Sample records for gregg penn abdi

  1. SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG MARLAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG MARLAND1 , BRUCE A. MCCARL2 , UWE SCHNEIDER3 1 Oak Ridge to the UNFCCC held a meeting in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, creating a Protocol intended to provide #12;3 3

  2. Wind Farm Reactive Support and Voltage Control Daniel F. Opila Abdi M. Zeynu Ian A. Hiskens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    Wind Farm Reactive Support and Voltage Control Daniel F. Opila Abdi M. Zeynu Ian A. Hiskens Abstract--Wind farms typically contain a variety of voltage control equipment including tap or wind farm; it is desirable to treat all the equipment as an integrated system rather than independent

  3. West Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) promotes the use of renewable energy and clean energy among commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers in the West Penn...

  4. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  5. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Penn State University Profile 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University Profile 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University...

  6. PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  7. Technology Transfer at Penn State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Technology Transfer at Penn State University An Inventor's Guide to #12;Our mission is to protect on the University of Michigan's "Inventor's Guide to Technology Transfer," with adaptation for Penn State, and the staff of the UM Office of Technology Transfer for their kind permission to use their excellent material

  8. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 31, 2004 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  9. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 30, 2003 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  10. Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Penn State Consortium for Building Energy Innovation (formerly the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub) develops, demonstrates, and deploys energy-saving technologies that can achieve 50% energy reduction in small- and medium-sized buildings. Its headquarters serves as a test bed for real-world integration of technology and market solutions.

  11. The Bottom Line Space@Penn Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    The Bottom Line Space@Penn Upgrade Coming Soon! A project is underway to upgrade the current that allows designated users in the field to update certain elements of their space. This project, whose: Grants & Projects ­ Used for invoice generation, overhead and revenue recognition, and award and project

  12. Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate) Program for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage Systems Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate)...

  13. Living on Campus Living on campus at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    . 100% Penn State Living Where to find us Penn State Altoona Housing and Food Services 3000 Ivyside Park assistance. Contact the Housing and Food Services Office to discuss the options available. Cable Television service is provided by Housing and Food Services. You may contract with the local cable TV provider

  14. Penn State DOE GATE Center of Exellence for In-Vehicle, High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Penn State DOE GATE Center of Exellence for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage Systems Penn State DOE GATE Center of Exellence for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage Systems...

  15. Date: May 1, 2010 To: Penn State University Learning Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    output vs. time graph. However, we could not obtain solar tracking data for the same. Another problemDate: May 1, 2010 To: Penn State University Learning Factory From: Harris 1 - Automated Solar Charge Station team Class: EE403W - Spring 2010 Subject: Project Recap We were assigned to design a solar

  16. Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

  17. FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) offers various rebates to eligible commercial, industrial, non-profit, local government and institutional customers in Pennsylvania service territory who upgrade to...

  18. Penn Engineering Alumni Society Report : October 2010 Submitted by Farnia Fresnel, President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Support the Career Services mentoring program Host a summer BBQ for graduate engineering studentsPenn Engineering Alumni Society Report : October 2010 Submitted by Farnia Fresnel, President http://www.seas.upenn.edu/alumni/alumnisociety The Penn Engineering Alumni Society Board is supported by more than 30 active members who attend monthly

  19. Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Characterization, treatment, and reuse of frac water related to horizontal hydraulic fracturing of Marcellus ShalePennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes

  20. Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment of Energy and the Environment Ann1 #12;Introduction Authorized by Congress as one of the nation's 54 water), Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Penn State University; 4) Lidiia Iiavorivska (Boyer), School of Forest

  1. www.energy.psu.edu The EMS Energy Institute at Penn State is a leading research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    www.energy.psu.edu The EMS Energy Institute at Penn State is a leading research and development organization focused on energy science and engineering. We are committed to: -- Providing academic and technical leadership in the development and assessment of energy technologies, -- Providing Penn State

  2. The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Fall 2005 Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    ,wasnamedpresidentoftheAcous- tical Society of America and will serve a one-year term. Yousry Azmy, professor of nuclear engineeringFall 2005 P e n n S t a t e The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Fall 2005 Engineering EnginEEring and the Economy #12; Engineering Penn State Anthony Atchley, Acoustics Program chair

  3. Banding Dates for Fall 2011 The Arboretum at Penn State Join us for bird banding in The Arboretum at Penn State. As the fall migrants move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    , with the assistance of Penn State students, will be banding (weather permitting) on the following dates: Sept. 10 program. Learn more about both the migrants that stop by the Arboretum to fuel up on their way south

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Penn State University Applied Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLSMolten-SaltReliabilityIntroduction ofLaboratory Penn State

  5. Enhanced magnetism and nuclear ordering of 169Tm spins in TmPO4 C. Fermon, J. F. Gregg(*), J.-F. Jacquinot, Y. Roinel, V. Bouffard, G. Fournier and A. Abragam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the nuclear relaxation obeys the Korringa law. In copper, the ordering temperature (ofthe order of 1001053 « Enhanced » magnetism and nuclear ordering of 169Tm spins in TmPO4 C. Fermon, J. F. Gregg.P.A.). Abstract 2014 Ordering of the nuclear spins of169Tm in TmPO4, caused by their « enhanced » nuclear

  6. FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Penn Power, a First Energy utility, provides rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up...

  7. Is newer better? Penn World Table Revisions and their impact on growth estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Simon

    This paper sheds light on two problems in the Penn World Table (PWT) GDP estimates. First, we show that these estimates vary substantially across different versions of the PWT despite being derived from very similar ...

  8. FirstEnergy (MetEdison, Penelec, Penn Power)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to help meet the goals established in Pennsylvania's Act 129, FirstEnergy's Pennsylvania companies (MetEdison, Penelec, and Penn Power) are providing energy efficiency incentives for a...

  9. FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) offers a variety of incentives to Pennsylvania residential customers who are interested in upgrading to more energy efficient appliances and equipment. Rebates are...

  10. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center August 2009 Mechanical and Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Section 16400 ­ Electric Service Section 16430 ­ Panelboards Section 16440 ­ Dry Type Transformers Section 16445 ­ Liquid Filled Transformers Section 16500 ­ Lighting #12;Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical

  11. Gregg Garfin Angela Jardine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    , agriculture, air quality, assessment, atmospheric river, biodiversity, climate change, climate impacts Change in the Southwest United States A Report Prepared for the National Climate Assessment National Climate Assessment Regional Technical Input Report Series #12;#12;#12;Assessment of Climate Change

  12. Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through carbon offset activities have been promoted to restore degraded drylands and improve of Geography at Penn State which dealt with soil carbon sequestration in dryland regions of Africa is also included. #12;Research Program #12;Award No. 05HQAG0076 Soil Carbon Sequestration in Drylands Basic

  13. Newsletters Researchers at Penn State announce breakthrough in microbial fuel cell development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Publishing Researchers at Penn State announce breakthrough in microbial fuel cell development A technological breakthrough has made it possible to use microbial fuel cells for large-scale electricity production has been devised. It is hoped that the combination of the two will allow microbial fuel cells

  14. Economic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geothermal, geothermal heat pumps and other non-petroleum or coal based energy production" for the Renewable Energy Industry. #12;GEOTHERMAL PRESENTATION 1.REMI is an economic-demographic forecasEconomic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD Grapevine

  15. HARMONIC CASCADE FEL DESIGNS FOR LUX G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    HARMONIC CASCADE FEL DESIGNS FOR LUX G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J. Wurtele , J.N. Corlett, W.M. Fawley, A stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200­250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser mod then produces ra- diation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differ- ently tuned undulator. Repeated

  16. A Two Level Finite Difference Scheme for One Dimensional Pennes' Bioheat Equation \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    by exposing human body to heat in a flash fire or being in contact with hot substances are some of the most for a skin heating model are conducted. Key words: bioheat transfer, Pennes' equation, finite difference.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under grant DE­FG02­02ER45961, by the Japanese Research Organization

  17. The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Spring/Summer 2013 for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    APhy: Curtis Chan Victoria Fryer Penn State Live grAPhics & design: Snavely Associates AdministrAtive officers hailed as hometown hero 9 university chosen for Department of Energy inaugural wind contest 6 #12;3S P R Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering for a faculty chair focused on energy and energy

  18. The significance of the parallels between T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Robert Penn Warren's All The King's Men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Patrick John

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of significant literary prizes awarded Warren: the Shelley Memorial Prize for Poetry Victor H. Strandberg, A Colder Fire: r R te t penn Warren (Lextnttean, OI653, p John L ~ Longley, Jr. , "Introduction, " Warren (New York, 1965), p. ix. 9 Stewart, pp. 45...$ and 542. Robert Penn (1942); the Southern Prize (1947); a Guggenheim fellow- ship (1947-1948); the Meltzer Award of the Screen Writer's Guild (1950); the Pulitzer Prize for fiction (1946); the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, the National Book Award...

  19. Lynne J. Williams, Anjali Krishnan & Herv Abdi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Hervé

    by publishing worldwide in Oxford New York Auckland Cape Town Dar es Salaam Hong Kong Karachi Kuala Lumpur

  20. Principal component analysis Herve Abdi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    depends upon the eigen-decomposition of positive semi- definite matrices and upon the singular value correlation preprocessing as a default). The matrix X has the following singular value decomposition [SVD, see

  1. Hello. I'm Blannie Bowen, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at Penn State. I want to take this opportunity to personally thank you for agreeing to serve on this search committee.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Hello. I'm Blannie Bowen, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at Penn State. I want to take Hello, I'm Ken Lehrman, Director of Penn State's Affirmative Action Office. Today I'd like to provide

  2. 1S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Penn State engineering `firsts' Integrated health care delivery systems center established 6 acoustics well in U.S. News survey Historical marker honors aero research Penn State launches $35.5 million WORKING WItH tHE WIND Project gives students hands-on experience with wind turbines 20 PROVIDING POWER

  3. Penn State Multi-Discipline Tribology Group and Energy Institute Studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph

    2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is a summary of the current research activities on fuels and lubricants in the Multi-discipline Tribology group and the engine test group in the Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The progress areas discussed in this summary include those found in Table 1. Table 1. RESEARCH AREAS: Diesel Engine Emission Reduction; Oxygenated Fuels; Improved Friction Fuels; Vegetable Oil Lubricants; Extended Drain Lubricants; Effect of Chemical Structure on Friction and Wear. The research is of interest either directly or indirectly to the goal of this workshop, diesel engine emissions reduction. The current projects at Penn State in the areas listed above will be discussed.

  4. The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Spring/Summer 2009 EngineeringP e n n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    ­ Male engineers sport their stuff in support of Thon ­ Engineering alumni get redesigned Web site ­ Wilbur Meier, former engineering dean, dies ­ Solar home gets new site ­ Nuclear engineering professorThe Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Spring/Summer 2009 EngineeringP e n n

  5. Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven technological, economic, environmental, and societal barriers associated with wind energy and needs and have the capabilities required to conceptualize, develop and evaluate wind energy systems

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Penn State DOE Graduate GATE Program for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pennsylvania State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Penn State DOE...

  7. Review of PennDOT Publication 408 for the use of recycled co-product materials: Summary recommendations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tassel, E.L.; Tikalsky, P.J.; Christensen, D.W.

    1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to decrease the institutional or perceived institutional barriers for the use of recycled and co-product materials including glass, steel slag, foundry sand, fly ash, shingle tabs, reclaimed Portland cement concrete, and scrap tires in the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation`s (PennDOT) Publications 408, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Specifications. This report reviews potential uses of each material, identifies the project that used these materials, and provides direction for future specification development.

  8. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives.

  9. 1FA L L / w i n t e r 2 0 1 3 The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Fall/Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    POWER SAVINGS Breakthrough may pave the way for more energy-efficient transistors NEWS & NOTES 4 lets farmers grow crops to sell 24 KICKSTARTER Penn State unveils new University-wide minor in entrepreneurship alumni 26 ALUMNI RECOGNITION PSEAS receives award for resume review workshop 30 MEP APG

  10. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives.

  11. Shale Webinar Series to Start September 13th The Penn State Marcellus Education Team will be offering a new monthly Shale webinar series beginning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale Webinar Series to Start September 13th The Penn State Marcellus Education Team will be offering a new monthly Shale webinar series beginning Thursday, September 13th from 1:00 to 2:00 PM. Tom the series with an overview of trends and updates on shale development. Tom will provide an analysis of shale

  12. http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/conm/426/08187 Licensed to Penn St Univ, University Park. Prepared on Sun Dec 29 17:35:46 EST 2013 for download from IP 128.118.88.48.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressan, Alberto

    on Sun Dec 29 17:35:46 EST 2013 for download from IP 128.118.88.48. License or copyright restrictions may(t,O+),z(t))dt. ~ Licensed to Penn St Univ, University Park. Prepared on Sun Dec 29 17:35:46 EST 2013 for download from IP://www.ams.org/publications/ebooks/terms #12;~ Licensed to Penn St Univ, University Park. Prepared on Sun Dec 29 17:35:46 EST 2013 for download

  13. NREL: Biomass Research - Gregg T. Beckham

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bonds. An illustration of lignin is shown below. In current selective routes for biomass utilization, lignin is typically burned for heat and power. However, the energy and...

  14. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels.

  15. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; Rhett McLaren; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz; Joseph J. Battista

    2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, utilizing funds furnished by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Power Program, investigated the installation of a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The study was performed using a team that included personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. The activities included assessing potential feedstocks at the University Park campus and surrounding region with an emphasis on biomass materials, collecting and analyzing potential feedstocks, assessing agglomeration, deposition, and corrosion tendencies, identifying the optimum location for the boiler system through an internal site selection process, performing a three circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler design and a 15-year boiler plant transition plan, determining the costs associated with installing the boiler system, developing a preliminary test program, determining the associated costs for the test program, and exploring potential emissions credits when using the biomass CFB boiler.

  16. 1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davis & S Belmecheri (Penn State University) Environmental water Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center sessions: 1. What data sources are currently available for collecting information on water and air systems

  17. Gregg County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county in Oklahoma. Its FIPS County Code is

  18. NREL: News - NREL Scientist Brian Gregg Named AAAS Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearch Staff Materials andBookmark and Share215 NREL

  19. Modelling Day-to-Day Variability of Intersection Performance using Micro-Simulation Zeeshan Abdy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    G1, Canada Tel: (519) 888-4567 ext. 6596 Fax: (519) 888-4349 E-mail: zrabdy@uwaterloo.ca Bruce demands are held constant. Method 2 consisted of using only a single random number seed but traffic

  20. Penn College | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County isParadise,

  1. [11:47 27/1/2009 ] Abdi: Experimental Design ans Analysis for Psychology Page: iii 1xix Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Hervé

    of a matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 23.6.4 Digression: An infinity of eigenvectors for one eigen- value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 #12;ii 0.0 CONTENTS 23.6.5 Positive (semi-)definite matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 23.6.5.1 Diagonalization

  2. ONSEIL ENERALC G Penn-ar-Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermet, Franck

    and biochemical interactions at seafloor spreading ridges, a rapidly expanding research domain (mineral resources, global budget, deep biosphere, ...). This summer school will specially focus on: - geodynamical and petro

  3. Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Penn Reverberant Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County isParadise,Large Water Tunnel

  5. Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County isParadise,Large Water TunnelWater Tunnel

  6. West Penn Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  7. PennDesign Career Plans Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    , Providence, RI Average Salary $48,333 1 MARCH graduate reported selfemployment in Bolivia Parttime Simulation and Energy Studies, Research Assistant, Philadelphia, PA University of Pennsylvania, Adjunct

  8. CO2 EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS Thomas A. Boden and Gregg Marland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMSMethanol Steam Reforming. |

  9. Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/ Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control · Water Quality Treatment · Recharges Groundwater · Reduction in Stormwater Infrastructure (Piping · Proper Soil Stabilization and Erosion Control are Required to Prevent Clogging · Quality Control-Days After Installation Cost & Maintenance Total Project Cost is Comparable for Pervious Concrete

  10. Ice in Volcanic Clouds: When and Where? William I Rose, Gregg JS Bluth and I Matthew Watson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    of large ash particles in descent. Ash fall occurs most markedly from the high energy first stage Very High Resolution Radiometer; MODIS= Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer; ASTER= Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer; TOMS= Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer occur and when

  11. Stratospheric Loading of Sulfur from Explosive Volcanic Eruptions1 Gregg J. S. Bluth, William I. Rose, Ian E. Sprod,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    . Rose, Ian E. Sprod,2 and Arlin J. Krueger3 Department of Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 A B S T R A C T This paper is an attempt to measure our the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. The sulfate aerosols stratosphere, roughly 1% of man

  12. Multibeam Workshop III Boulder, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /NGDC Ted.Habermann@noaa.gov (303) 497-6472 Gregg Glover NESDIS/NGDC Gregg.Glover@noaa.gov (303) 497

  13. PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Methods * ANL donated licenses for Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) * Matlab Sponsored software and hardware 100K * Support EcoCAR team * Energy storage focus -...

  14. Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Methods * ANL donated licenses for Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) * Matlab Sponsored softwarehardware 100K * Support EcoCAR team goals * Energy storage focus...

  15. High Altitude Balloon Project At Penn State Wilkes-Barre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    · Plasma Probes · Solar Cell Array · CO2 Horizon Sensor · Torque Coil Test · Viper PC104 Flight Test · Boom diameter at burst · 72 inch parachute · Payload · Multiple Pods · Student experiments · Sensors, cameras. · Magnetometer · OPT101 Light Sensors · Spectrometers · Geiger Counters · Altitude Valve Control · CUBE Sat

  16. Penn State Respiratory Protection Program Requirements Summary Scope and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    operations, and during some non-routine or emergency operations such as a spill or leak of a hazardous respirators and evaluating hazards. · Select respiratory protection options. · Conduct fit testing. · Evaluate and do not cause discomfort. · Continually check work areas and operations to identify possible

  17. Penn State -Intramural Sports Women's Tennis Singles Tournament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    courts (call 865-1381). Matches are self officiated. Disagreements must be mutually decided or elect LEAGUE: A PLAYERS: Eden Messerly Carly Millan Jessica Devlin Ashley Vuong MATCH DUE DATE Player 1 VS. Player 2 Wednesday Eden Messerly vs. Ashley Vuong 6-4 6-4 Sep 8 Carly Millan vs. Jessica Devlin 6-2 6

  18. East Penn Manufacturing Keeps Moving Forward After 65 Years ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Accelerate the Manufacturing and Deployment of the Next Generation of U.S. Batteries and Electric Vehicles Sysco Deploys Hydrogen Powered Pallet Trucks Vehicle Battery Basics...

  19. PENN STATE and "GREEN" HYDRAULIC FLUIDS A Fact Sheet

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    Lee, Dongwon

    oils must pass one or more tests currently used to assess biodegradability. If Petroleum.S. currently uses over 20 million barrels of oil per day, of which about 60 percent is imported. A barrel can reduce the amount of imported oil by over 15 million barrels per year by using vegetable oils

  20. Linear Programming: Penn State Math 484 Lecture Notes

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    Squicciarini, Anna Cinzia

    . Matrix Inverse 35 6. Solution of Linear Equations 37 7. Linear Combinations, Span, Linear Independence 39 Programs with Matlab 47 Chapter 4. Convex Sets, Functions and Cones and Polyhedral Theory 51 1. Convex Sets on the Graph of z. The level sets existing in R2 while the graph of z existing R3 . The level sets have been

  1. Bird Banding Fall 2014 The Arboretum at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    -Central Rail Trail in Big Hollow, approximately 0.5 mile NW of the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens. Banding is forest edge of brush growth, primarily 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 9-Sep 11-Sep 13-Sep 15-Sep 17-Sep

  2. Bird Banding Fall 2013 The Arboretum at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    to the Bellefonte Central Rail Trail in Big Hollow, approximately 0.5 mile NW of the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens Botanic Gardens. Habitat is forest edge of brush growth (primarily invasive privet) with pokeweed

  3. Penn State Chemical Engineering Self-Assembly, Nanoscience, Colloids,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    , fibrosis and cancer, biosensors #12;Computational Quantum Mechanics Catalysis, fuel cells, batteries and coarse- grained molecular simulation Li ion batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, biomimetic membranes Computational Strain Optimization for Biofuel Production #12;Neutron scattering and spectroscopy, atomistic

  4. 2007 Penn State Geospatial Technology Summer Camp Additional Registration Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    in the space provided below. Respiratory problems--asthma, tuberculosis, persistent cough, etc. Heart problems

  5. penn state waste management Glass should be thoroughly rinsed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    · Water and soda bottles · "Stretchy" plastic · Bubble wrap and packing pillows Labels may remain. Plastic bottle caps are recyclable too. PLASTIC · Aluminum, bimetal (tin), and steel containers · Aluminum foil take-out food containers · Laundry detergent bottles Plastic containers should be rinsed. MISCELLANEOUS

  6. Model Selection 5th Penn State Astrostatistics School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    in this talk. From Blustin et al (ApJ 2006) article on gamma ray bursts. Note bend in blue line; should. Parsimony Here is the gamma ray burst dataset: 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 -14-13-12-11-10-9 Log (Time since trigger (s)) Log2-10keVFlux June 2009 Model Selection #12;Fit vs. Parsimony Here is the gamma ray

  7. PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergyHistory andPEMFC R&D at the DOE

  8. Penn State Consortium: Advanced Critical AER Education, Training and Credentialing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow Your EnergyTechnology toPaul

  9. Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate) Program for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow Your EnergyTechnology toPaulStorage Systems

  10. Penn College - Williamsport The Scott Home Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdf MoreEnergyEnergyPending Long-Term Applications

  11. The Penn State Center - Pittsburgh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective Jump to:the Nature of theMagmaticCompany Inc-

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Salt Manufacturing Co Whitemarsh

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34Pantex

  13. East Penn Manufacturing Co. Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESEInformation Smart Grid Demonstration

  14. Penn Hills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,OrleansPassadumkeag, Maine:PawneeASPemiscotPenderPengchengHills,

  15. Penn Wynne, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,OrleansPassadumkeag,

  16. Wind Projects Providing Hope for Penn. Workers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartment ofAnnouncementAugust 30,PowerJune 17,Projects

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjusted correlation analysis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    correlation: shrunken and adjusted r The coefficient of correlation is a descriptive statistic... Coefficients of Correlation, Alienation and Determination Herv Abdi1 1 Overview...

  18. In Neil Salkind (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Research Design. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    -Keuls Test and Tukey Test Herv´e Abdi · Lynne J. Williams 1 Pairwise Comparisons An analysis of variance comparisons are the Tukey test and the Newman-Keuls test. Both tests are based Herv´e Abdi The University and Tukey Test on the "Studentized range" or "Student's q". They differ in that the Newman-Keuls test

  19. Remote Sensing for Hazard Mitigation and Resource Protection in Pacific Latin America Gregg Bluth (PI); John Gierke, Bill Rose, Essa Gross (Co-PI's)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , monitoring, and exploring large regions in a cost-effective manner, it has not met with much acceptance in furthering remote sensing capabilities for natural hazard mitigation and resource development (Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Ecuador), focusing on the collaborative development of remote sensing

  20. REMOVAL PROCESSES OF VOLCANIC ASH PARTICLES FROM THE ATMOSPHERE Gregg J.S. Bluth and William I. Rose, Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    . Rose, Michigan Technological University INTRODUCTION The use of satellite techniques provides valuable and liquids) -the atmosphere (water/ice, dust, sea salt, gases) -products from volcano-atmosphere reactions with coating of water or ice; parti

  1. S T A T EEngineeringThe Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Spring 2002 2 Engineering Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Nanofabrication Facility turns `Happy Valley' into `Tech Valley' 11 Education program creates high-tech workforce

  2. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on upland cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheiner, Justin Jack

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    or inhibition of ethylene production (Abdi et al., 1998; Jiang et al., 2001; Fan and Mattheis, 1999a; Dong et al., 2001; Jeong et al., 2002;), chlorophyll degradation (Porat et al., 1999; Ku and Willis, 1999; Fan and Mattheis, 1999b; Fan and Mattheis, 2000...; Jiang et al., 2002a), membrane leakage (Serek et al., 1995a; Jiang et al., 2002b), respiration (Abdi et al., 1998; Tian et al., 2000; Fan and Mattheis, 2000; Dong et al., 2001;), volatile production (Abdi et al., 1998; Golding et al., 1998; Fan...

  3. Penn Engineering Alumni Society Report (May 2009) Submitted by Harris G. Romanoff, President ('98)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Participated in mock interview sessions for students, coordinated by Engineering Career Services Annual EASPenn Engineering Alumni Society Report (May 2009) Submitted by Harris G. Romanoff, President ('98) We had a very exciting and event filled calendar this past year in the Engineering Alumni Society

  4. Penn State DOE GATE Center of Exellence for In-Vehicle, High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicles * ANL donated licenses for Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) * Matlab Sponsored software and hardware * Supporting EcoCAR proposal * Energy storage focus -...

  5. First Energy (MetEd, Penelec, Penn Power)- Residential Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: Phase I of the program closed June 7, 2013. Phase II information will be posted when it is available. The below information is for Phase I only. Check the program website for more...

  6. Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs Volume 1 | Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    in the future. To date, the U.S. has successfully conducted military operations sanctioned by the customary high

  7. Updated 5-10-11 Types of Outreach Opportunities at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    in sustainability (Green Careers) National Energy Leadership Corps Competition (Green Energy Challenge) Minor Energy Central America) http://www.cfs.psu.edu/program s.html Connections to careers in sustainability Domains/Target Audience Community/ General Public K-12 Students K-12 Educators Higher Education Industry

  8. US DOE Sponsored Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at Penn State Emphasizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    - power in-vehicle energy storage for hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles covering the fundamental High-Power In-Vehicle Energy Storage Mission: Provide graduate engineering curriculum focused on high into energy storage curriculum including vehicle topologies, advanced combustion, fuel cells, power

  9. Penn State to Lead Philadelphia-Based Team that will Pioneer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    will save energy, cut pollution, and position the United States as a leader in this industry. Buildings account for nearly 40 percent of U.S. energy consumption and carbon...

  10. Guidelines for the Mentor Welcome to the Penn State Engineering Alumni Society Mentor Program!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    't expect or ask students to `return the favor', by lining up football tickets or a place to stay in Happy Valley. · Understands that he/she isn't obligated to make commitments, but keeps all commitments made

  11. Robert Penn Warren's internal injuries: ''a picnic on the dark side of the moon''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaha, Marylouise

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    am grateful to the following individuals ? writers, readers, scholars, librarians, archivists, and interested laypersons ? who made various contributions to this project: the late Booker B. Bodine who was a kind companion and attentive listener... and cannot now ?remember why / He had cut? his mother?s throat. 8 He has a vague memory of where he comes from and only a nightmarish intimation of where he is going. That he is dying of intestinal cancer is telling in that Dr. Calvin Fiddler in Flood...

  12. GE to Invest in Penn State Center to Study Natural Gas Supply...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vision will be the collaboration of researchers in technical areas of chemical, petroleum, and materials engineering with those in the fields of supply chain management, data...

  13. A two level finite difference scheme for one dimensional Pennes bioheat equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    tissues [2,4,9]. Furthermore, skin burns caused by exposing human body to heat in a flash fire or being unconditionally. Numerical experiments for a skin-heating model are conducted. ? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights, by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under grant DE-FG02-02ER45961, by the Japanese Research

  14. Interactions between Bordetella bronchiseptica and its Host Luis M. Agosto, McNair Scholar, Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    of the human pathogen Bordetella pertussis, the organism responsible for whooping cough. Mice are a natural. Introduction Bordetella bronchiseptica, the pathogenic agent responsible for kennel cough in dogs and rhinitis is responsible for whooping cough. These organisms share several virulence factors, such as adenylate cyclase

  15. EcoCAR 2 Competition Announces Year Two Winner: Penn State University |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr. Steven Chu AboutAboutDepartment of Energy

  16. Penn State to Lead Philadelphia-Based Team that will Pioneer New

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT.Paul L. Joskow AboutEnergy-Efficient

  17. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Penn State University Profile

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 House Nuclear Cleanup CaucusProfile |Submission ||

  18. Penn State DOE GATE Center of Exellence for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdf MoreEnergyEnergyPending Long-Term

  19. INNOVATIONSummer 2014 One of Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    for Practical Research ............................. 8 Remembering the Life & Work of Influential Coal to Greater University Community................................................................ 12 Clean Song after a one- year sabbatical leave working with Dalian University of Technology in China as part

  20. February 3, 2011: Obama and Chu at Penn State | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &ofDepartment of Energy OnDramatic energy andof

  1. East Penn Manufacturing Co Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration Using

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday, Septemberof EnergyM AMichael East

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Central Transportation Co - PA 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34Pantex SewageTXPaul

  3. Penn State HyRES Laboratory Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County isParadise,Large Water TunnelWater TunnelHyRES

  4. Village of Penn Yan, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster, Ohio (UtilityJohnsonMilanMuscoda,ObetzPaw

  5. GE to Invest in Penn State Center to Study Natural Gas Supply Chains | GE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:ComputingFusionSan Ramon, USAGE

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-035 Penn State EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL6 SECTION407 SECTION

  7. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-080 Penn State EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL6 SECTION407916 SECTION0

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-076 Penn State EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL68 SECTION A.591 SECTION456

  9. Penn State Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory The Larson Transportation Institute (LTI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    on the internal combustion engine and fossil fuels to "greener" fuel cell and hybrid electric technology: · Vehicle integration and control expertise; · Alternative fuel infrastructure including hydrogen, LNG; · Vehicle test track and dynamometer facilities; · Vehicle fabrication facilities; and · Fuel cell

  10. Reproductive performance and preweaning growth of Spanish goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogui, Nathalie Scholastique

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Wilson. 1976), the Ganjam (Naik et al. , 1985) and several other breeds (Devendra and Burns, 1970). These observations suggest physiological differences in the relations between dam and fetus according to sex oF the fetus. Abdi (1985) indicated...

  11. An economic analysis of factors influencing Texas and U.S. dry onion prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bello, Haruna Mohammed

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humility. To Messrs. Tom Mebrahtu, John 0. Sobanjo Ghirmay Tekeste and Abdi A. Jama, thank you for sharing your experiences with me on domestic issues, especially. My appreciation to Ms. Beatriz B. Gonzales, Messrs. Awes S. Karama, Babiker El...

  12. The Comparative Effects of a Computer-Based Interactive Simulation during Structured, Guided, and Student-Directed Inquiry on Students' Mental Models of the Day/Night Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Moira Jenkins

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    and Pundak (1990), Finegold and Pundak (1991), LoPresto and Murrell (2011), and Trundle, Atwood, and Christopher (2007a) found similar misconceptions. Many strategies have been offered to correct students? misconceptions. Abdi (2006) asserted...

  13. Perceiving Emotion in Sounds: Does Timbre Play a Role?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, Casady

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of variables into a set of smaller, uncorrelated variables; the goal is to reduce the dimensionality of the original data set (Abdi & Williams, 2010). Because the principal components are uncorrelated, or orthogonal, each one makes an independent...

  14. A comparative analysis of the attitudes of present male students toward selected environmental factors of Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, Maryann Baird

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Statement The Grading System Defined in the Catalog and Used by Most Professors Is Fair 13. Comparative Percentages for the Statement The Recent Ruling Which Makes Corps Membership Optional' Will Improve ABdi 14. Comparative Percentages...

  15. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    with dichotomized long-term outcome in pediatric patients with TBI.11 A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, Richardson (Ms Wang and Drs Bakhadirov and Abdi); and Departments of Radiology (Drs Devous, McColl, W

  16. Host Plant Influences on Performance and Haplotype Diversity of Dalbulus maidis, a Specialist Herbivore of Zea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Flores, Amanda

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    host plants, followed by planned, a priori contrasts (with Sidak?s correction; Abdi and Williams 2010) to evaluate whether corn leafhopper overall performance was affected by transitions in Zea: (i) life history, i.e. perennial teosinte vs. Balsas... preference for any of the host plants if denied a choice of host plant (Bellota-Villafuerte 2012). When warranted by the ANOVA (P Abdi and Williams 2010) to evaluate whether individual...

  17. APS 7-BM Beamline: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomization and Spray Systems, ILASS-Americas, (2013), 76. "High-resistivity silicon photodiode arrays for x-ray detection," Steve Ross, Michael Haji-Sheikh, Gregg Westberg,...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - automating spreadsheet discovery Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences 56 Automated Test Case Generation for Spreadsheets Marc Fisher, Mingming Cao, Gregg Rothermel, Curtis R. Cook, Margaret M. Burnett Summary: Automated Test...

  19. Mapping the Hydrothermal System Beneath the Western Moat of Long...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sampling of the near magmatic environment as early as FY 1988, depending on the DOE budget. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. Author Gregg A....

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbons modified Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    losses... through changes in activity outside of the project focus area. For example, carbon sequestration endeavors... SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG ... Source:...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon modified Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    losses... through changes in activity outside of the project focus area. For example, carbon sequestration endeavors... SOIL CARBON: POLICY AND ECONOMICS GREGG ... Source:...

  2. Penn State Engineering Search for 6 Faculty Positions Dean's Frontier Faculty As part of a plan for substantial expansion of the faculty in both core and emerging fields, the Penn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    and imaging; nanomanufacturing; additive manufacturing; new materials for sustainability and enhanced Advanced Manufacturing for Medical and Mechanical Sciences: bioprinting; biomedical sensing, devices will be determined during the hiring process. Additional information about these positions and the College's plan

  3. 478 IEEE Transactionson Energy Conversion,vol.7, No. 3, September1092. THE PENN STATE INTELLIGENT DISTRIBUTED CONTROL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    microprocessor-based control system which is interfaced to real-time simulations of power plant processes, intelligent, and other advancedcontroltechniques for nuclear power plants. Keywords -simulation reactor power plant. This test-bed, which may be expanded to simulate other nuclear power plant

  4. Subscriber access provided by Penn State | University Libraries The Journal of Physical Chemistry C is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article (LSPR) occur when the nanoparticles are illuminated by a specific wavelength of light and optimizing these applications. For example, in plasmon- enhanced solar cells, the LSPR spectrum of the cells

  5. "Penn State will take every step possible to reduce emissions without unduly increasing our costs. In light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    's efforts." Sustainability Leadership Sustainability Leadership "We are currently working on an overall energy master plan. The current environmental plan that the University has in place has us achieving. The basis of the plan is as follows: · Continue with our plan to purchase Renewable Energy Credits

  6. PNC Bank On-line BankCard Center -Use to access Penn State Purchasing Card statements on-line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    the ability to view company or account information and transactions within a current cycle period forget your password you can contact your designated company administrator or PNC Bank. After the Welcome Screen after you have logged in: 1) Transaction Activity 2) Current Activity Note the in the PNC

  7. Penn State Ranked #5 Worldwide in Elsevier Alternative Energy Research Leadership Study Study investigated over 3,000 research institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    and Infrastructure Development Biomass Conversion Processes End Uses Systems Analyses Biomass Feedstocks Life Cycle

  8. International Conference on Engineering Education October 1621, 2004, Gainesville, Florida. The Learning Factory 10 Years of Impact at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamancusa, John S.

    of engineering majors for lack of hands-on opportunities to satisfy creativity, and graduates lackedInternational Conference on Engineering Education October 16­21, 2004, Gainesville, Florida. 1-industry partnership established to integrate design, manufacturing and business realities into the engineering

  9. EngineeringP e n n The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Summer 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    elect to take one or several modules. Wastewater Biology Various times and locations in the United to the operation of wastewater treatment plants and teaches participants to recognize and correct conditions? The College's Continuing and Distance Education office can probably help. Please contact us at the address

  10. Penn State Mont Alto Directory Listings2/7/2014 LAST NAME FIRST NAME EMAIL ADDRESS TELEPHONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Services Officer Bryant Kate kab61@psu.edu 6139 1st Floor Conklin Hall Admissions Counselor Bryce Shawn smb 124B MAC Assistant Coach of Wrestling Chamberlin Diane dmc39@psu.edu 4117, 6140 202 Wiestling Hall

  11. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-046 Penn State University EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL6 SECTION407916247373913456

  12. EngineeringP e n n The Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Summer 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    presents a biological approach to the opera- tion of wastewater treatment plants and teaches participants laboratory. Wastewater Biology July 28-29, Indianapolis, IN August 11-12, Greensboro, NC August 25-26, Muncie, effective design methods and noise treatments, and noise measure- ment methods. Rotary Wing Technology

  13. The characterization of bovine IgG1 allotypes using monoclonal antibodies in an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbant Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schutta, Christopher John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , 1979) and immunoflouresence (Abdi et al. , 1980) have been u ed to study immunoglobulin allot ypes . The Enzyme ? Linked Immunosorbcnt Assay or ELISA (Fig 3) is a pre cedvre that has been used in our laboratory for this purpose (Estes ct al. , 1990... the same locus. They do not appear to correlate w'th resistance to B. abortus infection, but assay"- foz the presence of these allotypes cn Bruce lla ? pecif ic ant ibodies remain to be per formed in order to conf'rm this. REFERENCES Abdi H. B...

  14. Purification and characterization of ORF69 of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiaofeng

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provided a powerful model system for genetic analysis of cap synthesis and the role of the cap in cellular metabolism (Shibagaki et al. , 1992; Mao et al. , 1995; Tsukamoto et al. , 1997). The yeast cap MTase ABDI gene was identified on the basis of its...

  15. Evaluation of Testing Locations in Central and South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Azzawi, Rasha

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    % of all commercial cotton grown in the U.S. Due to the narrow range of variability in these values, coefficients of variation would be expected to be low (Abdi, 2010),, which is what was observed in this data set (Table 9). All the non-irrigated trials...

  16. Physiological indicators of tick-induced stress in grazing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolleson, Douglas Ray

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    friends and co-workers in RLEM. Jay, if you ever need somebody to go out in the Gobi in a Russian Jeep, let me know; Robert, for babysitting me in Nairobi. Abdi, aka ?Camel Boy?, I hope we will meet again kind sir. Kristen, it was fun to watch you go...

  17. Fecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy calibrations for predicting diet quality and intake of donkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidane, Negusse Fessehaye

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems (LEWS) and Global Livestock CRSP (GL-CRSP) for financially supporting me during the last two years of my study at Texas A&M University and my research in Africa. I am deeply grateful to Dr. Abdi Jamma, Dr. Bob Blaisdell and Jey Angrer...

  18. Contributions to the biology of Tagelus plebeius (bivalvia: Tellinacea) in Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardle, William John

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 'AY, Ti. , AS A T. ~e ei6 ifTI, LIAY, JOHI'i ':1ABDI, II Approved as to style nd oontent by: YC airman of Co":mi~ttee) Q~~z~c~ 'ead of+apartment) Yl;emberT (iien!ber) ~iiember) ~!Ie aber ) Jannary lo70 95Z943 ABSTBACT Contributions...

  19. Permission for Use of the Image/Video Database Permission Form Governing Use of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    . The research applications envisaged include perception and memory experiments with human observers and tests in the Perception Lab at The University of Texas at Dallas under the supervision of A. J. O'Toole and H. Abdi. The database development project was funded by DARPA through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  20. A New Compact Multichannel Receiver for Underwater Wireless Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Ali

    size of the proposed receiver makes it particularly useful for small unmanned underwater vehicles1 A New Compact Multichannel Receiver for Underwater Wireless Communication Networks Ali Abdi of the particle velocity, in addition to the pressure, multichannel reception can be accomplished in underwater

  1. The Penn State Community Resource Directory Note: The topics and links listed below are for your reference and guidance and are not intended to encompass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    ://www.centredaily.com/ Entertainment: State College, commonly called Happy Valley, offers entertainment and recreation for all ages

  2. S t a t eEngineeringEngineeringThe Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Fall 2000 Engineering Conferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    , 2001 - Monroeville, PA February 22, 2001 - Valley Forge, PA Dr. Eric Burnett This annual workshop contact us at the address or num- bers above. We will be happy to work with you to design a program

  3. PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Group at Penn State showed that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Processing by Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D), is a program utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM was to develop an understanding of how key operating parameters such as layer thickness, manufacturing

  4. S t a t eEngineeringEngineeringThe Magazine of the Penn State College of Engineering Summer 2000 Engineering ConferencesModern Protective Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    participants to recognize and correct conditions causing plant operational or upset problems. Electric Power fundamental background information on potential threats and relate it to the perfor- mance and latest design, this workshop presents a biological approach to the operation of wastewater treatment plants and teaches

  5. Form Name Form description Form URL Laboratory Safety General Information on Laboratory Safety at Penn State http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/labsafety.cfm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Safety Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Example/Template SOP that must be approved by Laser Safety's safe for maintenance to work on http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/SafetyClearance.pdf Bloodborne from all lab personnel. http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/unit_specific_plan_form.pdf Procedures

  6. GEOC R Lee Penn Sunday, March 25, 2012 12 -Biogeochemical transformation of Fe-and Mn-along a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration within the Christina River Basin Critical Zone States Organic carbon (C)-mineral complexation mechanism is crucial in C sequestration. It is a function

  7. CX-004034: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program Residential Ground Source Heat Pump Installation - GreggCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 10/08/2010Location(s): MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  8. Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator (SCPO)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Ke Liu, Gregg Deluga, Lanny Schmidt, and Ted Krause at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  9. Environmental Research Group 2014 Fall Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Research Group 2014 Fall Seminar Series October 24, 2014 Gregg 320, 12:00 1 of five hours, the city of Boston would have sustained even more damage from Hurricane Sandy than New York

  10. No American Miltons: Melville, Zukofsky, and America's Lost Epic Tradition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Timothy Clayton

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Penn. ? Melville the Poet. ? Selected Essays of Robert PennMelville The Making of the Poet. Evanston, Illinois:thanks. But then, as the poets remind us, it is due to these

  11. Engineering online and in-person social networks to sustain physical activity: application of a conceptual model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability * Correspondence: lrovniak@hmc.psu.edu Departments of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Penn State College

  12. PDF file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    a Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 231 Steidle Building, Penn State University, ..... such as electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, magnetic...

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE A computational study of the use of an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in structural engineering [25], pedestrian evacuation dynamics [35], granular ...... Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, 2004.

  14. Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through the largest gift in kind in the history of Penn State's College of Information Sciences and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrick, Irene J.

    Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through, Armstrong Process Group (APG), a leading enterprise architecture service provider, is contributing software, research collaboration and organizational guidance to the Center. "We are very happy to have the Armstrong

  15. IMAGING SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF Ti I 2231 nm IN A SUNSPOT M. J. PENN1,2, W. D. CAO3,4, S. R. WALTON2, G. A. CHAPMAN2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line at 2231.0 nm is used to probe the magnetic and velocity fields in the spot umbra and penumbra in the umbra, and a dependence of the magnetic field on the plasma temperature similar to that which was seen

  16. Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

  17. 1. Get in touch if you have any ?'s about the industry or life after Penn! And to satiate what I'm sure is burning curiosity... I took the bus.4:22 PM Feb 17th via web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    'm sure is burning curiosity... I took the bus.4:22 PM Feb 17th via web 2. Well guys, that's it for my day!! Off to see what the post fashion week new york night has to offer...4:18 PM Feb 17th via web 3 to come in for the month.4:06 PM Feb 17th via web 4. Well, it's getting quiet around here now that shows

  18. Mauro F. Guilln is the Director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute at Penn, a research-and-teaching program on management and international relations. He holds the Dr. Felix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    and Organizational Change in Argentina, South Korea, and Spain (2001), Models of Management (1994), and The AIDS. Applied Policy: Telecommunications Policy and Transnational Corporations. #12;He is an Associate Editor, Entrepreneur Magazine, Financial Times, Forbes, Foreign Policy, Hispanic Business, Los Angeles Times

  19. Friday, March 17, 2006 MARTIAN NEAR-SURFACE ICE: PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    mapping of the south polar residual ice cap deposits. 3:15 p.m. Gregg T. K. P. * Briner J. R. Paris K. N in the Martian North Polar Layered Deposits from Ice Flow Inverse Modeling [#1875] We analyze MOLA data Polar Layered Deposits [#2053] We have correlated layers exposed in trough walls across the martian

  20. dukenvironment NICHOLAS SCHOOL OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND EARTH SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    TaylorKaupe,PalmBeach,FL AmyM.SchickKenneyT'96,MEM'98,Consultant,Philadelphia,PA(Ex-Officio) EdgarMaeyensJr.H'72,ParkClocks,Chelsea,MA NancyRaglandPerkinsT'93,MEM'97,OfficeofU.S.Sen.JuddGregg,Washington,DC FrankW

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 61816185, doi:10.1002/2013GL058403, 2013 Marginal instability and deep cycle turbulence in the eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 6181­6185, doi:10.1002/2013GL058403, 2013 Marginal in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 6181­6185, doi:10.1002/2013GL058403. 1-8276/13/10.1002/2013GL058403 therefore come to be known as the "deep cycle" (DC) [Gregg et al., 1985; Moum and Caldwell

  2. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . Kodack 39 Wind tunnels at NASA Langley being removed by FRP, by Debra Valine 40 Renewable energy projects-of-year report, by Gregg Chislett 6 Afghanistan Engineer District-South ends 2011 on high note, by Karla Marshall 2011, by Rachel Goodspeed 16 Sustainable, energy-efficient communities start with great planning

  3. Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures GREGG R. GITSCHLAG and BRYAN A. HERCZEG Introduction In July 1992 the total number of oil and gas production platformsI in the Gulfof. In that year 51 dead sea turtles were found on upper Texas beaches during mid-March to mid-April following

  4. Special Publication 800-115 Technical Guide to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orebaugh of Booz Allen Hamilton, wish to thank their colleagues who reviewed drafts of this document, Derrick Dicoi, Daniel Owens, Victoria Thompson, Selena Tonti, Theodore Winograd, and Gregg Zepp of Booz Allen Hamilton for their keen and insightful assistance throughout the development of the document

  5. ULTRANS BOARD OF ADVISORS Biographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ULTRANS BOARD OF ADVISORS Biographies GREGG ALBRIGHT California Business, Transportation moved to Sacramento. #12;ULTRANS Board of Advisors Biographies ULTRANS BOA Meeting Page 2 September 23, and Papers in Regional Science. DALE BONNER Cal-Infra Advisors, INC. Dale Bonner is founder of Cal

  6. HEALTHY FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    HEALTHY FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS Alfonso Morales FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS Alfonso Morales1 and Gregg College School of Law. #12;2009 Healthy Food Outside 21 INTRODUCTION One hundred years ago street vendors

  7. VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

  8. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  9. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  10. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

  11. Journal of Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability, V. 10, no. 2, June 2000. Regression Test Selection for C++ Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    Journal of Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability, V. 10, no. 2, June 2000. Regression Test Selection for C++ Software Gregg Rothermel Dept. of Computer Science Oregon State University University Corvallis, OR 97331 dedhia@cs.orst.edu Abstract Regression testing is an important but expensive

  12. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (to appear). Empirical Studies of a Prediction Model for Regression Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    for Regression Test Selection Mary Jean Harrold 1 David Rosenblum 2 Gregg Rothermel 3 Elaine Weyuker 4 Abstract Regression testing is an important activity that can account for a large proportion of the cost of software maintenance. One approach to reducing the cost of regression testing is to employ a selective regression

  13. Stochastic inversion of magnetotelluric data using a sharp boundary parameterization and application to a geothermal site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    and application to a geothermal site Jinsong Chen1 , G. Michael Hoversten2 , Kerry Key3 , Gregg Nordquist4 case that mimics a geothermal exploration scenario. Our results demonstrated that the de- veloped on the estimates. We also applied the developed method to the field MT data collected from the Darajat geothermal

  14. Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 104(14), 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandcourt, Edwin M. 75 Graves, John E. 434 Gray, Andrew K. 182 Gregg, Jacob L. 643 Gudmundson, Carolyn J. 445 Gunderson, Donald R. 616 Hall, Norman G. 512 Hamner, William M. 46 Hare, Jonathan A. 256, Andrew J. 343 Ream, Rolf R. 445 Reddin, David G. 415 Riemer, Susan D. 626 Robblee, Michael B. 60

  15. Reliable Protein Folding on Complex Energy Landscapes: The Free Energy Reaction Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    Reliable Protein Folding on Complex Energy Landscapes: The Free Energy Reaction Path Gregg Lois the dynamics of protein folding. The key insight is that the search for the native protein conformation. In the ``new view'' of protein folding (3,7), statistical fluctuations on an energy landscape give rise

  16. Acknowledgment of reviewers The editorial staff of Fishery Bulletin would like to acknowledge the scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins Christopher N. Rooper Gregg Rosenkranz Paul J. Rudershausen Keith M. Sakuma Jameal Farouq Samhouri Butler Michael Canino Nick Caputi Massimiliano Cardinale R. Christopher Chambers Unai Cotano George Duffy Keith J. Dunton Rana W. El-Sabaawi Robert L. Emmett Robert J. Feller Michael L. Fine Gary R

  17. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  18. Stochastic inversion of 2D magnetotelluric data using sharp boundary parameterization Jinsong Chen*, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Michael G. Hoversten, Chevron Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    in computing power, especially parallel computing techniques, and the recent development of new numerical Institution of Oceanography, and Gregg Nordquist, Chevron Geothermal and Power Operations Summary Stochastic approaches for inverting geophysical data have many advantages over deterministic inversion methods in terms

  19. The effects of fracture fluid cleanup upon the analysis of pressure buildup tests in tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Atle Thomas

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Mast A-1 are interpreted as being longitudinal- and transverse-bar deposits and channel ARCO OIL AND GAS ~ I PHILLIPS SMITH CO ? ? I I CLAYTON WILUAMS Ja ~ G I SAM IAIGHES I L HARRISON CO Z I GREGG CO. T' PANOLA CO. RUSK CO. SHELBY CO...

  20. U.S. Geological Survey Artificial Recharge Workshop Proceedings, April 2-4, 2002,

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    i U.S. Geological Survey Artificial Recharge Workshop Proceedings, April 2-4, 2002, Sacramento Strategies for Degradation of Organic Contaminants in Karst by Tom D. Byl, Gregg E. Hileman, Shannon D and the New York City Department of Environmental Protection by William A. Yulinsky, Paul Misut, and Donald K

  1. cONNEcTiONS SPriNG 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    curricular cONNEcTiONS GuiDE SPriNG 2015 Aquila Theatre Wuthering Heights Photo Credit: Richard Termine (top) Susan Brandeis Design Class at the Gregg Museum Photo Credit: Matthew Gay (bottom) #12G) is a great way to integrate the arts into academic work, to foster a well-rounded education where art

  2. Proc. of the ACM Int'l. Symp on Softw. Testing and Analysis, Seattle, WA, August 1994, pages 169184. Selecting Tests and Identifying Test Coverage Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    of structural coverage crite­ ria. Our technique partitions an existing test suite into two subsets: testsProc. of the ACM Int'l. Symp on Softw. Testing and Analysis, Seattle, WA, August 1994, pages 169­184. Selecting Tests and Identifying Test Coverage Requirements for Modified Software* Gregg Rothermel and Mary

  3. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series with regions of strong anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Citation: Erickson, D. J., III, R. T. Mills, J. Gregg, T. J

  4. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  5. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  6. analysis activities reporting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ability of Penn State researchers to compete Lee, Dongwon 26 NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report October 2000 Geosciences Websites Summary: for Climate Monitoring 8. CMDP CBRAMS...

  7. Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bayer MaterialSciencePenn State Consortium In order to achieve the required airtight envelope, commercial buildings with masonry facades in Climate Zones 4 and 5 are faced...

  8. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Technology Integration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    activities 2011amr08.pdf More Documents & Publications Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate) Program for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage...

  9. Contracting and litigation under biases and asymmetric information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovander, Elisa Wynne Kirsten

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF THE DISSERTATION Contracting and Litigation Under Biasesand David Thesmar, Financial Contracting with Opti- misticAl- ways Enforce What Contracting Parties Write? Penn

  10. Gateway:Amrica Latina/Aprender ms sobre las ERNC/Seleccion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Universidad de Penn State Idioma: Ingls Algas The Biology and Business of Biofuels: Algae as Biofuel Fuente: Universidad de California Idioma: Ingls Algal Derived Biofuels...

  11. Comeback Kids Win DOEs Collegiate Wind Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presented with an unforeseen challenge, the Penn State University team went the distance to win the Energy Departments inaugural Collegiate Wind Competition.

  12. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Univ. Pittsburgh) Theory and Computation Thomas Klassen (GKSS- Research Center, Germany) Nanostuctured Hydrides Peter Eklund (Penn State Univ) Carbon related materials Basic...

  13. aacp educating clinical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Maryland School of Medicine 100 Penn Street, Suite 115 Baltimore, MD 21201 Weber, David J. 4 Physician Assessment and Clinical Education Environmental Sciences and...

  14. Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region

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    Schwartz, Marla Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

  15. Appendix B (Documentation of Consultation)

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    Lee, Dongwon

    #12;#12;#12;#12;Appendix B (Documentation of Consultation) PSU and LCCC have entered this agreement Provost and Dean for Enrollment Management & Admissions Penn State University #12;

  16. Appendix B: (Documentation of Consultation)

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    Lee, Dongwon

    #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Appendix B: (Documentation of Consultation) PSU and NCC have entered Management & Admissions Penn State University #12;

  17. Supporting Information Enhanced Activated Carbon Cathode Performance for Microbial Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, 231Q Sackett Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA 2 State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - active handling building Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 26 Penn State Harrisburg SafetyPolice Services...

  19. Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration Using UltraBattery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Demonstration Using UltraBattery Technology (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration Using UltraBattery Technology (October 2012) East Penn...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian triga mark Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences, Paleomagnetic Laboratory Collection: Geosciences 50 478 IEEE Transactionson Energy Conversion,vol.7, No. 3, September1092. THE PENN STATE INTELLIGENT DISTRIBUTED...

  1. PDF file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    a Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 119 Steidle Building, Penn State Uni6ersity, ... effective linear electric and elastic properties of a mi-.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - axisymmetric shock wave Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUNY at Stony Brook Collection: Mathematics 11 AIAA-92-0315 Experiments on ShockVortex Interactions Summary: Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 Abstract The...

  3. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Penn State project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  4. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Penn State project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Electrolytes - R&D for Advanced Lithium Batteries. Interfacial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Johnson). * Providing samples for analysis by Dielectric Relaxation( Penn State and Neutron Scattering(NIST) Future Work * Continued Synthesis of polyelectrolyte materials -...

  6. Demonstrating and Deploying Integrated Retrofit Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and solutions that can achieve 50% energy reduction in small- and medium-sized commercial buildings (SMSCBs). The Penn State Consortium collaborates with other research...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobial surveillance program Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Extension Summary: of Veterinary Science University Park, PA 16802 12;Philosophy of the Food Safety Program at Penn State farm... ;Farm Table Production...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - arst ants erm Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Final Report Executive Summary Vision: The Environmental Resource... Management (ERM) program at Penn State University aspires to excellence in training students to become......

  9. DOE Announces Contracts to Achieve $140 Million in Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Penn.) - The project will provide a showcase of innovative technologies, including: biogas boilers, green roofs, hybrid lighting, advanced metering, solar lighting, rooftop wind...

  10. analog integrated circuits: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Academic, ON, DECREASING, and OFF Visual Signals KWABENA BOAHEN Penn Bioengineering, 3320 Smith Walk Boahen, Kwabena 15 Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing, 43,...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture agricultural research Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to students and advocate for agricultural education, research and extension... Potato Products facility. Keith is a graduate of Penn State with a B.S. in Agricultural...

  12. http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Optimization of a Vortex Finder in a Cyclone Separator using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Tracking with Coupled Multi-Phase Computational Fluid Dynamics Matt Crowell, Mechanical Engineering senior, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College Dr. William Lasher, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College Overview Fluidized bed power plants suspend particles in a fluid medium

  13. Conservation Law Models for Traffic Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressan, Alberto

    Conservation Law Models for Traffic Flow Alberto Bressan Mathematics Department, Penn State University http://www.math.psu.edu/bressan/ Alberto Bressan (Penn State) Scalar Conservation Laws 1 / 117 #12;Review of hyperbolic conservation laws Models of traffic flow, on a single road and on a network of roads

  14. Research and Technology Transfer Organization www.techtransfer.psu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Research and Technology Transfer Organization www.techtransfer.psu.edu from idea to product #12;About us Research and Technology Transfer Organization from idea to product The Penn State Research and Technology Transfer Organization (RTTO) consists of four units working together to connect industry to Penn

  15. Engineering Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Engineering Engineering Technology & A T P E N N S T A T E 2 0 1 0 ­ 2 0 1 1 #12;2 Join us at penn state! Since 1896, Penn State has been a leader in engineering and engineering technology education varieties of engineering and engineering technology majors found anywhere in the United States. This means

  16. College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING

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    Maroncelli, Mark

    College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING in Learning, Discovery and Engagement 2014-2019 STRATEGY #12;College of Engineering PREAMBLE The College of Engineering at Penn State is a leading academy, research enterprise and service to the global engineering community. Innovation is a hallmark of Penn State

  17. AlmAnAc november 15, 1994 Published by the University of PennsylvaniaTuesday, November 15, 1994 Volume 41 Number 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    Opening, p. 3 · Rhoads Pavilion, p. 4; PennMed Stories, p. 5 · MGA Program: Hostile Takeover?, pp. 6 scientists, engineers, physicists, linguists,androboticsspecialistsatPenn,Illinois and Maryland, who have." The virtual supercomputer is expected to be sopowerfulandfastthatitcanbeusedbyanyone linked into the system

  18. Long Ways from Home: The Rhetoric and Performance of the American Folk Outlaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Damian

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    , but soon becomes more of a consumed rebel without a cause disingenuously trying to desperately secure a stable domestic life. And we see Billy the Kid in a film like Arthur Penns The Left Handed Gun (1958) as an illiterate, emotionally unstable kid who...

  19. Economic aspects of black bases in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoen, Wayne Ayron

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the f easibility of using sand-asphalt stabilized base courses. Gregg reported that the sand-asphalt bases investigated in the field studies performed well under moving traffic. Moduli of resilient deformation of the bitumen-sand mixtures were... Ayron Schoen, B. S. , Texas ARK University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jon A. Epps Although black base construction has gained increasing popularity in recent years, the rising costs of asphalt and asphalt materials have demanded that more...

  20. Approaches to Forming a Water-soluble Extracellular Domain From ?3 Subunits of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankovich, Victoria Lea

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    APPROACHES TO FORMING A WATER-SOLUBLE EXTRACELLULAR DOMAIN FROM ?3 SUBUNITS OF NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS An Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis by VICTORIA LEA FRANKOVICH Submitted to Honors and Undergraduate Research... Acetylcholine Receptors. (May 2014) Victoria Lea Frankovich Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Gregg Wells Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine Texas A&M Health Science Center Obtaining...

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of 2.45 GHz rectifying antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McSpadden, James Oliver

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intyre for consenting to serve on my advisory committee. Much recognition and gratitude is expressed to William C. Brown for his constant advice, assistance, and encouragement throughout this research. A special gratefulness is extended to Richard M. Dickinson.... Nobuyuki Kaya of Kobe University, Japan, Alan Brown of the Center for Space Power, Gregg Maryniak of the International Space University, and Dr. Henry Brandhorst of NASA's Lewis Research Center for allowing the METS project to happen. The donated printed...

  2. Feline pancreatic lipase: purification and validation of a clinically significant radioimmunoassay for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Benjamin Gregg

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    FELINE PANCREATIC LIPASE: PURIFICATION AND VALIDATION OF A CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT RADIOIMMUNOASSAY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF FELINE PANCREATITIS A Thesis by BENJAMIN GREGG WILSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2003 Major Subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences iii FELINE PANCREATIC LIPASE: PURIFICATION AND VALIDATION OF A CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT...

  3. University of Vermont College of Medicine Residency Appointment List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    San Francisco Pediatrics - Primary San Francisco, CA James Corbett-Detig UC San Diego Med. Center Hershey Med. Center/Penn State Vascular Surgery Hershey, PA Joseph Foley Roger Williams Med. Center

  4. Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Kevin; Jensen, Paul R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orcutt B, et al: Ecological genomics of marine roseobacters.1037-1042. Penn and Jensen BMC Genomics 2012, 13:86 http://and Jensen: Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 542 (2005) 134141 Study of water distribution and transport in a polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 542 (2005) 134­141 Study of water has been developed at the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Neutron images allow us to visualize

  6. pi+p, pi+n, AND pi+d INTERACTIONS - A COMPILATION: PARTS I and II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chew, D.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRS A ORUC OXF PENN PITH PPl RPPA PSEH PURD QUNS REHO RHE lI) ADERHDll KRAMER NP B8 PPL 25 Y=A EXP(-B*ABS(TI) ) KRAMER1.170 BELL PPL 20 **. *********** **************************

  7. pi+p, pi+n, AND pi+d INTERACTIONS - A COMPILATION: PART I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chew, D.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRS A ORUC OXF PENN PITH PPl RPPA PSEH PURD QUNS REHO RHE lI) ADERHDll KRAMER NP B8 PPL 25 Y=A EXP(-B*ABS(TI) ) KRAMER1.170 BELL PPL 20 **. *********** **************************

  8. EEHG Performance and Scaling Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Gregory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    References [1] G. Stupakov, Using the Beam-Echo Effect for6] G. Stupakov, Effect of Coulomb collisions on echo-G. Penn and M. Reinsch, Designs and numerical calculations for echo-

  9. To place your meal order please dial MEAL (ext. 6325)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Marinara/Garlic Butter/Pesto/Meatballs a: Rotini or Whole Wheat Penne w/ your choice of: General Tso Provolone Breads White, Wheat, Rye, Kaiser Roll, Hoagie Roll of Wheat Oatmeal Blueberry Mini Muffin Corn Mini Muffin Hash Brown Bagel

  10. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (FEERC), including optimizing engines for high ethanol-content fuels and advanced combustion strategies, and engine optimization for high ethanol-content fuels. Jim received his Ph.D. in Fuel Science from Penn

  11. The Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meville, Jeff; Wilson, Jack; Manz, John; Gannett, Kirk; Smith, Franzennia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A look into some of the remarkable work being done in the Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College. Penn College's program has served as the model for six other training centers in Pennsylvania alone.

  12. The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pennsylvanian Pennsylvanian Pennsylvanian Canyon Reef Canyon Reef Pennsylvanian Reef Penney'lvanian Reef Penn'sylvanian Reef Wolfcamp San Andres Silurian OH ? open hole completion P - perforated completion 81 31 40 44 45 39 ll 28 10 127 296...

  13. Supporting Information Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, 231Q Sackett Building, University Park, PA and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P.R. China b Department

  14. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gregory T

    Background: Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. ...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural impact statement Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Keith E. Masser is ChairmanCEO of Sterman Masser, Inc. in Sacramento, Summary: Potato Products facility. Keith is a graduate of Penn State with a B.S. in Agricultural...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha chain cd25 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Expected False Discoveries Dean Foster Bob Stine Department... Meeting, Salt Lake City August 2007 Bob Stine (U Penn) Alpha-investing JSM 2007 1 16 12;Overview 1......

  17. The Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Meville, Jeff; Wilson, Jack; Manz, John; Gannett, Kirk; Smith, Franzennia;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A look into some of the remarkable work being done in the Weatherization Training program at Pennsylvania College. Penn College's program has served as the model for six other training centers in Pennsylvania alone.

  18. Steps Toward a Successful Transition to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Steps Toward a Successful Transition to No-Till Sjoerd W. Duiker Soil Management Specialist, Penn .................................................................................. 3 Planning the transition to no ........................................................................ 12 Cover crop selection and management .............................................. 12 STEP 3

  19. Disease Dynamics Evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Myriant Corporation Established Scholarship for Excellence in Bio-Energy and Energy Sustainability: Graphics&Design Penn State Eberly College of Science22 #12;Dear Friends of the College, This issue

  20. Molhabilidade: Tendncia de um determinado fludo espalhar ou aderir sobre uma superfcie slida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    . C., Sheu, E.Y., "Structure and Dynamics of Asphaltenes", Plenum Press, NY, 1998. ·Becker, J.R., "Crude Oil - Waxes, Emulsion and Asphaltenes", PennWell Books, Tulsa, 1997. ·Adamson, A.W., "Physical

  1. Chapter 1. Introduction to Nutrient Management Gregory K. Evanylo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Chapter 1. Introduction to Nutrient Management Gregory K. Evanylo Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Douglas Beegle Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Penn State University................................. 3 Fate and transport of nutrients

  2. An evaluation of gaseous sterilants under various conditions and their effect upon the heat resistance of Salmonella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Md. Razzak

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous Sterilant Exposure Chamber Environment for Gas Exposure Tests with Formaldehyde Preparation for Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Test with Beta-propiolactone Test with Penn Gas 10 10 10 10 12 IV. RESULTS Test wi. th Formaldehyde Test... with BPL Test with Penn Gas 14 14 17 19 V DISCUSSION 23 iv Chapter VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED . . . , ~ ~ ~ . 26 47 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Effect of formaldehyde (conc. 0. 005 ml/L) with subsequent heat treatment (50 C...

  3. Owning and Belonging: Southern Literature and the Environment, 1903-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beilfuss, Michael J.

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, M. Jimmie Killingsworth Committee Members, William Bedford Clark Dennis Berthold Tarla Rai Peterson Head of Department, Nancy Warren August 2012 Major Subject: English iii ABSTRACT... to William Bedford Clark for encouraging my studies of Robert Penn Warren and William Faulkner, and for generously providing financial assistance with his Cornerstone Grant so I could present a paper at the annual Robert Penn Warren Circle Meeting...

  4. Also visit my online sites on Facebook www.facebook.com/ceceiliajill or LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/ceceilia about 20 hours ago via web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    .linkedin.com/in/ceceilia about 20 hours ago via web Love the online Profile that ShannonKelly did in PennCareerServices @PennCareerDay http://ulife.vpul.upenn.edu/careerservices/blog/?cat=92 about 20 hours ago via web Looong drive out starting point. about 20 hours ago via web Time to go out and have fun but will continue to tweet

  5. An evaluation of radio-iodinated human serum albumin in the dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, David Martin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iodinated (131I) human serum albumin. I. Animal studies. Circulation. 4: 552-556, 1951. 19. McFarlane, W. S. Efficient trace-labeling of proteins with iodine. Nature, 182: 53, 1958. 20. Prinzmetal, M. , E. Corday, R. J. Spritzler, and W. Flieg.... Nature. 190: 1211-1212, 1961. Seely, R. D. , W. E. Nerlich, and D. E. Gregg. A comparison of cardiac output determined by the Fick procedure and a direct method using the rotameter? Circulation. 1: 1261-1266, 1950. 25. Shipley, R. A. , R. E. Clark, D...

  6. A review of "A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718" by Edward Corp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molly McClain

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of History at the University of Toulouse. In addition to producing an impressive array of ar- ticles, Corp has curated and written the catalogs of two major exhibitions, La Cour des Stuarts ? Saint-Germain-en-Laye au temps de Louis XIV (1992) and The King... of Saint- Germain. In Chapter 1, Edward Gregg provides a detailed account of the activities of the exiled Stuarts from the Revolution of 1688-89 to the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. He suggests that James II and Louis XIV were not friends until after...

  7. Oyster River CHILD STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    PICKUP !( !( ALL CAMPUS CONNECTOR ROUTES ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC University of New Hampshire Information Center Mast Road Durham, New Hampshire (603) 862-2328 JULY 2013 § WEEKEND & WINTER BAN EVENING #12; PRINTING SERVICES ALUMNI CENTER GREGG HALL ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ? ??? ??? ?????? ??? ??? ?????? ?? ? ??? ???

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Quan, Wenying; Xiao, Jing; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Fujii, Mamoru; Sun, Funxia; Shalaby, Cigdem; Li, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ma, Xiaoliang; Johnson, David; Lee, Jeong; Fedkin, Mark; LaBarbera, Mark; Das, Debanjan; Thompson, David; Lvov, Serguei; Song, Chunshan

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE project at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) initially involved Siemens Energy, Inc. to (1) develop new fuel processing approaches for using selected alternative and renewable fuels anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and commercial diesel fuel (with 15 ppm sulfur) in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems; and (2) conduct integrated fuel processor SOFC system tests to evaluate the performance of the fuel processors and overall systems. Siemens Energy Inc. was to provide SOFC system to Penn State for testing. The Siemens work was carried out at Siemens Energy Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA. The unexpected restructuring in Siemens organization, however, led to the elimination of the Siemens Stationary Fuel Cell Division within the company. Unfortunately, this led to the Siemens subcontract with Penn State ending on September 23rd, 2010. SOFC system was never delivered to Penn State. With the assistance of NETL project manager, the Penn State team has since developed a collaborative research with Delphi as the new subcontractor and this work involved the testing of a stack of planar solid oxide fuel cells from Delphi.

  9. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

  10. Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn States chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Because helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.

  11. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  12. NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 1123 Gas Well Drilling and Your Private Water Supply (2010). Penn State University Cooperative Extension for CSI Documenting Contamination of Private Water Supplies by Gas Well Drilling in New York State (2009

  13. A Stormwater Master Plan For The University of Pennsylvania Finding Opportunities for Sustainable Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    's goals for increased environmental sustainability, increased green space, and reduced utility costs). EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Study Area (251.6 acres) WALL GREEN SPACE PAVEMENT UNIVERSITY OWNED BUILDING NON - PENN Waters. One of the performance standards included within this plan involves the development of Green

  14. Conventional wisdom has long held that innovation is the strength of the West and that what gets developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is completing his PhD in social media and innovation at Penn State University. He is a Royal Thai GovernmentConventional wisdom has long held that innovation is the strength of the West and that what gets not support this assump- tion. In point of fact, we're seeing a rise in the number of innovations coming from

  15. Visual Arts Safety Plan: 1. Visual Arts Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    and guidance to help you conduct your work safely and in compliance with environmental health and safety. The Visual Arts Safety plan should be made available to all workers and all persons in your area who work for good practice. The requirements for working with Lasers can be found in SY-17. This Penn State Safety

  16. Should You Join a Landowner Group? Gas Royalties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Should You Join a Landowner Group? Gas Royalties Penn State is committed to affirmative action will sign for the exact same rental fees and royalties, landowners in the bargaining unit will receive with this group. It could be an up-front fee per acre or a per- centage of the royalty, or both. What are other

  17. Focus on Research Three New DOE Energy Centers Awarded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    and instructors of solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar heating and cooling (SHC) technologies across the country, and service of both solar PV and solar heating and cooling technologies. Solar Instructor Trainings classes and learning opportunities for Penn State stu- dents, such as a new solar PV design

  18. Efficient recovery of nano-sized iron oxide particles from synthetic acid-mine drainage (AMD) water using fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Hangzhou 310027, PR China b Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 212 Sackett Building, Penn (AMD) is an important contributor to surface water pollution due to the release of acid and metals. Fe chemicals such as lead, copper, cadmium, and arsenic. AMD can be difficult and costly to treat. Treatment

  19. 9/14/2012 BOT 1 1:30 p.m. -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    , NY) 2014 - J. David Rogers, Chief Executive Officer, J.D. Capital Management (Greenwich, CT) Gary, NY) It is proposed to appoint Blake Gall and Edward R. Hintz, Jr. to membership with terms expiring, That Blake Gall and Edward R. Hintz, Jr., non-University employees, are appointed to the Penn State

  20. Minutes of the Meeting Wednesday, January 18, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    . Foley's absence. The minutes of the meeting of December 14, 2011, were approved. COMMUNICATIONS to Dr. Foley for individuals to represent Penn State in the 2012 competition. #12;Minutes of the Meeting Student and Faculty Issues Dr. Vasilatos-Younken recognized Dr. James Nemes, Chair, Committee on Gra

  1. Minimizing Private Data Disclosures in the Smart Grid Weining Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Patrick Drew

    Minimizing Private Data Disclosures in the Smart Grid Weining Yang Purdue University yang469@cs@cse.psu.edu Patrick McDaniel Penn State University mcdaniel@cse.psu.edu ABSTRACT Smart electric meters pose monitors, smart meter data can reveal precise home appliance usage information. An emerging solution

  2. Stephen E. McLaughlin Computer Science and Engineering Pennsylvania State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adam D.

    International Conference on Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm). Tainan City, Taiwan. November 2012Daniel. Minimizing Private Data Disclosures in the Smart Grid. 19th ACM Conference on Computer and Com- munications Infrastructure Security Lab Penn State University, January 2009 - Present Conducted penetration testing of smart

  3. 384 VOLUME 131M O N T H L Y W E A T H E R R E V I E W 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    . The simulations are generated with the fifth-generation Penn- sylvania State University­National Center a persistent positive pressure bias is found in the model simulations, caused by the interaction between, temperature, wind speed, wind direction, and water vapor mixing ratio, as well as the diurnal cycles

  4. Department of Bioengineering Spring 2013 Robotic Arm Rest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Bioengineering Spring 2013 Robotic Arm Rest Overview Patients with Upper with the constant contractions of their arm muscles. Physicians at the Penn State Hershey Rehabilitation Hospital stabilize and support the patient's outstretched arm. Objectives The main objectives were to create

  5. BGSU ASIAN POPULAR CULTURE SYMPOSIUM by Esther Clinton, Jeremy Wallach, and Kristen Rudisill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    ethnomusicologist Paul D. Greene from Penn State. Dis- Bowling Green State University P O P U L A R C U LT U R E N E Scholars from around the country converged on Bowling Green's campus for the BGSU Asian Popular Culture Sym by the hospitality they encoun- tered and by the undeniable usefulness of the Bowling Green approach, with its

  6. The Manually Annotated Sub-Corpus: A Community Resource For and By the People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ide, Nancy

    of Computer Science Vassar College Poughkeepsie, NY, USA ide@cs.vassar.edu Collin Baker International Computer Street Journal corpus known as the Penn Treebank (Mar- cus et al., 1993), which over the years has been". However, like the Wall Street Journal corpus, OntoNotes is limited in the range of genres it includes

  7. ISA | InTech Home 19 March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and efficiencies similar to those we have achieved with platinum-catalyzed carbon cloth," said Bruce E. Logan, Penn they had to locate the stainless steel brush very close to the graphite fiber brush anode for optimum energy recovery," Logan said. He did say however, "One problem might be the stainless steel brushes

  8. Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2010 Materials Handling for Oilseed Press and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil Overview Penn State Farm Operations has an expeller press for producing meal and oil from various seeds. The oil from the press is currently being used as biodiesel that needed to be replaced every two hours. The oil is worth two dollars per gallon as fuel, but if it can

  9. Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Selcuk Bayraktar, Georgios architecture (Cloud cap technologies) Hybrid Modeling (of the Piccolo autopilot) Experiments Autonomous Flight - 20min #12;UAVs @ Penn Servos controlling the payload LaptopPC Dell X200 3.5HP fuel engine Deployable

  10. 18 August 2009 www.fwbog.com Range Resources'(RRC) fourth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    the Marcellus gas shale's breakout year. At the time, the "official" sources, including the U.S. Geological recoverable gas from Appalachian Basin black shales had mysteriously dropped out of sight.At a Petroleum authority on the recent Marcellus gas shale play, holds degrees from Penn State B.S. ('68), Yale M.S. ('72

  11. Examples of CSATS Projects Center for Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Examples of CSATS Projects Center for Science and the Schools The Pennsylvania State University 182-5901; Tel 814- CSATS-Hosted Outreach Saturday Science Workshops for Teachers Research Experiences for Urban Science Teachers Penn State STEM Outreach Database STEM Research Grants Research and Education on Buruli

  12. T h e P e n n S T a T e S T r a T e g i c P l a n 2 0 0 9 1 0 t h r o u g h 2 0 1 3 1 4 e x e c u T i v e S u m m a r y Priorities for Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Farmers' high School, has grown into a large and tremendously diverse university. It is today among many constitu- ents--while becoming more efficient and effective. Despite obvious challenges pursuit of excel- lence. Penn State is a very efficient institution that has accomplished great things

  13. New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies.

  14. The Pennsylvania State University www.BioEnergyBridge.psu.edu 1 BioEnergy Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    © The Pennsylvania State University www.BioEnergyBridge.psu.edu 1 Penn State BioEnergy# trichard@psu.edu rtw103@psu.edu www.bioenergy.psu.edu Biomass Energy Center #12;© The Pennsylvania State · The BioEnergy BridgeTM will address the full spectrum of challenges to our national priority of reducing

  15. Page 1 of 13 e of this P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    of a rich ts. At Pen s through ng digital he process digital iden managing he asserti he Univers he techno digital i upport the r authentic s at Penn ce of deve tity and A echnology ary Identi comprised e Universi

  16. CAREER SERVICES University of Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    admission. A search of LinkedIn and the Penn Alumni on line directory was accessed to search for any updated RESPONDENTS Number Accepted Organization 14 Accenture 8 Goldman Sachs, McKinsey & Company 5 Amazon, Barclays, Blackstone Group, Citigroup, Microsoft 4 Bank of America/Merrill Lynch, Booz & Company, Facebook 3 AQR

  17. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel Olivier Courty a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Paris, France b Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, 227 Reber Building, Penn State Available online 14 May 2014 a b s t r a c t As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a con- centration gradient due to Fick's law and under

  18. Study of phase transitions in piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride M. Latour and H. Abo Dorra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    groups : Solvay (Belgium), Kureha Chemical Ind. (Japan), Pennwalt Chemicals Co. (USA) and Rhône by suspension (Kureha, Solvay, Rhône-Poulenc) and the other by emulsion (Penn- walt). Generally [7 grade. Z .1 FILMS FROM SoLVAY. - The previous reference to this film, Solef XION, is now Solef 1010 FEF

  19. Sharon Thompson-Schill Explores the Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon

    WiTh clAss--Teaching & Learning What Will You Do Managing enviromental risks in an Uncertain World 33 l to Change lives into the Water Penn Humanities Forum resetting the Biological Clock Machine language- rian who could be a new addition to our faculty. Managing the astonishing intellectual breadth

  20. Ice Hockey vs. Ithaca College Sa 11/2 Women's Soccer Tournament Su 11/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Facilities Ice Hockey vs. Ithaca College Sa 11/2 Women's Soccer Tournament Su 11/3 Women/16 Fencing Club Tournament Su 11/17 Ice Hockey vs. Penn State Sa 11/22 Ice Hockey vs. Cortland State Su 11

  1. New Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire Wednesday, 06 June 2007 According to Penn State researchers, the answer to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells under the sea may be discarded lobster and crab shells. Microbial fuel cells produce energy when the microbes consume organic

  2. Generating electricity from renewable sources will soon become as easy as putting a brush and a tube in a tub of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    and a tube in a tub of wastewater. A carbon fiber, bottle-brush anode developed by Penn State researchers, adapted from existing wastewater treatment equipment, will complete the circuit. "The carbon fiber brushes. Previously, Logan and his team showed that small, rectangular fuel cells that used a carbon fiber paper

  3. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    (Limit1) RiceKrispies Cheerios FrostedFlakes SpecialK CreamofWheat Oatmeal BreakfastBreads(Limit1Entrée) HOTENTREES: BakedTilapia Turkeyw/Stuffing&Gravy Macaroni&Cheese Meatloaf Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne wVanillaCake FrostedChocolateCake PoundCake AngelFoodCake Brownie Sherbet:Raspberry,Orange Pudding

  4. DINNER MENU 5 (Limit 1 Hot or 1 Cold Entre)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Macaroni & Cheese Pasta: Rotini or Whole Wheat Penne w/your choice of: Marinara /Meatballs Southwest & Vinegar/Low fat Italian/ Low fat French) DESSERTS: Angel Food Cake Diet Gelatin Diet Pudding: Chocolate Chicken Salad Roast Beef Swiss Breads: White, Wheat, Rye Kaiser Roll Peanut Butter & Diet Jelly Extras

  5. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Burrito:Eggs,Cheese, Salsainawrap TurkeySausage Cereals RiceKrispies SpecialK Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat Raisin/Stuffing&Gravy Macaroni&Cheese Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof:Marinara/Meatballs Southwest,1mustbefruit) AngelFoodCakeDietGelatin DietPudding:Chocolate,Vanilla Sherbet:Raspberry,Orange Italian

  6. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Krispies FrostedFlakes SpecialKCheerios CreamofWheatOatmeal BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin Blueberry/Stuffing&Gravy Grilled Chicken Pot Roast Meatloaf Chicken Marsala Macaroni & Cheese Pasta: Rotini or (Whole Wheat Penne w,1mustbefruit) PoundCakeBrownieAngelFoodCake Sherbet:Raspberry ItalianIce:Cherry,Watermelon,Lemon Fresh

  7. June 2014 Newell Drive Menu c:\\users\\hmonkhorst\\appdata\\local\\microsoft\\windows\\temporary internet files\\content.outlook\\azxec63b\\june

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapletal, Jindrich

    Sandwich on Wheat S: Graham Crackers, Peaches 16 17 18 19 20 B: Cold Cereal, Orange Juice, Milk L: Latin Turkey Breast w/ Gravy, Maple Caramelized Carrots, Whole Wheat Penne Pasta, Crushed Pineapple, Milk Meat Alt- Dinner Roll S: Birthday Day Snack Angel Food Cake, Vanilla Ice Cream 23 24 25 26 27 B: Cold

  8. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Burrito:Eggs,Cheese,Salsaina wrap TurkeySausage CEREALS RiceKrispies SpecialK Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat Raisin/Stuffing&Gravy Macaroni&Cheese Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof:Marinara/Meatballs Southwest,1mustbefruit) AngelFoodCakeDietGelatin DietPudding:Chocolate,Vanilla Sherbet:Raspberry,Orange Italian

  9. To place your meal order please dial MEAL (ext. 6325)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Vegetarian Chili Pasta: Rotini or Whole Wheat Penne w/ your choice of: Marinara/Pesto From the Grill Butter & Jelly Breads: White, Wheat, Rye, Kaiser Roll Extras: Lettuce, Tomato, Onion, Pickle indicates Hard Boiled Egg Egg Substitute French Toast Pancakes Cream of Wheat Oatmeal English Muffin Bagel

  10. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Krispies SpecialKCheerios CreamofWheat Oatmeal BreakfastBreads BlueberryMiniMuffin (1CHO) CornMiniMuffin(1CHO) ChickenMarsala(1CHO) Meatloaf(1CHO)PotRoast Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w,1mustbefruit)(Each 1CHO) AngelFoodCake FreshFruit:Apple,Grapes,Pineapple, CannedFruit:Peaches,Pears, Applesauce

  11. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Oatmeal CreamofWheat BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin Croissant BlueberryMiniMuffin Corn&Cheese Meatloaf ChickenMarsala PotRoast Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof: Marinara) FrostedVanillaCakePoundCake BrownieFrostedChocolateCake AngelFoodCake Cookies

  12. September 2014 Newell Drive Menu \\\\ad.ufl.edu\\hr\\home\\hmonkhorst\\desktop\\september 2014.docx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , Yogurt, California Veggie Blend, Apple Slices, Milk Dairy Alt- Turkey Sandwich on Wheat S: Graham Caramelized Carrots, Whole Wheat Penne Pasta, Crushed Pineapple, Milk Meat Alt- Yogurt S: Club Crackers/Garlic Sauce, Diced Pears, Milk Dairy Alt- Ham Sandwich S: Birthday Day Snack Angel Food Cake, Vanilla Ice

  13. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CreamofWheat BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin Croissant CornMiniMuffin BreakfastPotatoes BagelPotPie Turkeyw/Stuffing&Gravy ChickenMarsala GrilledChicken PotRoast Pasta:Rotini,WholeWheatPenne orw,1mustbefruit) AngelFoodCake Cookies:ChocolateChip,PeanutButter ItalianIce:Cherry,Watermelon,Lemon Fresh

  14. To place your meal order please dial MEAL (ext. 6325)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    & Cheese Turkey Pot Pie Chicken Marsala Pot Roast Meatloaf Pasta: Rotini or Whole Wheat Penne w/ your Provolone Breads White, Wheat, Rye, Kaiser Roll, Hoagie Roll Peanut Butter & Jelly Turkey Club (w Toast Pancakes Cream of Wheat Oatmeal English Muffin Croissant Blueberry Mini Muffin Corn Mini Muffin

  15. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ) RiceKrispies FrostedFlakes SpecialK Cheerios CreamofWheat Oatmeal BreakfastBreads(Limit1Entrée) HOTENTREES: BakedTilapia Turkeyw/Gravy Macaroni&Cheese Meatloaf Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne wVanillaCake PoundCake FrostedChocolateCake Brownie AngelFoodCake Sherbet:Raspberry,Orange Pudding

  16. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Krispies FrostedFlakes SpecialK Cheerios CreamofWheat Oatmeal BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin Blueberry/Stuffing&Gravy Grilled Chicken Meatloaf Macaroni & Cheese Chicken Marsala Pot Roast Pasta: Rotini or (Whole Wheat Penne w,1mustbefruit) PoundCakeBrownieAngelFoodCake Sherbet:Raspberry ItalianIce:Cherry,Watermelon,Lemon Fresh

  17. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    K Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin BlueberryMiniMuffin Corn Macaroni&CheeseChickenMarsala Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof:Marinara/ GarlicVanillaCakePoundCake BrownieFrostedChocolateCake AngelFoodCake Cookies:ChocolateChip,OatmealRaisin, PeanutButter Sherbet

  18. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    K Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat BreakfastBreads(Limit1) EnglishMuffin BlueberryMiniMuffin Corn Macaroni&CheeseChickenMarsala Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof:Marinara/ GarlicFrostedChocolateCake AngelFoodCake Cookies:ChocolateChip,OatmealRaisin, PeanutButter Sherbet:Raspberry,Orange Pudding

  19. BREAKFAST MENU (665 MG NA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    K (130 mg) Cheerios(130 mg) Raisin Bran (210 mg) Cream of Wheat (85 mg) Oatmeal (0 MG) Breakfast mg) Pasta: Rotini /Whole Wheat Penne w/your choice of: Marinara (240 mg)/Pesto (0 mg) From the Grill/Lowfat Italian/Lowfat French) (5 MG) DESSERTS: Angel Food Cake (280 MG) Diet Gelatin (5 MG) Diet Pudding: Vanilla

  20. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Burrito:Eggs,Cheese, Salsainawrap (2CHO) TurkeySausage Cereals(1CHOEACH) RiceKrispies SpecialK Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheatCHO) Turkeyw/Stuffing&Gravy(2CHO) Macaroni&Cheese(2CHO) Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w (Oil&Vinegar/LowfatItalian/LowfatFrench) DESSERTS:(Limit2,1mustbefruit)(1 CHOEACH) Angel

  1. BREAKFASTMenu1+3 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Burrito:Eggs,Cheese, Salsainawrap TurkeySausage Cereals RiceKrispies SpecialK Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat Raisin&Cheese Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne w/yourchoiceof:Marinara/Meatballs SouthwestVegetarianChili FromtheSaladw/Cucumbers&OrganicField Greens (Oil&Vinegar/LowfatItalian/ LowfatFrench) DESSERTS:(Limit2,1mustbefruit) Angel

  2. March 2014 Newell Drive Menu \\\\ad.ufl.edu\\hr\\home\\agould\\desktop\\march 2014.docx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Dairy Alt- Turkey Sandwich on Wheat S: Birthday Day Snack Angel Food Cake, Vanilla Ice Cream 24 25 26 27: Oatmeal, Bananas, Milk L: Roasted Turkey Breast w/ Gravy, Maple Caramelized Carrots, Whole Wheat Penne Alt- Turkey Sandwich on Wheat S: Vanilla Wafers, Peaches B: Banana Muffin, Crushed Pineapple, Milk L

  3. August 2014 Newell Drive Menu \\\\ad.ufl.edu\\hr\\home\\hmonkhorst\\desktop\\august 2014.docx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Alt- Turkey Sandwich on Wheat S: Birthday Day Snack Angel Food Cake, Vanilla Ice Cream 18 19 20 21 22 Wheat Penne Pasta, Crushed Pineapple, Milk Meat Alt- Yogurt S: Club Crackers, Mozzarella String Cheese B on Wheat S: Graham Crackers, Pears #12;

  4. NSF Web Site News From the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineers. Full Story The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports Microbes Turn Electricity Directly to Methane Without Hydrogen Generation March 30, 2009 Source Penn State A tiny microbe can take electricity and directly convert carbon dioxide and water to methane, producing

  5. Thermo-elasto-plastic finite element analysis of quasi-state processes in Eulerian reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    Thermo-elasto-plastic finite element analysis of quasi-state processes in Eulerian reference frames ­ Incremental scheme ­ Fine mesh along entire heat source path ­ Lengthy computer runs · Elasto-Plasticity at times ti and ti-1, respectively. Penn State University 5 #12;Elasto-Plasticity Equilibrium: r(r, t) + b

  6. Ferroelectric Thin-Film Active Sensors for Structural Health , Victor Giurgiutiu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    , Structural health monitoring 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Piezoelectric wafer active sensors have beenFerroelectric Thin-Film Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Bin Lin1 , Victor laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 ABSTRACT Piezoelectric wafer active sensors

  7. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DEPUTY CHIEF, ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION DIVISION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the oil spill. NRDA also assesses the lost uses of those resources, such as recreational fishing, canoeing damages resulting from the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill. My name is Tony Penn and I am the Deputy Chief the opportunity to discuss the critical roles NOAA serves during and following oil spills and the importance

  8. (814) 865-6391 Fax: (814) 863-7427

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Contractors perform many functions at Penn State, often using equipment that contains petroleum products to release petroleum products (including hydraulic oils) to the environment through normal use or through for releases of petroleum products into the environment, spills and releases do occur. Spills that are promptly

  9. Theoretical Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, John C.; Roiban, Radu S

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes work at Penn State University from June 1, 1990 to April 30, 2012. The work was in theoretical elementary particle physics. Many new results in perturbative QCD, in string theory, and in related areas were obtained, with a substantial impact on the experimental program.

  10. Introduction to Hard Cider Production Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 8:00 AM -3:30 PM (Snow Date January 14)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    for Virginia Tech. He has collaborated on economic feasibility studies for small-scale cideries and hard cider fermentation, sanitation and stabilization. The program fee includes tasting of hard ciders of various flavors Snyder, Penn State Extension Educator 1:00 PM Hard Cider Production--Fermentation, Sanitation

  11. Programdescription October2014 The Scholarship and Research Integrity (SARI) program was launched in fall 2009 to provide graduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Programdescription October2014 The Scholarship and Research Integrity (SARI) program was launched, but will also be prepared to conduct their professional lives with integrity and responsibility. In 2011 Penn State annually as full-time faculty, as well as graduate students, postdoctoral fellows

  12. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  13. ALMANAC September 2, 2014 www.upenn.edu/almanac 1 UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    of Chicago and an AB (1987) in English and anthropology from the University of Michigan. EvanCThompson,W'64ALMANAC September 2, 2014 www.upenn.edu/almanac 1 UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Tuesday September 2 Diversity Fund 3 Deaths 4 Convocation 2014 6 Alumni Reunion Gifts; A Big Stick of Confidence; Penn Ice Rink

  14. -Supporting information-Improving Startup Performance with Carbon Mesh Anodes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China c School of Environmental Science a , and Bruce E. Logan a* a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, 212 Sackett Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA b State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation

  15. Supporting information Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,c, * a State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment Research, 200 Haemajihaean-ro, Gujwa-eup, Jeju, 695-971, Korea c Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, 212 Sackett Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA *Corresponding author

  16. Some applications of functional data analysis to econometrics and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokoszka, Piotr

    Some applications of functional data analysis to econometrics and finance Piotr Kokoszka Department of Statistics, Penn State University Piotr Kokoszka FDA in econometrics and finance #12;Outline Functional time Kokoszka FDA in econometrics and finance #12;Cumulative intraday returns on SP500; Lucca and Moench 2014

  17. Journal of Econometrics 162 (2011) 225239 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zhibiao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Econometrics 162 (2011) 225239 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Econometrics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom Nonparametric model validations for hidden Markov models with applications in financial econometrics Zhibiao Zhao Department of Statistics, Penn

  18. 1November 2007 Professor Louise Fortmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    in genetics) at Penn State. I returned to Cornell for my Ph.D. in rural sociology. And in 1984 I happily and the effects of a gendered tenure system on tree planting by women. My edited book, Participatory Research part of higher plants. We are sometimes made aware of roots, particularly tree roots, only when

  19. The High Average Power Laser Program 15th HAPL meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Georgia Tech 4. UCLA 5. U Rochester, LLE 6. UC Santa Barbara 7. UC Berkeley 8. UNC 9. Penn State Electro-optics Final opticsFinal optics #12;3 The HAPL program is developing two lasers: Diode Pumped Solid State Laser k continuous) Ceramic Honeycomb* "Primary" emitter *325 ppi cordierite honeycomb with gamma

  20. Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Design (LEED) programprogram Increased insulation and energy efficiencyIncreased insulation and energy efficiency #12;10/31/2008 2 Wildlife Habitat Photo Courtesy Penn State Center for Green Roof Research GreenTested membranes highly recommended ­­ Plastic root barrier above membrane?Plastic root barrier above membrane

  1. Joint Degree Program Giang T. Nguyen, MD, MPH, MSCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    ! Physical Activity Programming #12;Medical Director of a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home · Penn Family health is the science and art of protecting and improving the health of communities. · It involves Immunization programs Outbreak investigationsDomestic violence prevention Seat belt design Lead testing

  2. Joint Degree Program Giang T. Nguyen, MD, MPH, MSCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    -Centered Medical Home · Penn Family Care · Urban Family Medicine Office · 45 providers, 2 offices · Admissions at 2 health is the science and art of protecting and improving the health of communities. · It involves Outbreak investigationsDomestic violence prevention Seat belt design Lead testing and abatement Cancer

  3. Approximate Connectivity Graph Generation in Mobile Ad Hoc Radio Networks Christopher L. Barrett1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    Madhav V. Marathe1 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos NM 87545 Email: barrett,marathe@lanl.gov D. Charles Engelhart1;2 Anand Sivasubramaniam Penn. State University University Park PA 16802 Email: engelhar the author was a graduate research student in the Basic and Applied Simulation Science Group at Los Alamos

  4. Analyzing the Short-Term Fairness of IEEE 802.11 in Wireless Multi-hop Radio Christopher L. Barrett1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    . Barrett1 Madhav V. Marathe1 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos NM 87545 Email: barrett,marathe@lanl.gov D. Charles Engelhart1;2 Anand Sivasubramaniam Penn. State University University Park PA 16802 Email Simulation Science Group at Los Alamos National lab- oratory. wireless ad hoc radio networks have been

  5. A Spatial Analysis of Mobility Models: Application to Wireless Ad Hoc Network D. Charles Engelhart1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    Engelhart1,2 Anand Sivasubramaniam Penn. State University University Park PA 16802 engelhar,anand @cse.psu.edu Christopher L. Barrett1 Madhav V. Marathe1 James P. Smith1 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos NM 87545 was a graduate research student in the Basic and Applied Simulation Science Group at Los Alamos National lab

  6. Wind field estimation for autonomous dynamic soaring Jack W. Langelaan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spletzer, John R.

    Wind field estimation for autonomous dynamic soaring Jack W. Langelaan Aerospace Engineering, Penn for distributed parameter estimation of a previously unknown wind field is described. The application is dynamic parameterization of the wind field is used, allowing implementation of a linear Kalman filter for parameter

  7. Census 2000 Demographic Profiles Allegheny County Municipalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Township Emsworth Etna Fawn Findlay Forest Hills Forward Fox Chapel Franklin Park Frazer Glassport Heights Bethel Park Blawnox Brackenridge Braddock Braddock Hills Bradfordwoods Brentwood Bridgeville Oakdale Oakmont O'Hara Ohio Osborne Penn Hills Pennsbury Village Pine Pitcairn Pittsburgh City Pleasant

  8. 2013 Reinvention Fund Request for Proposals 1 2013 Reinvention Fund: Request for Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    2013 Reinvention Fund Request for Proposals 1 2013 Reinvention Fund: Request for Proposals Building a Living Laboratory for Sustainability at Penn State Reinvention Fund Projects Pre-Proposals Due: October 21, 2013 Full Proposals Due: December 20, 2013 Student Sustainability Innovation Projects Pre

  9. Barron's Own Chicken-Fried Carrot Sticks breaded and lightly fried until golden brown; served with homemade sriracha ranch $4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    with homemade sriracha ranch $4 Potato Croquettes-- whipped potatoes blended with seasonal ingredients Cheese Sticks­ served with homemade ranch and marinara $4 S T A R T E R S SERVING LUNCH * Monday ­ Friday-- fresh romaine, penne pasta, chicken breast and parmesan cheese tossed in Caesar dressing; finished

  10. JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS DEFINITION AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    1 JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS DEFINITION AND POLICY: Within the fields of medicine and law, dual training for such complementary training can be demonstrated, the creation of a formal "Joint" degree program in which students or MD) offered at Penn State may be warranted. Such Joint degree programs enhance the educational

  11. Development of a Turnkey H2 Fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feedstocks Storage NG Compression PSAPSARef.Ref. PTI, CATA, Penn State H2 Generator #12;5 © Air ProductsDevelopment of a Turnkey H2 Fueling Station David E. Guro Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Allentown, PA U.S. D.O.E. - Hydrogen Program Annual Review May 2003 #12;2 © Air Products & Chemicals, Inc

  12. A Survey of Methods For Analyzing and Improving GPU Energy Sparsh Mittal, Iowa State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A A Survey of Methods For Analyzing and Improving GPU Energy Efficiency Sparsh Mittal, Iowa State., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869-0481, or permissions led to dramatic increase in their power consumption. This paper surveys research works on analyzing

  13. A Learning-based Approach to Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Gang

    energy consumption. Watchdog can use different machine learning techniques to learn the sensing Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869 KEALLY, College of William and Mary GANG ZHOU, College of William and Mary GUOLIANG XING, Michigan State

  14. ASCE/SEI Technical Committee on Optimal Structural Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan Jr., Colby Corson

    -Champaign (Control Member) · Christopher M. Foley, Marquette University (Control Member and Assoc. Editor) · Dan, Brigham Young University (Member) · Ali Memari, Penn State University (Member) · Keith Mueller (Member by Christopher Foley. The session has five papers. b. "Soft Computing Potentials in Structural Optimization

  15. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health Issues 1 Billion people lack #12;Energy content of Wastewaters · Electricity "lost" to water and wastewater treatment= 0.6 quad

  16. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health IssuesGlobal Energy & Health content of WastewatersEnergy content of Wastewaters ·· ElectricityElectricity ""lostlost"" to water

  17. August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water University Park, Pa. -- A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish organic material from wastewater," said Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn

  18. Advanced Search WEF Login Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Profile Business Products Water Volumes Advertiser Index Resources Archives Contact Us Subscribe to WE and a tube in a tub of wastewater, according to a Pennsylvania State University (Penn State; Collegeville from existing wastewater treatment equipment will complete the circuit, the news release states. "The

  19. ROBOTIC MASTERS PLAN OF STUDY FORM NAME: DATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    ROBOTIC MASTERS PLAN OF STUDY FORM NAME: DATE PENN ID #: ADVISOR: Expected Graduation Date/FUNDAMENTALS OF AI MEAM 520/ROBOTICS & AUTOMATION MEAM 620/MOTION PLANNING ESE 500/LINEAR SYSTEMS ESE 505 NUMBER & TITLE SEMESTER R RO OB BO OT TI IC CS S E EL LE EC CT TI IV VE ES S (2) COURSE NUMBER & TITLE

  20. Bridging Research to Implementation, from Fields to Wheels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    has a tremendous breadth of expertise in these issues that span across the entire biomass supply chain as the technical issues related to biomass processing, for the success of a biorefinery and bioindustry. Penn State. They include, but are not limited to: Feedstock assessment Sustainable agricultural and forest feedstock

  1. Department of Materials Science & Engineering Spring 2012 Assessing the Performance of Energy Efficient Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    of Energy Efficient Housing Overview Penn State's Department of Architecture partnered with the Union Country Housing Authority (UCHA) to create the Energy Efficient Housing Program (EEHP). A duplex was constructed and two homes were remodelled using energy efficient technologies and sustainable materials. UCHA

  2. publication 450-236 The most effective form of plant disease control in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    publication 450-236 The most effective form of plant disease control in the landscape is prevention and is relatively drought-toler- ant. William Penn barberry is typically used as a low hedge or in border plantings, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2009

  3. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing Overview The Penn State Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering instrument they are using to develop a soil abrasion index. While our team's initially proposed concept met

  4. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 IMPROVING THE TRANSMISSION OF A12FOOT DANCE VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    DANCE VEHICLE Overview A Penn State Creative Campus collaborative project called the "Secret Life of Public Spaces" (SLoPS) prompted the creative idea of a mobile dance vehicle. This vehicle would be used system for this vehicle, which was discovered after they built an initial prototype that didn't function

  5. Letter of Interest or Prospecting Letter You may find that you are sincerely interested in a particular organization, but they have no jobs currently

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    . 1. State why you are interested in working for that organization. 2. Demonstrate the skills you year at Penn State, my interest in working for an organization that shares my passion has become34 Letter of Interest or Prospecting Letter You may find that you are sincerely interested

  6. Development and Validation of ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Hydrocarbon Chemistry Catalyzed by Nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    and theoretical studies show that steps not only provide a low energy barrier for the chemisorption of methane of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State UniVersity, UniVersity Park, PennsylVania 16801 Recei reactions catalyzed by nickel surfaces and particles using reactive molecular dynamics on thousands of atoms

  7. Water Dissociation on Aluminum Nanoparticles Dr. Adri van Duin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    Engineering Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State College of Engineering. For rapid energy-Water Reactions Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy Accepted of parameters; at low water pressures a low water conversion rate is observed. At intermediate pressure, water

  8. BioMed Central Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    BioMed Central Page 1 of 4 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Bioinformatics Open Access, The Netherlands, 4Bioinformatics and Statistics, Dept. of Molecular Biology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and 5Department of Biology and PENN Genome Frontiers Institute, University

  9. Optimal control of robot behaviour using language Xi Wang, Asok Ray*, Peter Lee and Jinbo Fu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Assistant in the Networked Robotics Laboratory of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Penn State. MrOptimal control of robot behaviour using language measure1 Xi Wang, Asok Ray*, Peter Lee and Jinbo presents optimal control of robot behaviour in the discrete event setting. Real signed measure

  10. Nittany Lights Landscape Lighting Sept. 28-30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittany Lights ­ Landscape Lighting Workshop Sept. 28-30, 2012 Penn State Campus - University Park with a lecture at the Palmer Art Museum to be provided by internationally known architectural/landscape artist get a chance to think beyond budgets, maintenance, codes, etc and get back to the fun creative side

  11. Inhibition of Biohydrogen Production by Undissociated Acetic and Butyric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inhibition of Biohydrogen Production by Undissociated Acetic and Butyric Acids S T E V E N V A N G Sackett Building, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 Glucose fermentation to hydrogen results in the production of acetic and butyric acids. The inhibitory effect of these acids

  12. Self-Identifying Data for Fair Use STEPHEN CHONG, Harvard University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869, The University of Vermont JEFFREY A. VAUGHAN, LogicBlox, Inc. Public-use earth science datasets are a useful are probabilistic in nature and are characterized by both combinatorial and empirical analyses. Mark em- bedding can

  13. MultiFLIP for Energetic Two-Phase Fluid Simulation LANDON BOYD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridson, Robert

    MultiFLIP for Energetic Two-Phase Fluid Simulation LANDON BOYD and ROBERT BRIDSON University- ing up interesting behaviour. We present a new method which treats both air and liquid., ACM, Inc., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869-0481, or permissions

  14. Editor's Note: This occasional series looks at powerful ideas --some existing, some futuristic --for fueling and electrifying modern life.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    engineer Bruce Logan at Penn State University. "Instead of wiring people up to generate electricity, we are using bacteria to directly generate electricity." Scientists have experimented with a variety at Amherst and his colleagues have focused on is Geobacter, which is naturally found in many soils

  15. A microbial fuel cell built by the researchers produces electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Park Campus on November 14. Edward Kiczek of Air Products and Chemicals Inc., explained hydrogen by Air Products, Penn State, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Many took rides in Nissan's X-Trail FCV production methods, capabilities, and fueling opportunities. Dr. JoAnn Milliken of the U.S. Department

  16. State DOT: PENNSYLVANIA State Report Questions on NDT Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity surveys, management of load restrictions, fatigue tests and compaction control. On concreteState DOT: PENNSYLVANIA State Report Questions on NDT Testing 1. What NDT testing methods for concrete materials, concrete pavements, and overlays are you trying? PennDOT performs Falling Weight

  17. January/February 2008 Subscriptions Blueberries Sprouts, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    that without honey bees, it would be "tough to source and produce" ice cream. By working with UC Davis and Penn-Dazs brand ice cream flavors are linked to fruits and nuts pollinated by bees. As part of the "Häagen-Dazs Loves Honey Bees" campaign, the company created a new flavor of ice cream, Vanilla Honey Bee, available

  18. Dr. John Messner is a Construction option faculty member in the Architectural Engineering Department. He specializes in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    to improve building design, construction, and operation. Messner serves as the director of the Computer Integrated Construction (CIC) Research Program at Penn State and he is the Design Tools co-task leader of America Emerging Technologies Committee, and member of the Design-Build Institute of America BIM Committee

  19. Center for Sustainability Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems (HyRES) Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    wind, solar, and hydrogen fuel cell technologies is planned for an experimental residence built at Penn is used to balance energy use, and surplus power used to make hydrogen for a fuel cell vehicle. Power System Features In case of multiple system failure - 25kW fuel cell (vehicle) - External hydrogen fuel

  20. Hybrid & Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    such as Challenge X use this facility to develop advanced vehicles. Hydrogen Fueling Station Developed byAir Products and Chemicals, Inc. with funding from US DOE, the commercial hydrogen fueling station was installed at Penn State University Park in Fall 2004. This station will be used to fuel in-service hydrogen

  1. Corporate Controller's Office Statement on Stewardship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    agencies and state government. These constituents provide resources to Penn State to meet our mission stewardship principles in our own daily management practices, promote those same principles to everyone we regarding resource utilization should be guided by the following questions: · How does this action support

  2. Universal Journal of Engineering Mechanics 1 (2013), 50 -70 www.papersciences.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for 2D Heat Transfer in Skin Tissues with Moving Boundary Q. H. Qin and W. C. Zhang Research, based on the most popular bioheat model, that is, the Pennes equation [7], the finite element method.qin@anu.edu.au Abstract A new meshless method is developed to investigate the behavior of heat conduction in isotropic

  3. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Wind Tunnel Automated Bicycle Adjustment System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENN STATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Wind Tunnel Automated Bicycle with the development of Aerofit's prototype portable wind tunnel used in the aerodynamic testing of bicycles was to automate this adjustment of the bicycle seat and aerobars in order to decrease the time for fitting each

  4. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    #12;Marcellus Shale Litigation and Legislation December 17, 2009 7 . Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Law1 Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series October 2009 - March 2010 Penn State Cooperative Extension #12;2 Marcellus Shale Webinar Series Planning Committee · Members ­ Mark Douglass, Jefferson

  5. Phase-field Modeling of Microstructures Rapid Image-Based Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    tensile strength steel such as a dual phase (DP) steel is one of the key materials on the developmentPhase-field Modeling of Microstructures and Rapid Image-Based Calculation of Stress-Strain Curve Third International Symposium on Phase-field Method (PFM-2014), The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel

  6. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.

  7. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

  8. Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the ABAN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the ABAN experiment. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivitythe ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation}/D{sub Si}. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship between isotopic separation efficiency and D{sub cation} =D{sub H 2 O} , although the efficiencies are smaller than in silicate liquids. Our empirical relationship provides a tool for predicting the magnitude of diffusive isotopic effects in many geologic environments and a basis for a more comprehensive theory of isotope separation in liquid solutions. We present a conceptual model for the relationship between diffusivity and liquid structure that is consistent with available data.

  9. Paleoautecology of Caninia torquia (Owen) from the Beil Limestone Member (Pennsylvanian, Virgilian), Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, R. H., Jr.

    1978-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    soft mud sub- 3 strate. Baird ( 1971) recognized two coral assemblages, a "Coral-Algal Community Wackestone" on the Nebraska shelf and a "Fusulinid-Coral Assemblage Wackestone" on the Nebraska shelf and in the Forest City basin. In the former... ( 1971) concluded that this assemblage lived in slightly deeper waters than the coral-algal community. Paleoecology of midcontinent Penn.sylva- nian rugose corals.Most pre-1950 work on Pennsylvanian rugose corals was taxonomic, and later studies included...

  10. COMMUNICATIONS 1100 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, D-69451 Weinheim, 1998 1433-7851/98/3708-1100 $ 17.50+.50/0 Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 1998, 37, No. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xumu

    R R OMs OMs R R OH OH PH2 PH2 P P R R R R R = Me, 1 , NaH > 99 % MsCl, Et3N CH2Cl2 R = iPr , 2 R = Me, 3 R = iPr, 4 R = Me, 5, 43 % R = iPr, 6, 54%HMPA, THF, 0 °C 20 °C Scheme 1. Synthesis of the PennPho

  11. BREAKFAST MENU 5 Yourmenuwillbecorrectedaccordingtothe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Burrito:Eggs,Cheese,Salsaina wrap (2CHO) TurkeySausage Cereals(1CHOEACH) RiceKrispies SpecialK Cheerios Oatmeal CreamofWheat) TurkeyPotPie(2CHO) Turkeyw/Stuffing&Gravy(2CHO) Macaroni&Cheese(2CHO) Pasta:RotiniorWholeWheatPenne wSaladw/Cucumbers&OrganicField Greens (Oil&Vinegar/LowfatItalian/LowfatFrench) DESSERTS:(Limit2,1mustbefruit)(1 CHOEACH) Angel

  12. Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    at: http://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain #12;2 Roof · Summer 2002: Laboratory TCLP (acid rain simulation) · Fall/Winter 2002 and Spring 2003: Laboratory Testing Set-Up at Penn State Harrisburg During Rain Event, August 2005 pH Rainfall pH Range: 3.9 ­ 6

  13. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

  14. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 2: January through March 2011).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 2 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of the four carbons that have been added to the negative active material of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for the purposes of this study. The four carbons selected for this study were a graphitic carbon, a carbon black, an activated carbon, and acetylene black. The morphology, crystallinity, and impurity contents of each of the four carbons were analyzed; results were consistent with previous data. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown.

  15. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 1: October through December 2010).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails conducting a thorough literature review to establish the current level of understanding of the mechanisms through which carbon additions to the negative active material improve valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Most studies have entailed phenomenological research observing that the carbon additions prevent/reduce sulfation of the negative electrode; however, no understanding is available to provide insight into why certain carbons are successful while others are not. Impurities were implicated in one recent review of the electrochemical behavior of carbon additions. Four carbon samples have been received from East Penn Manufacturing and impurity contents have been analyzed. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown in the graph.

  16. Role of interface structure and chemistry in resistive switching of NiO nanocrystals on SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Xuan; Sullaphen, Jivika; Valanoor, Nagarajan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Weyland, Matthew [Department of Materials Engineering and Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Liu, Hongwei [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanocrystals epitaxially grown on (001) strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) single crystal substrates were characterized to investigate interface morphology and chemistry. Aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals the interface between the NiO nanocrystals and the underlying SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to be rough, irregular, and have a lower average atomic number than the substrate or the nanocrystal. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy confirm both chemical disorder and a shift of the energy of the Ti L{sub 2,3} peaks. Analysis of the O K edge profiles in conjunction with this shift, implies the presence of oxygen vacancies at the interface. This sheds light into the origin of the previously postulated minority carriers model to explain resistive switching in NiO [J. Sullaphen, K. Bogle, X. Cheng, J. M. Gregg, and N. Valanoor, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 203115 (2012)].

  17. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally (Xiaolei) Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditionsit is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  18. Lady Bird Johnson Middle School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scrivner, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - 600KW array $2,976,972.00 $19.55 Wind Turbines - 12 Skystream units $143,217.00 $0.94 Geothermal HVAC Water Well $277,194.00 $1.82 Water collection tank $27,125.00 $0.18 Native landscaping/ bio swales $3,000.00 $0.02 Energy monitoring system - Convia...Irving Independent School District Jim Scrivner Energy Manager jscrivner@irvingisd.net Lady Bird JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL Engineer: Image Engineering Group, LLC Don Penn, President dpenn@iegltd.com Architect: Corgan Associates, Inc Susan Smith, Vice...

  19. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  20. Census 2000 Demographic Rankings Tables Allegheny County Municipalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Neville 1,232 46 Oakmont 6,911 111 Heidelberg 1,225 47 Forest Hills 6,831 112 Lincoln 1,218 #12;48 Indiana Pittsburgh City 334,563 66 Mount Oliver 3,970 2 Penn Hills 46,809 67 Etna 3,924 3 Bethel Park 33,556 68 Dravosburg 2,015 30 Jefferson 9,666 95 Braddock Hills 1,998 31 Swissvale 9,653 96 Ben Avon 1,917 32 Dormont 9

  1. Final Report: Northeastern Regional Center of the DOE's National Institute for Climatic Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Kenneth

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration of the NERC of NICCR began at Penn State in December of 2005 and ended in December of 2011. During that time, five requests for proposals were released and five rounds of proposals were reviewed, awarded and administered. Throughout this award, 203 pre-proposals have been received by the NERC in five RFPS and 110 full proposals invited. Of the 110 full proposals reviewed, 53 were funded (most in full, some partially) resulting in 51 subcontracts. These awards were distributed among 17 universities and 3 non-governmental research institutes. Full proposals have been received from 29 universities and 5 non-governmental research institutes. Research activities have now been completed.

  2. RSL: A parallel Runtime System Library for regional atmospheric models with nesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.G.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RSL is a parallel runtime system library developed at Argonne National Laboratory that is tailored to regular-grid atmospheric models with mesh refinement in the form of two-way interacting nested grids. RSL provides high-level stencil and interdomain communication, irregular domain decomposition, automatic local/global index translation, distributed I/O, and dynamic load balancing. RSL was used with Fortran90 to parallelize a well-known and widely used regional weather model, the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale model.

  3. Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration Using UltraBattery Technology (October 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFYOxideof Energy Clean CoalDNV KEMA|East Penn

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Pennsylvania State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLSMolten-SaltReliabilityIntroduction ofLaboratory Penn

  5. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifA Comparison955 SiemensDE-EE0004261 Penn State

  6. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifA Comparison955 SiemensDE-EE0004261 Penn

  7. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical hydride based H2release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  8. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected eleven projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005.

  9. Vacancy solution theory of adsorption from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwanayuen, S.; Danner, R.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new correlation based on vacancy-solution theory, reports Pennsylvania State University, improves predictions of gas-mixture adsorption equilibria from single-component adsorption isotherm data. The new method is more general, simpler to apply, and more accurate than other available models. For an adsorption system, the binary parameters - adsorbate and vacancy - are obtained from regression of the pure-gas adsorption data with the vacancy-solution isotherm equation. These parameters are then used to predict multicomponent adsorption equilibrium, assuming that the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are negligible. Penn State has verified the new correlation on two different kinds of binary adsorption systems: mixtures of O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, and CO on zeolite 10X and mixtures of light hydrocarbons on Nuxit-AL activated carbon.

  10. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  11. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  12. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Edwards

    2003-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs.

  13. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec. During the first quarter of 2003 final design and start of fabrication of the membrane wet ESP was undertaken.

  14. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

  15. Firing microfine coal with a low NOx, RSFC burner in an industrial boiler designed for oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornhock, D.E.; Patel, R.; Borio, R.W. [Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States). ABB Power Plant Labs.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ABB Power Plant Laboratories (ABB-PPL) working under a US Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) contract has carried out tests with the Radially Stratified Flame Core (RSFC) burner which was licensed from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed and patented the RSFC burner. Tests were carried out in a small industrial boiler, designed for oil and natural gas, located at the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University who was working as a subcontractor to ABB-PPL. The paper presents results from the long-term testing task in the DOE-PETC program with particular attention being paid to the challenges faced in maintaining high combustion efficiencies while achieving low NOx in a small industrial boiler designed for firing oil or natural gas. The paper will also address the issue of ash management when firing coal in a boiler designed for fuels having essentially no ash.

  16. Estimations of local thermal impact on living organisms irradiated by non-thermal microwaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatalov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pennes' differential equation for bioheat transfer and the heat transfer equation are solved for the temperature distribution in a living tissue with spherical inclusions, irradiated by microwave power. It is shown that relative temperature excess in a small inclusion in the tissue in some cases is inversely proportional to its radius and does not depend on the applied power. In pulsing RF fields the effect is amplified proportionally to the ratio of the pulse period to the pulse duration. The local temperature rise significantly outpaces the averaged one and therefore the Watt to Weight SAR limits may be insufficient to estimate the safety of RF radiation and the conventional division of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on the thermal and non-thermal needs to be revised.

  17. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (FY11 Quarter 4: July through September 2011).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 4 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails the initiation of high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling of the carbon enhanced batteries. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within the plates after 1k and 10k cycles were documented, illustrating the changes which take place in the early life of the carbon containing batteries, and as the battery approaches failure due to hard sulfation for the control battery. Longer term cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) continues, and will progress into FY12. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO2) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown in a graph. In addition to the aforementioned hybrid device, carbon has also been added directly to traditional VRLA batteries as an admixture in both the positive and negative plates, the latter of which has been found to result in similar improvements to battery performance under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. It is this latter construction, where carbon is added directly to the negative active material (NAM) that is the specific incarnation being evaluated through this program. Thus, the carbon-modified (or Pb-C) battery (termed the 'Advanced' VRLA battery by East Penn Manufacturing) is a traditional VRLA battery where an additional component has been added to the negative electrode during production of the negative plate. The addition of select carbon materials to the NAM of VRLA batteries has been demonstrated to increase cycle life by an order of magnitude or more under (HRPSoC) operation. Additionally, battery capacity increases on cycling and, in fact, exceeds the performance of the batteries when new.

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  19. Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Eklund (deceased); T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

  20. Study of optical parameters of the Se-As chalcogenide semiconductor system containing EuF{sub 3} impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isayev, A. I.; Mekhtiyeva, S. I.; Garibova, S. N., E-mail: sgaribova@rambler.ru; Alekperov, R. I.; Zeynalov, V. Z. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Abdullaev Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of composition Se{sub 95}As{sub 5} containing different amounts of rare-earth metal fluorides (EuF{sub 3}) are studied, and, on this basis, the fundamental parameters, such as the refractive index and extinction coefficient, are determined. The dependences of these parameters on the content of EuF{sub 3} molecules are nonmonotonic: the low content (below 0.25 at %) aids in decreasing the parameters, whereas the high content tends to increase them. From the analysis of the results with consideration for the structural features of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of the Se{sub 95}As{sub 5} system (the presence of ordered high-coordinated microregions separated from each other by regions with a lower atomic density), it is concluded that the optical properties of the chalcogenide vitreous semiconductor system under study can be described in the context of Penn's model.

  1. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

  2. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieffer, Gregg

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

  3. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  4. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  5. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  6. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  7. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  8. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive programs in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware; (5) Developed and maintained a MACEAC website to provide technical information and regional CHP, WHR and DE case studies and site profiles for use by interested stakeholders in information transfer and policy discussions; (6) Provided Technical Assistance through feasibility studies and on site evaluations. The MACEAC completed 28 technical evaluations and 9 Level 1 CHP analyses ; and (7) the MACEAC provided Technical Education to the region through a series of 29 workshops and webinars, 37 technical presentations, 14 seminars and participation in 13 CHP conferences.

  9. The Application of the PEBBED Code Suite to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark - FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the recent developments of the PEBBED code suite and its application to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark. This report addresses an FY2006 Level 2 milestone under the NGNP Design and Evaluation Methods Work Package. The milestone states "Complete a report describing the results of the application of the integrated PEBBED code package to the PBMR-400 coupled code benchmark". The report describes the current state of the PEBBED code suite, provides an overview of the Benchmark problems to which it was applied, discusses the code developments achieved in the past year, and states some of the results attained. Results of the steady state problems generated by the PEBBED fuel management code compare favorably to the preliminary results generated by codes from other participating institutions and to similar non-Benchmark analyses. Partial transient analysis capability has been achieved through the acquisition of the NEM-THERMIX code from Penn State University. Phase I of the task has been achieved through the development of a self-consistent set of tools for generating cross sections for design and transient analysis and in the successful execution of the steady state benchmark exercises.

  10. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

  11. Gas adsorption isotherm equation based on vacancy solution theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwanayuen, S.; Danner, R.P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pennsylvania State University's new isotherm equation for pure gas adsorption treats the adsorption equilbrium as an osmotic equilibrium between two ''vacancy'' solutions having different compositions. One solution represents the gas phase and the other the adsorbed phase. The vacancy solution is composed of adsorbates and vacancies (imaginary entities defined as the vacuum space that acts as the solvent for the system). Penn State evaluated the developed correlation against published adsorption-isotherm data for O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, and CO on zeolite 10X and for light hydrocarbons (CH/sub 4/ to nC/sub 4/H/sub 10/) and CO/sub 2/ on Nuxit-AL activated carbon. For both adsorbents, the correlations were closer than those obtained by any other adsorption model that has been extended to gas mixtures. The new method can also represent multicomponent systems because the activity coefficient governing the nonideality of adsorbed mixtures can be readily calculated from binary parameters. These are obtained from single-component adsorption data by a procedure analogous to a bulk solution.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

  13. Grid tied PV system energy smoothing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Keith Phillip; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-tied PV energy smoothing was implemented by using a valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery as a temporary energy storage device to both charge and discharge as required to smooth the inverter energy output from the PV array. Inverter output was controlled by the average solar irradiance over the previous 1h time interval. On a clear day the solar irradiance power curve is offset by about 1h, while on a variable cloudy day the inverter output power curve will be smoothed based on the average solar irradiance. Test results demonstrate that this smoothing algorithm works very well. Battery state of charge was more difficult to manage because of the variable system inefficiencies. Testing continued for 30-days and established consistent operational performance for extended periods of time under a wide variety of resource conditions. Both battery technologies from Exide (Absolyte) and East Penn (Advanced Valve Regulated Lead-Acid) proved to cycle well at a partial state of charge over the time interval tested.

  14. Grid-tied PV battery systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Keith Phillip; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid tied PV energy smoothing was implemented by using a valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery as a temporary energy storage device to both charge and discharge as required to smooth the inverter energy output from the PV array. Inverter output was controlled by the average solar irradiance over the previous 1h time interval. On a clear day the solar irradiance power curve is offset by about 1h, while on a variable cloudy day the inverter output power curve will be smoothed based on the average solar irradiance. Test results demonstrate that this smoothing algorithm works very well. Battery state of charge was more difficult to manage because of the variable system inefficiencies. Testing continued for 30-days and established consistent operational performance for extended periods of time under a wide variety of resource conditions. Both battery technologies from Exide (Absolyte) and East Penn (ALABC Advanced) proved to cycle well at a Partial state of charge over the time interval tested.

  15. Unconventional digital reactor control without conventional programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Johns, R.M.; Kenney, S.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in simulation technology have resulted in the capability to design, test, and implement advanced control algorithms without the need for the labor-intensive effort of writing and debugging of computer programs. This technology has been adopted for a program of experimental development of power reactor control, which is jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Electric Power Research Institute. The experimental reactor control test bed utilizes the General Atomic Mark III TRIGA reactor at the Penn State Breazeale reactor facility. Control experiments are conducted within the movable experiment technical specifications of the TRIGA. A digital controller with an experimental control algorithm is interfaced to a secondary control rod (SCR). The new technology presented in this paper utilizes a UNIX network-compatible microprocessor-based controller operating under the Wind River Systems VxWorks real-time operating system. The controller interfaces with the Math-works MATLAB/SIMULINK development environment and Real-Time Innovations 8 monitoring software remotely operated on a SPARC workstation.

  16. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  17. Coal: America's energy future. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

  18. Three-dimensional warm plasma simulations for low-frequency waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellet, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Villard, L.; Brunner, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Popovich, P. [Center for Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, CA 90095-01547 Los Angeles (United States)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-wave code for the wave propagation studies in the Alfven and the ion-cyclotron frequency domain in 3D plasmas is presented. In addition to the cold model, a warm plasma model where kinetic effects are taken into account in the limit of small Larmor radius has also been implemented. Due to the Fourier discretization in the poloidal and the toroidal directions the parallel wave vector expression is relatively simple. However, the exact computation of k(parallel sign) in 2D and 3D configurations is complicated because of the dependence on both the spatial position and the (m,n) mode numbers considered. A comparison with the 2D PENN code is presented where we use different approximations for the value of the parallel wave vector. Parallelisation and optimisation of the cold plasma version of the LEMan code is also discussed. Due to improved matrix construction and storage algorithms, the memory requirements are considerably reduced which allows for calculations in the IC frequency range in the stellarator geometry.

  19. The Joseph J. Pennell Photograph Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t of t he K a n s a s Col lec t ion , t he reg iona l h is tory b r a n c h of t he Un ivers i ty of K a n s a s L ib ra r ies , o p e n to the p u b l i c f r o m 8 a m to 5 p m o n M o n d a y to F r iday ( a n d 9 a m to 1 p m o n Sa tu rday w h e n... t he Un ive rs i t y is in sess ion) . A m ic ro f i lm s h o w i n g ove r 6 , 0 0 0 p h o t o g r a p h s f r o m the Penne l l Co l lec t ion c a n b e b o r r o w e d t h r o u g h in ter l ibrary loan for r e s e a r c h p u r p o s e s . Por...

  20. Study of catalytic diffusion in coal. Final report for 1983/1984 SOMED Project. [Determination of pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our studies is to determine the pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution in standard bituminous coal samples from various Alabama coal seams such as that of the Mary Lee, Black Creek and Pratt during and after swelling of the coal with different solvents at various temperatures. These samples come from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank at Pennsylvania State University Coal Research Section and from Alabama's Mineral Industries. Methods have been developed in the laboratory whereby free radical probes of varying sizes can be diffused into the coal under various conditions. These probes can be detected and the environment surrounding the probes can be deduced by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. To date, we have found that not only can the shape and size of the pores be determined, but that the size distribution varies from one bituminous coal seam to another, even for coal of the same rank, suggesting a different optimal catalyst should be used for each seam. The effect of oxygen on the coal samples during grinding has been studied; however, the free radical technique appears to be insensitive to the presence of oxygen effects. It is our goal to determine the structural differences between various bituminous coals. 9 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  1. Study of catalytic diffusion in coal. Final report, 1983-1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of these studies is to determine the pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution in standard bituminous coal samples from various Alabama coal seams such as that of the Mary Lee, Black Creek and Pratt during and after swelling of the coal with different solvents at various temperatures. These samples come from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank at Pennsylvania State University Coal Research Section and from Alabama's Mineral Industries. Methods were developed in the laboratory whereby free-radical probes of varying sizes can be diffused into the coal under various conditions. These probes can be detected and the environment surrounding the probes can be deduced by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. To date, it has been found that not only can the shape and size of the pores be determined, but that the size distribution varies from one bituminous coal seam to another, even for coal of the same rank, suggesting a different optimal catalyst should be used for each seam. The effect of oxygen on the coal samples during grinding has been studied; however, the free radical technique appears to be insensitive to the presence of oxygen effects. The goal is to determine the structural differences between various bituminous coals.

  2. Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cosgrove, Daniel (Director, Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation) [Director, Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation; CLSF Staff

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car' was submitted by the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CLSF is directed by Daniel Cosgrove at Pennsylvania State University and is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: Penn State (lead), North Caroline State University, and Virginia Tech University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation is 'to dramatically increase our fundamental knowledge of the formation and physical interactions of bio-polymer networks in plant cell walls to provide a basis for improved methods for converting biomass into fuels.' Research topics are: biofuels (biomass), membrane, interfacial characterization, matter by design, and self-assembly.

  3. Lattice and electronic contributions to the refractive index of CuWO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Fuertes, J., E-mail: ruiz-fuertes@kristall.uni-frankfurt.de [Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universitt, Altenhferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Malta-Consolider Team, Departamento de Fsica Aplicada-ICMUV, Universitat de Valncia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Pellicer-Porres, J.; Segura, A. [Malta-Consolider Team, Departamento de Fsica Aplicada-ICMUV, Universitat de Valncia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Rodrguez-Hernndez, P.; Muoz, A. [Malta-Consolider Team Departamento de Fsica Fundamental II, Instituto de Materiales y Nanotecnologa, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38205 Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an investigation of the refractive index dispersion and anisotropy in CuWO{sub 4} by means of interference measurements in two extinction directions from mid infrared to the visible region of the energy spectrum. The analysis of the refractive index dispersion yields ?(?)?=?4.5(1) for light polarization parallel to the c-axis and ?(?)?=?5.3(1) with respect to the other extinction axis. In addition, we report reflectance measurements carried out from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet to study the lattice and electronic contributions to the refractive index of CuWO{sub 4}. We have determined the wavenumbers of nine infrared active lattice modes and compared them with previous ab initio calculations. The value of the Penn gap, 7?eV, as well as the origin of a structure observed at 4.4?eV in the reflectance spectrum, is discussed in the context of the CuWO{sub 4} electronic structure.

  4. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reynolds

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

  5. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

  6. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program with the objective of demonstrating the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in industrial boilers designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3.0% ash and 0.9% sulfur) can effectively be burned in oil-designed industrial boilers without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of three phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, and (3) demonstration and evaluation. The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits. Progress is reported. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Quarterly technical progress report, November 15, 1989--February 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Elston, J.T.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1990-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of demonstrating the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in industrial boilers designed for oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with less than 3% ash and 0.9% sulfur) can effectively be burned in oil-designed industrial boilers without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of three phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, and (3) operations and disposition. The boiler testing will determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, slagging and fouling factors, erosion and corrosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting and operating boilers will be identified to assess the viability of future oil-to-coal retrofits. Progress for this quarter is summarized.

  8. Superclean coal-water slurry combustion testing in an oil-fired boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, August 15, 1992--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Poe, R.L.; Morrison, J.L.; Xie, J.; Walsh, P.M.; Wincek, R.T.; Clark, D.A.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a superclean coal-water slurry (SCCWS) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the capability of effectively firing SCCWS in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State has entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to determine if SCCWS (a fuel containing coal with 3.0 wt.% ash and 0.9 wt.% sulfur) can effectively be burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will provide information on the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The project consists of four phases: (1) design, permitting, and test planning, (2) construction and start up, (3) demonstration and evaluation (1,000-hour demonstration), and (4) program expansion (additional 1,000 hours of testing). The boiler testing wig determine if the SCCWS combustion characteristics, heat release rate, fouling and slagging behavior, corrosion and erosion limits, and fuel transport, storage, and handling characteristics can be accommodated in an oil-designed boiler system. In addition, the proof-of-concept demonstration will generate data to determine how the properties of SCCWS and its parent coal affect boiler performance. Economic factors associated with retrofitting boilers will be identified

  9. Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cosgrove, Daniel (Director, Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation); CLSF Staff

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    'Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car' was submitted by the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CLSF is directed by Daniel Cosgrove at Pennsylvania State University and is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: Penn State (lead), North Caroline State University, and Virginia Tech University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation is 'to dramatically increase our fundamental knowledge of the formation and physical interactions of bio-polymer networks in plant cell walls to provide a basis for improved methods for converting biomass into fuels.' Research topics are: biofuels (biomass), membrane, interfacial characterization, matter by design, and self-assembly.

  10. Carbon-enhanced VRLA batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.; Shane, Rod (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of certain forms of carbon to the negative plate in valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries has been demonstrated to increase the cycle life of such batteries by an order of magnitude or more under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge operation. Such performance will provide a significant impact, and in some cases it will be an enabling feature for applications including hybrid electric vehicles, utility ancillary regulation services, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. There is a critical need to understnd how the carbon interacts with the negative plate and achieves the aforementioned benefits at a fundamental level. Such an understanding will not only enable the performance of such batteries to be optimzied, but also to explore the feasibility of applying this technology to other battery chemistries. In partnership with the East Penn Manufacturing, Sandia will investigate the electrochemical function of the carbon and possibly identify improvements to its anti-sulfation properties. Shiomi, et al. (1997) discovered that the addition of carbon to the negative active material (NAM) substantially reduced PbSO{sub 4} accumulation in high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling applications. This improved performance with a minimal cost. Cycling applications that were uneconomical for traditional VRLA batteries are viable for the carbon enhanced VRLA. The overall goal of this work is to quantitatively define the role that carbon plays in the electrochemistry of a VRLA battery.

  11. Assessment of the Effect of Air Pollution Controls on Trends in Shortwave Radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from Multiple Observation Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Chuen-Meei; Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Hogrefe, Christian; Long, Charles N.; Xing, Jia; Roselle, Shawn; Wei, Chao

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Long term datasets of total (all-sky) and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) radiation, cloud cover fraction (cloudiness) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are analyzed together with aerosol concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) in the United States (US). Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effect of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to test the hypothesis that the reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the past 15 years across the US has caused an increase in surface SW radiation. We show that the total and clear-sky downwelling SW radiation from seven sites have increasing trends except Penn State which shows no tendency in clear-sky SW radiation. After investigating several confounding factors, the causes can be due to the geography of the site, aerosol distribution, heavy air traffic and increasing cloudiness. Moreover, we assess the relationship between total column AOD with surface aerosol concentration to test our hypothesis. In our findings, the trends of clear-sky SW radiation, AOD, and aerosol concentration from the sites in eastern US agree well with our hypothesis. However, the sites in western US demonstrate increasing AOD associated with mostly increasing trends in surface aerosol concentration. At these sites, the changes in aerosol burden and/or direct aerosol effects alone cannot explain the observed changes in SW radiation, but other factors need to be considered such as cloudiness, aerosol vertical profiles and elevated plumes.

  12. Characteristics of American coals in relation to their conversion into clean-energy fuels. Final report. [1150 samples of US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spackman, W.; Davis, A.; Walker, P.L.; Lovell, H.L.; Vastola, F.J.; Given, P.H.; Suhr, N.H.; Jenkins, R.G.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To further characterize the Nation's coals, the Penn State Coal Sample Bank and Data Base were expanded to include a total of 1150 coal samples. The Sample Bank includes full-seam channel samples as well as samples of lithotypes, seam benches, and sub-seam sections. To the extent feasible and appropriate basic compositional data were generated for each sample and validated and computerized. These data include: proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, sulfur forms analysis, calorific value, maceral analysis, vitrinite reflectance analysis, ash fusion analysis, free-swelling index determination, Gray-King coke type determination, Hardgrove grindability determination, Vicker's microhardness determination, major and minor element analysis, trace element analysis, and mineral species analysis. During the contract period more than 5000 samples were prepared and distributed. A theoretical and experimental study of the pyrolysis of coal has been completed. The reactivity of chars, produced from all ranks of American coals, has been studied with regard to reactivity to air, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/ and steam. Another area research has concerned the catalytic effect of minerals and various cations on the gasification processes. Combustion of chars, low volatile fuels, coal-oil-water-air emulsions and other subjects of research are reported here. The products of this research can be found in 23 DOE Technical Research Reports and 49 published papers. As another mechanism of technology transfer, the results have been conveyed via more than 70 papers presented at a variety of scientific meetings. References to all of these are contained in this report.

  13. Three red giants with substellar-mass companions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niedzielski, A; Nowak, G; Adamw, M; Kowalik, K; Maciejewski, G; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B; Adamczyk, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three giant stars from the ongoing Penn State-Toru\\'n Planet Search with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which exhibit radial velocity variations that point to a presence of planetary --mass companions around them. BD+49 828 is a $M=1.52 \\pm 0.22$ $M_{\\odot}$ K0 giant with a $m sini$=$1.6^{+0.4}_{-0.2}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=4.2^{+0.32}_{-0.2}$ AU ($2590^{+300}_{-180}$d), $e=0.35^{+0.24}_{-0.10}$ orbit. HD 95127, a log$L$/$L_{\\odot}$=$2.28 \\pm 0.38$, $R = 20\\pm 9$ $R_{\\odot}$, $M=1.20 \\pm 0.22$ $M_{\\odot}$ K0 giant has a $m sini$=$5.01^{+0.61}_{-0.44}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=1.28^{+0.01}_{-0.01}$ AU ($482^{+5}_{-5}$d), $e=0.11^{+0.15}_{-0.06}$ orbit. Finally, HD 216536, is a $M=1.36 \\pm 0.38$ $M_{\\odot}$ K0 giant with a $m sin i=1.47^{+0.20}_{-0.12}$ $M_{J}$ minimum mass companion in $a=0.609^{+0.002}_{-0.002}$ AU ($148.6^{+0.7}_{-0.7}$d), $e=0.38^{+0.12}_{-0.10}$ orbit. Both, HD 95127 b and HD 216536 b in their compact orbits, are very close to the engulfment zone and henc...

  14. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

  15. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the pyrolysis of n-butylbenzene in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. A number of similarities to trends previously observed in high-pressure static reactions were identified. The product distribution from pyrolysis of n-tetradecane at 400{degrees}C and 425{degrees}C was investigated. The critical temperatures of a suite of petroleum- and coal-derived jet fuels were measured by a rapidly heating sealed tube method. Work has continued on refining the measurements of deposit growth for stressing mixtures of coal-derived JP-8C with tetradecane. Current work has given emphasis to the initial stages of fuel decomposition and the onset of deposition. Pretreatment of JPTS fuel with PX-21 activated carbon (50 mg of PX-21 in 15 mL JPTS) delayed degradation and prevented carbon deposition during thermal stressing at 425{degrees}C for 5 h in nitrogen and air atmospheres. Clear indications of initial and subsequent deposit formation on different metal surfaces have been identified for thermal stressing of dodecane. Seven additives were tested for their ability to retard decomposition of dodecane at 450{degrees}C under nitrogen. Nuclear magnetic resonance data for Dammar resin indicates that structures proposed in the literature are not entirely correct.

  16. Mid-Century Ensemble Regional Climate Change Scenarios for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Bian, Xindi; Washington, Warren M.; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the impacts of climate change on water resources in the western U.S., global climate simulations were produced using the National Center for Atmospheric Research/Department of Energy (NCAR/DOE) Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used to downscale the PCM control (1995-2015) and three future (2040-2060) climate simulations to yield ensemble regional climate simulations at 40 km spatial resolution for the western U.S. This paper focuses on analyses of regional simulations in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins. Results based on the regional simulations show that by mid-century, the average regional warming of 1-2.5oC strongly affects snowpack in the western U.S. Along coastal mountains, reduction in annual snowpack is about 70%. Besides changes in mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack, cold season extreme daily precipitation is found to increase by 5 to 15 mm/day (15-20%) along the Cascades and the Sierra. The warming results in increased rainfall over snowfall and reduced snow accumulation (or earlier snowmelt) during the cold season. In the Columbia River Basin, these changes are accompanied by more frequent rain-on-snow events. Overall, they induce higher likelihood of wintertime flooding and reduced runoff and soil moisture in the summer. Such changes could have serious impacts on water resources and agriculture in the western U.S. Changes in surface water and energy budgets in the Columbia River and Sacramento-San Joaquin basins are driven mainly by changes in surface temperature, which are statistically significant at the 0.95 confidence level. Changes in precipitation, however, are spatially incoherent and not statistically significant except for the drying trend during summer.

  17. Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

  18. Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

  19. Temperature elevation by HIFU in ex vivo porcine muscle: MRI measurement and simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A., E-mail: solovchuk@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hwang, San Chao; Chang, Hsu [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan (China)] [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan (China); Thiriet, Marc [Sorbonne Universits, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France)] [Sorbonne Universits, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Sheu, Tony W. H., E-mail: twhsheu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, Republic of China and Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, Republic of China and Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound is a rapidly developing medical technology with a large number of potential clinical applications. Computational model can play a pivotal role in the planning and optimization of the treatment based on the patient's image. Nonlinear propagation effects can significantly affect the temperature elevation and should be taken into account. In order to investigate the importance of nonlinear propagation effects, nonlinear Westervelt equation was solved. Weak nonlinear propagation effects were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the predicted and measured temperature elevations and lesion in a porcine muscle. Methods: The investigated single-element transducer has a focal length of 12 cm, an aperture of 8 cm, and frequency of 1.08 MHz. Porcine muscle was heated for 30 s by focused ultrasound transducer with an acoustic power in the range of 2456 W. The theoretical model consists of nonlinear Westervelt equation with relaxation effects being taken into account and Pennes bioheat equation. Results: Excellent agreement between the measured and simulated temperature rises was found. For peak temperatures above 8590?C preboiling or cavitation activity appears and lesion distortion starts, causing small discrepancy between the measured and simulated temperature rises. From the measurements and simulations, it was shown that distortion of the lesion was caused by the preboiling activity. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that for peak temperatures below 8590?C numerical simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in three dimensions. Both temperature rise and lesion size can be well predicted. Due to nonlinear effect the temperature in the focal region can be increased compared with the linear case. The current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution is not sufficient. Due to the inevitable averaging the measured temperature can be 1030?C lower than the peak temperature. Computational fluid dynamics can provide additional important information that is lost using a state of the art MRI device.

  20. Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George, H.

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided STAR mode IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for spin off applications along the way to a power producing plant.

  1. Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

  2. DHS Summary Report -- Robert Weldon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weldon, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This summer I worked on benchmarking the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fission multiplicity capability used in the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX. This work involved running simulations and then comparing the simulation results with experimental experiments. Outlined in this paper is a brief description of the work completed this summer, skills and knowledge gained, and how the internship has impacted my planning for the future. Neutron multiplicity counting is a neutron detection technique that leverages the multiplicity emissions of neutrons from fission to identify various actinides in a lump of material. The identification of individual actinides in lumps of material crossing our boarders, especially U-235 and Pu-239, is a key component for maintaining the safety of the country from nuclear threats. Several multiplicity emission options from spontaneous and induced fission already existed in MCNPX 2.4.0. These options can be accessed through use of the 6th entry on the PHYS:N card. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed a physics model for the simulation of neutron and gamma ray emission from fission and photofission that was included in MCNPX 2.7.B as an undocumented feature and then was documented in MCNPX 2.7.C. The LLNL multiplicity capability provided a different means for MCNPX to simulate neutron and gamma-ray distributions for neutron induced, spontaneous and photonuclear fission reactions. The original testing on the model for implementation into MCNPX was conducted by Gregg McKinney and John Hendricks. The model is an encapsulation of measured data of neutron multiplicity distributions from Gwin, Spencer, and Ingle, along with the data from Zucker and Holden. One of the founding principles of MCNPX was that it would have several redundant capabilities, providing the means of testing and including various physics packages. Though several multiplicity sampling methodologies already existed within MCNPX, the LLNL fission multiplicity was included to provide a separate capability for computing multiplicity as well as including several new features not already included in MCNPX. These new features include: (1) prompt gamma emission/multiplicity from neutron-induced fission; (2) neutron multiplicity and gamma emission/multiplicity from photofission; and (3) an option to enforce energy correlation for gamma neutron multiplicity emission. These new capabilities allow correlated signal detection for identifying presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Therefore, these new capabilities help meet the missions of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), which is tasked with developing nuclear detection strategies for identifying potential radiological and nuclear threats, by providing new simulation capability for detection strategies that leverage the new available physics in the LLNL multiplicity capability. Two types of tests were accomplished this summer to test the default LLNL neutron multiplicity capability: neutron-induced fission tests and spontaneous fission tests. Both cases set the 6th entry on the PHYS:N card to 5 (i.e. use LLNL multiplicity). The neutron-induced fission tests utilized a simple 0.001 cm radius sphere where 0.0253 eV neutrons were released at the sphere center. Neutrons were forced to immediately collide in the sphere and release all progeny from the sphere, without further collision, using the LCA card, LCA 7j -2 (therefore density and size of the sphere were irrelevant). Enough particles were run to ensure that the average error of any specific multiplicity did not exceed 0.36%. Neutron-induced fission multiplicities were computed for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241. The spontaneous fission tests also used the same spherical geometry, except: (1) the LCA card was removed; (2) the density of the sphere was set to 0.001 g/cm3; and (3) instead of emitting a thermal neutron, the PAR keyword was set to PAR=SF. The purpose of the small density was to ensure that the spontaneous fission neutrons would not further interact and induce fissions (i.e. th

  3. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  4. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded an RPD of 50% between years. However, they did not exceed the bioaccumulation critical values or the critical body residues corresponding to the no observed effect dose (NOED) and the lowest observed effect dose (LOED) with one exception. The Cd concentrations exceeded the NOED and LOED for the Manchester Lab Pier and the Pike Place Market samples. For the PAHs and PCB, the 2012 data were generally lower than 2010 and some cases significantly lower for PAHs and none of the available invertebrate benchmarks were exceeded.

  5. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  6. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, P.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the ninth quarter of the program. During this quarter, the natural gas baseline testing at the Penn State demonstration boiler was completed, results were analyzed and are presented here. The burner operates in a stable manner over an 8/1 turndown, however due to baghouse temperature limitations (300{degrees}F for acid dewpoint), the burner is not operated for long periods of time below 75% load. Boiler efficiency averaged 83.1% at the 100 percent load rate while increasing to 83.7% at 75% load. NO{sub x} emissions ranged from a low of 0.17 Lbs/MBtu to a high of 0.24 Lbs/MBtu. After the baseline natural gas testing was completed, work continued on hardware optimization and testing with the goal of increasing carbon conversion efficiency on 100% coal firing from {approx}95% to 98%. Several coal handling and feeding problems were encountered during this quarter and no long term testing was conducted. While resolving these problems several shorter term (less than 6 hour) tests were conducted. These included, 100% coal firing tests, 100% natural gas firing tests, testing of air sparges on coal to simulate more primary air and a series of cofiring tests. For 100% coal firing, the carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) obtained this quarter did not exceed the 95-96% barrier previously reached. NO{sub x} emissions on coal only ranged from {approx} 0.42 to {approx} 0.78 Lbs/MBtu. The burner has not been optimized for low NO{sub x} yet, however, due to the short furnace residence time, meeting the goals of 98% CCE and <0.6 Lbs/MBtu NO{sub x} simultaneously will be difficult. Testing on 100% natural gas in the boiler after coal firing indicated no changes in efficiency due to firing in a `dirty` boiler. The co-firing tests showed that increased levels of natural gas firing proportionately decreased NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO.

  7. Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Abbott; Edward Casey; Etop Esen; Douglas Smith; Bruce Burke; Binh Nguyen; Samuel Tam; Paul Worhach; Mahabubul Alam; Juhun Song; James Szybist; Ragini Acharya; Vince Zello; David Morris; Patrick Flynn; Stephen Kirby; Krishan Bhatia; Jeff Gonder; Yun Wang; Wenpeng Liu; Hua Meng; Subramani Velu; Jian-Ping Shen, Weidong Gu; Elise Bickford; Chunshan Song; Chao-Yang Wang; Andre' Boehman

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ConocoPhillips, in conjunction with Nexant Inc., Penn State University, and Cummins Engine Co., joined with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in a cooperative agreement to perform a comprehensive study of new ultra clean fuels (UCFs) produced from remote sources of natural gas. The project study consists of three primary tasks: an environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a Market Study, and a series of Engine Tests to evaluate the potential markets for Ultra Clean Fuels. The overall objective of DOE's Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative is to develop and deploy technologies that will produce ultra-clean burning transportation fuels for the 21st century from both petroleum and non-petroleum resources. These fuels will: (1) Enable vehicles to comply with future emission requirements; (2) Be compatible with the existing liquid fuels infrastructure; (3) Enable vehicle efficiencies to be significantly increased, with concomitantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions; (4) Be obtainable from a fossil resource, alone or in combination with other hydrocarbon materials such as refinery wastes, municipal wastes, biomass, and coal; and (5) Be competitive with current petroleum fuels. The objectives of the ConocoPhillips Ultra Clean Fuels Project are to perform a comprehensive life cycle analysis and to conduct a market study on ultra clean fuels of commercial interest produced from natural gas, and, in addition, perform engine tests for Fisher-Tropsch diesel and methanol in neat, blended or special formulations to obtain data on emissions. This resulting data will be used to optimize fuel compositions and engine operation in order to minimize the release of atmospheric pollutants resulting from the fuel combustion. Development and testing of both direct and indirect methanol fuel cells was to be conducted and the optimum properties of a suitable fuel-grade methanol was to be defined. The results of the study are also applicable to coal-derived FT liquid fuels. After different gas clean up processes steps, the coal-derived syngas will produce FT liquid fuels that have similar properties to natural gas derived FT liquids.

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  10. UNDERSTANDING OLIVINE CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; H. Bearat; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonation of Mg-rich minerals offers an intriguing candidate carbon sequestration process technology, which can provide large-scale CO{sub 2} disposal. Such disposal bypasses many long-term storage problems by (i) providing containment in the form of mineral carbonates that have proven stable over geological time, (ii) generating only environmentally benign materials, and (iii) essentially eliminating the need for continuous site monitoring. The primary challenge for viable process development is reducing process cost. This is the primary focus of the CO{sub 2} Mineral Sequestration Working Group managed by Fossil Energy at DOE, which includes members from the Albany Research Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Penn State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the University of Utah, as well as from our research group at Arizona State University. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a leading process candidate, which converts CO{sub 2} into the mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). As olivine carbonation is exothermic, it offers intriguing low-cost potential. Recent studies at the Albany Research Center have found aqueous-solution carbonation is a promising approach. Cost effectively enhancing carbonation reactivity is central to reducing process cost. Many of the mechanisms that impact reactivity occur at the solid/solution interface. Understanding these mechanisms is central to the ability to engineer new and modified processes to enhance carbonation reactivity and lower cost. Herein, we report the results of our UCR I project, which focused on exploring the reaction mechanisms that govern aqueous-solution olivine carbonation using model olivine feedstock materials. Carbonation was found to be a complex process associated with passivating silica layer formation, which includes the trapping of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating silica layers, cracking and exfoliation of the layers, silica surface migration, olivine etch pit formation, transfer of the Mg and Fe in the olivine into the product carbonate, and the nucleation and growth of magnesite crystals on/in the silica/olivine reaction matrix. These phenomena occur in concert with the large solid volume changes that accompany the carbonation process, which can substantially impact carbonation reactivity. Passivating silica layer formation appears to play a major role in inhibiting carbonation reactivity. New approaches that can mitigate the effectiveness of passivating layer formation may offer intriguing potential to enhance carbonation reactivity and lower process cost.

  11. 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

  12. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 1 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  13. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  14. Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury capture. During July, August, and September 2007, BES designed, procured, installed, and tested the slurry injection system at Beaver Valley. Slurry production was performed by Penn State University using equipment that was moved from campus to the Beaver Valley site. Waste coal fines were procured from Headwaters Inc. and transported to the site in Super Sacks. In addition, bituminous coal was pulverized at Penn State and trucked to the site in 55-gallon drums. This system was operated for three weeks during August and September 2007. NO{sub x} emission data were obtained using the plant CEM system. Hg measurements were taken using EPA Method 30B (Sorbent Trap method) both downstream of the electrostatic precipitator and in the stack. Ohio Lumex Company was on site to provide rapid Hg analysis on the sorbent traps during the tests. Key results from these tests are: (1) Coal Fines reburn alone reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 0-10% with up to 4% heat input from the CWS. However, the NO{sub x} reduction was accompanied by higher CO emissions. The higher CO limited our ability to try higher reburn rates for further NO{sub x} reduction. (2) Coal Fines reburn with Urea (Carbon enhanced SNCR) decreased NO{sub x} emissions by an additional 30% compared to Urea injection only. (3) Coal slurry injection did not change Hg capture across the ESP at full load with an inlet temperature of 400-430 F. The Hg capture in the ESP averaged 40%, with or without slurry injection; low mercury particulate capture is normally expected across a higher temperature ESP because any oxidized mercury is thought to desorb from the particulate at ESP temperatures above 250 F. (4) Coal slurry injection with halogen salts added to the mixing tank increased the Hg capture in the ESP to 60%. This significant incremental mercury reduction is important to improved mercury capture with hot-side ESP operation and wherever hindrance from sulfur oxides limit mercury reduction, because the higher temperature is above sulfur oxide dew point interference.

  15. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Pennsylvania State Univeristy: Serguei Lvov, Mike Chung, Mark Fedkin, Victor Balashov, Elena, Chalkova, Nikolay Akinfiev; University of South Carolina: Carol Stork, Thomas Davis, Francis Gadala-Maria, Thomas Stanford, John Weidner; Tulane University: Victor Law, John Prindle; ANL: Michele Lewis

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the worldâ??s hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements - around 530 oC and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and reactions going to completion without side reactions, and lower demands on materials of construction. Three university research groups from PSU, USC, and TU as well as a group from ANL have been collaborating on the development of enabling technologies for the Cu-Cl cycle, including experimental work on the Cu-Cl cycle reactions, modeling and simulation, and particularly electrochemical reaction for hydrogen production using a CuCl electrolyzer. The Consortium research was distributed over the participants and organized in the following tasks: (1) Development of CuCl electrolyzer (PSU), (2) Thermodynamic modeling of anolyte solution (PSU), (3) Proton conductive membranes for CuCl electrolysis (PSU), (4) Development of an analytical method for online analysis of copper compounds in highly concentrated aqueous solutions (USC), (5) Electrodialysis as a means for separation and purification of the streams exiting the electrolyzer in the Cu-Cl cycle (USC), (6) Development of nanostructured electrocatalysts for the Cu-Cl electrolysis (USC), (7) Cu-Cl electrolyzer modeling (USC), (8) Aspen Plus modeling of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (TU), (9) International coordination of research on the development of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (ANL). The results obtained in the project clearly demonstrate that the Cu-Cl alternative thermochemical cycle is a promising and viable technology to produce hydrogen efficiently.

  16. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus on meeting two of the eight needs outlined in the recently published 'Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs' which was created 'to provide a systematic path forward for the integration of new ICHMI technologies in both near-term and future nuclear power plants and the reinvigoration of the U.S. nuclear ICHMI community and capabilities.' The research consortium is led by The University of Tennessee (UT) and is focused on three interrelated topics: Topic 1 (simulator development and measurement sensitivity analysis) is led by Dr. Mike Doster with Dr. Paul Turinsky of North Carolina State University (NCSU). Topic 2 (multivariate autonomous control of modular reactors) is led by Dr. Belle Upadhyaya of the University of Tennessee (UT) and Dr. Robert Edwards of Penn State University (PSU). Topic 3 (monitoring, diagnostics, and prognostics system development) is led by Dr. Wes Hines of UT. Additionally, South Carolina State University (SCSU, Dr. Ken Lewis) participated in this research through summer interns, visiting faculty, and on-campus research projects identified throughout the grant period. Lastly, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (Dr. Mario Carelli) was a no-cost collaborator and provided design information related to the IRIS demonstration platform and defining needs that may be common to other SMR designs. The results of this research are reported in a six-volume Final Report (including the Executive Summary, Volume 1). Volumes 2 through 6 of the report describe in detail the research and development under the topical areas. This volume serves to introduce the overall NERI-C project and to summarize the key results. Section 2 provides a summary of the significant contributions of this project. A list of all the publications under this project is also given in Section 2. Section 3 provides a brief summary of each of the five volumes (2-6) of the report. The contributions of SCSU are described in Section 4, including a summary of undergraduate research exper

  17. Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research, Technical Quarterly Progress Report. October 1, 1998--December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Major accomplishments during this reporting period by the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) are: AGTSR submitted FY99 program continuation request to DOE-FETC for $4M; AGTSR submitted program and workshop Formation to the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) initiative; AGTSR distributed research accomplishment summaries to DOE-FETC in the areas of combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from Arizona State, Cornell, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Clemson, Texas and Georgia Tech; AGTSR prepared background material for DOE-FETC on three technology workshops for distribution at the DOE-ATS conference in Washington, DC; AGTSR coordinated two recommendations for reputable firms to conduct an economic impact analysis in support of new DOE gas turbine initiatives; AGTSR released letters announcing the short-list winners/non-winners from the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR updated fact sheet for 1999 and announced four upcoming workshops via the SCIES web page AGTSR distributed formation to EPRI on research successes, active university projects, and workshop offerings in 1999 AGTSR continued to conduct telephone debriefings to non-winning PI's born the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR distributed completed quarterly progress report assessments to the IRB experts in the various technology areas AGTSR provided Formation to GE-Evandale on the active combustion control research at Georgia Tech AGTSR provided information to AlliedSignal and Wright-Pat Air Force Base on Connecticut's latest short-listed proposal pertaining to NDE of thermal barrier coatings AGTSR submitted final technical reports from Georgia Tech - one on coatings and the other on active combustion control - to the HU3 for review and evaluation AGTSR coordinated the format, presentation and review of 28 university research posters for the ATS Annual Review Meeting in November, 1998 AGTSR published a research summary paper at the ATS Annual Review pertaining to the university consortium's activities AGTSR published and presented a paper on the status of ATS catalytic combustion R&D at the RTA/NATO Gas Turbine Combustion Symposium, October 12-16,1998 in Lisbon, Portugal IRE approved a 12-month add-on request from Penn State University to conduct an added research task in their multistage unsteady aerodynamics project AGTSR reviewed a research extension white paper from Clemson University with the IRB to conduct an added task pertaining to their mist/steam cooling research project AGTSR coordinated new research topics with the IR.Band select universities to facilitate R&D roadmapping needs at the Aero-Heat Transfer III workshop in Austin, TX AGTSR distributed FY97 research progress reports to DOE and the XRB; and AGTSR solicited new R&D topics from the IRB experts for the 1999 RFP.