power Flow Model for Grid Analysis A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MultiPhase Power Flow Model for µµµµGrid Analysis A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos School of Electrical power system with distributed energy sources forming a microgrid (µGrid). The µGrid is a radial multiphase power flow analysis method that provides exact solution to the operation of the µGrid under steady

  14. Multigrid-like Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Multigrid-like Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya University of Illinois, Urbana-micron VLSI designs include huge power grids that are required to distribute large amounts of current, at in a novel multigrid-like technique for the analysis of power grids. The grid is reduced to a coarser

  15. Scheduling Parallel Applications on Utility Grids: Time and Cost Trade-off Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Scheduling Parallel Applications on Utility Grids: Time and Cost Trade-off Management Saurabh Kumar Garg 1, Rajkumar Buyya1 and H. J. Siegel2 1 Grid Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory With the growth of Utility Grids and various Grid market infrastructures, the need for efficient and cost

  16. Parallel grid population

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  17. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    Reliability for Improved Grid Security,” IEEE TransmissionNext Generation Power Grid Security, Syngress, 2010. [12] A.Grids,” 16th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security,

  18. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    customers, and improve overall service reliability to reduce customer losses from power disruptions. This report presents findings on smart grid improvements in outage...

  19. Jeudi 3 octobre 2013 Grid integration of REN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    of Smartgrids Nouredine Hadjsaid, Grenoble INP/ENSE3, laboratoire G2ELAB, CNRS #12;MV/LV 20kV/400V HV/MV 63kV/20 de distribution Opérateur Système Production Transport Distribution SmartGrids Evolution: Value chain and implication SmartGrids value chain Interface des c Interface des c #12;Tools for managing complexity ICT

  20. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5556E Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information TCP/IP over CDMA CAISO Utility Aggregator NOC Proprietary Comm. EMS GridLink Loads Interval Meter

  1. Techniques for Securing Substation Automation Systems David Guidry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burmester, Mike

    that such systems are properly secured. Most critical infrastructures such as the electricity grid can be modeled be modeled as cyber-physical systems whose cyber components control the underlying physical components so propose techniques for resilient substation automation of power utility systems with security based

  2. Exploiting the Computational Grid Lecture 1 Globus and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    software used. · · The Globus toolkit consists of four key components: · Security ­ handled by Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI) · Resource Management ­ Grid Resource Allocation Manager (GRAM) · Information Services ­ Grid Resource Information Protocol (GRIP) · Data Management ­ Grid FTP · Security is essential

  3. GridPACK Toolkit for Developing Power Grid Simulations on High Performance Computing Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Bruce J.; Perkins, William A.; Glass, Kevin A.; Chen, Yousu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Callahan, Charles D.

    2013-11-30

    This paper describes the GridPACK™ framework, which is designed to help power grid engineers develop modeling software capable of running on todays high performance computers. The framework contains modules for setting up distributed power grid networks, assigning buses and branches with arbitrary behaviors to the network, creating distributed matrices and vectors, using parallel linear and non-linear solvers to solve algebraic equations, and mapping functionality to create matrices and vectors based on properties of the network. In addition, the framework contains additional functionality to support IO and to manage errors.

  4. Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison.www.gastechnology.org 2 #12;Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated-Battelle for the Department of Energy Subcontract Number: 4000052360 GTI Project Number: 20441 New York State Energy Research

  5. Method of grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  6. The soft grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kardasis, Ari (Ari David)

    2011-01-01

    The grid in architecture is a systematic organization of space. The means that architects use to organize space are, almost by definition, rigid and totalizing. The Cartesian grid, which will serve as the antagonist of the ...

  7. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    Grids”, IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2,Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Attack and Detection in Smart Grid,” to appear in IEEE

  8. (No) Security in Automation!?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lüders, S

    2008-01-01

    Modern Information Technologies like Ethernet, TCP/IP, web server or FTP are nowadays increas-ingly used in distributed control and automation systems. Thus, information from the factory floor is now directly available at the management level (From Shop-Floor to Top-Floor) and can be ma-nipulated from there. Despite the benefits coming with this (r)evolution, new vulnerabilities are in-herited, too: worms and viruses spread within seconds via Ethernet and attackers are becoming interested in control systems. Unfortunately, control systems lack the standard security features that usual office PCs have. This contribution will elaborate on these problems, discuss the vulnerabilities of modern control systems and present international initiatives for mitigation.

  9. Cyber Security & Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J.

    2011-01-01

    and interoperability ESL-KT-11-11-23 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Cyber Vulnerabilities In The Legacy Power Grid ? SCADA Security ? Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are used extensively to control and monitor the national... & Smart Grid Jonathan Shapiro Texas Institute The Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference Cyber Security & Smart Grid ESL-KT-11-11-23 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Cyber Security and The Smart Grid Networks...

  10. Developing and Implementing the Foundation for a Renewable Energy-Based "Distribution Generation Micro-grid": A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Co-Funded Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, P.; Sebold, F. D.; Carpenter, M.; Kitto, W.

    2002-01-01

    The California Energy Commission has been implementing its Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) and Renewable Energy Programs since early 1998. In the last two years, the demand for renewable distributed generation systems has increased rapidly...

  11. Grid Information Security Functional Requirement - Fulfilling Information Security of a Smart Grid System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai; 10.5121/ijgca.2011.2201

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid information security. It introduces the conceptual analysis to the methodology with the application of hermeneutic circle and information security functional requirement identification. Information security for the grid market cover matters includes automation and communications industry that affects the operation of electric power systems and the functioning of the utilities that manage them and its awareness of this information infrastructure has become critical to the reliability of the power system. Community benefits from of cost savings, flexibility and deployment along with the establishment of wireless communications. However, concern revolves around the security protections for easily accessible devices such as the smart meter and the related communications hardware. On the other hand, the changing points between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the information security importance on...

  12. A Test Bed for Self-regulating Distribution Systems: Modeling Intergrated Renewable Energy and Demand Response in the GridLAB-D/MATLAB Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dan; de Wit, Braydon; Parkinson, Simon; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Crawford, Curran; Djilali, Ned

    2012-01-16

    This paper discusses the development of a simulation test bed permitting the study of integrated renewable energy generators and controlled distributed heat pumps operating within distribution systems. The test bed is demonstrated in this paper by addressing the important issue of the self-regulating effect of consumer-owned air-source heat pumps on the variability induced by wind power integration, particularly when coupled with increased access to demand response realized through a centralized load control strategy.

  13. Multiplex automated genome engineering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M; Wang, Harris H; Isaacs, Farren J

    2013-10-29

    The present invention relates to automated methods of introducing multiple nucleic acid sequences into one or more target cells.

  14. Metagenomics Smart power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metagenomics Smart power grid The new weapons workhorse Laser on Mars LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE'll read about a unique collaboration to create a "smart" power grid to accommodate an increasing, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING 2 8 14 Dynamic Vision DARHT FULFILLS ITS DESTINY Solar Smart Grid in the Atomic

  15. Pilot evaluation of electricity-reliability and power-quality monitoring in California's Silicon Valley with the I-Grid(R) system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph; Divan, Deepak; Brumsickle, William

    2004-01-01

    affect the regional power grid. January 23, 2003, AirplaneParadigm in Distribution Grid Power Quality And Reliability5 3. Description of the I-Grid Power-Quality and Reliability

  16. 1996 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 Active Participation of Demand Through a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    in the smart-grid and distributed generation paradigm. Index Terms--Ancillary services, day ahead market

  17. An Interview with Professor Alexandra von Meier on an Efficient Electric Grid: Improving Visibility and Integrating Renewable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhary, Harshika; Gill, Manraj; McGuinness, Philippa; Miller, Daniel; Patel, Saavan

    2015-01-01

    and future power distribution grids, micro-synchrophasor technology and the challenges with optimizing the incorporation of renewable energy

  18. A Lightweight Java Taskspaces Framework for Scientific Computing on Computational Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sterck, Hans

    A Lightweight Java Taskspaces Framework for Scientific Computing on Computational Grids Appeared orientation and platform independence realized by implementation in Java. Grid administration tasks, Intertask Communication, Scalability, Java 1. INTRODUCTION Distributed computing on heterogeneous

  19. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gori, I; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  20. Grid regulation services for energy storage devices based on grid frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M; Hammerstrom, Donald J; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Tuffner, Francis K

    2013-07-02

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for charging and discharging an energy storage device connected to an electrical power distribution system. In one exemplary embodiment, a controller monitors electrical characteristics of an electrical power distribution system and provides an output to a bi-directional charger causing the charger to charge or discharge an energy storage device (e.g., a battery in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)). The controller can help stabilize the electrical power distribution system by increasing the charging rate when there is excess power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid exceeds an average value), or by discharging power from the energy storage device to stabilize the grid when there is a shortage of power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid is below an average value).

  1. Grid regulation services for energy storage devices based on grid frequency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pratt, Richard M; Hammerstrom, Donald J; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Tuffner, Francis K

    2014-04-15

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for charging and discharging an energy storage device connected to an electrical power distribution system. In one exemplary embodiment, a controller monitors electrical characteristics of an electrical power distribution system and provides an output to a bi-directional charger causing the charger to charge or discharge an energy storage device (e.g., a battery in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)). The controller can help stabilize the electrical power distribution system by increasing the charging rate when there is excess power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid exceeds an average value), or by discharging power from the energy storage device to stabilize the grid when there is a shortage of power in the electrical power distribution system (e.g., when the frequency of an AC power grid is below an average value).

  2. 248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 20, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 Micro-Grid Autonomous Operation During

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 20, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 Micro-Grid Autonomous--Distributed generation, distributed resources, electromagnetic transients, islanding, micro-grid, power sharing, voltage events and (ii) fault events that lead to islanding of a distribution subsystem and formation of a micro-grid

  3. A Security Based Data Mining Approach in Data Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidhya, S

    2010-01-01

    Grid computing is the next logical step to distributed computing. Main objective of grid computing is an innovative approach to share resources such as CPU usage; memory sharing and software sharing. Data Grids provide transparent access to semantically related data resources in a heterogeneous system. The system incorporates both data mining and grid computing techniques where Grid application reduces the time for sending results to several clients at the same time and Data mining application on computational grids gives fast and sophisticated results to users. In this work, grid based data mining technique is used to do automatic allocation based on probabilistic mining frequent sequence algorithm. It finds frequent sequences for many users at a time with accurate result. It also includes the trust management architecture for trust enhanced security.

  4. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Joint Genome Institute’s Automation Approach and Historythroughput environment; – automation does not necessarilyissues “Islands of Automation” – modular instruments with

  5. Method and structure for skewed block-cyclic distribution of lower-dimensional data arrays in higher-dimensional processor grids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gunnels, John A. (Brewster, NY)

    2011-11-08

    A method and structure of distributing elements of an array of data in a computer memory to a specific processor of a multi-dimensional mesh of parallel processors includes designating a distribution of elements of at least a portion of the array to be executed by specific processors in the multi-dimensional mesh of parallel processors. The pattern of the designating includes a cyclical repetitive pattern of the parallel processor mesh, as modified to have a skew in at least one dimension so that both a row of data in the array and a column of data in the array map to respective contiguous groupings of the processors such that a dimension of the contiguous groupings is greater than one.

  6. Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaics into the Distribution Grid on Oahu, Hawaii: Detailed Analysis of HECO Feeder WF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, E.; MacPherson, J.; Vasilic, S.; Nakafuji, D.; Aukai, T.

    2013-05-01

    Renewable generation is growing at a rapid rate due to the incentives available and the aggressive renewable portfolio standard targets implemented by state governments. Distributed generation in particular is seeing the fastest growth among renewable energy projects, and is directly related to the incentives. Hawaii has the highest electricity costs in the country due to the high percentage of oil burning steam generation, and therefore has some of the highest penetration of distributed PV in the nation. The High Penetration PV project on Oahu aims to understand the effects of high penetration PV on the distribution level, to identify penetration levels creating disturbances on the circuit, and to offer mitigating solutions based on model results. Power flow models are validated using data collected from solar resources and load monitors deployed throughout the circuit. Existing interconnection methods and standards are evaluated in these emerging high penetration scenarios. A key finding is a shift in the level of detail to be considered and moving away from steady-state peak time analysis towards dynamic and time varying simulations. Each level of normal interconnection study is evaluated and enhanced to a new level of detail, allowing full understanding of each issue.

  7. Smart Grid: Transforming the Electric System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.

    2010-04-13

    This paper introduces smart grid concepts, summarizes the status of current smart grid related efforts, and explains smart grid priorities.

  8. Grid Simulator for Power Quality Assessment of Micro-Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    1 Grid Simulator for Power Quality Assessment of Micro-Grids Joaqu´in Eloy-Garc´iaa , Juan C of the simulator. Finally, a case study is presented by testing a micro-grid. Index Terms Grid Simulator, Power for power quality assessment of micro-grids". Published in IET Power Electronics. doi: 10.1049/iet-pel.2012

  9. A Multigrid-like Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya, Sani R. Nassif, and Farid N. Najm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    1 A Multigrid-like Technique for Power Grid Analysis Joseph N. Kozhaya, Sani R. Nassif, and Farid N. Najm Abstract-- Modern sub-micron VLSI designs include huge power grids that are required to distribute and memory complexity. We propose a novel multigrid-like technique for the analysis of power grids. The grid

  10. An Automation System for Optimizing a Supply Chain Network Design under the Influence of Demand Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polany, Rany

    2012-01-01

    Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii 3Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Dashboard/Cockpit Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  11. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Advisory Committee (thru 2020) Smart Grid Task Force (thru 2020) Smart Grid Interoperability Framework (NIST) Smart Grid System Report Status and prospects of development...

  12. Data security on the national fusion grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    of any computational grid is security. Effective sharing oflike ITER. Keywords: security, FusionGrid, grid computing 1.A Security Architecture for Computational Grids,” Proc. 5th

  13. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    of any computational grid is security. Effective sharing oflike ITER. Keywords: security, FusionGrid, grid computing 1.A Security Architecture for Computational Grids,” Proc. 5th

  14. Grid Conected Functionality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PM: Dane Christensen, dane.christensen@nrel.gov National Renewable Energy Laboratory Grid Connected Functionality 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary...

  15. Automation without predictability is a recipe for failure Raja R. Sambasivan & Gregory R. Ganger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automation without predictability is a recipe for failure Raja R. Sambasivan & Gregory R. Ganger-3890 Abstract Automated management seems a must, as distributed systems and datacenters continue to grow in scale and complexity. But, automation of performance problem diagnosis and tuning relies upon

  16. Microsoft Word - Compendium of Modern Grid Technologies V1.0Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processor and time synchronization. Cybectec Inc.; http:www.cybectec.com Distribution Automation (DA) Available now DA is the integration of smart sensors with integrated...

  17. EERE & Buildings to Grid Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technology - Advanced automation deployments constrained to large buildings due to automation equipment, installation, and maintenance costs - Value streams are often hidden...

  18. High Penetration, Grid Connected Photovoltaic Technology Codes and Standards: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports the interim status in identifying and reviewing photovoltaic (PV) codes and standards (C&S) and related electrical activities for grid-connected, high-penetration PV systems with a focus on U.S. electric utility distribution grid interconnection.

  19. Vehicle to Grid -A Control Area Operators Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Mexico Nav Glen Four Corners NM Coal Hydro Gas Wind Other Palo Verde AZ Market- place S. NV #12;#12;Key ISO Roles · Frequency Monitoring & Time Error Control · Scheduling of Power Transfers · Grid Planning of experience in dealing with Distributed Resources #12;Wireless Provider Grid Operator Power Command Power

  20. The Grid Economy RAJKUMAR BUYYA, DAVID ABRAMSON, AND SRIKUMAR VENUGOPAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    The Grid Economy RAJKUMAR BUYYA, DAVID ABRAMSON, AND SRIKUMAR VENUGOPAL Invited Paper This paper economy as a metaphor for effective management of resources and appli- cation scheduling. It identifies distributed resource management challenges and requirements of economy-based Grid systems, and discusses

  1. Copyright (c) Cem Kaner, Automated Testing. 1 Software Test Automation:Software Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright (c) Cem Kaner, Automated Testing. 1 Software Test Automation:Software Test Automation: A RealA Real--World ProblemWorld Problem Cem Kaner, Ph.D., J.D. #12;Copyright (c) Cem Kaner, Automated Testing. 2 This TalkThis Talk The most widely used class of automated testing tools leads senior software

  2. Architectures of Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architectures of Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Cem Kaner Institute of Technology October 2003 #12;Architectures of Test Automation 2 Acknowledgements developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos Workshops on Software Testing

  3. High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 2139 Dynamic Energy Management for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 2139 Dynamic Energy Management for the Smart Grid With Distributed Energy Resources Sergio Salinas, Student Member, IEEE, Ming Li, Student- lenges for energy management in the system. In this paper, we in- vestigate optimal energy management

  5. Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability and Implementing NIST's Interoperability Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso,T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2010-04-01

    The IEEE American National Standards project P2030TM addressing smart grid interoperability and the IEEE 1547 series of standards addressing distributed resources interconnection with the grid have been identified in priority action plans in the Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap. This paper presents the status of the IEEE P2030 development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards publications and drafts, and provides insight on systems integration and grid infrastructure. The P2030 and 1547 series of standards are sponsored by IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21.

  6. Human-automation collaborative RRT for UAV mission path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caves, Américo De Jesús (Caves Corral)

    2010-01-01

    Future envisioned Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) missions will be carried out in dynamic and complex environments. Human-automation collaboration will be required in order to distribute the increased mission workload that ...

  7. Smart Grid Data Integrity Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poolla, Kameshwar

    2012-01-01

    IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, vol. 2, no. 2, June [21] O.Malicious Data Attacks on Smart Grid State Estimation:Attack and Detection in Smart Grid,” to appear in IEEE

  8. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tierney, Brian L

    2008-01-01

    file” file=/etc/grid-security/certificates/4a6cd8b1.0 guid=reading” file=/etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile guid=F7D64975-

  9. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  10. Automation and security of Supply (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustria Geothermal Region Jump to:

  11. Metagenomics Smart power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metagenomics Smart power grid The new weapons workhorse Laser on Mars LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE'll read about a unique collaboration to create a "smart" power grid to accommodate an increasing, and plans to modify an enzyme to grow renewable biofuels and mitigate carbon emissions from power plants

  12. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01

    Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

  13. Power Jobs: The Smart Grid Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    “Really anyone who likes science or math, we’ve probably got a job for you,” said Justin Johnson, Senior Director of Engineering at Oncor, one of the country’s largest transmission and distribution utilities based in Dallas, Texas. Find out more about the exciting career opportunities smart grid technology is offering.

  14. SGIP Smart Grid Interoperabilty Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SGIP Smart Grid Interoperability Panel Building2Grid Integration Dave Hardin David Holmberg The SGIP was explicitly established to support NIST in fulfilling its...

  15. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Data Processing Architectures for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Data Processing Architectures for the Smart Grid Akshay Uttama Nambi S applications in smart grid. We introduce several key cost indicators to analyze hierarchical data processing- plications Keywords Data Processing, Distributed Information Systems, Smart Grid, Cost-Benefit Analysis 1

  16. Application of Centrality Measures of Complex Network Framework in Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Application of Centrality Measures of Complex Network Framework in Power Grid A. B. M. Nasiruzzaman of the power grid. In this paper three distinct measures of centrality are presented and they are described Typically a system like power grid consists of power plants, transformers, transmission lines, distribution

  17. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Electric Power Micro-grids: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Electric Power Micro-grids: Opportunities and Challenges for an Emerging;Electric Power Micro-grids: Barriers and opportunities for an emerging distributed energy architecture ii, such as engines and micro-turbines. #12;Electric Power Micro-grids: Barriers and opportunities for an emerging

  18. An Economy-based Algorithm for Scheduling Data-Intensive Applications on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Economy-based Algorithm for Scheduling Data-Intensive Applications on Global Grids Srikumar suggested a computational economy metaphor for resource management within compute and data grids. However, the issue of scheduling jobs that require distributed data within an economy-based data grid has not been

  19. The Gridbus Toolkit for Service Oriented Grid and Utility Computing: An Overview and Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    , and (3) motivates the grid service consumers to trade-off between deadline, budget, and the required1 The Gridbus Toolkit for Service Oriented Grid and Utility Computing: An Overview and Status Report Rajkumar Buyya and Srikumar Venugopal Grid Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory Department

  20. A Distortion-Theoretic Perspective for Redundant Metering Security in a Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    the advantages of our approach. I. INTRODUCTION A smart grid is a term used to describe an electricity network and flexible generation, transmission, and distribution of power through the grid. By facilitating bidirectional information and energy flow through the overall network, a smart grid promises energy savings

  1. Smart Grid Communications: Overview of Research Challenges, Solutions, and Standardization Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhong; Gormus, Sedat; Efthymiou, Costas; Kalogridis, Georgios; Sooriyabandara, Mahesh; Zhu, Ziming; Lambotharan, Sangarapillai; Chin, Woon Hau

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of energy consumption in future intelligent energy networks (or Smart Grids) will be based on grid-integrated near-real-time communications between various grid elements in generation, transmission, distribution and loads. This paper discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of communications research in the areas of smart grid and smart metering. In particular, we focus on some of the key communications challenges for realizing interoperable and future-proof smart grid/metering networks, smart grid security and privacy, and how some of the existing networking technologies can be applied to energy management. Finally, we also discuss the coordinated standardization efforts in Europe to harmonize communications standards and protocols.

  2. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of all 16 machines damped quickly ­ improved frequency performance » AGC ensures tie line power flows on the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) national electric grid research facility, the FPGI will advance the science and develop the technologies

  3. Systems Using Hardware-in-the-Loop: Part III -- Grid Interconnection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B.; Shirazi, M.; Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B. 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION ELECTRICITY; GRID; ICS; INTERCONNECTION;...

  4. Expanding Buildings-to-Grid (B2G) Objectives in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    advanced and community-scale microgrids with grid-integratedEnergy Resources and Storage Microgrids • Use distributedIntegration of building-level Microgrids with basic metering

  5. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM Power Networking, Equipment, and Technology (powerNET) Testbed OBJECTIVE A lot of interest in research, improvements, and testing surrounds the power grid to bear on the challenges of the power grid Therefore, a community resource is needed to enable needed

  6. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Future Grid: The Environment Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U

  7. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  8. RF test bench automation Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    RF test bench automation Description: Callisto would like to implement automated RF test bench. Three RF test benches have to be studied and automated: LNA noise temperature test bench LNA gain phase of the test benches and an implementation of the automation phase. Tasks: Noise temperature

  9. Automation of Feynman Diagram Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tentyukov; J. Fleischer

    1998-02-04

    A C-program DIANA (DIagram ANAlyser) for the automation of Feynman diagram evaluations is presented.

  10. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  11. Random array grid collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  12. Automation of Diagrammatic Reasoning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamnik, Mateja; Bundy, Alan; Green, Ian

    1997-01-01

    Theorems in automated theorem proving are usually proved by logical formal proofs. However, there is a subset of problems which humans can prove in a different way by the use of geometric operations on diagrams, so called diagrammatic proofs...

  13. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Muthukumar, Vishak; Scaglione, Anna; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    unknown) @2 Enphase Energy Solar Panel web access TESTower PLC BACnet Solar Panel @ Thompson UC Foundation15 (unknown) @13 Solar Panel @ Miller TES Train BCU CCS/BMS

  14. Networked Loads in the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Muthukumar, Vishak; Scaglione, Anna; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    is structured according to the SCADA model. Although thea prototypical instance of SCADA network in the distributionservers that are part of a SCADA system, which has grown in

  15. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:NewsWebmaster PleaseSpring 2014 /WebmasterPhoto of

  16. Sandia Energy » Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkholeCapabilitiesTheSandians ParticipateSmall

  17. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  18. Visual Analytics for Power Grid Contingency Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Mackey, Patrick S.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-20

    Contingency analysis is the process of employing different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to remove the threats. This application paper focuses on a class of contingency analysis problems found in the power grid management system. A power grid is a geographically distributed interconnected transmission network that transmits and delivers electricity from generators to end users. The power grid contingency analysis problem is increasingly important because of both the growing size of the underlying raw data that need to be analyzed and the urgency to deliver working solutions in an aggressive timeframe. Failure to do so may bring significant financial, economic, and security impacts to all parties involved and the society at large. The paper presents a scalable visual analytics pipeline that transforms about 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form for grid operators to examine different scenarios and come up with preventive or mitigation strategies to address the problems in a predictive and timely manner. Great attention is given to the computational scalability, information scalability, visual scalability, and display scalability issues surrounding the data analytics pipeline. Most of the large-scale computation requirements of our work are conducted on a Cray XMT multi-threaded parallel computer. The paper demonstrates a number of examples using western North American power grid models and data.

  19. Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Engineers BACnet: Building Automation and Control Networksprotocol for building automation and control networks. It iscommunication of building automation and control systems for

  20. Development of Building Automation and Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Zhu, Qi; Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A design flow for building automation and control systems,’’Development of Building Automation and Control Systems Yanga design flow for building automation systems that focuses

  1. Development of Building Automation and Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Zhu, Qi; Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A design flow for building automation and control systems,’’Development of Building Automation and Control Systems Yangdesign of the build- ing automation system (including the

  2. Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National(TechnicalNISACDisruptionEnergy Analysis

  3. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Pharmingen Distributed Energy Resources in Practice Tablemany regions. Distributed Energy Resources in Practice 10.of µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Using DER-CAM

  4. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    BD Biosciences Pharmingen Distributed Energy Resources inin many regions. Distributed Energy Resources in PracticeAssessment of µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential

  5. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    New England Outlook: Smart Grid is About Consumers,” Apr. [Transmission in the Smart Grid By Kory Walter Hedman ATransmission in the Smart Grid by Kory Walter Hedman Doctor

  6. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01

    case, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidencecase, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidencecase, confidence in grid security will increase. Confidence

  7. GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems (Smart Grid Project) (Spain) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected...

  8. Grid Security and Integration with Minimal Performance Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Sugata; Abraham, Ajith; Paprzycki, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Computational grids are believed to be the ultimate framework to meet the growing computational needs of the scientific community. Here, the processing power of geographically distributed resources working under different ownerships, having their own access policy, cost structure and the likes, is logically coupled to make them perform as a unified resource. The continuous increase of availability of high-bandwidth communication as well as powerful computers built of low-cost components further enhance chances of computational grids becoming a reality. However, the question of grid security remains one of the important open research issues. Here, we present some novel ideas about how to implement grid security, without appreciable performance degradation in grids. A suitable alternative to the computationally expensive encryption is suggested, which uses a key for message authentication. Methods of secure transfer and exchange of the required key(s) are also discussed.

  9. Dynamic Modeling and Resilience for Power Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanyi

    --Resilience of power distribution is pertinent to the energy grid under severe weather. This work develops an ana is to improve resilience of the power grid to external disruptions from severe weather. Severe weather events-scale external disruptions from severe weather [3]. Resilience here corresponds to the ability of the grid

  10. Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart is the integrated study of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmis- sion and distribution grids1 Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Dionysios

  11. Benchmarking Knowledge-assisted Kriging for Automated Spatial Interpolation of Wind Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middleton, Stuart E.

    Benchmarking Knowledge-assisted Kriging for Automated Spatial Interpolation of Wind Measurements-case is to create wind interpolation grids for input into a bathing water quality model of microbial contamination-office wind data (189 sensors). Our wind estimation results are comparable, but not better than ordinary

  12. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  13. O`ahu Grid Study: Validation of Grid Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O`ahu Grid Study: Validation of Grid Models Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 7.2 Deliverable By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York

  14. Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages...

  15. Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) provides...

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  17. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology HomeGrid CyberGrid Integration

  18. Core Grid Functions: A Minimal Architecture for Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , etc.) Identity Credential Management Grid Security Infrastructure Globus 2-style interface · Service Security Gateways information servers · J2EE hosting environment servers · Factory services Grid Security · Architectural Constraints (e.g. security) · Bindings #12;8 Resource Discovery & State / Grid Persistent State

  19. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

  20. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  1. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  2. Stability of elastic grid shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesnil, Romain, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The elastic grid shell is a solution that combines double curvature and ease of mounting. This structural system, based on the deformation of an initially at grid without shear stiffness was invented more than fifty years ...

  3. Grid Applications Dr Gabrielle Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    CCT Grid Application Areas ! Computational Chemistry " GridChem: Building community deployment simulations, drilling technologies, integration with sensors and wireless networks, dynamic data driven & DynaCode: Data workflows with coupled models, dynamic data driven scenarios, metadata. (scoop

  4. Smart Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric Power Smart Grid Smart Grid Rows of battery racks at the Salem Smart Power Center in Salem, Oregon. The Battelle-led Pacific Northwest Smart...

  5. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Stephen D. (Corrales, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  6. An Electricity Trade Model for Microgrid Communities in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Electricity Trade Model for Microgrid Communities in Smart Grid Tiansong Cui, Yanzhi Wang Los Angeles, CA, USA {tcui, yanzhiwa, shahin, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Distributed microgrid network and a small group of energy users. In the distributed power system, each microgrid acts as a "prosumer

  7. A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid with Residential Users and PEVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid California Los Angeles, CA USA {yli760, yanzhiwa, shahin, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--In the smart grid, real to the smart grid with distributed control mechanism in order to reduce the amount of communication overhead

  8. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  9. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  10. Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    potential locations for grid monitoring, and hence, will have impact on the deployment of the smart-grid

  11. print_grid() add_vessel()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharlin, Ehud

    grid.py print_grid() add_vessel() has_overlap() GRID_WIDTH GRID_HEIGHT NUM_VESSELS B VESSEL_NAMES[] VESSEL_SIZES[] human.py get_location() get_choice() grid_defend[] grid_attack[] import grid ai.py get, return false · add_vessel(grid, row, column, size, direction) ­ Check direction ­ Single for loop (size

  12. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  13. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  14. The Application Hosting Environment: Lightweight Middleware for Grid-Based Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Coveney; R. S. Saksena; S. J. Zasada; M. McKeown; S. Pickles

    2006-11-27

    Grid computing is distributed computing performed transparently across multiple administrative domains. Grid middleware, which is meant to enable access to grid resources, is currently widely seen as being too heavyweight and, in consequence, unwieldy for general scientific use. Its heavyweight nature, especially on the client-side, has severely restricted the uptake of grid technology by computational scientists. In this paper, we describe the Application Hosting Environment (AHE) which we have developed to address some of these problems. The AHE is a lightweight, easily deployable environment designed to allow the scientist to quickly and easily run legacy applications on distributed grid resources. It provides a higher level abstraction of a grid than is offered by existing grid middleware schemes such as the Globus Toolkit. As a result the computational scientist does not need to know the details of any particular underlying grid middleware and is isolated from any changes to it on the distributed resources. The functionality provided by the AHE is `application-centric': applications are exposed as web services with a well-defined standards-compliant interface. This allows the computational scientist to start and manage application instances on a grid in a transparent manner, thus greatly simplifying the user experience. We describe how a range of computational science codes have been hosted within the AHE and how the design of the AHE allows us to implement complex workflows for deployment on grid infrastructure.

  15. Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01

    Protocol for Building Automation and Control  Networks.  Protocol for Building Automation and Control  Networks, Protocol for building Automation and Controls Networks.   

  16. Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01

    Protocol for Building Automation and Control  Networks.  Protocol for Building Automation and Control  Networks, Demand Response Automation Server  Demand Response Research 

  17. Grid-Based Surrogate Reservoir Modeling (SRM) for Fast Track Analysis of Numerical Reservoir Simulation Models at the Grid block Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    capability of being able to replicate the pressure and saturation distribution throughout the reservoirSPE 153844 Grid-Based Surrogate Reservoir Modeling (SRM) for Fast Track Analysis of Numerical Reservoir Simulation Models at the Grid block Level Shahab D. Mohaghegh, West Virginia University

  18. Data Management in the GridRPC GridRPC Data Management API

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caniou, Yves

    Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion GridRPC Data Management API Implementations, Le Mahec, Nakada GridRPC DM API: Implem. and Interop. Issues (1/13) #12;Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion Goal GridRPC DM types: Reminder 1 Data Management in the GridRPC Goal GridRPC DM types

  19. Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical and Economic...

  20. Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, Thoman

    2014-12-31

    The Consolidated Edison, Inc., of New York (Con Edison) Secure Interoperable Open Smart Grid Demonstration Project (SGDP), sponsored by the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), demonstrated that the reliability, efficiency, and flexibility of the grid can be improved through a combination of enhanced monitoring and control capabilities using systems and resources that interoperate within a secure services framework. The project demonstrated the capability to shift, balance, and reduce load where and when needed in response to system contingencies or emergencies by leveraging controllable field assets. The range of field assets includes curtailable customer loads, distributed generation (DG), battery storage, electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, building management systems (BMS), home area networks (HANs), high-voltage monitoring, and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). The SGDP enables the seamless integration and control of these field assets through a common, cyber-secure, interoperable control platform, which integrates a number of existing legacy control and data systems, as well as new smart grid (SG) systems and applications. By integrating advanced technologies for monitoring and control, the SGDP helps target and reduce peak load growth, improves the reliability and efficiency of Con Edison’s grid, and increases the ability to accommodate the growing use of distributed resources. Con Edison is dedicated to lowering costs, improving reliability and customer service, and reducing its impact on the environment for its customers. These objectives also align with the policy objectives of New York State as a whole. To help meet these objectives, Con Edison’s long-term vision for the distribution grid relies on the successful integration and control of a growing penetration of distributed resources, including demand response (DR) resources, battery storage units, and DG. For example, Con Edison is expecting significant long-term growth of DG. The SGDP enables the efficient, flexible integration of these disparate resources and lays the architectural foundations for future scalability. Con Edison assembled an SGDP team of more than 16 different project partners, including technology vendors, and participating organizations, and the Con Edison team provided overall guidance and project management. Project team members are listed in Table 1-1.

  1. The Automated Palomar 60-Inch Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bradley Cenko; Derek B. Fox; Dae-Sik Moon; Fiona A. Harrison; S. R. Kulkarni; John R. Henning; C. Dani Guzman; Marco Bonati; Roger M. Smith; Robert P. Thicksten; Michael W. Doyle; Hal L. Petrie; Avishay Gal-Yam; Alicia M. Soderberg; Nathaniel L. Anagnostou; Anastasia C. Laity

    2006-08-15

    We have converted the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60) from a classical night assistant-operated telescope to a fully robotic facility. The automated system, which has been operational since September 2004, is designed for moderately fast (t <~ 3 minutes) and sustained (R <~ 23 mag) observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows and other transient events. Routine queue-scheduled observations can be interrupted in response to electronic notification of transient events. An automated pipeline reduces data in real-time, which is then stored on a searchable web-based archive for ease of distribution. We describe here the design requirements, hardware and software upgrades, and lessons learned from roboticization. We present an overview of the current system performance as well as plans for future upgrades.

  2. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  3. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  4. Secure Compressed Reading in Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Sheng; Chen, Minghua; Yan, Jianxin; Jaggi, Sidharth

    2012-01-01

    Smart Grids measure energy usage in real-time and tailor supply and delivery accordingly, in order to improve power transmission and distribution. For the grids to operate effectively, it is critical to collect readings from massively-installed smart meters to control centers in an efficient and secure manner. In this paper, we propose a secure compressed reading scheme to address this critical issue. We observe that our collected real-world meter data express strong temporal correlations, indicating they are sparse in certain domains. We adopt Compressed Sensing technique to exploit this sparsity and design an efficient meter data transmission scheme. Our scheme achieves substantial efficiency offered by compressed sensing, without the need to know beforehand in which domain the meter data are sparse. This is in contrast to traditional compressed-sensing based scheme where such sparse-domain information is required a priori. We then design specific dependable scheme to work with our compressed sensing based ...

  5. Communication Systems for Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, F Richard; Xiao, Weidong; Choudhury, Paul

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in renewable energy around the world. Since most renewable sources are intermittent in nature, it is a challenging task to integrate renewable energy resources into the power grid infrastructure. In this grid integration, communication systems are crucial technologies, which enable the accommodation of distributed renewable energy generation and play extremely important role in monitoring, operating, and protecting both renewable energy generators and power systems. In this paper, we review some communication technologies available for grid integration of renewable energy resources. Then, we present the communication systems used in a real renewable energy project, Bear Mountain Wind Farm (BMW) in British Columbia, Canada. In addition, we present the communication systems used in Photovoltaic Power Systems (PPS). Finally, we outline some research challenges and possible solutions about the communication systems for grid integration of renewable energy resources.

  6. Automated Job Hazards Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

  7. National SCADA Test Bed Substation Automation Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Barnes; Briam Johnson

    2009-10-01

    Increased awareness of the potential for cyber attack has recently resulted in improved cyber security practices associated with the electrical power grid. However, the level of practical understanding and deployment of cyber security practices has not been evenly applied across all business sectors. Much of the focus has been centered on information technology business centers and control rooms. This report explores the current level of substation automation, communication, and cyber security protection deployed in electrical substations throughout existing utilities in the United States. This report documents the evaluation of substation automation implementation and associated vulnerabilities. This evaluation used research conducted by Newton-Evans Research Company for some of its observations and results. The Newton Evans Report aided in the determination of what is the state of substation automation in North American electric utilities. Idaho National Laboratory cyber security experts aided in the determination of what cyber vulnerabilities may pose a threat to electrical substations. This report includes cyber vulnerabilities as well as recommended mitigations. It also describes specific cyber issues found in typical substation automation configurations within the electric utility industry. The evaluation report was performed over a 5-month period starting in October 2008

  8. Grid Integration Studies: Data Requirements, Greening the Grid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates) for grid integration model development and calibration. * Collect and archive sub-hourly data where possible. * Monitor and incorporate best practices in fore- casting...

  9. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    measurements, control strategy, and theories so that the essential transactive market between buildings and the grid will fully function and deliver benefits to all...

  10. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Ren authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission

  11. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-01-01

    issues and challenges The Grid security requirements that wea seri- ous challenge to Grid security measures. Grids thatbased on using available Grid security services. Both Globus

  12. Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers DOE: Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage...

  13. Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III...

  14. Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

    2009-03-23

    Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

  15. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of GridWise Alliance 1 SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York Smart Grid: Enabler of the New Energy Economy...

  16. Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition-Getting Started We are on the ground floor of a Smart Grid...

  17. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  18. Sandia Energy - Smart Grid Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reliability, efficiency, flexibility, and cost effectiveness. Smart-grid features include demand-response capabilities, advanced controls, DER integration, increased situational...

  19. Sandia Energy - Transmission Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are not adequate for PV systems. In particular, utilities are concerned about the cost of managing PV variability and uncertainty, and possible impact on bulk grid...

  20. Getting Our Grid Report Card

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overwhelming turnout at peer reviews shows the growing recognition that a modern grid is integral to developing a clean energy economy.

  1. Buildings to Grid Technical Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    A meeting book created for the Buildings to Grid Technical Meeting that includes speaker and attendee bios, as well as white papers and discussion questions.

  2. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-02

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  3. 2014 Modern Power Grid Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22

    A video from NETL that describes the details of a modern power grid and how it can help our nation save on energy costs.

  4. Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanram, Kartik

    Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition Quming Zhou, Kai Sun, Kartik Mohanram, Danny C referred to as the power grid. The power grid for a modern integrated circuit may consist of several grid is traditionally described as a large-scale linear system. Simulation of power grids usually

  5. Sandia Energy - Grid Modernization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologiesEnergyGeoscience HomeGrid Modernization

  6. Smart Grid System Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES PursuantEnergy Small| August 2014 2014 Smart Grid

  7. National Transmission Grid Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department ofDepartment ofEnergyIncreasedNational104-113] |Grid

  8. Grid Client Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-Delwiche SignGridClient

  9. Grid Software and Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene'sGreg-DelwicheGrid

  10. Grid-based Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based Production Grid-based Production

  11. Sandia Energy - Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology HomeGrid Cyber

  12. Letter Report on Testing of Distributed Energy Resource, Microgrid, and End-Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential renewable, distributed energy resource, and micro-grid technology initiatives. Specific activities renewable generation technologies. The more energy storage available on the grid, the more intermittent renewables such as wind and solar that can be added to the grid. Currently grids use backup power generators

  13. Comparison of grid-based algorithms for computing upslope contributing area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Comparison of grid-based algorithms for computing upslope contributing area Robert H. Erskine,1 area, A, are used widely in distributed hydrologic models. Several grid-based algorithms are available for estimating A. In this study, five algorithms (D8, 8, MFD, DEMON, and D1) were compared quantitatively on two

  14. Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Raissa

    OPINION Transdisciplinary electric power grid science Charles D. Brummitta,b,1 , Paul D. H. Hinesc-long feedbacks surrounding electrical infrastructure (includ- ing weather, policy, public sentiment, mar- kets storm damage or build distributed generation?). The "smart grid," which monitors and controls electrical

  15. The MetaCC project Compilation and optimisation on the Grid http://www.metacc.net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silber, Georges-André

    -Andre.Silber@ensmp.fr http://www.metacc.net The MetaCC team is supported by the french ministry of research (ACI Grid, jeune are handled by standard tools and kernel modules. User can access its files with a combination of rsync. Compilation can also be done on the grid using a distributed compilation service developped with DIET (ACI

  16. A GA-based Approach for Scheduling Decomposable Data Grid Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    A GA-based Approach for Scheduling Decomposable Data Grid Applications Seonho Kim and Jon B, storage, and data. The data grid involves accessing and sharing massive geographically distributed datasets, typical in science communities, as well as compute resources. Since data transfers through a WAN

  17. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    With the convergence of technologies such as MEMS sensor devices, wireless networking, and low-power em- beddedSensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged

  18. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01

    Protocol for Building Automation and Control Networks.EPRI), and C&C Building Automation, Inc. PG&E directlyLBNL hired C&C Building Automation to start transferring

  19. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascio, D; Chincarini, A; De Nunzio, G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Gargano, G; Gori, I; Masala, G L; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A; Santoro, M; Spinelli, C; Tarantino, T

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness (~300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very hig...

  20. International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities is currently evolving into the smart grid. Smart grid integrates the traditional electrical power grid, controlling and managing the demands of customers. A smart grid is a huge complex network composed of millions

  1. Solar energy grid integration systems - Energy storage (SEGIS-ES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, Dan; Peek, Georgianne H.; Hanley, Charles; Boyes, John

    2008-05-01

    In late 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a series of studies to address issues related to potential high penetration of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation systems on our nation’s electric grid. This Renewable Systems Interconnection (RSI) initiative resulted in the publication of 14 reports and an Executive Summary that defined needs in areas related to utility planning tools and business models, new grid architectures and PV systems configurations, and models to assess market penetration and the effects of high-penetration PV systems. As a result of this effort, the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) program was initiated in early 2008. SEGIS is an industry-led effort to develop new PV inverters, controllers, and energy management systems that will greatly enhance the utility of distributed PV systems.

  2. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Alex Farrell of the Energy and Resources Group, UniversityMicrogrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Using DER-of Distributed Energy Resources: The CERTS MicroGrid

  3. IEEE Smart Grid Series of Standards IEEE 2030 (Interoperability) and IEEE 1547 (Interconnection) Status: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2012-04-01

    The IEEE American National Standards smart grid publications and standards development projects IEEE 2030, which addresses smart grid interoperability, and IEEE 1547TM, which addresses distributed resources interconnection with the grid, have made substantial progress since 2009. The IEEE 2030TM and 1547 standards series focus on systems-level aspects and cover many of the technical integration issues involved in a mature smart grid. The status and highlights of these two IEEE series of standards, which are sponsored by IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21), are provided in this paper.

  4. Hydrogen ions produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using nickel grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oohara, W.; Kawata, K.; Hibino, T. [Department of Electronic Device Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)] [Department of Electronic Device Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Positive and negative hydrogen ions are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a nickel grid, where the irradiation current density of positive ions onto the grid can be controlled by the discharge power. The irradiation energy can be controlled by both the grid potential and the discharge plasma potential. Extraction properties and energy distributions of positive and negative ions produced in the cases of using the grid and a porous nickel plate are compared. Two production mechanisms of negative ions are found in the process of plasma-assisted catalytic ionization.

  5. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  6. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strand, Oliver T. (Castro Valley, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  7. Parallel Simulation for VLSI Power Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Le

    2015-07-23

    Due to the increasing complexity of VLSI circuits, power grid simulation has become more and more time-consuming. Hence, there is a need for fast and accurate power grid simulator. In order to perform power grid simulation ...

  8. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    inclusion of energy storage devices in the smart grid couldGrid and its Affect on Renewable Resources and Energy Storage ..Grid and its Affect on Renewable Resources and Energy Storage

  9. Considering Prefabulous and Almost Off the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenier, Lotus; Beba, Zoe; Gray, Art

    2013-01-01

    upon it.The prototype, Off—grid IT HOUSE is our own house,were very accurate. The ?rst off—grid IT HOUSE is relativelyPrefabulous and Almost Off the Grid Introduction Two recent

  10. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment of Off-Grid Lighting Applications:Testing for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination SystemsBudget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small

  11. What will the Smart Grid Look Like?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to natural disasters. Smart GrId mIleStoneS Smart Grid milestones represent the building blocks of the Smart Grid. Completion of each requires the deployment and...

  12. Maestro: A cloud computing framework with automated locking (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    Maestro: A cloud computing framework with automated locking (Invited Paper) Murat Demirbas challenge for distributed systems programming and cloud computing. Using locks is the most common technique (shared-memory), Maestro improves productivity and lowers the cost of entry to cloud computing backend

  13. The Open Science Grid status and architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; Petravick, Don; Kramer, Bill; Olsen, James D.; Livny, Miron; Roy, Gordon A.; Avery, Paul Ralph; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre J.; Wuerthwein, Frank K.; Foster, Ian; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-09-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. The OSG project[1] is funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program. The OSG project provides specific activities for the operation and evolution of the common infrastructure. The US ATLAS and US CMS collaborations contribute to and depend on OSG as the US infrastructure contributing to the World Wide LHC Computing Grid on which the LHC experiments distribute and analyze their data. Other stakeholders include the STAR RHIC experiment, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and several Fermilab Tevatron experiments- CDF, D0, MiniBoone etc. The OSG implementation architecture brings a pragmatic approach to enabling vertically integrated community specific distributed systems over a common horizontal set of shared resources and services. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  14. Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

    2012-07-31

    This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

  15. A Technique to Utilize Smart Meter Load Information for Adapting Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution Systems with Distributed Generations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ituzaro, Fred Agyekum

    2012-07-16

    Smart radial distribution grids will include advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and significant distributed generators (DGs) connected close to loads. DGs in these radial distribution systems (RDS) introduce bidirectional power flows (BPFs...

  16. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  17. Load forecasting for active distribution networks Simone Paoletti, Member, IEEE, Marco Casini, Member, IEEE, Antonio Giannitrapani, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitrapani, Antonello

    forecasting for distribution networks with Active Demand (AD), a new concept in smart-grids introduced within

  18. GridStat – Cyber Security and Regional Deployment Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Samuel L.

    2009-02-18

    GridStat is a developing communication technology to provide real-time data delivery services to the electric power grid. It is being developed in a collaborative effort between the Electrical Power Engineering and Distributed Computing Science Departments at Washington State University. Improving the cyber security of GridStat was the principle focus of this project. A regional network was established to test GridStat’s cyber security mechanisms in a realistic environment. The network consists of nodes at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Washington State University. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was tasked with performing the security assessment, the results of which detailed a number or easily resolvable and previously unknown issues, as well as a number of difficult and previously known issues. Going forward we recommend additional development prior to commercialization of GridStat. The development plan is structured into three domains: Core Development, Cyber Security and Pilot Projects. Each domain contains a number of phased subtasks that build upon each other to increase the robustness and maturity of GridStat.

  19. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  20. Integrated Transmission and Distribution Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-16

    Distributed, generation, demand response, distributed storage, smart appliances, electric vehicles and renewable energy resources are expected to play a key part in the transformation of the American power system. Control, coordination and compensation of these smart grid assets are inherently interlinked. Advanced control strategies to warrant large-scale penetration of distributed smart grid assets do not currently exist. While many of the smart grid technologies proposed involve assets being deployed at the distribution level, most of the significant benefits accrue at the transmission level. The development of advanced smart grid simulation tools, such as GridLAB-D, has led to a dramatic improvement in the models of smart grid assets available for design and evaluation of smart grid technology. However, one of the main challenges to quantifying the benefits of smart grid assets at the transmission level is the lack of tools and framework for integrating transmission and distribution technologies into a single simulation environment. Furthermore, given the size and complexity of the distribution system, it is crucial to be able to represent the behavior of distributed smart grid assets using reduced-order controllable models and to analyze their impacts on the bulk power system in terms of stability and reliability. The objectives of the project were to: • Develop a simulation environment for integrating transmission and distribution control, • Construct reduced-order controllable models for smart grid assets at the distribution level, • Design and validate closed-loop control strategies for distributed smart grid assets, and • Demonstrate impact of integrating thousands of smart grid assets under closed-loop control demand response strategies on the transmission system. More specifically, GridLAB-D, a distribution system tool, and PowerWorld, a transmission planning tool, are integrated into a single simulation environment. The integrated environment allows the load flow interactions between the bulk power system and end-use loads to be explicitly modeled. Power system interactions are modeled down to time intervals as short as 1-second. Another practical issue is that the size and complexity of typical distribution systems makes direct integration with transmission models computationally intractable. Hence, the focus of the next main task is to develop reduced-order controllable models for some of the smart grid assets. In particular, HVAC units, which are a type of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs), are considered. The reduced-order modeling approach can be extended to other smart grid assets, like water heaters, PVs and PHEVs. Closed-loop control strategies are designed for a population of HVAC units under realistic conditions. The proposed load controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing the end-use performance. Finally, using the T&D simulation platform, the benefits to the bulk power system are demonstrated by controlling smart grid assets under different demand response closed-loop control strategies.

  1. Resilient Distributed Consensus for Tree Topology Mark Yampolskiy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Security, Algorithms Keywords Resilience, distributed consensus, tree topology, smart grids 1. INTRODUCTION, in Smart Grid, an emerging distributed CPS, the node connectivity is expected to resemble the scale free.1145/2566468.2566485 . Categories and Subject Descriptors [Security and privacy]: Systems security--Distributed sys- tems security

  2. Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support Features Electric Energy System #12;#12;Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV project titled "Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support

  3. Smart Grid Inverters for High-Penetration PV Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart Grid Inverters for High- Penetration PV Applications Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute of recognized energy industry leaders working to develop enhanced capability smart inverters and to demonstrate by deploying and evaluating smart inverters on operating utility distribution feeders in two locations

  4. Solar Power and the Electric Grid, Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    In today's electricity generation system, different resources make different contributions to the electricity grid. This fact sheet illustrates the roles of distributed and centralized renewable energy technologies, particularly solar power, and how they will contribute to the future electricity system. The advantages of a diversified mix of power generation systems are highlighted.

  5. 1 Vehicle-to-grid systems: ancillary services and communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    is shown in Figure 1.1 [2]. A large number of EVs can not only help to reduce the amount of oil and gas be used to boost distributed electricity storage. Depending on the type and class, the battery storage electricity storage unit in most power grids are the pumped storage systems [6]. 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

  6. COMPARING UTILITY CONNECTED TO STAND ALONE MICRO-GRIDS: FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF A UTILITY ENGINEER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-06-23

    Project examples of grid connected micro grid & example of grid isolated micro grid: drivers – economic, environmental and financial tools to plan/design modeling software resource options, tools to plan/design generation types, fuel options and services to provide smooth transitions required equipment and software controls minimal expense to maximum functionality, real time operational interfaces, getting it built real world complications and advice. This paper is an attempt to present a broad overview of micro grids, project examples, modeling tools, technology options, practical and business insights to enable those interested in micro-grids to quickly come up to speed on the basics and potentially move forward on their own projects with the tools and resources presented. Knowledge and experience with electrical distribution systems will make such an effort easier.

  7. Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act SGIG Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipient Information BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity...

  8. Flexible Transmission in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Kory Walter

    2010-01-01

    models of the electric transmission network flow problem.requirements in the electric transmission grid is provided.operations of the electric transmission grid. It also

  9. Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Grid Basics Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar...

  10. National Grid Generation, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Grid Generation, LLC (Redirected from KeySpan Generation LLC) Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Grid Generation, LLC Place: New York Service Territory:...

  11. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    does not address the 21 st century power supply challenges The benefits of a modernized grid are substantial Running today's digital society through yesterday's grid is like...

  12. An Analysis of Security and Privacy Issues in Smart Grid Software Architectures on Yogesh Simmhan, Alok Gautam Kumbhare, Baohua Cao, and Viktor Prasanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    An Analysis of Security and Privacy Issues in Smart Grid Software Architectures on Clouds Yogesh are increasingly upgrading to Smart Grids that use bi-directional communication with the consumer to enable an information-driven approach to distributed energy management. Clouds offer features well suited for Smart Grid

  13. Abstract--A key component of the smart grid is the ability to enable dynamic residential pricing to incentivize the customer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    Abstract-- A key component of the smart grid is the ability to enable dynamic residential pricing, Multiple Knapsack Problem (MKP), Optimization, Smart Grids. I. INTRODUCTION With ever challenge to the future electricity distribution systems. The smart grid has emerged as a solution

  14. GHS: A Performance System of Grid Computing Xian-He Sun, Ming Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, Illinois 60616, USA {sun, wuming}@iit.edu Abstract Conventional and facilitate the formation of national scale distributed environments, Grid computing [FoKe04]. While much

  15. A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang

    Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

  16. A Grid Workflow-Based Monte Carlo Simulation Environment Yaohang Li1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Engelen, Robert A.

    of a computational grid for large distributed computational jobs and the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators in numerous fields of science and engineering, including nuclear physics, chemistry, meteorology, biology

  17. Data Layout Transformation Exploiting Memory-Level Parallelism in Structured Grid Many-Core Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwu, Wen-mei W.

    automatic data layout transformation as an ef- fective compiler performance optimization for memory using a dense, regular grid as the primary data structure. Fluid dynamics and heat distribution, which- tecture]: Multiple Data Stream Architectures; E.2 [Data Storage Representations]: Contiguous

  18. Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taming the Grid: Dynamic Load Composition Quantification at the Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holby, Edward F. Los Alamos...

  19. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the electric transmission and distribution grid. Major components of a Smart Grid include automation and two-way communication between components of an electric supply system. This...

  20. Smart Grid e-Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Smart Grid Task Force Smart Grid e-Forum Smart Grid e-Forum DOE conducted a series of Smart Grid E-Forums to discuss various issues surrounding Smart Grid including...

  1. Smart Grid Week: Working to Modernize the Nation's Electric Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Learn More about the Smart Grid Visit smartgrid.gov for access to videos, maps and data on the effort to transform the nation's...

  2. 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Day 2 Smart Grid panel discussion are below. Moderator: Lee Kreval, SDG&E 2012 SG Peer Review - Day 2 Panel Discussion: Puesh Kumar, American Public Power Association 2012 SG Peer...

  3. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropski, Ben; Pratt, Rob

    2014-03-28

    This paper outlines the nature of the power grid, lists challenges and barriers to the implementation of a transactive energy ecosystem, and provides concept solutions to current technological impediments.

  4. Analysis of a power grid using the Kuramoto-like model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filatrella, Giovanni; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2008-01-01

    We show that there is a link between the Kuramoto paradigm and another system of synchronized oscillators, namely an electrical power distribution grid of generators and consumers. The purpose of this work is to show both the formal analogy and some practical consequences. The mapping can be made quantitative, and under some necessary approximations a class of Kuramoto-like models, those with bimodal distribution of the frequencies, is most appropriate for the power-grid. In fact in the power-grid there are two kinds of oscillators: the 'sources' delivering power to the 'consumers'.

  5. Analysis of a power grid using the Kuramoto-like model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Filatrella; Arne Hejde Nielsen; Niels Falsig Pedersen

    2008-02-16

    We show that there is a link between the Kuramoto paradigm and another system of synchronized oscillators, namely an electrical power distribution grid of generators and consumers. The purpose of this work is to show both the formal analogy and some practical consequences. The mapping can be made quantitative, and under some necessary approximations a class of Kuramoto-like models, those with bimodal distribution of the frequencies, is most appropriate for the power-grid. In fact in the power-grid there are two kinds of oscillators: the 'sources' delivering power to the 'consumers'.

  6. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  7. Framework for Interactive Parallel Dataset Analysis on the Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, David A.; Ananthan, Balamurali; /Tech-X Corp.; Johnson, Tony; Serbo, Victor; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    We present a framework for use at a typical Grid site to facilitate custom interactive parallel dataset analysis targeting terabyte-scale datasets of the type typically produced by large multi-institutional science experiments. We summarize the needs for interactive analysis and show a prototype solution that satisfies those needs. The solution consists of desktop client tool and a set of Web Services that allow scientists to sign onto a Grid site, compose analysis script code to carry out physics analysis on datasets, distribute the code and datasets to worker nodes, collect the results back to the client, and to construct professional-quality visualizations of the results.

  8. NREL + SolarCity: Maximizing Solar Power on Electrical Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannegan, Bryan; Hanley, Ryan; Symko-Davies, Martha

    2015-06-03

    Learn how NREL is partnering with SolarCity to study how to better integrate rooftop solar onto the grid. The work includes collaboration with the Hawaiian Electric Companies (HECO) to analyze high-penetration solar scenarios using advanced modeling and inverter testing at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on NREL’s campus. Results to date have been so promising that HECO has more than doubled the amount of rooftop solar it allows on its grid, showing utilities across the country that distributed solar is not a liability for reliability—and can even be an asset.

  9. Cloud Computing and Grid Computing 360-Degree Compared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Ian; Raicu, Ioan; Lu, Shiyong

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing has become another buzzword after Web 2.0. However, there are dozens of different definitions for Cloud Computing and there seems to be no consensus on what a Cloud is. On the other hand, Cloud Computing is not a completely new concept; it has intricate connection to the relatively new but thirteen-year established Grid Computing paradigm, and other relevant technologies such as utility computing, cluster computing, and distributed systems in general. This paper strives to compare and contrast Cloud Computing with Grid Computing from various angles and give insights into the essential characteristics of both.

  10. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  11. Automating Personalized Battery Management on Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falaki, Mohamamd Hossein

    2012-01-01

    3 Automating Battery Management . . . . . . .122 Battery Goal Setting UI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Power and Battery Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  12. OPPORTUNITIES FOR AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA’S DAIRY PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, Gregory K.; Aghajanzadeh, Arian; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    During periods of peak electrical demand on the energy grid or when there is a shortage of supply, the stability of the grid may be compromised or the cost of supplying electricity may rise dramatically, respectively. Demand response programs are designed to mitigate the severity of these problems and improve reliability by reducing the demand on the grid during such critical times. In 2010, the Demand Response Research Center convened a group of industry experts to suggest potential industries that would be good demand response program candidates for further review. The dairy industry was suggested due to the perception that the industry had suitable flexibility and automatic controls in place. The purpose of this report is to provide an initial description of the industry with regard to demand response potential, specifically automated demand response. This report qualitatively describes the potential for participation in demand response and automated demand response by dairy processing facilities in California, as well as barriers to widespread participation. The report first describes the magnitude, timing, location, purpose, and manner of energy use. Typical process equipment and controls are discussed, as well as common impediments to participation in demand response and automated demand response programs. Two case studies of demand response at dairy facilities in California and across the country are reviewed. Finally, recommendations are made for future research that can enhance the understanding of demand response potential in this industry.

  13. The OLAP-Enabled Grid: Model and Query Processing Algorithms Michael Lawrence Andrew Rau-Chaplin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau-Chaplin, Andrew

    is on the efficient optimization of resources for answering queries based on a distributed query algorithm which uses com- puting resources. Grids, widely distributed collections of heterogeneous computers whose.cgmLab.org Abstract The operation of modern distributed enterprises, be they commercial, scientific, or health related

  14. Load control in low voltage level of the electricity grid using CHP appliances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurink, Johann

    as a Virtual Power Plant to the electricity grid. In this work we focus on different algorithms to control is centrally generated in large power plants and in which distribution means distribution from these power.g.c.bosman@utwente.nl Abstract--The introduction of µCHP (Combined Heat and Power) appliances and other means of distributed

  15. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  16. ReSS: A Resource Selection Service for the Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Timm, Steve; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Open Science Grid offers access to hundreds of computing and storage resources via standard Grid interfaces. Before the deployment of an automated resource selection system, users had to submit jobs directly to these resources. They would manually select a resource and specify all relevant attributes in the job description prior to submitting the job. The necessity of a human intervention in resource selection and attribute specification hinders automated job management components from accessing OSG resources and it is inconvenient for the users. The Resource Selection Service (ReSS) project addresses these shortcomings. The system integrates condor technology, for the core match making service, with the gLite CEMon component, for gathering and publishing resource information in the Glue Schema format. Each one of these components communicates over secure protocols via web services interfaces. The system is currently used in production on OSG by the DZero Experiment, the Engagement Virtual Organization, and the Dark Energy. It is also the resource selection service for the Fermilab Campus Grid, FermiGrid. ReSS is considered a lightweight solution to push-based workload management. This paper describes the architecture, performance, and typical usage of the system.

  17. Grid Architecture Release 2.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November 2014 Draft #12;Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November..................................................................................................... 2.1 3.0 Brief Introduction to Grid Architecture........................................................................................ 3.2 3.1 How Grid Architecture Can Be Used

  18. Algorithmic Decision Theory and the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of uncontrollable influences such as weather #12;11 Today's Electric Power Grid ·Today's electric power systems Grid, October 2010. #12;10 Today's Electric Power Grid ·Today's electric power systems have grown up's Electric Power Grid ·Challenges include: -Huge number of customers, uncontrolled demand -Changing supply

  19. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Intelligent Networked Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Intelligent Networked Sensors Capable of Autonomous, Adaptive from the rest of the power grid and reconnect and synchronize without loss of functionality FOCUS AREA Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) will deliver next-generation concepts and tools for grid operation

  20. Course Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmroth, Erik

    #12;­ Grid security: Grid security demands and solutions for, e.g., authen- tication, authorityCourse Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p Erik Elmroth, Olle Mulmo, and Leif Nixon February 14, 2003 General information This course is designed to give a broad overview of the concept of grid comput

  1. Introduction to FireGrid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Stephen; Usmani, Asif; Upadhyay, Rochan; Berry, Dave; Potter, Stephen; Torero, Jose L

    2007-11-14

    FireGrid is an ambitious and innovative project, seeking to develop the technology to support a new way of managing emergency response in the modern built environment. Specific novel aspects include the integration of ...

  2. Grid Pricing of Fed Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Ted C.; Hogan, Robert J.; Anderson, David P.

    2009-03-02

    There are several value-based fed cattle pricing systems, including formula pricing, price grids and alliances. This publication describes the different cattle pricing methods and helps you decide which is best for you....

  3. Los Angeles Air Force Base Vehicle to Grid Pilot Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Akuacom Inc. operated Demand Response Automated Server (the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) protocol. PEVstandard for Automated Demand Response, OpenADR has achieved

  4. Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid S. Massoud Amin, D electrical energy infrastructure ­ Transforming the Network into a Smart Grid ­ Developing an Expanded be reproduced in any form without prior authorization. Enabling a Stronger and Smarter Grid ·Smart Grid

  5. How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems Laurence Field CERN rizos@cs.man.ac.uk Abstract--Grid information systems play a core role in today's production Grid. Quality metrics for Grid information systems are required in order to compare different implementations

  6. EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

  7. National transmission grid study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, Spencer

    2003-05-31

    The National Energy Policy Plan directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to address them. DOE began by conducting an independent analysis of U.S. electricity markets and identifying transmission system bottlenecks using DOE’s Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS). DOE’s analysis, presented in Section 2, confirms the central role of the nation’s transmission system in lowering costs to consumers through increased trade. More importantly, DOE’s analysis also confirms the results of previous studies, which show that transmission bottlenecks and related transmission system market practices are adding hundreds of millions of dollars to consumers’ electricity bills each year. A more detailed technical overview of the use of POEMS is provided in Appendix A. DOE led an extensive, open, public input process and heard a wide range of comments and recommendations that have all been considered.1 More than 150 participants registered for three public workshops held in Detroit, MI (September 24, 2001); Atlanta, GA (September 26, 2001); and Phoenix, AZ (September 28, 2001).

  8. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

  9. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-04-09

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  10. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  11. Distributed Power Dispatch via Bifurcation Control Pirathayini Srikantha and Deepa Kundur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    ) and wind turbines. The main grid mostly contains non-distributed synchronous generation sources that have deployed in today's power grid. These energy sources are typically sustainable and cost

  12. Automating component reuse and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

    2004-09-01

    framework for automating specification-based component retrieval and adaptation that has been successfully applied to synthesis of software for embedded and digital signal processing systems. Using specifications to abstractly represent implementations...

  13. Automated Assembly Using Feature Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Steven Jeffrey

    1986-12-01

    Automated assembly of mechanical devices is studies by researching methods of operating assembly equipment in a variable manner; that is, systems which may be configured to perform many different assembly operations ...

  14. Aspects of automation mode confusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Paul H. (Paul Harrison)

    2007-01-01

    Complex systems such as commercial aircraft are difficult for operators to manage. Designers, intending to simplify the interface between the operator and the system, have introduced automation to assist the operator. In ...

  15. Delocalization of Phase Fluctuations and the Stability of AC Electricity Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kettemann

    2015-04-21

    The energy transition towards an increased supply of renewable energy raises concerns that existing electricity grids, built to connect few centralized large power plants with consumers, may become more difficult to control and stabilized with a rising number of decentralized small scale generators. Here, we aim to study therefore, how local phase fluctuations affect the AC grid stability. To this end, we start from a model of nonlinear dynamic power balance equations. We map them to complex linear wave equations and find stationary solutions for the distribution of phases $\\varphi_i$ at the generator and consumer sites $i$. Next, we derive differential equations for deviations from these stationary solutions. Next, we derive differential equations for deviations from these stationary solutions. Starting with an initially localized phase perturbation, it is found to spread in a periodic grid diffusively throughout the grid. We derive the parametric dependence of diffusion constant $D$. We apply the same solution strategy to general grid topologies and analyse their stability against local fluctuations. The fluctuation remains either localized or becomes delocalized, depending on grid topology and distribution of consumers and generators $P_i$. Delocalization is found to increase the lifetime of phase fluctuations and thereby their influence on grid stability, while localization results in an exponentially fast decay of phase fluctuations at all grid sites.

  16. Delocalization of Phase Perturbations and the Stability of AC Electricity Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kettemann

    2015-08-12

    The energy transition towards an increased supply of renewable energy raises concerns that existing electricity grids, built to connect few centralized large power plants with consumers, may become more difficult to control and stabilized with a rising number of decentralized small scale generators. Here, we aim to study therefore, how local phase fluctuations affect the AC grid stability. To this end, we start from a model of nonlinear dynamic power balance equations. We map them to complex linear wave equations and find stationary solutions for the distribution of phases $\\varphi_i$ at the generator and consumer sites $i$. Next, we derive differential equations for deviations from these stationary solutions. Next, we derive differential equations for deviations from these stationary solutions. Starting with an initially localized phase perturbation, it is found to spread in a periodic grid diffusively throughout the grid. We derive the parametric dependence of diffusion constant $D$. We apply the same solution strategy to general grid topologies and analyse their stability against local fluctuations. The fluctuation remains either localized or becomes delocalized, depending on grid topology and distribution of consumers and generators $P_i$. Delocalization is found to increase the lifetime of phase fluctuations and thereby their influence on grid stability, while localization results in an exponentially fast decay of phase fluctuations at all grid sites.

  17. An Investigation of the Utilization of Smart Meter Data to Adapt Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution Systems with a High Penetration of Distributed Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglin, Richard Henry

    2012-07-16

    The future of electric power distribution systems (DSs) is one that incorporates extensive amounts of advanced metering, distribution automation, and distributed generation technologies. Most DSs were designed to be radial ...

  18. Delocalization of Phase Perturbations and the Stability of AC Electricity Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kettemann

    2016-01-03

    The energy transition towards an increased supply of renewable energy raises concerns that existing electricity grids, built to connect few centralized large power plants with consumers, may become more difficult to control and stabilized with a rising number of decentralized small scale generators. Here, we aim to study therefore, how local phase perturbations which may be caused by local power fluctuations, affect the AC grid stability. To this end, we start from nonlinear power balance equations and map them to complex linear wave equations, yielding stationary solutions with phases $\\varphi_i$ at generator and consumer sites $i$. Next, we study deviations from these stationary solutions. Starting with an initially localized perturbation, it is found to spread in a periodic grid diffusively throughout the grid. We derive the parametric dependence of diffusion constant $D$. We apply the same solution strategy to general grid topologies and analyse their stability against local perturbations. The perturbation remains either localized or becomes delocalized, depending on grid topology, power capacity and distribution of consumers and generators $P_i$. Delocalization is found to increase the lifetime of perturbations and thereby their influence on grid stability, while localization results in an exponentiallyfast decay of perturbations at all grid sites. These results may therefore lead to new strategies to control the stability of electricity grids.

  19. Participation through Automation: Fully Automated Critical Peak Pricing in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Figure 2. Demand Response Automation Server and BuildingII system to notify the Automation Server of an up comingoccurs day-ahead). 2. The Automation Server posts two pieces

  20. Bio-Inspired Cyber Security for Smart Grid Deployments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, Archibald D.; Thompson, Seth R.; Doroshchuk, Ruslan A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2013-05-01

    mart grid technologies are transforming the electric power grid into a grid with bi-directional flows of both power and information. Operating millions of new smart meters and smart appliances will significantly impact electric distribution systems resulting in greater efficiency. However, the scale of the grid and the new types of information transmitted will potentially introduce several security risks that cannot be addressed by traditional, centralized security techniques. We propose a new bio-inspired cyber security approach. Social insects, such as ants and bees, have developed complex-adaptive systems that emerge from the collective application of simple, light-weight behaviors. The Digital Ants framework is a bio-inspired framework that uses mobile light-weight agents. Sensors within the framework use digital pheromones to communicate with each other and to alert each other of possible cyber security issues. All communication and coordination is both localized and decentralized thereby allowing the framework to scale across the large numbers of devices that will exist in the smart grid. Furthermore, the sensors are light-weight and therefore suitable for implementation on devices with limited computational resources. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Digital Ants framework and then present results from test bed-based demonstrations that show that Digital Ants can identify a cyber attack scenario against smart meter deployments.