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Sample records for greenland grenada guadeloupe

  1. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Grenada (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Grenada - a small island nation consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea - three of which are inhabited: Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique.

  2. Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  3. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guadeloupe; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-27

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guadeloupe, an overseas region of France located in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Guadeloupe’s utility rates are approximately $0.18 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  4. Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West Indies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (estimated at more than 30 millions m3 using tracer tests) suggest a relatively long (>> 100 years) residence1 Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West, France 3. BRGM, Department of Geothermal Energy 3, Av. Claude Guillemin - 45060 Orléans Cedex 2, France

  5. Three Essays On Agricultural and Forestry Offsets In Climate Change Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Siyi

    2012-07-16

    , New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Vanuatu 17 RCAM Antigua Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras...

  6. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  7. FEBRUARY 2008|158 THE GREENLAND STIRRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wintertime planetary waves episodically places Greenland in the path of the polar jet stream and associated hPa, where the jet stream wraps around the lee side of Greenland; (c) 50 hPa, showing enhancement in the troposphere and stratosphere, leading to northerly dislocation of the polar jet stream. Along the dislocated

  8. Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Vikas

    1998-01-01

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  9. Trend surface analysis of Greenland precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Vromwich, D. H.; Csatho, B. M.; Kim, C.

    2001-12-27

    Multivariate regression methods are applied to measurements of accumulation covering much of the interior of the Greenland ice sheet to evaluate the important factors that describe the current distribution of accumulation. ...

  10. Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hip-poglossoides (Walbaum)) is a deep-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    documentation of pelagic use is scarce, particularly for adult specimens. Jørgensen (1997) reported that one- year-old Greenland halibut were com- monly found in pelagic trawls in West Greenland waters, and two-year-olds. Although records are scarce, a sig- nificant portion of the diet of adult Greenland halibut consists

  11. Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics Utilizing an LID approach that featured porous asphalt and supporting designs. This case study shows how a combination of porous asphalt and standard pavement design natural underlying soils are mainly clay in composition, which is very prohibitive towards infiltration

  12. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists...

  13. Dispatches from WBUR Greenland: by Dan Grossman & WBUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    to go to the Ice Core section of WBUR's Greenland site, as well as Daniel Grossman's The Drilling Site to a freezer of freezing outside temperatures · Snow or shaved ice · Paper · Colored pencils · Camera (optional: In this activity, students will learn how and why scientists drill ice cores in Greenland. They will use

  14. Dispatches from WBUR Greenland: by Dan Grossman & WBUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    to go to the Ice Core section of WBUR's Greenland site, as well as Daniel Grossman's The Drilling Site to a freezer of freezing outside temperatures · Snow or shaved ice · Paper · Colored pencils · Camera (optional how and why scientists drill ice cores in Greenland. They will use this knowledge to create an ice

  15. Extensional evolution of the central East Greenland Caledonides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Arthur Percy, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    This thesis addresses the complexity of both syn- and post-orogenic extension in the overriding plate during Caledonian continental collision through field and laboratory investigations in the central East Greenland ...

  16. Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

  17. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from 1958 to 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rignot, E; Rignot, E; Box, JE; Burgess, E; Hanna, E

    2008-01-01

    ice sheet surface mass balance varia- bility (1988 – 2004)5 L20502 RIGNOT ET AL. : MASS BALANCE GREENLAND 1958 – 20072005), Runoff and mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet:

  18. The East Greenland Coastal Current : its structure, variability, and large-scale impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, David A. (David Alan)

    2008-01-01

    The subtidal circulation of the southeast Greenland shelf is described using a set of high resolution hydrographic and velocity transects occupied in summer 2004. The main feature present is the East Greenland Coastal ...

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc, orbital cycles, glacial isostatic adjustment and tectonics. Each of these elements contribute different it to be directly observed. This project examined the contribution to sea-level change due to melting of ice from

  20. Equilibrium sensitivities of the Greenland ice sheet inferred from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    changing, steady laminar fluid to a dynamically active one which is essen-7 tially turbulent (e.g. [Wunsch. The objective of this article is largely a proof of concept. Available adjoint code generation tools now open up studies have reported evidence of rapid changes11 in flow speed and mass balance in parts of Greenland

  1. Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data Mark R. DrinkwaterWinds on QuikScat (QSCAT) satellite instruments are used to illustrate spatiotemporal variability in snow in backscatter, B, in the range 20 ­60 are compared with historical snow accumulation data and recent

  2. Greenland's Pressure Drag and the Atlantic Storm Track THOMAS JUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the stratosphere, produce a trough/ridge system with jet stream lying close to Greenland, mean Icelandic low in its is strong. Interaction of traveling storms, the jet stream, and the orographic wake frequently leads resolution, intense tip jet, hydraulic downslope jet, and gravity wave radiation appear in strong flow events

  3. Jakobshavn Glacier, west Greenland: 30 years of spaceborne observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Hong-Gyoo; Jezek, Kenneth C.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    1998-07-05

    Early 1960's reconnaissance satellite images are compared to more recent image and map data in an interannual and seasonal study of West Central Greenland margin fluctuations. From 1962 to 1992, ice sheet margins to the north and south of Jakobshavn...

  4. Cambrian Agnostida of North America and Greenland, Part I, Ptychagnostidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robison, Richard A.

    1984-06-08

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS June 8, 1984 Paper 109 CAMBRIAN AGNOSTIDA OF NORTH AMERICA AND GREENLAND PART I, PTYCHAGNOSTIDAE' R. A. ROBISON Department of Geology, University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas 66045 Abstract... D Z 38°-n 2 The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions—Paper 109 ABUNDANCE, WIDE geographic distribution, and rapid evolution make agnostoid trilobites some of the best indices for global correlation of Cambrian strata. The value...

  5. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15

    Chris Hensz University of Kansas Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Biodiversity Institute Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns The Problem 1: How do migratory animals choose... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  6. Ocean Challenge, Vol.19, Autumn 2012 Early Online The shrinking Greenland ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    , the circulation within Greenland's fjords is not well known, and the interaction between glacial ice and the ocean's melting demands that oceanographers get involved! Unlike Antarctica, Greenland is not surrounded speeding up of the glacial ice flux over land. This in turn has caused concern over the vulnerability

  7. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from 1958 to 2007 E. Rignot,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from 1958 to 2007 E. Rignot,1,2 J. E. Box,3 E. Burgess,4 October 2008. [1] We combine estimates of the surface mass balance, SMB, of the Greenland ice sheet the total ice sheet mass balance. During that time period, we find a robust correlation (R2 = 0.83) between

  8. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T. L.

    2001-12-27

    averaged over a distance covered by aircraft in 1 s (-130 m).) tt(X, g = -d) = Sice(t: T, x). (6) The value t = - can be interpreted as the time when S ice(t, x) represents the wave energy due to scattering specifically from depth d, as opposed... of the Greenland ice sheet produced by Mark Fahnestock (Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ron Kwok (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasa- dena). The helpful suggestions and comments of two...

  9. Grenada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro ElectricGreenLtdUtilities Comm

  10. Remote sounding of Greenland supraglacial melt lakes: implications for subglacial hydraulics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    to Greenland ice-sheet flow may be a feedback between abrupt lake drainage events and ice dynamics. Lake to lift the ice sheet locally, if water flow in the subglacial environment is constrained laterally

  11. Sudden increase in tidal response linked to calving and acceleration at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Juan, J.; Elosegui, P.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Davis, J. L.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Anderson, M. L.; Ekstrom, G.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Stenseng, L.; Khan, S. A.; Forsberg, R.

    2010-06-23

    [1] Large calving events at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers are associated with glacial earthquakes and near-instantaneous increases in glacier flow speed. At some glaciers and ice streams, flow is also modulated in a regular way by ocean tidal...

  12. Assessing and Analyzing Near-Surface Radar Snow Accumulation Layers at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overly, Thomas Buckmaster

    2010-04-28

    High vertical-resolution 0.5&mdash2 GHz frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar data collected near Summit on the Greenland Ice Sheet reveal continuous horizons connecting the GRIP and GISP2 deep ice cores. Traced radar ...

  13. Subglacial topography and geothermal heat flux: potential interactions with drainage of the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Leftwich, T.; von Frese, R.; Csatho, B. M.; Li, J.

    2007-06-05

    [1] Many of the outlet glaciers in Greenland overlie deep and narrow trenches cut into the bedrock. It is well known that pronounced topography intensifies the geothermal heat flux in deep valleys and attenuates this flux on mountains. Here we...

  14. Spatial and temporal melt variability at Helheim Glacier, East Greenland, and its effect on ice dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, M. L.; Larsen, T. B.; Nettles, M.; Elosegui, P.; van As, D.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Davis, J. L.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; de Juan, J.; Ekstrom, G.; Stenseng, L.; Khan, S. A.; Forsberg, R.; Dahl-Jensen, D.

    2010-12-29

    [1] Understanding the behavior of large outlet glaciers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet is critical for assessing the impact of climate change on sea level rise. The flow of marine-terminating outlet glaciers is partly governed by calving...

  15. Controls on the recent speed-up of Jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Plummer, J. C.; Stearns, Leigh

    2011-02-05

    Jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland, underwent a large, rapid and not well understood change in flow dynamics in 1998, leading to a doubling of its ice discharge rates. We calculate the width-averaged forces controlling flow of Jakobshavn Isbrae...

  16. Synoptic Scale Weather Patterns Associated with Annual Snow Accumulation Variability in North-Central Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEN, SHU

    2013-08-31

    Abstract Previous studies on the synoptic forcing of high elevation areas of central Greenland have mostly relied on ice cores, snow pits, mesoscale models, and climate models. In this study, a radar-measured 118-year annual snow accumulation record...

  17. Controls on the recent speed-up of Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Plummer, J. C.; Stearns, Leigh

    2011-09-01

    Jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland, underwent a large, rapid and not well understood change in flow dynamics in 1998, leading to a doubling of its ice discharge rates. We calculate the width-averaged forces controlling flow of Jakobshavn Isbrae...

  18. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  19. Runoff simulations from the Greenland ice sheet at Kangerlussuaq from 2006-2007 to 2007/08. West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hasholt, Bent [UNIV OF COPENHAGEN; Van Den Broeke, Michiel [UTRECHT UNIV; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on runoff from a large sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) - the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland - for the runoff observation period 2006/07 to 2007/08. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate winter accumulation and summer ablation processes, including runoff. Independent in situ end-of-winter snow depth and high-resolution runoff observations were used for validation of simulated accumulation and ablation processes. Runoff was modeled on both daily and hourly time steps, filling a data gap of runoff exiting part of the GrIS. Using hourly meteorological driving data instead of smoothed daily-averaged data produced more realistic meteorological conditions in relation to snow and melt threshold surface processes, and produced 6-17% higher annual cumulative runoff. The simulated runoff series yielded useful insights into the present conditions of inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of Kangerlussuaq runoff, and provided an acceptable degree of agreement between simulated and observed runoff. The simulated spatial runoff distributions, in some areas of the GrIS terminus, were as high as 2,750 mm w.eq. of runoff for 2006/07, while only 900 mm w.eq was simulated for 2007/08. The simulated total runoff from Kangerlussuaq was 1.9 km{sup 3} for 2006/07 and 1.2 km{sup 3} for 2007/08, indicating a reduction of 35-40% caused by the climate conditions and changes in the GrIS freshwater storage. The reduction in runoff from 2006/07 to 2007/08 occurred simultaneously with the reduction in the overall pattern of satellite-derived GrIS surface melt from 2007 to 2008.

  20. Pollution Transport From North America to Greenland During Summer 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J. L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Law, K. S.; Marelle, L.; Ancellet, G.; Ravetta, F.; Fast, Jerome D.; Pfister, G.; Emmons, L.; Diskin, G. S.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Roiger, A.; Schlager, H.

    2013-04-10

    Ozone pollution transported to the Arctic is a significant concern because of the rapid, enhanced warming in high northern latitudes, which is caused, in part, by short lived climate forcers, such as ozone. Long range transport of pollution contributes to background and episodic ozone levels in the Arctic. However, the extent to which plumes are photochemically active during transport, particularly during the summer, is uncertain. Regional chemical transport model simulations are used to examine photochemical production of ozone in air masses originating from boreal fire and anthropogenic emissions over North America and during their transport toward the Arctic during early July 2008. Model results shows good agreement with aircraft data collected over boreal fire source regions in Canada and several days downwind over Greenland during the study period. Pollutant plumes were transported east and north towards the Arctic and show significant ozone enhancements downwind of source regions. Anthropogenic plumes were more photochemically active than fire plumes. Together, both sources made an important contribution to ozone in pollution plumes transported to the Arctic.

  1. Pollution transport from North America to Greenland during summer 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J. L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Law, K. S.; Marelle, L.; Ancellet, G.; Ravetta, F.; Fast, Jerome D.; Pfister, G.; Emmons, L.; Diskin, G. S.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Roiger, A.; Schlager, H.

    2013-04-10

    Ozone pollution transported to the Arctic is a significant concern because of the rapid, enhanced warming in high northern latitudes, which is caused, in part, by short lived climate forcers, such as ozone. Long range transport of pollution contributes to background and episodic ozone levels in the Arctic. However, the extent to which plumes are photochemically active during transport, particularly during the summer, is uncertain. Regional chemical transport model simulations are used to examine photochemical production 8 of ozone in air masses originating from boreal fire and anthropogenic emissions over North America and during their transport toward the Arctic during early July 2008. Model results shows good agreement with aircraft data collected over boreal fire source regions in Canada and several days down-wind over Greenland during the study period. Pollutant plumes were transported east and north towards the Arctic and show significant ozone enhancements downwind of source regions. Anthropogenic plumes were more photochemically active than fire plumes. Together, both sources made an important contribution to ozone in pollution plumes transported to the Arctic.

  2. Guadeloupe: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New

  3. Evolution of supra-glacial lakes across the Greenland Ice Sheet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundal, Aud

    2008-12-05

    We used 268 cloud-free Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images spanning the melt seasons 2003 and 2005-2007 to study the seasonal evolution of supra-glacial lakes in three different regions of the Greenland ice sheet. Lake area...

  4. Deep convection in the Irminger Sea forced by the Greenland tip jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep convection in the Irminger Sea forced by the Greenland tip jet Robert S. Pickart*, Michael A ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Open-ocean deep convection, one of the processes by which deep waters of the world's oceans are formed, the southwest Irminger Sea has been suggested as an additional location for open-ocean deep convection. The deep

  5. GEOLOGY, May 2008 359 The retreat of the southern Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    GEOLOGY, May 2008 359 ABSTRACT The retreat of the southern Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) during that the southern GIS has a significant lag in its response to deglacial warming. Here we use geochemical to examine the behavior of the southern GIS during TI and TII. Our records show that during TI and TII

  6. Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    .1029/2007JD008742. 1. Introduction [2] The present atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide is about 380Remote sensing of Greenland ice sheet using multispectral near-infrared and visible radiances Petr remote-sensing algorithm that utilizes reflected visible and near-infrared radiation to discriminate

  7. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shfaqat A.; Wahr, John; Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon; van Dam, Tonie; Larson, Kristine M.; Francis, Olivier

    2007-11-01

    [1] The rapid unloading of ice from the southeastern sector of the Greenland ice sheet between 2001 and 2006 caused an elastic uplift of ?35 mm at a GPS site in Kulusuk. Most of the uplift results from ice dynamic-induced volume losses on two nearby...

  8. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss Shfaqat A. Khan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss Shfaqat A. Khan,1 John Wahr,2 caused an elastic uplift of $35 mm at a GPS site in Kulusuk. Most of the uplift results from ice dynamic digital elevation models, contributes about $16 mm of the observed uplift, with an additional $5 mm from

  9. Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic to changes in the available volume of deep and intermediate waters in the Nordic Seas. Hydraulic control sensitive to changes in the deep water supply than that of the Faeroe-Bank Channel, but no sudden breakdown

  10. Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA 4 Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University is usually packed with dense ice melange. Helheim Glacier accelerated and retreated between 2000 and 2005

  11. Modeling the response of subglacial drainage at Paakitsoq, West Greenland, to 21st century climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Banwell, Alison F.; Arnold, Neil S.; Willis, Ian C.

    2015-01-22

    , and into the future. Here, we apply a physically-based, subglacial hydrological model to the Paakitsoq region, west Greenland, and run it into the future to calculate patterns of daily subglacial water pressure fluctuations in response to climatic warming. The model...

  12. Holocene tephra from Iceland and Alaska in SE Greenland Shelf Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoner, Joseph

    Holocene tephra from Iceland and Alaska in SE Greenland Shelf Sediments ANNE JENNINGS1*, THORVALDURJW, UK 3 Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, Reykjavi´k 101, Iceland 4 College of Earth Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University 104 COAS Admin Building

  13. Freshwater flux and spatiotemporal simulated runoff1 variability into Ilulissat Icefjord, West Greenland, linked2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    of Natural Resources, Nuuk, GREENLAND19 20 JACOB C. YDE21 Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal SWITZERLAND, and Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ecole31 Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne, SWITZERLAND32 33 34 35 Submitted to Journal of Physical Oceanography, October 21, 201436 37 38 39

  14. Challenges to Understanding the Dynamic Response of Greenland's Marine Terminating Glaciers to Oceanic and Atmospheric Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straneo, Fiammetta

    The recent retreat and speedup of outlet glaciers, as well as enhanced surface melting around the ice sheet margin, have increased Greenland's contribution to sea level rise to 0.6 ± 0.1 mm yr[superscript ?1] and its ...

  15. Neogene overflow of Northern Component Water at the Greenland-Scotland Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samworth, Richard

    EQ, UK [1] In the North Atlantic Ocean, flow of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), and of its ancient the three major deep water masses (i.e., Northern Component Water, Southern Ocean Water, and Pacific OceanNeogene overflow of Northern Component Water at the Greenland-Scotland Ridge H. R. Poore Department

  16. Estimating a Volumetric Backscatter Coefficient from Measurements on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Estimating a Volumetric Backscatter Coefficient from Measurements on the Greenland Ice Sheet J (> 25°) the measured backscatter is dominated by volumetric scattering, as opposed to surface and specu the volumetric backscatter coefficient as a function of depth in flrn. Re- sults show trends consistent with both

  17. Multi-decadal record of ice dynamics on Daugaard Jensen Gletscher, East Greenland, from satellite imagery and terrestrial measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon; Reeh, Niels

    2005-08-01

    The history of ice velocity and calving front position of Daugaard Jensen Gletscher, a large outlet glacier in East Greenland, is reconstructed from field measurements, aerial photography and satellite imagery for the ...

  18. Strong wind events across Greenland's coast and their influence on the ice sheet, sea ice and ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oltmanns, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    In winter, Greenland's coastline adjacent to the subpolar North Atlantic and Nordic Seas is characterized by a large land-sea temperature contrast. Therefore, winds across the coast advect air across a horizontal temperature ...

  19. Changes in the firn structure of the western Greenland Ice Sheet caused by recent warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de la Peña, S.; Howat, I. M.; Nienow, P. W.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Price, S. F.; Mair, D.; Noël, B.; Sole, A. J.

    2015-06-11

    Atmospheric warming over the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last 2 decades has increased the amount of surface meltwater production, resulting in the migration of melt and percolation regimes to higher altitudes and an increase in the amount of ice content from refrozen meltwater found in the firn above the superimposed ice zone. Here we present field and airborne radar observations of buried ice layers within the near-surface (0–20 m) firn in western Greenland, obtained from campaigns between 1998 and 2014. We find a sharp increase in firn-ice content in the form of thick widespread layers in the percolation zone,more »which decreases the capacity of the firn to store meltwater. The estimated total annual ice content retained in the near-surface firn in areas with positive surface mass balance west of the ice divide in Greenland reached a maximum of 74 ± 25 Gt in 2012, compared to the 1958–1999 average of 13 ± 2 Gt, while the percolation zone area more than doubled between 2003 and 2012. Increased melt and column densification resulted in surface lowering averaging –0.80 ± 0.39 m yr?¹ between 1800 and 2800 m in the accumulation zone of western Greenland. Since 2007, modeled annual melt and refreezing rates in the percolation zone at elevations below 2100 m surpass the annual snowfall from the previous year, implying that mass gain in the region is retained after melt in the form of refrozen meltwater. If current melt trends over high elevation regions continue, subsequent changes in firn structure will have implications for the hydrology of the ice sheet and related abrupt seasonal densification could become increasingly significant for altimetry-derived ice sheet mass balance estimates.« less

  20. Seasonal variations in N and O isotopes of nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland: Implications for the study of nitrate in snow and ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Seasonal variations in N and O isotopes of nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland: Implications for the study of nitrate in snow and ice cores Meredith G. Hastings Department of Geosciences, Princeton measured in snow and firn from Summit, Greenland. The 15 N/14 N and 18 O/16 O ratios of NO3 À in recently

  1. Public ideologies and personal meaning-making in postcolonial Grenada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Noga

    2012-01-01

    policy of controlled, eco-friendly, sustainable tourismmarina and the sort of eco-friendly – although I don‘t see

  2. Public ideologies and personal meaning-making in postcolonial Grenada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Noga

    2012-01-01

    tourism is a particularly transparent dependency. The need to make one‘s nation appealing and accessible

  3. Public ideologies and personal meaning-making in postcolonial Grenada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Noga

    2012-01-01

    Social Studies Syllabus. Barbados, West Indies. CaribbeanAnd then they also run the risk of getting like Barbados.Barbados has so many condo hotels and not enough traditional

  4. Public ideologies and personal meaning-making in postcolonial Grenada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Noga

    2012-01-01

    the internet and find maybe, find some of the things. ?Cuzsome things about the Revolution. So both internet, parents,

  5. Grenada County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar Jump to:Resources Jump

  6. Grenada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar Jump to:Resources JumpStrategy | Open Energy

  7. Grenada-Caribbean Solar Finance Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro ElectricGreenLtdUtilities Comm Jump

  8. Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformation RegionalGreenvironment plcGregson

  9. Grenada-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformation RegionalGreenvironment plcGregsonResilience

  10. Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straneo, Fiamma

    . The loss was not so much a result of increased surface melt but, rather, of ice loss due to the widespread; Holland et al. 2008]. Specifically, increased melting due, for example, to warming ocean waters can speed that STW penetrate inside Greenland's glacial fjords is limited to a handful of summer profiles from

  11. Evaluation of the MODIS (MOD10A1) daily snow albedo product over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Evaluation of the MODIS (MOD10A1) daily snow albedo product over the Greenland ice sheet Julienne C Abstract This study evaluates the performance of the beta-test MODIS (MOD10A1) daily albedo product using with the launch of the first Landsat. Since then, a wide range of optical-wavelength sensors have been launched

  12. P. Schuchert 2001a. Hydroids of Greenland and Iceland (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa). Meddelelser om Grnland 53: 1-184.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuchert, Peter

    P. Schuchert 2001a. Hydroids of Greenland and Iceland (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa). Meddelelser om Grønland 53: 1-184. Errata During the printing process, the Icelandic letter ð (eth) was occasionally changed be replaced by "C, BIOICE 2516..." page 172: "Material of Icelandic Museum of Natural History BIOICE material

  13. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Avva; J. M. Kovac; C. Miki; D. Saltzberg; A. G. Vieregg

    2014-09-30

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. The measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as the most promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  14. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Avva; J. M. Kovac; C. Miki; D. Saltzberg; A. G. Vieregg

    2015-12-02

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. Assuming a reliable extrapolation to higher frequencies, the measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as a promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  15. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore »in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (« less

  16. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lüthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warming in deep crevasses.

  17. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lüthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warmingmore »in deep crevasses.« less

  18. Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Steffen, Konrad [UNIV OF COLORADO

    2009-01-01

    The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are similar, indicating increasing (insignificant) influx of freshwater to the Illulissat Icefiord for the period 2000/01-2006/07. This study suggests that surface runoff forms a minor part of the overall Jakobshavn freshwater flux to the fiord: around 7% ({approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1}) of the average annual freshwater flux of {approx}51.0 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} originates from the surface runoff.

  19. Cost and Efficacy of Collective Action Clauses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Chenbo

    2015-01-01

    Greece Grenada Moldova Pakistan Russia Jul-00 external bondsGreece Grenada Moldova Pakistan Ecuador Country ArgentinaGreece Grenada Moldova Pakistan Russia Jul-00 external bonds

  20. Greenland and Antarctic mass balances for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} from the GENESIS version-2 global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Pollard, D.

    1997-05-01

    As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in these mass balances have received considerable attention in the glaciological literature, but until recently relatively few general circulation modeling (GCM) studies have focused on the problem. However, there are two significant problems in using GCMs to predict mass balance distributions on ice sheets: (i) the relatively coarse GCM horizontal resolution truncates the topography of the ice-sheet flanks and smaller ice sheets such as Greenland, and (ii) the snow and ice physics in most GCMs does not include ice-sheet-specific processes such as the refreezing of meltwater. Two techniques are described that attack these problems, involving (i) an elevation-based correction to the surface meteorology and (ii) a simple a posteriori correction for the refreezing of meltwater following Pfeiffer et al. Using these techniques in a new version 2 of the Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems global climate model, the authors present global climate and ice-sheet mass-balance results from two equilibrated runs for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This GCM is well suited for ice-sheet mass-balance studies because (a) the surface can be represented at a finer resolution (2{degrees} lat x 2{degrees} long) than the atmospheric GCM, (b) the two correction techniques are included as part of the model, and the model`s mass balances for present-day Greenland and Antarctica are realistic. 131 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2007-07-10

    Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

  2. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tezaur, Irina K.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Price, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditionermore »results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.« less

  3. Abundance of fin whales in West Greenland in 2007 M.P. HEIDE-JRGENSEN*, K.L. LAIDRE*+, M. SIMON*, M.L. BURT$, D.L. BORCHERS$ AND M. RASMUSSEN#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    ., 2008). A ship-based survey also conducted in 2005 gave a smaller abundance estimate (1,980, 95% CI 913 and too imprecise to be used for generating advice on sustainable takes (IWC, 2005). For continued advice on the sustainability of the harvest in West Greenland it is important to determine if the abundance of fin whales

  4. The influence of air temperature inversions on snowmelt and glacier mass-balance simulations, Ammassalik island, SE Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, a realistic description of air temperature inversions is essential for accurate snow and glacier ice melt, and glacier mass-balance simulations. A physically based snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) was used to simulate eight years (1998/99 to 2005/06) of snow accumulation and snow and glacier ice ablation from numerous small coastal marginal glaciers on the SW-part of Ammassalik Island in SE Greenland. These glaciers are regularly influenced by inversions and sea breezes associated with the adjacent relatively low temperature and frequently ice-choked fjords and ocean. To account for the influence of these inversions on the spatiotemporal variation of air temperature and snow and glacier melt rates, temperature inversion routines were added to MircoMet, the meteorological distribution sub-model used in SnowModel. The inversions were observed and modeled to occur during 84% of the simulation period. Modeled inversions were defined not to occur during days with strong winds and high precipitation rates due to the potential of inversion break-up. Field observations showed inversions to extend from sea level to approximately 300 m a.s.l., and this inversion level was prescribed in the model simulations. Simulations with and without the inversion routines were compared. The inversion model produced air temperature distributions with warmer lower elevation areas and cooler higher elevation areas than without inversion routines due to the use of cold sea-breeze base temperature data from underneath the inversion. This yielded an up to 2 weeks earlier snowmelt in the lower areas and up to 1 to 3 weeks later snowmelt in the higher elevation areas of the simulation domain. Averaged mean annual modeled surface mass-balance for all glaciers (mainly located above the inversion layer) was -720 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} for inversion simulations, and -880 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} without the inversion routines, a difference of 160 mm w.eq. y{sup -1}. The annual glacier loss for the two simulations was 50.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} and 64.4 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} y{sup -1} for all glaciers - a difference of {approx}21%. The average equilibrium line altitude (ELA) for all glaciers in the simulation domain was located at 875 m a.s.l. and at 900 m a.s.l. for simulations with or without inversion routines, respectively.

  5. Spectral and Angular Ground-Based Radar BackScatter Measurements of Greenland Snow Facies. BAUMGARTNER1 F., JEZEK2 K., FORSTER3 R.R., GOGINEN14S.P., and ZABEL5 LH.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . The radar cross section of the lens c1 is expressed in meters squared. The sum is made over the successiveSpectral and Angular Ground-Based Radar BackScatter Measurements of Greenland Snow Facies. BAUMGARTNER1 F., JEZEK2 K., FORSTER3 R.R., GOGINEN14S.P., and ZABEL5 LH.H. 1'2'3'5TheByrd Polar Research

  6. Cost and Efficacy of Collective Action Clauses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Chenbo

    2015-01-01

    Sep-05 Aug-02 Nov-99 Ecuador Greece Grenada Moldova Pakistanbonds Panama Ecuador Greece Grenada Moldova Pakistan EcuadorSep-05 Aug-02 Nov-99 Ecuador Greece Grenada Moldova Pakistan

  7. SIT Workshops 1995 2011 Page 1 of 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , MD General Standards and Conformity Assessment Antigua & Barbuda Bahamas Barbados Dominica Grenada Barbados Belize Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominica Ecuador El Salvador Grenada Guatemala Guyana

  8. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tezaur, Irina K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Tuminaro, Raymond S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perego, Mauro [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinger, Andrew G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, Stephen F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditioner results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.

  9. Remote and in situ plume measurements of acid gas release from La Soufrie`re volcano, Guadeloupe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauducel, François

    measurements which suggest a magmatic origin of the gases. Readjustments inside the volcanic system may have taken place during the seismic activity beginning in 1992 and enhance the transfer of magmatic gases: mlbernar@univ-ag.fr (M.-L. Bernard). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 150 (2006) 395­409 www

  10. The Stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    , distribution and seasonality · Solid Earth: · Geothermal heatflux Abrupt Climate Change Studies Symposium 21 Rebound (GIA) GPS stations measure vertical deformation of solid Earth as ice

  11. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    S. : A new ice thick- ness and bed data set for theto measure ice thick- ness in areas of warm and fractured

  12. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    pathways in Antarc- tica to small ice-sheet changes,flown extensively in Antarc- tica including surveys over the

  13. Greenland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformation Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP)

  14. Greenland New Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL SolarGate SolarGijeonWindNew Energy Jump to:

  15. Environmental Science and Pollution ISSN 0944-1344

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 23 Environmental Science and Pollution Research ISSN 0944-1344 Environ Sci Pollut Res DOI 10 PROTECTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH: LEGACY MANAGEMENT AND NEW CONCEPTS Assessment of the contamination . Organochlorine pollution . Marine fauna . Contamination . Guadeloupe . Martinique Introduction Guadeloupe

  16. Heat flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones: Example of the Ty fault (La Soufrire de Guadeloupe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauducel, François

    the geothermal flux of a dormant volcano is necessary both for hazard assessment and for studying hydrothermal for the thermal infrared method, and 275 ± 50 W/m2 for the vertical temperature gradient method), if surface through connected porosity and fissures of rocks in which the thermal vertical gradient is nil. Near

  17. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2003. 31:55577 doi: 10.1146/annurev.earth.31.100901.141246

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC, Univeridad de Grenada, Campus de Fuente Nueva s/n, Granada, 18002. 0084-6597/03/0519-0555

  18. NETHERLANDS SWITZERLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Daeyeol

    ANTILLES SAINT KITTS & NEVIS SAINT LUCIA BARBADOS SAINT VINCENT TRINIDAD & TOBAGO URUGUAY ECUADOR VENEZUELA GRENADA LESSER ANTILLES SAINT KITTS & NEVIS SAINT LUCIA BARBADOS SAINT VINCENT TRINIDAD & TOBAGO URUGUAY

  19. Acceleration of Greenland ice mass loss in spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    of increased melting at the ice sheet surface and increased glacial discharge at the coasts. All these trends, suggest that both accumulation and melting have increased during the past decade, with melting increasing thinning in the 1990s at low elevations8 where increased melting is probably more important than increased

  20. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  1. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    is 3.15, equivalent to a radio-wave velocity in ice of 168.9to be vertical) that a radio wave travels through ice during?t is where v ice is the radio-wave velocity in ice, ?z ¼ v

  2. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    on obliquely propagating radio waves, IEEE Trans. Geosci.dielectric attenuation of radio waves through ice is alsoattenuation of radio waves through ice is also temperature

  3. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    team determined that additional sea-level rise resulting from lubrication is small (8 mm) in comparison with that from experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance...

  4. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    corrected echo-intensity P irc of the i th re?ection is (e.g. , Figure 2a) z i C B P irc ¼ P ir @ h þ q ??????? A : ?in equation (1), the ratio of P irc to that of the ?rst

  5. Acceleration of Greenland ice mass loss in spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I; Velicogna, I; Wahr, J

    2006-01-01

    10.1029/ 2005GL025550 (2006). Peltier, W. R. Global glacial2004). Tushingham, A. M. & Peltier, W. R. ICE-3G: A new

  6. Stratospheric gravity wave simulation over Greenland during 24 January 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    gravity waves because of imbalance of the jet stream. Where the horizontal jet is rapidly changing speed anticyclonic jet stream over the North Atlantic. Likewise, inertia gravity waves can result from synoptic

  7. EnvironmentThe MIT Press 2011 The Fate of Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Daniel

    On April 20, 2010, the gigantic drilling rig Deepwater Horizon blew up in the Gulf of Mexico, killing

  8. Topic and Discourse Structure in West Greenlandic Agreement Constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berge, Anna

    1997-01-01

    the place that is now the shipyard there was formerly athe place that is now the shipyard, ilinniartut_ilinniartutthe other side of the shipyard there was a former student's

  9. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following commentsMethods for Estimating:ILaboratory Hydrides-AComplex

  10. Greenland, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar Jump to: navigation, searchInitiative

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic- HemisphericCloudsgovCampaignsLidar

  12. Team advances understanding of the Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable UserTeacher Resourcechannels

  13. Hainan Greenland Microalgae Biotechnology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River Power Co LtdGuntherGreen Power

  14. Greenland Ice Sheet Modeling Update (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) | SciTechConnectbeyond

  15. Male gender, increased blood viscosity, body mass index and triglyceride levels are independently associated with systemic relative hypertension in sickle cell anemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Pointe-à-Pitre, Pointe- à-Pitre, Guadeloupe; 2 Université des'Iinvestigation Clinique - Epidémiologie Clinique 802 Inserm Antilles-Guyane, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Pointe-à-Pitre, Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe; 5 Unité Transversale de la Drépanocytose, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de

  16. Evaluating the national HIV counseling and testing (CT) program of St. Lucia: a study to determine coverage, utilization, successes, and gaps in service delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asrat, Anjabebu S.

    2010-01-01

    quot;“""°5 ‘ -M ~ Barbados 0 200 Kilometers ‘ .Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada,Tobago 2.6% Guyana 2.4% Barbados 1.5% Jamaica 1.5% Dominican

  17. "Calling the Magician": The Metamorphic Indo-Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Aliyah Ryhaan

    2012-01-01

    promotion and transfer to Barbados to be Caribbean directorSt Lucia, St Vincent and Barbados” (217). After staking outwith parents from Grenada and Barbados, and identified as a

  18. The Heroic Framing of US Foreign Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Emily D.

    2010-01-01

    Syria Germany France Germany Turkey Venezuela Thailand EgyptGermany Japan Panama Japan Nicaragua Japan Mexico TurkeyTurkey Mexico Italy Grenada Cuba El Salvador Russia Afgha nista n Korea Germany

  19. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    island of Guadeloupe (France, Lesser Antilles). The large range of scientific (geology, geochemistry) and onshore (gravimetry, electrical resistivity tomography profile and passive seismic), characterization of the geothermal alteration, numeric geological modelling of the developed field, fluid geochemistry and tracer

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Dominica (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Dominica, an island nation located southeast of Guadeloupe and northwest of Martinique in the Lesser Antilles.

  1. Ocean circulation and properties in Petermann Fjord, Greenland H. L. Johnson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    the Arctic. Glacial melt water appears on the northeast side of the fjord at depths between 200 m and is thought to lose at least 80% of its mass through basal melting. Based on three opportunistic ocean surveys of the resulting melt water. The 1100 m deep fjord is separated from neighboring Hall Basin by a sill between 350

  2. Complex fabric development revealed by englacial seismic reflectivity: Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horgan, H. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Alley, R. B.; Peters, L. E.; Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Voigt, D. E.; Winberry, J. P.

    2008-05-21

    profiles, 10 km and 6 km long, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the flow of the glacier, respectively (Figure 1). The seismic sources were provided by the detonation of 500 g of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a depth of 10 m below the surface... profiles, 10 km and 6 km long, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the flow of the glacier, respectively (Figure 1). The seismic sources were provided by the detonation of 500 g of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a depth of 10 m below the surface...

  3. COMPARISON OF MODIS AND MISR-DERIVED SURFACE ALBEDO WITH IN SITU MEASUREMENTS IN GREENLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    visible and near infrared (NIR) data from sensors such as the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution to spectral signatures for high- resolution snow albedo retrievals. This study evaluates snow surface albedo

  4. Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over soft bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bougamont, M. H.; Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, A.. L..; Fitzpatrick, A.. A..; Doyle, S. H.; Carter, S. P.

    2014-09-29

    by frictional and geothermal heating accumulates at the 136 bed over the course of winter and is released together with the first SGL drainage 137 events. With either one of these factors included, our model was able to reproduce the 138 2010 spring... . Measurements of ice 492 deformation, temperature and cross-borehole conductivity in boreholes to the 493 bedrock. Journal Of Glaciology 48, 369-385 (2002). 494 25 Pimentel, S. & Flowers, G. E. A numerical study of hydrologically driven 495 glacier dynamics...

  5. Spread of ice mass loss into northwest Greenland observed by GRACE and GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, SA; Wahr, J; Bevis, M; Velicogna, I; Velicogna, I; Kendrick, E

    2010-01-01

    Geophys. J. Int. , 171(2), Peltier, W. R. (2004), Globaland VM2 viscosity profile of [Peltier, 2004]) to removeand VM2 viscosity profile [Peltier, 2004]. These predicted

  6. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Int. 171 (2), 497–508. Peltier, W.R. , 2004. Global glacialL10503). Tushingham, A.M. , Peltier, W.R. , 1992. Validationa version of ICE-5G (Peltier, 2004), adjusted to reconcile

  7. Rapid volume loss from two East Greenland outlet glaciers quantified using repeat stereo satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon S.

    2007-03-14

    . These catchment-wide volume losses contributed ?0.31 ± 0.07 mm yr?1 to global sea level rise over the 5-year observation period with the coastal regions alone contributing at least 0.1 ± 0.02 mm yr?1....

  8. Surface roughness over the northern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne laser altimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Ahn, Y.; Csatho, B. M.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Krabill, William B.

    2009-06-05

    radioactivity from atmospheric thermonuclear testing. The five cores contain a 66-year period of overlap from 1928 to 1994 (the most recent complete year of accumula- tion). Annual accumulation rates for each of the cores are shown in Figure 2. 2.3. Validation...

  9. Quantitative estimates of velocity sensitivity to surface melt variations at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, M. L.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh

    2011-09-01

    , marine-terminating outlet glaciers that drain the ice sheet. We use a validated model of meltwater input and GPS-derived surface velocities to quantify the sensitivity of glacier flow speed to changes in surface melt at Helheim Glacier during two summer...

  10. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Space Center, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads Building 348, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3) supraglacial extent and timing with passive microwave, thermal and scatterometer satellite data and show melt

  11. Supraglacial lakes on the Larsen B Ice Shelf, Antarctica, and Paakitsoq Region, Greenland: a comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banwell, Alison F.; Caballero, Martamaria; Arnold, Neil S.; Glasser, Neil F.; Cathles, L. Mac; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

    2014-05-01

    shelf disintegration by plate bending and hydro-532 fracture: Satellite observations and model results of the 2008 Wilkins ice shelf break-533 ups, Earth and Plan. Sci. Lett., 280, 51-60. 534 Selmes, N., T. Murray and T. D. James (2011), Fast draining... ., 95, 139–45. 577 FIGURES 578 Figure 1: Schematic of optimal fit of an ellipse to the outline of a previously 579 identified lake. The ellipse and original lake are equal in area. The angle between the 580 long axis of the ellipse and the flow...

  12. Efficient meltwater drainage through supraglacial streams and rivers on the southwest Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    , and accepted by the Editorial Board November 13, 2014 (received for review July 10, 2014) Thermally incised to characterize supraglacial water storage, drainage pattern, and discharge across 6,812 km2 of south- west surface water storage (3.6 ± 0.9 cm), negligi- ble impoundment by supraglacial lakes or topographic

  13. Field Metabolic Rate and PCB Adipose Tissue Deposition Efficiency in East Greenland Polar Bears Derived from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    , Ontario, Canada Abstract Climate change will increasingly affect the natural habitat and diet of polar Derived from Contaminant Monitoring Data Viola Pavlova1 *, Jacob Nabe-Nielsen1,2 , Rune Dietz1,2 , Jens from Contaminant Monitoring Data. PLoS ONE 9(8): e104037. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104037 Editor

  14. Apatite in early Archean Isua supracrustal rocks, southern West Greenland: its origin, association with graphite and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrhenius, Gustaf

    (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Rosing, 1999). The minimum age of Isua supracrustal rocks is :/ 3.7 Ga (Moorbath et to be reached; either :/3.85 Ga (Nutman et al., 1997b; Mojzsis and Harrison, 2000) or :/3.65 Ga (Kamber and generally high strain of Isua and Akilia rocks respectively (Bridgewater and McGregor, 1974; Griffin et al

  15. A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    Analysis (CFA) impurity records from the NGRIP ice core. Several investigators have identified and counted layers that were hard to interpret, but not a possible bias in the set of rules used for annual layer isotope and electrical conductivity measurement profiles [Hammer et al., 1986; Hammer, 1989; Johnsen et al

  16. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT FOR Modeling chemistry in and above snow at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2 by OH SO2 þ OH þ M ! HOSO2 þ M HOSO2 þ O2 ! HO2 þ SO3 SO3 þ H2O þ M ! H2SO4 þ M ðR1Þ produces H2SO-base dissociation of SO2 Á H2O to HSO3 À (pKa1 = 1.9) and SO3 2À (pKa2 = 7.2). We refer to total dissolved SO2 as S(IV) SO2 Á H2O + HSO3 À + SO3 2À . Oxidation of S(IV) takes place by dissolved H2O2 HSOÀ 3 þ H2O2 $ SO2

  17. Hartz, fieldsafety, East Greenland 19-05-06 6 EXAMPLES OF WHAT TO BRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartz, Ebbe

    personal washing gear sunscreen: skin and lips knife sunglasses 2 sleeping bags (-10oC) Pillow cover (fill

  18. Comparison of methods for melt detection over Greenland using active and passive microwave measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    snow absorbs approximately 45% more incoming solar radiation than dry snow (Abdalati and Steffen, 1995/sensor combinations are compared using data for the summer of 2000. The sensors include the Special Spectral Microwave factor in global sea level change, the Earth's radiation budget, and other areas of global environmental

  19. New Method Relates Greenland Ice Sheet Changes to Sea-Level Rise | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6AerosolsofMarshallMissionScienceAppliedOffice of

  20. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion Measurement ofSchweglerfeed-imagelevel rise than

  1. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion Measurement ofSchweglerfeed-imagelevel rise

  2. New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications64 2.251 2.211New SpeciesNewNationalNew Algaland

  3. Volume 13, Number 8 16 August 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin Michael Manga Department (mhornbach@smu.edu) Anne Le Friant Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Universite Paris Diderot, UMR 7175, CNRS, 1, rue Jussieu, FR-75238 Paris, France (lefriant@ipgp.fr) Osamu Ishizuka

  4. High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S.P. Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    been attributed to the melting of mountain glaciers among other causes. The mass balance of the glacial attributed half of this rise to thermal expansion of the ocean and melting of mountain glaciers. To assess extent, intensity of summer melt, wind-generated surface roughness, ice temperature, and absolute

  5. Feasibility of reconstructing paleoatmospheric records of selected alkanes, methyl halides, and sulfur gases from Greenland ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, M.; Williams, M. B; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatialyear atmospheric history for carbonyl sulfide inferred fromterm measurement record of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in two

  6. Feasibility of reconstructing paleoatmospheric records of selected alkanes, methyl halides, and sulfur gases from Greenland ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, M.; Williams, M. B; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    Hemispheric air. 4.1.3. n-Butane [ 26 ] n-C 4 H 10 levels inH 6 ; propane, C 3 H 8 ; n-butane, n-C 4 H 10 ), two methyl

  7. Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Elosegui, P.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Davis, J. L.; Anderson, M. L.; de Juan, J.; Khan, S. A.; Stenseng, L.; Ekstrom, G.; Forsberg, R.

    2008-12-30

    with teleseismically detected glacial earthquakes and major iceberg calving events. No coseismic offset in the position of the glacier surface is observed; instead, modest tsunamis associated with the glacial earthquakes implicate glacier calving in the seismogenic...

  8. Challenges to understanding the dynamic response of Greenland's marine terminating glaciers to oc eanic and atmospheric forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    the dynamics into Earth system models. In addition to theseof the results into Earth system models. Results of process-circula- tion and Earth system models to enable improved

  9. MODIS snow albedo bias at high solar zenith angles relative to theory and to in situ observations in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xianwei; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    speci?c surface area of dry snow: Isothermal and temperatureresponse from black carbon in snow. Journal of Geophysicalassessment of the MODIS snow-cover products. Hydrological

  10. Constraining MODIS snow albedo at large solar zenith angles: Implications for the surface energy budget in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xianwei; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    response from black carbon in snow. J. Geophys. Res. ,112,Springtime warming and reduced snow cover from carbonaceousBlack Carbon (BC) in the snow of glaciers in west China and

  11. Changes in Sea-Level associated with Modi cations of the Mass Balance of the Greenland and Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by comparing the predictions of the six possible combinations of two climate models and three methods for Antarctica. The energy balance based approach, which relies on an explicit modellingof the temperature estimated from thermal expansion alone. This surprisingly small range of uncertainty is due 1 #12;to

  12. Decadal-scale sensitivity of Northeast Greenland ice flow to errors in surface mass balance using ISSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, N-J.; Larour, E.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Box, J. E

    2013-01-01

    perturbations in SMB upstream and downstream from gate 8of ice ?ow both upstream and downstream. [ 36 ] By mappingthat errors far upstream and downstream of a gate could

  13. High-resolution bed topography mapping of Russell Glacier, Greenland, inferred from Operation IceBridge data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution bed topography mapping of Russell Glacier,for generalizing topography to grids while preservingRasmussen LA (1988) Bed topography and mass-balance

  14. Sulphate record from a northeast Greenland ice core over the last 1200 years based on continuous flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    distribution of heat, salt, and moisture, potentially driving climatic change on regional to global scales; Moran et al., 2006). In 2004, the first Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expedition to the Lomonosov

  15. Seasonally resolved Alpine and Greenland ice core records of anthropogenic HCl emissions over the 20th century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    drilling operations on the continental shelf off the Atlantic margin of Florida in 1965, revealed of the Atlantic shelf was shown by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilling operations in 1976 to be underlain maximum and not yet replaced by salt water penetrating from the sea floor (Meisler et al. 1984). Active

  16. Observations of hydroxyl and peroxy radicals and the impact of BrO at Summit, Greenland in 2007 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Stohl, A. : Observations of hydroxyl and the sum of peroxyand Physics Observations of hydroxyl and peroxy radicals andet al. : Observations of hydroxyl and peroxy radicals and

  17. Feasibility of reconstructing paleoatmospheric records of selected alkanes, methyl halides, and sulfur gases from Greenland ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, M.; Williams, M. B; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    study of ethane and propane oxidation in the tropo- sphere,alkanes (ethane, C 2 H 6 ; propane, C 3 H 8 ; n-butane, n-Cfluid contamination. 4.1.2. Propane [ 24 ] Propane levels in

  18. Feasibility of reconstructing paleoatmospheric records of selected alkanes, methyl halides, and sulfur gases from Greenland ice cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, M.; Williams, M. B; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    production is responsible for this scatter, the processes responsible do not appear to be continuous and

  19. Laboratory Experiments on the Interaction of a Buoyant Coastal Current with a Canyon: Application to the East Greenland Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, David A.

    This paper presents a set of laboratory experiments focused on how a buoyant coastal current flowing over a sloping bottom interacts with a canyon and what controls the separation, if any, of the current from the upstream ...

  20. Airborne UHF Radar for Fine Resolution Mapping of Near Surface Accumulation Layers in Greenland and West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Cameron Scott

    2010-11-01

    as understanding sea level rise. Previously developed accumulation layer radars were used as templates for the current single channel system. Improvements were incorporated including increased output power, increased receiver sensitivity, single antenna operation...

  1. New floral, sedimentological and isotopic data from the TriassicJurassicboundary strata in Jameson Land, East Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McRoberts, Christopher A.

    New floral, sedimentological and isotopic data from the Triassic­Jurassicboundary strata in Jameson of the sedimentological context of the plant fossils, reconstruction of the plant communities and the vegetation dynamics

  2. Comparison of satellite-derived and in-situ observations of ice and snow surface temperatures over Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Comparison of satellite-derived and in-situ observations of ice and snow surface temperatures over temperature in the data-sparse cryosphere is by satellite remote sensing. The uncertainties in satellite-derived) records needed for climate studies. In this work we assess satellite-derived "clear-sky" LST products from

  3. Aspects of earthquake triggering and seismicity clustering /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    melting occurs. Also in Greenland, detailed satellite images reveal a strong correspondence between glacial

  4. Internship at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis Discretization of geothermal systems in fractured porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    Geothermal energy is a carbon-free steady energy source with low environmental impact. In countries with a favorable geological context, high temperature geothermal energy can make a significant contribution of Guadeloupe already comes from geothermal energy and it is essential for achieving energetic and environmental

  5. INTERNATIONAL VOICE For further help and advice, mailto: itp@bath.ac.uk or call 01225 386201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    , Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain (inc. Canary Islands, Ceuta and Melilla), Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican Countries Zone 1 Ireland & Channel Islands Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey, Republic of Ireland. Zone 2 EE, Estonia, Finland (inc. Aland Islands), France (inc. French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Reunion

  6. Modlisation et potentialits du chauffage solaire des sols par paillage artificiel la Guade-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    different mulches (black plastic, clear plastic and glass) showed that daily maximum temperatures could Modelling and potential of soil heating by application of an artificial mulch in Guadeloupe. Solarization consists of soil heating by application of an artificial mulch. High temperatures can be reached which

  7. Session: Geothermal Research Volcanology Oral presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and magnetotelluric data acquired during the last 30 years. Oldest electric and magnetotelluric data were digitalizedSession: Geothermal Research ­ Volcanology Oral presentation Contribution of multi-methods geophysics to improve the regional knowledge of Bouillante geothermal Province (Guadeloupe) Lydie Gailler1

  8. Insights into spatial sensitivities of ice mass response to environmental change from the SeaRISE ice sheet modeling project II: Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    year Finite difference, Eulerian CISM ISSM Calving front andthe University of Montana CISM web site to be available tocontract DE-AC05-00OR22725. CISM development and simulations

  9. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 21, PAGES 3951-3954, NOVEMBER 1, 1998 Present-day uplift patterns over Greenland from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybrechts, Philippe

    temperature and melting. Pre- vious studies [Le Meur and Huybrechts, 1996; Tarasov and Peltier, 1997] show how Meur, 1996b; Peltier, 1974; Wu and Peltier, 1982; Spada et al., 1992] with a 3-D thermomechanical ice [Peltier, 1974; Wu and Peltier, 1982; Lam- beck et al., 1990; Spada et al., 1992]. Following the work

  11. 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06/30/2009 MELTING GREENLAND ICE SHEETS MAY THREATEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Treehugger 06 Could Lead to Massive Waves of Climate Refugees Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid Waves of Climate Refugees Green Options 06/04/2009 in the news Peterborough Examiner, The 06

  12. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    glacial loss from Antarctic and Greenland land mass, and meltingthe melting or release of Greenland and or Antarctic glacialmelting of Alpine snowpack, shifting the timing of snowmelt runoff worldwide. Glacial

  13. Ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

    2007-01-01

    Island Glacier, Antarc- tica. Geophysical Research Letters,in Greenland and Antarc- tica today. Sea level would rise by

  14. Stefan Rahmstorf/ Anny Cazenave,2 John A. Church,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is rapidly increasing, with contributions both from Greenland and Antarc- tica [e.g., (5)]. Overall

  15. PALEOCLIMATE S. E. Schwanz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in paleogeologicallimes, focusing on results form ice cores in Greenland (Hammer) and the Vostok core in Antarc- tica

  16. Understand. Annual Report &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Greenland ice sheet to research focusing on the development of alternative aviation fuels, Sheffield has

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 14 FEBRUARY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO764 Rapid circulation of warm subtropical waters in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    subtropical waters in a major glacial fjord in East Greenland Fiammetta Straneo1 *, Gordon S. Hamilton2 melting at the ice­ocean interface6,7 , driven by the synchronous warming8­10 of subtropical waters offshore of Greenland. However, because of the lack of observations from Greenland's glacial fjords and our

  18. Millennial changes in North American wildfire and soil activity over the last glacial cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Bigler, Matthias; Röthlisberger, Regine; Erhardt, Tobias; Stocker, Thomas F.; Mulvaney, Robert; Wolff, Eric W.

    2015-08-10

      climatic   changes  during   the   Last   Glacial   period   based   on   three   synchronized  Greenland   ice-­?core  records:   refining   and   extending   the   INTIMATE   event   stratigraphy.  Quat  Sci...

  19. By simulating biogeochemical cycles, the Greenland ice sheet, and more--with reach to the lower thermosphere--this system gives the research community a flexible, state-of-the-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate variability and change. THE COMMUNITY EARTH SYSTEM MODEL A Framework for Collaborative Research in the CCSM4/CESM1 (version 1.0 of the Community Earth System Model) special collection of the Journal processes must be represented before a climate model becomes an Earth system model (ESM), but typically

  20. Modeled and measured albedo of surface snow over central Greenland M. Dumont1, C. M. Carmagnola1, F. Domine3,2, P. Wright4, M. Bergin5, J. Dibb6 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and albedo during the compaign Solar incident zenith angle around 50 ° for all the measurements Radiance sensing retrieval algorithms using this modeling approach CONCLUSIONS & OUTLOOK References: · K. Stamnes

  1. Upton, Long Island, New York April 4, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet, SWITZERLAND 1859 - 2001 Glacial retreat is 2.5 km. Base is 450 meters higher. http Increase Mote et al., 2005 #12;MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent

  2. Deep-SeaResearch,VoL26A,pp. 1311to 1327 0011-7471/79/1201-1311 $02.00/0 ,~')PergamonPressLtd 1979.Printed in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    Seven transects of the East Greenland portion of the Polar Front were made by HM nuclear submarine.Printed in Great Britain Transects by submarine of the East Greenland Polar Front P. WADHAMS*, A. E. GILL of Polar Water, probably due to eddies. Once the submarine passed through the Front twice by diving, which

  3. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 47994810, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/4799/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    -sky irradiance at Summit by 4­6%; aerosol influence is largest in April. Differences in total ozone at the three and Physics Comparison of UV irradiance measurements at Summit, Greenland; Barrow, Alaska; and South Pole ultraviolet (UV) irradiance was installed at Summit, Greenland, in August 2004. Here we compare the initial

  4. STATE OF THE CLIMATE Jessica Blunden Derek S. Arndt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ice caps (outside Greenland); Greenland Ice Sheet; Permafrost; Lake ice; Sea ice; Ocean; and Ocean. Conversely, penetration of Arctic air masses into northern and eastern Europe in autumn 2010 and spring 2011 sectors of the Arctic Basin, upper ocean temperatures in summer 2011 were generally warmer than

  5. Saunders, A.D., Larsen, H.C., and Wise, S.W., Jr. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 152

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, A.D., Larsen, H.C., and Wise, S.W., Jr. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling During Ocean Drilling Program Leg 152, Sites 914 through 919 were drilled on the southeast Greenland of the Iceland hot-spot track (Iceland- Greenland Ridge). Sites 915 through 918 penetrated the entire cover

  6. International Journal of Remote Sensing Vol. 32, No. 23, 10 December 2011, 80538080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    . The planet's solar radiation budget is directly affected by the albedo of the Greenland ice-sheet, which is strongly affected by the liquid water content in the snow ­ nearly 45% more incom- ing solar radiation Greenland melt and refreeze severity from SeaWinds scatterometer data BRANDON R. HICKS and DAVID G. LONG

  7. San Jose Accord: energy aid or petroleum-marketing strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-30

    The San Jose Accord was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica on August 3, 1980 by the Presidents of Venezuela and Mexico, whereby the two countries mutually committed to supply the net imported domestic oil consumption of several Central American and Caribbean countries. Countries initially participating in the program are: Barbados, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Seven eastern Caribbean countries were to meet on October 7 to petition for inclusion in the Accord, namely: Antigua, St. Kitt/Nevis, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Grenada. The official language of the Accord is presented, and the operative status of the Accord two years after signing is discussed. Specific briefs about some of the individual countries in the Accord are included. The fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries is updated.

  8. Abstract We investigate the model sensitivity of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    atmospheric moisture trans- port, melting of sea ice (Johannessen et al. 2002) and of the Greenland ice sheet formation and slow down the AMOC. Furthermore, some abrupt climate chan- ges in the last glacial period

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say August 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 19, 2013-The effects of...

  10. Energy Department Announces $5 Million to Develop Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foundation (Arctic Program at Thule Air Base in Greenland)-This 30 kilowatt (kW) CHP system will serve as a model for NSF facilities and assist agencies in evaluating the...

  11. Wind-driven circulation on a shallow, stratified shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Jay Alan

    1999-01-01

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  12. Ocean General Circula-on near 1000 m depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lherminier, Pascale

    currents near 1000 m depth · Eddy Kine-c Energy near 1000 m depth · Seasonal hemisphere), Kuroshio, Oyashio, East Kamchatka, Alaska Stream, Gulf Stream, Labrador, East and West Greenland (northern hemisphere). · Alternate zonal bands

  13. California Energy Commission Systems Assessment & Facilities Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Atlantic Ocean South Atlantic Ocean North Pacific Ocean South Pacific Ocean Arctic Ocean North Pacific Ocean Indian Ocean NORTH AMERICA SOUTH AMERICA AFRICA EUROPE ASIA AUSTRAILA RUSSIA ANTARCTICA GREENLAND CENTRAL AMERICA MIDDLE EAST Southern Ocean California Energy Commission Systems

  14. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-01-01

    observations, Science, 314, Peltier, W. R. (2004), Globalice history models (ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and Fleming andfor Greenland; ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and IJ05 [Ivins and

  15. Oceanic Boundary Conditions for Jakobshavn Glacier. Part I: Variability and Renewal of Ilulissat Icefjord Waters, 2001–14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David M.

    Jakobshavn Glacier, west Greenland, has responded to temperature changes in Ilulissat Icefjord, into which it terminates. This study collected hydrographic observations inside Ilulissat Icefjord and from adjacent Disko Bay ...

  16. Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Våge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

  17. Evolution of the Earth's mantle-crust-atmosphere system from the trace element and isotope geochemistry of the plume-mantle reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starkey, Natalie

    2009-11-26

    The 62 million year old lava flows of Baffin Island and West Greenland represent the earliest phase of magmatism in the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). These picritic lavas are characterised by high magnesium ...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a B-52 near Thule, Greenland, in 1968. by Sue Major Holmes Sandia has released its documentary, AlwaysNever: The Quest for Safety, Control, and Survivability, which...

  19. bowhead whales. The Naval Arctic Re-search Laboratory at Barrow, Alaska,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Greenland whale, or bowhead. Unpubl. manuscr. [Vol. 15, Encyclopedia Arctica], 71 p. Avail. Dartmouth. Biology of the bowhead whale (Sa/aena mysticetus) in the western Arctic. Unpubl. manuscr., 93 p. Dep. Bio

  20. Validation of CReSIS Synthetic Aperture Radar Processor and Optimal Processing Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Logan

    2014-12-31

    Sounding the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica is a vital component in determining the effect of global warming on sea level rise. Of particular importance are measurements of the bedrock topography of the outlet ...

  1. Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, John E.

    2013-12-16

    , the highest concentrations are found among the East Greenland and Svalbard populations, with the lowest concentrations found in the Alaska population. Exposure to some POPs can reduce vitamin concentrations in tissue and blood, affect the endocrine system...

  2. Investigation of Glacial Dynamics in the Lambert Glacier-Amery Ice Shelf System (LAS) Using Remote Sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Zhaohui 1982-

    2012-12-10

    Numerous recent studies have documented dynamic changes in the behaviors of large marine-terminating outlet glaciers and ice streams in Greenland, the Antarctic Peninsula, and West Antarctica. However, fewer observations of outlet glaciers and ice...

  3. N2O and CH4 variations during the last glacial epoch: Insight into global processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    provide important insight into the former composition of the atmosphere, its natural variations; accepted 12 December 2003; published 30 January 2004. [1] Greenhouse gas measurements along polar ice cores reconstructed for Greenland. INDEX TERMS: 0325 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Evolution

  4. Novel Application of Metering Pump on Diesel Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guyan a The Bahamas Cuba Dominican Republic Panama Costa Rica Nicaragu a Honduras Guatemala El Salv ador T rinidad and Tobag o Jam. Haiti Puerto Rico (US) Greenland (Den.)...

  5. 90E 120 150E 180 150W 120 90 60 30W 0 30E 60 DSDP Legs 196 ( ), ODP Legs 100210 ( ), IODP Expeditions 301352 ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN

  6. Cooperation among Stakeholders for a Preventative and Responsive Maritime Disaster System: The Mitigation of an Arctic Wicked Problem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoram, Lawrence Clifton

    2015-05-11

    and continues to grow as Norway, Russia, and Greenland try to maximize the value of fish stocks (Lasserre 2012). Overfishing has presented many problems for nations, leading to piracy and civil unrest in other parts of the world, which could in the future... region includes of parts of Alaska (United States), Canada, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden (Nsidc.org 2015). What makes the region unique includes, among other traits, is its treeless tundra or permafrost, its...

  7. Geothermal power development: 1984 overview and update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPippo, R.

    1984-10-01

    The status of geothermal power plants as of mid-1984 is given. There are 15 countries with active plants, and France (Guadeloupe) is expected to join the roster in the near future. The total number of operating units (defined as individual turbo-generator sets) is 145; the total installed capacity is somewhat less than 3770 MW. If plans for additional plants are met, the total could jump by more than 200 MW over the next two years. Recent growth is presented and the worldwide installed capacity is traced. A graphic portrayal of the growth pattern is presented. The countries that will be most responsible for sustaining this growth are the US, the Philippines, Mexico, and Indonesia. Other countries that will contribute significantly include Italy, Japan, Kenya, Nicaragua, and Turkey. The following countries do not now have any geothermal plants but may bring some online by 1990: Guatemala, Costa Rica, Greece, St. Lucia, Thailand, and Ethiopia.

  8. Bringing simulation to implementation: Presentation of a global approach in the design of passive solar buildings under humid tropical climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garde, François; Celaire, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In early 1995, a DSM pilot initiative has been launched in the French islands of Guadeloupe and Reunion through a partnership between several public and private partners (the French Public Utility EDF, the University of Reunion Island, low cost housing companies, architects, energy consultants, etc...) to set up standards to improve thermal design of new residential buildings in tropical climates. This partnership led to defining optimized bio-climatic urban planning and architectural designs featuring the use of passive cooling architectural principles (solar shading, natural ventilation) and components, as well as energy efficient systems and technologies. The design and sizing of each architectural component on internal thermal comfort in building has been assessed with a validated thermal and airflow building simulation software (CODYRUN). These technical specifications have been edited in a reference document which has been used to build over 300 new pilot dwellings through the years 1996-1998 in Reunion...

  9. An alternative to present United States defense strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, William Wallace

    1971-01-01

    Major Subject: Political Science AN ALT 'IIIIATXVE '10 PRES4, 'NT UiVTTED STATES DZ . ZIFSZ STFIAT ZGY Thesis by '/ILL1AI1 WALLACE. A%i'TFIOM' Approved as I, o style and content by; ~. g, 4~~ (Chairman of Committe~e Vdk@3 w~ /0 I:ember Nay 1971...-Allied Relationships Page 73 76 85 VI GREENLAND: GEOSTRATEGY Implications for Deterrence Greenland: The Site, Use, Design and Tactical Organization VII CONCLUSIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY 'PPENDIX VITA 101 106 113 ?6 140 PREFACE "P ' V' D d ~Ph'1...

  10. Climate Change II: Projections Everything you ever wanted to know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    melting and sea level rise AR4 WGI SPM Key caveat: · Doesn't include glacial sliding #12;Antarctica, Washington Upsala Glacier, Argentina High certainty: Loss of montane glaciers #12;Lower certainty: Glacial Council on Global Change, WBGU, 2006) #12;Increased melting of Greenland glaciers #12;#12;#12;Lower

  11. U.S. District Court: Vermont Auto Dealers & Manufacturers versus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    dwarf natural forcings that drove glacial-interglacial climate change. 5. Humans now control global Date #12;Increasing Melt Area on Greenland · 2002 all-time record melt area · Melting up to elevation of 2000 m · 16% increase from 1979 to 2002 70 meters thinning in 5 years Satellite-era record melt of 2002

  12. Art Hobson, ahobson@uark.edu For publication on 12 May 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobson, Art

    , 2010, 2005, and 1998. The hottest decade on record was 2001-2010. Mountain glaciers are melting worldwide. The Arctic ocean, Greenland, and West Antarctic are melting. Sea levels are rising. According "glacial" periods of about 100,000-year duration each, and warmer "interglacial" periods of about 10

  13. Received 26 Aug 2013 | Accepted 22 Apr 2014 | Published 21 May 2014 Ice sheets as a significant source of highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40­2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06­0.17 Tg per and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting. DOI: 10 and minor parts of the North Atlantic (NA), all areas proximal to significant glacial activity1

  14. 148 nature geoscience | VOL 3 | MARCH 2010 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience news & views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Their data allow ocean-based calculations of Greenland glacier melting. Perhaps their most notable finding, derived melt rates vary by a factor of five. For the glaciers Rignot and colleagues studied, ocean melting calving. Observed fjord currents reveal narrow jets near the surface, which could be glacial meltwater

  15. Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic G.H. Miller a,*, J. Brigham-Grette b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    , with the extra melt coming from both Greenland and Antarctica as well as small glaciers. The Last Glacial Maximum 41 ka, in pace with cycles in the tilt of Earth's axis, but for the past 700 ka, glacial cycles have were close to present. The cause of the shift from 41 ka to 100 ka glacial cycles is still debated

  16. Foraminifer isotope study of the Pleistocene Labrador Sea, northwest North Atlantic (IODP Sites 1302/03 and 1305), with emphasis on paleoceanographical differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2010 Communicated by D.J.W. Piper Keywords: IODP Pleistocene isotope stratigraphy Labrador Sea the Labrador Coast (Orphan Knoll site 1302/1303) wereanalyzedtoestablishan isotope stratigraphy sequences recording ice and climate variability over Greenland (de Vernal and Hillaire-Marcel, 2008

  17. 16 University of New Hampshire Magazine Winter 200516 University of New Hampshire Magazine Winter 2007 When UNH glaciologist Mark Fahnestock heads north to conduct field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    16 · University of New Hampshire Magazine · Winter 200516 · University of New Hampshire Magazine coastlinethatlooksexactlylikeNewHampshire'swouldhaveaftertheicesheet retreated 10,000 years ago," he says. It is a pristineGreenland'sglaciershave begunmeltingatarapidpace. PERRYSMITH/UNHPHOTOGRAPHICSERVICESMARKFAHNESTOCK #12;Winter 2005 · University of New Hampshire

  18. Maryam Rahnemoonfar1, Geoffrey Fox2 1.Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global warming has caused serious damage to our environment Accelerated loss of ice from Greenland;Projection profile #12;Ground-truth Anisotropic Diffusion Electric field Final result with our proposed method #12;Ground-truth Anisotropic Diffusion Electric field Final result with our proposed method #12

  19. VIS. ttUUU>IC7 w Ris-R-541

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    foodstuffs (including milk in Uic Faroes) and drinking water. Estimates are given of the mean contents of 90 water 46 3.3. Estimate of the mean contents of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the human diet in Greenland in 1985. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 was determined in samples of precipitation, sea water, vegetation, various

  20. Annual Report 2010 Aarhus University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    : The Danish Energy Agency The Environmental Protection Agency The Government of Greenland Private foundations4th Annual Report 2010 Aarhus University DCE ­ Danish Centre for Environment and Energy #12: Aarhus University, DCE ­ Danish Centre for Environment and Energy URL: http://dmu.au.dk Year

  1. A selective sweep on a deleterious mutation in the CPT1A gene in Arctic populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemente, Florian J.; Cardona, Alexia; Inchley, Charlotte E.; Peter, Benjamin M.; Jacobs, Guy; Pagani, Luca; Lawson, Daniel J.; Antão, Tiago; Vicente, Mário; Mitt, Mario; DeGiorgio, Michael; Faltyskova, Zuzana; Xue, Yali; Ayub, Qasim; Szpak, Michal; Mägi, Reedik; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Rasmussen, Simon; Willerslev, Eske; Vidal?Puig, Antonio; Tyler?Smith, Chris; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Metspalu, Mait; Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-10-23

    Project 7,8; NUN – Nunavut Inuit 3; M’TA –Mal’ta 16; ANZ – Clovis 17; ALE – Aleutian Islander, DOR – Early- Middle- and Late Dorset (Table S10) 19; SQQ – Saqqaq 18; and GIN – Greenland Inuit 2. (B) The Haplotype Median Joining Network was constructed...

  2. Gas ageice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, M. L. Bender,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Gas age­ice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, 0­100 ka M. L. Bender,1 G. [1] Gas is trapped in polar ice at depths of $50­120 m and is therefore significantly younger than cores (Vostok, Dome Fuji, and Dome C). We recorrelate the gas records of Vostok and Greenland Ice Sheet

  3. H A&S 220C : Energy and Environment : Life Under the Pale Sun Out: 12 October 2004 (Tues)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science. An example might be to estimate the amount of solar energy hitting Greenland, comparedH A&S 220C : Energy and Environment : Life Under the Pale Sun Out: 12 October 2004 (Tues) Back: 26 of life: water, food, shelter, warmth, transport, plus materials for constructing clothing, tools

  4. Amaelle Landais Vale rie Masson-Delmotte Jean Jouzel Dominique Raynaud Sigfus Johnsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    measurements in the re- cently drilled NorthGRIP ice core, we show that no evidence exists for stratigraphic to intermediate levels of CO2 and to the absence of clear ice rafting associated with DO 25, highlights (seesaw mechanism) (Broecker 1998; Stocker and Johnsen 2003). The recently drilled NorthGRIP Greenland ice

  5. 1616 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 40, NO. 7, JULY 2002 New Methods to Infer Snow Albedo From the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    to Infer Snow Albedo From the MISR Instrument With Applications to the Greenland Ice Sheet Julienne C. Stroeve and Anne W. Nolin Abstract--Snow-covered surfaces have a very high surface albedo, thereby allowing little energy to be absorbed by the snow- pack. As the snowpack ages and/or begins to melt

  6. Unusual narwhal sea ice entrapments and delayed autumn freeze-up trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    entrapments of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) occur when rapid changes in weather and wind conditions create into offshore winter areas in the autumn when fast ice forms. In many areas, the disjunct K. Laidre (&) Á H of Natural Resources, Box 570, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland P. Richard Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Freshwater

  7. Polar Biol (2008) 31:12951306 DOI 10.1007/s00300-008-0466-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    2008-01-01

    , such as shipping, commercial Wshing and development of non-renewable resources (e.g. oVshore oil and gas). Although of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, P·O. Box 358, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark e-mail: rdi@dmu.dk M. P. Heide-Jørgensen · K. Laidre · H. C. Schmidt Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, P·O. Box 570, 3900 Nuuk

  8. Projected 21st-century changes to Arctic marine access Scott R. Stephenson & Laurence C. Smith &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiences the greatest percentage access increases to its exclusive economic zone, followed by Greenland/Denmark). While natural climatic variability has caused interannual fluctuations in sea ice extent throughout human history, the current decline is attributed primarily to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions

  9. http://www.arctic.uoguelph.ca/cpl/arcticnews/articles/Holes/Holes.htm Latent vs sensible heat polynyas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    (± 10) km2 y-1 or about 10% of total annual net ice production (as estimated from ice export in Fram G = geology Sweden Canada USA USA Canada Japan Germany Norway Germany Russia USA USA Den/Greenland Japan Russia Norway UK Denmark Canada USA Denmark France Switzerland Germany Poland #12;Brief History

  10. 2622 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 46, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 WindSat Passive Microwave Polarimetric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Sat Passive Microwave Polarimetric Signatures of the Greenland Ice Sheet Li Li, Senior Member, IEEE, Peter Abstract--WindSat has systematically collected the first global fully polarimetric passive microwave data over both land and ocean. As the first spaceborne polarimetric microwave radiometer, it was designed

  11. Influence of large-scale teleconnection patterns on methane sulfonate ice core records in Dronning Maud Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    temperature difference. This salt-based storage of heat at depth is analogous to Convectively Available). First widely recognized as more than climatic ``noise'' by the drilling of two deep Greenland summit ice coherent pattern of climate in- stability. Broecker first proposed that a ``salt oscillator

  12. Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result, or materials. Before 1200 AD · Air pollution results from wood burning, tanning, decaying trash, smelting with carbon PbO + C -> Pb + CO Pollutants Produced: CO, SO2 ·Hong, et al., Greenland ice evidence

  13. Steady two-layer source-sink flow Lynne Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    and plane steady ocean circulation models. 2. Equations The two-layer system is illustrated in Fig. 1. H1 Dynamics at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution WHOI-79-84 (advisor: Adrian Gill) August, 1979 Note Greenland Current and colder fresher water from the north. The model discussed here is a steady extension

  14. Water column structure and statistics of Denmark Strait Overflow Water cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    Water column structure and statistics of Denmark Strait Overflow Water cyclones Wilken-Jon von November 2013 Keywords: Denmark Strait overflow water cyclone East Greenland boundary current system East the characteristics and dynamics of Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) cyclones. On average, a cyclone passes

  15. The Caledonide Orogen in the Nordic countries is exposed in Norway, western Sweden, westernmost Fin-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    The Caledonide Orogen in the Nordic countries is exposed in Norway, western Sweden, westernmost Fin-age basement. In northernmost Norway, the NE-trending Caledonian thrust front trun- cates the NW and north- eastern Greenland; it continues northwards from northern Norway, across the Barents Shelf

  16. Lidar Bacscatter Cross-Section Radar Bacscatter Cross-Section Mixed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    S S I AC A N A D A U.K.IRE. ICELAND NORWAY SWEDEN FINLAND LATVIA LITH. BELARUS UKRAINE POLAND DENMARK GERMANY EST. KAZ. JAPAN (DENMARK) Greenland (NORWAY) Svalbard (NORWAY) (NORWAY) CHINA UNITED STATES Faroe AC A N A D A U.K.IRE. ICELAND NORWAY SWEDEN FINLAND LATVIA LITH. BELARUS UKRAINE POLAND DENMARK

  17. Geological Society of America Bulletin doi: 10.1130/B30503.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on June 3, 2012gsabulletin.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;ABSTRACT More than 1800 detrital zircon uranium provide important insights into the depositional and tectonic evolution of the northern margin axially along the foreland basin of the East Greenland Caledonides (Caledonian orogen) and deposited

  18. Using Radar and Seismic Methods for the Determination of Ice Column Properties and Basal Conditions at Jakobshavn Isbræ and the NEEM Drill Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velez Gonzalez, Jose Antonio

    2015-05-31

    measurements. Glacier basal drag is also an important, and difficult to predict, property that influences glacier flow. For this investigation I re-processed a 10 km-long high-resolution reflection seismic line at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland, using an iterative...

  19. The response of Petermann Glacier to large calving events and its future stability in the context of atmospheric and oceanic warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Nick, F. M.; Luckman, A.; Vieli, A.; van As, D.; Van De Wal, R.S.W.; Pattyn, F.; Hubbard, A. L.; Floricioiu, D.

    2012-11-05

    This study assesses the impact of a large 2010 calving event on the current and future stability of Petermann Glacier, Greenland, and ascertains the glacier’s interaction with different components of the climate and ocean system. We use a numerical...

  20. State of balance of the cryosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    1991-12-05

    of the retreat. The interior part of the Greenland ice sheet appears to be thickening or in near equilibrium, but this ice sheet may be thinning in the coastal areas. Estimates of the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet suggest that it is positive, although...

  1. A. E.K.Ris Ris-M-DIlL] Title and uthor(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry. A nuclear geophysical group develops methods for uranium prospecting and also takes part in actual uranium searching Irf the most northern area of Denmark - Greenland. Another group works in basic physics and chemistry research, as well as in technological re- search and development

  2. Ri* Report No. 133 Danish Atomk Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission Research Establishment Riso Chemistry Department Abstract As part of the work aimed at the exploitation of the uraniferous rock in southern Greenland a flotation process has been developed. The uranium as a possible source of uranium for Denmark's future energy supply. The uranium-bearing rock is a lujavrite

  3. The Cryosphere, 6, 119, 2012 www.the-cryosphere.net/6/1/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    with calibrated regional climate modeled surface air temperature and surface downward solar irradiance, we de ­ Accepted: 28 June 2012 ­ Published: Abstract. Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated in the past, ab- sorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor

  4. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 101107, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/101/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - cal electric fields penetrating from the earthquake zone into the ionosphere, and seismic activity seismic activity over Southern Ocean, Greenland Sea, South-Weat Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, Central America, South-East Pacific Ocean, Malay Archipelago regions are presented. These anomalies, as phenomena

  5. Geophysical Journal International Geophys. J. Int. (2013) doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt029

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    -Industrial con- ditions (and hence about 0.2 ± 0.6 C warmer than today; NOAA National Climatic Data Center 2011 the terminology for probability employed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment reports, we estimates can provide insight into rates of Greenland and/or Antarctic melt under climate conditions

  6. B u L m i m OF THE, UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 301 91.-TRE ICELAND BflhRIC-FISHERIES.'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B u L m i m OF THE, UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 301 91.-TRE ICELAND BflhRIC-FISHERIES.' The kind the entire Arctic Ocean, near Greenland and Iceland, and, though in smaller numbers, in the North Sea . in the Arctic Ocean between Beeren (Iceland)and Spitzbergen, where .these fish are called liuu7da

  7. Flow laws for glacier ice: comparison of numerical predictions and field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Whillans, I. M.

    1990-10-05

    Ice flow along the 20 km long strain network up-stream of the Dye 3 bore hole in Greenland is studied in detail. By solving the force—balance equations and using selected flow laws, stresses and strain-rates are calculated throughout the section...

  8. cfchou@phys.sinica.edu.tw Global Warming -Lohachara Island by Robert Clemenzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang-Yuan

    ;GISP2 (1991) #12;Greenland Ice Sheet Project (GISP2, 1991 GISP2 (1991) #12;#12;#12; #12; #12 307 SCIENCE p.706 #12;Three major warming signs: 1. Oregon Dead Zone 2. Namibia, Africa 3. Gulf The Geysers San Francisco, CA Solar power plants III-VII at Kramer Junction, CA #12; #12; #12

  9. Northern Bering Sea tip jets G. W. K. Moore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    Northern Bering Sea tip jets G. W. K. Moore1 and R. S. Pickart2 Received 28 February 2012; revised speed known as tip jets have been identified near Cape Farewell, Greenland's southernmost point during the boreal winter. In particular we show that tips jets character- ized by enhanced northeasterly

  10. Published: August 31, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 8642 dx.doi.org/10.1021/es2004599 |Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45, 86428647

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    that is generally related to coal combustion. The influence of these long-term Pb and Hg emmissions on the pollution The history of atmospheric Pb pollution for 3000 years in Europe is well established by studies of Greenland and Arctic ice cores,1,2 lake sediments,3,4 and peat deposits.5À7 The pollution reached a peak during

  11. Integrated Systems Biology Chapter 22: Homeostasis at the Cellular Level Chapter 22: Homeostasis at the Cellular Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    . Describe how plants capture energy from sunlight and convert that energy into new forms of potential energy of habitats and energy sources exploited by extremophiles. 6. Draw a picture that shows the flow of energy in Europe? 22.2 How does Brazil's rainforest affect Greenland's glaciers? ELSI Box 22.1 How do you

  12. Cone penetration testing in polar snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Adrian Bruce

    2012-04-10

    Penetration Testing. Creep Ductile deformation of ice (and thus snow) primarily through the movement of crystallographic basal planes due to load applied at low strain rates . Effective Area The extended end-bearing area of the cone or plate during penetra... of determining snow strength. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.7 Classical creep curve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Methods 28 3.1 Test location, Greenland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3...

  13. PII S0016-7037(02)00965-1 A method for precise measurement of argon 40/36 and krypton/argon ratios in trapped air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    in trapped air in polar ice with applications to past firn thickness and abrupt climate change in Greenland a method for measuring the 40 Ar/36 Ar ratio and the 84 Kr/36 Ar ratio in air from bubbles trapped in ice isotopes of inert or near-inert gases trapped in air bubbles in ice cores have been used to infer ancient

  14. Shrimp Imports 37 Kenya 0.6 in 1972 Total 223.2 38 Mozambique 33.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3 The statistics, provided to the NMFS 14 Greenland 117.6 47 Paraguay 46.0 Statistics and Market News Division countries with 21 Austria 3.8 54 Surinam 2,132.6 more than 80 million pounds. India was 22 Turkey 7.5 55- 25 India 33,523.5 58 Haiti 12.2 ports. Imports from the People's Repub- 26 Sri Lamka 489.4 59 Jamaica

  15. 182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    . L. Sparks Dent of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717 The1ldsorption. (1970). Clays Clay Miner., 18,203-212. 3. Greenland, D.J. and J.P. Quirk. (1964) J. Soil ScL, 15, 178.A., P.R. Jaffe, and C.T. Chiou. (1990). Environ. Sci. Techno!., 24, 1167-1172. 6. Cadena, F. and R

  16. 90E 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 0 30 60 SOUTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN Reentry cone use 126/793B 127/797C 210/1276A,B 45/395A 127/794C PACIFIC OCEAN #12; ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN 44/390A 86/577,A,B 113/689B 113/690C 119/738C 120/750A 121/752B 122/761C 122

  17. 90E 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 0 30 60 OCEAN ATLANTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN 418 625 626-636 637-641 642-644 645 646 647 648-649 650-656 657-659 660-661 662 1102-1103 1104-1106 1107 1108-1118 1119 1120 1121 1122 1123 1124 1125 1126-1134 998-1001 SOUTHERN OCEAN

  18. Industry`s turnaround looks real

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the industry outlook for North American gas and oil industries. In a robust Canada, land sales are setting records, drilling is up, and output is rising beyond last year`s 21% growth. A perception among US operators that wellhead prices will remain stable is translating to increased spending. The USA, Canada, Mexico, Cuba are evaluated separately, with brief evaluations of Greenland, Guatemala, Belize, and Costa Rico. Data are presented on drilling activities.

  19. Occurrence Patterns and Social Behaviors of Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) Wintering off Puerto Rico, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, Mithriel

    2015-07-14

    . Lawrence, Newfoundland/Labrador, Greenland, Iceland, and Norway (Waring et al. 2014) (Figure 1), with the number of males and females nearly equal (Palsbøll et al. 1997). The Years of the North Atlantic Humpbacks (YoNAH) project during 1992 - 1993..., Iceland and Norway. Winter (breeding and calving) grounds (pink shaded areas) include the West Indies and Cape Verde Islands. Because NAHW fast in winter habitats, the accumulation and storing of energy in the form of blubber to meet the high...

  20. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  1. Early Miocene Carbonate Dissolution in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Julia Keegan

    2014-11-19

    stream_source_info WILSON-DISSERTATION-2014.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 158802 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name WILSON-DISSERTATION-2014.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... GPTS Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale GIN Greenland, Iceland, Norwegian h Hour(s) HCl Hydrochloric Acid HCO3- Bicarbonate H2CO3 Carbonic Acid HClO4 Perchloric Acid HF Hydroflouric Acid HNO3 Nitric Acid H2O Water H2O2 Hydrogen Peroxide H3PO4...

  2. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 113133, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/113/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    -Alesund, Svalbard (Spitsbergen), Norway and Sweden SUM 72.58 -38.48 3238.0 Summit, Greenland BRW 71.32 -156.60 11, Mongolia NWR 40.05 -105.58 3526.0 Niwot Ridge, Colorado, USA AZR 38.77 -27.38 40.0 Terceira Island, Azores, Midway, USA ASK 23.18 5.42 2728.0 Assekrem, Algeria MLO 19.53 -155.58 3397.0 Mauna Loa, Hawai, USA KUM 19

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet

  4. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland's

  6. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland'sRover finds

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland'sRover

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland'sRoverPBS

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmospheric RadiationMeltwater effects on flow of Greenland'sRoverPBSon

  10. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryofNotices | DepartmentDepartment of Energy GreenLand

  11. Technique for continuous high-resolution analysis of trace substances in firn and ice cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roethlisberger, R.; Bigler, M.; Hutterli, M.; Sommer, S.; Stauffer, B.; Junghans, H.G.; Wagenbach, D.

    2000-01-15

    The very successful application of a CFA (Continuous flow analysis) system in the GRIP project (Greenland Ice Core Project) for high-resolution ammonium, calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde measurements along a deep ice core led to further development of this analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis of sodium, nitrate, sulfate, and electrolytical conductivity, while the existing methods have been improved. The melting device has been optimized to allow the simultaneous analysis of eight components. Furthermore, a new melter was developed for analyzing firn cores. The system has been used in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) for in-situ analysis of several firn cores from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and for the new ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica.

  12. Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen K; Wang, Muyin

    2010-12-08

    Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

  13. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  14. Dynamically coupling the non-linear Stokes equations with the Shallow Ice Approximation in glaciology: Description and first applications of the ISCAL method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlkrona, Josefin; Kirchner, Nina; Zwinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a new method, called the Ice Sheet Coupled Approximation Levels (ISCAL) method, for simulation of ice sheet flow in large domains under long time-intervals. The method couples the exact, full Stokes (FS) equations with the Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA). The part of the domain where SIA is applied is determined automatically and dynamically based on estimates of the modeling error. For a three dimensional model problem where the number of degrees of freedom is comparable to a real world application, ISCAL performs almost an order of magnitude faster with a low reduction in accuracy compared to a monolithic FS. Furthermore, ISCAL is shown to be able to detect rapid dynamic changes in the flow. Three different error estimations are applied and compared. Finally, ISCAL is applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet, proving ISCAL to be a potential valuable tool for the ice sheet modeling community.

  15. Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

    2015-01-01

    Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

  16. Nitrate ions spikes in ice cores are not suitable proxies for solar proton events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duderstadt, Katharine A; Jackman, Charles H; Randall, Cora E; Schwadron, Nathan A; Solomon, Stanley C; Spence, Harlan E; Yudin, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate ion spikes in polar ice cores are contentiously used to estimate the intensity, frequency, and probability of historical solar proton events, quantities that are needed to prepare for potentially society-crippling space weather events. We use the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model to calculate how large an event would have to be to produce enough odd nitrogen throughout the atmosphere to be discernible as nitrate peaks at the Earth's surface. These hypothetically large events are compared with probability of occurrence estimates derived from measured events, sunspot records, and cosmogenic radionuclides archives. We conclude that the fluence and spectrum of solar proton events necessary to produce odd nitrogen enhancements equivalent to the spikes of nitrate ions in Greenland ice cores are unlikely to have occurred throughout the Holocene, confirming that nitrate ions in ice cores are not suitable proxies for historical individual solar proton events.

  17. The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Bacteria of the genus Exiguobacterium are low G + C, Gram-positive facultative anaerobes that have been repeatedly isolated from ancient Siberian permafrost. In addition, Exiguobacterium spp. have been isolated from markedly diverse sources, including Greenland Glacial ice, hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, the rhizosphere of plants, and the environment of food processing plants. Strains of this hereto little known bacterium that have been retrieved from such different (and often extreme) environments are worthy of attention as they are likely to be specifically adapted to such environments and to carry variations in the genome which may correspond to psychrophilic and thermophilic adaptations. However, comparative genomic investigations of Exiguobacterium spp. from different sources have been limited. In this study, we employed different molecular approaches for the comparative analysis of 24 isolates from markedly diverse environments including ancient Siberian permafrost and hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with I-CeuI (an intron-encoded endonuclease), AscI and NotI were optimized for the determination of genomic fingerprints of nuclease-producing isolates. The application of a DNA macroarray for 82 putative stress-response genes yielded strain-specific hybridization profiles. Cluster analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, PFGE I-CeuI restriction patterns and hybridization profiles suggested that Exiguobacterium strains formed two distinct divisions that generally agreed with temperature ranges for growth. With few exceptions (e.g., Greenland ice isolate GIC31), psychrotrophic and thermophilic isolates belonged to different divisions.

  18. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

  19. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  20. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tezaur, I. K. [Sandia National Laboratories; Perego, M. [Sandia National Laboratories; Salinger, A. G. [Sandia National Laboratories; Tuminaro, R. S. [Sandia National Laboratories; Price, S. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  1. Drilling deep in South Pole Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo

    2014-01-01

    To detect the tiny flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei or from interactions of highest energy cosmic rays with the microwave background photons needs target masses of the order of several hundred cubic kilometers. Clear Antarctic ice has been discussed as a favorable material for hybrid detection of optical, radio and acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions. To apply these technologies at the adequate scale hundreds of holes have to be drilled in the ice down to depths of about 2500 m to deploy the corresponding sensors. To do this on a reasonable time scale is impossible with presently available tools. Remote drilling and deployment schemes have to be developed to make such a detector design reality. After a short discussion of the status of modern hot water drilling we present here a design of an autonomous melting probe, tested 50 years ago to reach a depth of about 1000 m in Greenland ice. A scenario how to build such a probe today with modern technologies...

  2. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburstmore »spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.« less

  3. Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar observations during the lower thermosphere coupling study: September 21-26, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The incoherent scatter radar located at Soendre Stroemfjord, Greenland, obtained E and F region measurements during the first Lower Thermosphere Coupling Study (LTCS 1), September 21-26, 1987. Lower thermospheric neutral winds deduced from these measurements show that the neutral dynamics are influenced by both tidal oscillations and magnetospheric forcing. During an interval which was relatively quiet geomagnetically, September 23-24, a semidiurnal oscillation dominated the neutral motion. The model equinox tidal amplitudes and phases of Forbes (1982) for the diurnal tide are roughly in agreement with the observed diurnal oscillation for the first four days of the experiment. Vertical variations in the observed diurnal phases are consistent with the results of Forbes and Hagan (1988) and may provide evidence of dissipation of the propagating (1, 1) tidal mode. The semidiurnal motion observed during this period is not well represented by the recent theoretical results for the amplitude and phase of the semidiurnal tide (Forbes and Vial, this issue). Neutral winds obtained during a geomagnetically active interval, September 25-26, displayed a flow pattern that was significantly distorted from that observed during the preceding, relatively quiet interval. Although the changes in the zonal winds throughout this active interval were consistent with the direction of the ion drag force at 115 km and above, the variations in the meridional winds suggest that other forces, such as pressure gradients driven by Joule heating, need to be considered to explain the observations.

  4. High-latitude lower thermospheric neutral winds at EISCAT and Sondrestrom during LTCS 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Virdi, T.S. (Univ. Coll. of Wales, Aberystwyth (England))

    1991-02-01

    The incoherent scatter radar located at Soendre Stroemfjord, Greenland (67{degree}N, 51{degree}W, 74.5{degree}{Lambda}) and the EISCAT incoherent scatter facility located in northern Scandinavia (69.5{degree}N, 19{degree}E, 66.3{degree}{Lambda}) both obtained E and F region measurements during the first campaign of the Lower Thermosphere Coupling Study (LTCS 1, September 21-25, 1987). Neutral winds deduced from these measurements have been analyzed for their mean flow and tidal components. A number of the altitude profiles for the mean winds and the diurnal and semidiurnal wave components at the two radar locations show similar variations with height, indicating that latitudinal rather than longitudinal effects are dominant in determining the observed wind field. Diurnal tidal amplitudes and phases are reasonably well represented by theoretical model results (Forbes, 1982). The semidiurnal amplitudes and phases, although somewhat consistent between the two radars, are not well represented in equinox tidal model results (Forbes and Vial, this issue). Results from both radars indicate a vertical wavelength for the zonal semidiurnal oscillation of approximately 60 km. During a period of impulsive magnetospheric forcing (September 22-23), winds deduced from measurements at both radars show enhanced eastward flows near midnight accompanied by equatorward winds at Sondrestrom. Comparison with the results of a National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) simulation of the LTCS 1 interval shows generally better agreement with the observations at EISCAT than at Sondrestrom.

  5. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; MacKenzie, E.

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authrs examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B(sub z). A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations.

  6. Stability of Thermohaline circulation with respect to fresh water release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajay Patwardhan; Vivek Tewary

    2008-05-16

    The relatively warm climate found in the North- Western Europe is due to the gulf stream that circulates warm saline water from southern latitudes to Europe. In North Atlantic ocean the stream gives out a large amount of heat, cools down and sinks to the bottom to complete the Thermohaline circulation. There is considerable debate on the stability of the stream to inputs of fresh water from the melting ice in Greenland and Arctic. The circulation, being switched off, will have massive impact on the climate of Europe. Intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) has warned of this danger in its recent report. Our aim is to model the Thermohaline circulation at the point where it sinks in the North-Atlantic. We create a two dimensional discrete map modeling the salinity gradient and vertical velocity of the stream. We look for how a perturbation in the form of fresh water release can destabilise the circulation by pushing the velocity below a certain threshold.

  7. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-01

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburst spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. Using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.

  8. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore »with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  9. Comparison of optically measured and radar-derived horizontal neutral winds. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christie, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Nighttime thermospheric winds for Sondrestrom, Greenland from 11 nights between 1983 and 1988, have been compared to learn about the O(+)-O collision cross section and the high-latitude atomic oxygen density. The horizontal winds in the magnetic meridian were derived indirectly from incoherent-scatter radar (ISR) measurements on ion velocities antiparallel to the magnetic field and directly from Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) measurements of Doppler shifts of the (6300-A) emission of atomic oxygen. In deriving the radar winds, the O(+)-O collision cross section, was scaled by a factor of f what was varied from 0.5 to 5.1. On the basis of several arguments the altitude of the 6300-A emission was assumed to be 230 km. The best agreement between the ISR and FPI winds was obtained when f was increased substantially, to between 1.7 and 3.4. If the average peak emission altitude were higher, these factors would be larger; if it were lower, they would be somewhat smaller. However, if the average altitude were substantially lower it would have been more difficult to have obtained agreement between the two techniques.

  10. Dynamic jamming of iceberg-choked fjords

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivo R. Peters; Jason M. Amundson; Ryan Cassotto; Mark Fahnestock; Kristopher N. Darnell; Martin Truffer; Wendy W. Zhang

    2014-12-03

    We investigate the dynamics of ice m\\'elange by analyzing rapid motion recorded by a time-lapse camera and terrestrial radar during several calving events that occurred at Jakobshavn Isbr\\ae, Greenland. During calving events (1) the kinetic energy of the ice m\\'elange is two orders of magnitude smaller than the total energy released during the events, (2) a jamming front propagates through the ice m\\'elange at a rate that is an order of magnitude faster than the motion of individual icebergs, (3) the ice m\\'elange undergoes initial compaction followed by slow relaxation and extension, and (4) motion of the ice m\\'elange gradually decays before coming to an abrupt halt. These observations indicate that the ice m\\'elange experiences widespread jamming during calving events and is always close to being in a jammed state during periods of terminus quiescence. We therefore suspect that local jamming influences longer timescale ice m\\'elange dynamics and stress transmission.

  11. Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-03-05

    As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

  12. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  13. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States); Basu, S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States); Sojka, J.J. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [and others] [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); and others

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authors examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B{sub z}. A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations. This ability to bridge between macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations provides a natural framework for the modeling of mesoscale structures themselves. This mesoscale modeling, in turn, can be utilized in a variety of radar and communication systems applications in the polar region. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  14. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.; Kada, J.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.

  15. Collaborative research on the Northeast Water Polynya: NEWP92 hydrographic data report. USCGC Polar Sea cruise, July 15--August 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, D.W.R.; Behrens, W.J.; Hopkins, T.S.; Kinder, C.; Deming, J.; Smith, W.O.; Top, Z.; Walsh, I.D.

    1995-06-01

    The Northeast Water Polynya (NEW) off the northeast coast of Greenland was the focus of two cruises aboard the USCGC Polar Sea during the summers of 1992 and 1993. The cruises were supported by the National Science Foundation Arctic Systems Science (ARCSS) program and were part of the Arctic Ocean Science Board`s International Arctic Polynya Program. The Polar Sea cruises were designed as multidisciplinary studies to test hypotheses about the mechanisms of heat, water and carbon flow within and beyond the boundaries of the polynya. Preliminary results of the 1992 study have been described elsewhere. A collection of papers arising from the 1992 cruise have been published in a Special Section of the Journal of Geophysical Research. This data report presents the hydrographic and basic chemical observations made from CTD/Rosette casts during the 1992 cruise. The station positions cruise are plotted in Figure 1. Also included in the report are selected section plots and vertical profiles. A total of 130 CTD casts were made during the cruise, measuring pressure, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and light transmission. Discrete samples were collected in 10-liter, rosette-mounted, Niskin bottles and analyzed, from most casts, for: salinity, dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, anthropogenic halocarbons (e.g., Freon gases), pigments, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen. Suspended particulate matter was analyzed at selected stations and these data were used to calibrate the CTD-transmissometer. Samples were collected from selected stations and depths for tritium and helium analyses, carbonate chemistry, as well as for measurements of bacterial abundance.

  16. Early Proterozoic transcontinental orogenic belts in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Schmus, W.R. . Dept. of Geology); Bickford, M.E. . Dept. of Geology); Condie, K.C. . Dept. Geoscience)

    1993-02-01

    It has been recognized for many years that Early Proterozoic orogenic rocks in the western US range from 1.8 to 1.6 Ga, with a general distribution such that 1.8 to 1.7 Ga rocks underlie Colorado, northern Arizona, and northern New Mexico and 1.7 to 1.6 Ga rocks underlie southern Arizona and southern New Mexico. Recent U-Pb geochronologic and Sm-Nd isotopic studies by a variety of research groups have refined crustal history in the western region and have extended knowledge eastward into the buried midcontinent basement. As a result, the authors propose that 1.8 Ga to 1.6 Ga crust of the US by divided into two distinct, but overlapping, orogenic belts: a 1.8 to 1.7 Ga Inner Accretionary Belt and a 1.7 to 1.6 Ga Outer Tectonic Belt. The Inner Accretionary Belt (IAB) comprises rock suites with compositions and isotopic signatures compatible with origin as juvenile crustal terranes formed as oceanic or off-shore and related terranes that were accreted to southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The IAB includes the Yavapai Province of Arizona, Early Proterozoic basement of Colorado and southern Wyoming, and the basement of Nebraska. The Mojave Province of California may be part of this belt, although it also includes components derived from older Proterozoic or Archean crust. Extension of the IAB eastward from Nebraska is uncertain at present, although coeval rocks that may be eastern manifestations of this 1.8 to 1.7 Ga orogenesis occur in Wisconsin (1.76 Ga granite-rhyolite suite), Ontario (Killarney granite), Labrador (Makkovic Province) and southern Greenland (Ketilidian orogen). The Outer Tectonic Belt (OTB) comprises rock suites which have compositions, structures, and isotopic signature compatible with origin in continental margin tectonic settings between 1.7 and 1.6 Ga.

  17. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.