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1

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 9:59am Addthis Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases. Federal Requirements: Look up requirements for agency greenhouse gas management as outlined in Federal initiatives and executive orders. Guidance and Reporting: Find guidance documents and resources for greenhouse gas accounting and reporting. GHG Inventories and Performance: See detailed comprehensive GHG inventories by Federal agency and progress toward achieving Scope 1 and 2 GHG and Scope 3 GHG reduction targets. Mitigation Planning: Learn how Federal agencies can cost-effectively meet their GHG reduction goals.

2

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting Inventories & Performance Mitigation Planning Resources Contacts Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets

3

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A primer on greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a reference summarizing current understanding of basic information for information greenhouse gases. Each of the gases included is recognized to be important to the future state of global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Included as greenhouse gases are thoses of direct radiative importance to climate, thoses that act as radiative precursors, and those of importance as intermediate constitutents because of their chemical activities. Knowns, unknowns and uncertainties for each gas are described. This document focuses on information relevant to understanding the role of energy and atmospheric chemical and radiative processes in the determination of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

Wuebbles, D.J.; Edmonds, J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A comparison of the contribution of various gases to the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The current concern about an anthropogenic impact on global climate has made it of interest to compare the potential effect of various human activities. A case in point is the comparison between the emission of greenhouse gases from the use of natural gas and that from other fossil fuels. This comparison requires an evaluation of the effect of methane emissions relative to that of carbon dioxide emissions. A rough analysis based on the use of currently accepted values shows that natural gas is preferable to other fossil fuels in consideration of the greenhouse effect as long as its leakage can be limited to 3 to 6 percent. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Rodhe, H. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden))

1990-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel carbon-conversion-fig-1.jpg Key Challenges: An important strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to fuels and chemicals. Although researchers working toward that goal demonstrated in 1992 such a reaction in the lab, a key outstanding scientific challenge was explaining the details of how the reaction took place - its "mechanism." Why it Matters: An important potential strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it electrochemically to fuels and chemicals. Accomplishments: Computation to explain how carbon dioxide can be converted to small organic molecules with little energy input. The

7

Climate VISION: Greenhouse Gases Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Greenhouse Gases, Global Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001 [1605(a)] This report, required by Section 1605(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, provides estimates of U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, as well as information on the methods used to develop the estimates. The estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors, not on measured or metered emissions monitoring. Available Energy Footprints Industry NAICS* All Manufacturing Alumina & Aluminum 3313 Cement 327310 Chemicals 325 Fabricated Metals 332 Food and Beverages 311, 312 Forest Products 321, 322 Foundries 3315 Glass & Glass Products, Fiber Glass 3272, 3296 Iron & Steel Mills 331111 Machinery & Equipment 333, 334, 335, 336

8

Greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect refers to the phenomenon whereby carbon dioxide and other small-molecule gases trap longwave infrared radiation (heat) in the atmosphere, thereby warming the Earth. After several years of relatively low priority, the greenhouse effect is re-emerging as a subject of concern to Congress and regulatory agencies. So also is the sister issue of ozone depletion, the breakdown of the layer of ozone that shields the Earth from massive doses of ultraviolet radiation. These two issues are discussed in this report.

Dowd, R.M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The contribution from emissions of different gases to the enhanced greenhouse effect. Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this paper is to compare the different contributions, that mankind has made to perturbing the atmosphere`s radiative balance. We have, and will continue to perturb both the balance of outgoing long-wave radiation and the balance of incoming short-wave radiation. Human activities since preindustrial times have caused a substantial enhancement of the greenhouse effect, a process involving the absorption of outgoing long-wave radiation which leads to a warming of the lower atmosphere. Because the atmosphere`s short-wave radiative balance is affected by the presence of small particles (aerosols) produced by the oxidation of sulphur compounds, anthropogenic emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) have also caused a perturbation of the overall balance. The greenhouse gases we will consider are, in order of importance: carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), Methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and the halocarbons. We use observed and model-based concentration data together with the most recent information relating concentrations to radiative forcing to estimate the individual contributions of the different gases to the changing radiative balance of the atmosphere. We also estimate the ranges of uncertainty in each of these estimates. We base all results on the 1992 IPCC emissions scenarios IS92a-f. We begin with a summary of 1990 conditions, then consider each gas separately (but lumping the halocarbons into a single group), to compare their relative importance.

Wigley, T.M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry  

SciTech Connect

The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

Lupis, C.H.P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Trace gases, CO/sub 2/, climate, and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Weather is driven by the sun's energy input and the difference between insolation per unit area of the poles and the equator. The energy flux of the Earth is in long-term balance: as much is radiated away by the Earth as is absorbed, or the mean temperature would have to increase or decrease steadily (and, of course, this is not observed). CO/sub 2/ and other ''trace gases'' can cause the Earth's mean temperature to rise through the Greenhouse Effect. The mean temperature in the Little Ice Age was only 1 /sup 0/C cooler, but large effects were felt, especially toward the poles. The CO/sub 2/ which stays in the atmosphere will raise Earth's mean temperature, with effects which are relatively certain: a lot of warming at the poles, and a very small amount of warming at the equator.

Aubrecht G.J. II

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States. Contact the 1605(b) Program ...

13

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology Editorial CurtisWelcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology. Throughon greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases Presentation to the Department of Energy Republic of the Philippines September 17, 1997 Arthur Rypinski Energy ...

15

Greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The authors analyze the problems of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere and the possible future climatic changes which may ensue. They consider such issues as the quantity of CO2 likely to be released into the atmosphere as a result of fossil fuel combustion, the expected increases of other greenhouse gases that effect the earth's radiation budget, how and when climatic changes can be detected, and the projected changes in sea level resulting from global warming.

Bolin, B.; Doos, B.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Archive  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Greenhouse gases: What is their role in climate change  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes information relevant to understanding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It examines the nature of the greenhouse effect, the Earth's radiation budget, the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere, how these concentrations have been changing, natural processes which regulate these concentrations of greenhouse gases, residence times of these gases in the atmosphere, and the rate of release of gases affecting atmospheric composition by human activities. We address the issue of the greenhouse effect itself in the first section. In the second section we examine trends in atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases and emissions sources. In the third section, we examine the natural carbon cycle and its role in determining the atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the fourth section, we examine the role atmospheric chemistry plays in the determining the concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of these issues. Exhaustive treatments can be found in other volumes, many of which are cited throughout this paper. Rather, this paper is intended to summarize some of the major findings, unknowns, and uncertainties associated with the current state of knowledge regarding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 57 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Edmonds, J.A.; Chandler, W.U. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wuebbles, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Greenhouse Gases: The Measurement Challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The continuing increase in the level of carbon dioxide and other "greenhouse ... man-made, as well as the mechanisms that capture and "sequester ...

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

NRC symposium explores links between greenhouse gases, stratospheric ozone  

SciTech Connect

Two important climatic issues stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse gas increase and the apparent connection between them led to the holding in March 1988 of a Joint Symposium on Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change. This symposium was primarily concerned with the linkages between ozone depletion and increasing greenhouse gases and with their combined effect in causing climate change to occur on a global scale. The presentations review the current state of knowledge about stratospheric ozone depletion, discuss the probable effect of predicted greenhouse gas increase on future ozone trends, summarize observational data on changing atmospheric chemistry and associated atmospheric temperatures, and describe the continuing effort to model and predict future scenarios of climatic change relative to ozone and greenhouse gases in both the stratosphere and the troposphere.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Assess Potential Agency Size Changes to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis To support planning for using renewable energy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the Federal agency or program-level, it is important to consider what changes to the agencies building or land-holding portfolio may have on opportunities for renewable energy. Changes to consider include: Addition of new buildings or sites to the agencies portfolio Major renovations to existing buildings Office moves into or out of agency-owned or leased space. As is the case with planning energy efficiency measures, planning for renewable energy in new construction can be more cost-effective than

22

Ozone depletion, greenhouse gases, and climate change: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This symposium was primarily concerned with the linkages between ozone depletion and increasing greenhouse gases and with their combined effect in causing climate change to occur on a global scale. The presentations in these proceedings review the current state of knowledge about stratospheric ozone depletion, discuss the probable effect of predicted greenhouse gas increase on future ozone trends, summarize observational data on changing atmospheric chemistry and associated atmospheric temperatures, and describe the continuing effort to model and predict future scenarios of climatic change relative to ozone and greenhouse gases in both the stratosphere and the troposphere. Some of the questions and answers that followed the presentations have been included when they highlight noteworthy points that were not covered in the presentation itself. The request by the National Climate Program Office for a symposium on the above related issues is included. The symposium agenda and participants are given. As well as a glossary of special terms and abbreviations. In summary, the Joint Symposium on Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases, and Climate Change reviewed the magnitude and causes of stratospheric ozone depletion and examined the connections that exist between this problem and the impending climate warming to increasing greenhouse gases. The presentations of these proceedings indicate that the connections are real and important, and that the stratospheric ozone depletion and tropospheric greenhouse warming problems must be studied as parts of an interactive global system rather than as more or less unconnected events.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Potential effects of clean coal technologies on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, and solid waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was initially funded by Congress to demonstrate more efficient, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable coal technologies. Although the environmental focus at first was on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) because their relationship to acid precipitation, the CCTDP may also lead to reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions and in the volume of solid waste produced, compared with conventional technologies. The environmental effects of clean coal technologies (CCTs) depend upon which (if any) specific technologies eventually achieve high acceptance in the marketplace. In general, the repowering technologies and a small group of retrofit technologies show the most promise for reducing C0{sub 2} emissions and solid waste. These technologies also compare favorably with other CCTs in terms of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} reductions. The upper bound for CO{sup 2} reductions in the year 2010 is only enough to reduce global ``greenhouse`` warming potential by about 1%. However, CO{sub 2} emissions come from such variety of sources around the globe that no single technological innovation or national policy change could realistically be expected to reduce these emissions by more than a few percent. Particular CCTs can lead to either increases or decreases in the amount of solid waste produced. However, even if decreases are not achieved, much of the solid waste from clean coal technologies would be dry and therefore easier to dispose of than scrubber sludge.

Blasing, T.J.; Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Present scientific knowledge indicates that the CO/sub 2/ released from the burning of fossil fuels may accumulate in the atmosphere to the point where a greenhouse effect is evident. In lay terms this book details the possible climatic consequences of the continued dominant position of fossil fuels in world energy production. It also discusses actions that can be taken. (ACR)

Bernard, H.W. Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

29

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Greenhouse gases and agriculture. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture ranks third in its contribution to Earth's anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse effect. (Energy use and production and chlorofluorocarbons are ranked first and second, respectively.) Specifically, greenhouse gas sources and sinks are increased, and sinks are decreased, by conversion of land to agricultural use, using fertilizers, cultivating paddy rice, producing other plant and animal crops, and by creating and managing animal and plant wastes. However, some of these same activities increase greenhouse gas sinks and decrease greenhouse gas sources so the net effects are not obvious. The paper identifies the agricultural inputs, outputs, and wastes that alter atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxides, and discusses agriculture's net impact on greenhouse gas fluxes.

Jackson, R.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biomass burning and the production of greenhouse gases, in Climate Biosphere Interaction: Biogenic Emissions and the Environmental Effects of Climate Change, edited by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along with methane, lead to the chemical production of tropospheric ozone (another greenhouse gas) as well as control the concentration of the

Joel S. Levine

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Integrated model shows that atmospheric brown clouds and greenhouse gases have reduced rice harvests in India  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have found that atmospheric brown clouds partially offset the warming effects of greenhouse gases. This finding suggests a tradeoff between the impacts of reducing emissions of aerosols and greenhouse gases. Results from a statistical model of historical rice harvests in India, coupled with regional climate scenarios from a parallel climate model, indicate that joint reductions in brown clouds and greenhouse gases would in fact have complementary, positive impacts on harvests. The results also imply that adverse climate change due to brown clouds and greenhouse gases contributed to the slowdown in harvest growth that occurred during the past two decades.

Auffhammer, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Agricultural and Resource Economics; Ramanathan, V. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States); Vincent, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999 iii ... The 1.1-percent average annual growth in U.S. green-

34

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program -Data and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > Data and Reports Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Data and Reports The first reporting cycle under the revised...

35

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Contact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Mail: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Energy Information Administration, EI-81 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave, SW Washington, DC 20585...

36

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.govmain Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation...

37

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Greenhouse Gases Program of Greenhouse Gases Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program ***THE VOLUNTARY REPORTING OF GREENHOUSE GASES ("1605(b)") PROGRAM HAS BEEN SUSPENDED.*** This affects all survey respondents. Please visit the What's New page for full details. What Is the Voluntary Reporting Program? logo Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. More information on the program...

38

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What's New  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program What's New Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Suspended May 2011 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases ("1605(b)") Program has been suspended. The suspension is due to recent reductions in budget appropriations and is effective immediately. Survey respondents may still submit data to the 1605(b) Program using the program's Workbook Form via EIA's Secure File Transfer mechanism. However, EIA will not be able to process and review submitted data or offer respondent support on the submitted data. Should a respondant submit data under the current collection cycle to EIA, the data will be retained in our electronic records. If the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operations, your submitted data will be reviewed and processed at that time. You will be notified in the future if the 1605(b) Program resumes normal operation. If you have any questions, please contact the survey manager, Paul McArdle, at paul.mcardle@eia.gov

40

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Agriculture Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://globalresearchalliance. References Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases [1] Background "The Alliance is a bottom-up network, founded on the voluntary, collaborative efforts of countries. It will coordinate research on agricultural greenhouse gas emission reductions by linking up existing and new research efforts across a range of sub-sectors and work areas. It will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

42

The greenhouse effect and climate change  

SciTech Connect

The physical basis of the projected changes in climate due to enhancement of the greenhouse effect is outlined. Gases important to the greenhouse effect are discussed as well as the expected changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases, potential climatic effects, and the ways of detecting changes in the climate. The potential warming due to man-made changes over the last 100 years is expected to be 1-2 K. 81 refs.

Mitchell, J.F.B. (Meteorological Office, Bracknell (England))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Mission The team establishes an energy conservation program as defined in Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The team incorporates requirements for energy efficiency and reductions in greenhouse gases, and it advocates conserving environmental resources and improving operational capabilities and mission sustainability. Scope The team evaluates how to maintain and operate its buildings and facilities in a resource-efficient, sustainable, and economically viable manner. The

44

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the present status and future trends concerning the effect of soils and their cover on the fluxes of greenhouse gases, the surface energy balance and the water balance. Comprising the proceedings of the conference on soils and the greenhouse effect, the book reviews the background of existing research in the field, while also identifying significant gaps in our understanding of the scientific issues and pointing the way to future work. In addition, the contributors discuss a wide range of topics, including geographic quantification of soil properties involved in fluxes of greenhouse gases; measurement of fluxes and extrapolation to smaller scales; remote sensing of land use; and regional estimation of evaporation and energy fluxes. Throughout, the emphasis is on quantification of greenhouse gas fluxes, evapotranspiration, and energy fluxes.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EIA's Energy in Brief: What are greenhouse gases and how much are ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gases trap heat from the sun and warm the planet's surface. Of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, 87% are related to energy consumption. Since 1990, greenhouse ...

46

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Agency/Company /Organization: EPA and NHTSA Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.epa.gov/oms/climate/regulations/420f10014.pdf This document establish a national program consisting of new standards for model year 2012 through 2016 light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. EPA is finalizing the first-ever national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards under the

60

Rethinking Downstream Regulation: California's Opportunity to Engage Households in Reducing Greenhouse Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gases. Energy Policy (2008), doi:10.1016/j.rebound effect—a survey. Energy Policy 28 (6-7), 389–401.and climate policy. Energy Policy 32 (4), 481–491. Leiby,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases 2005: Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gram, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions.

62

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

63

Overview of global greenhouse effects  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the factors that influence the evolution of climate and climate change. Recent studies have confirmed that CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and chlorofluorocarbos are increasing in abundance in the atmosphere and can alter the radiation balance by means of the so-called greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is as well-accepted phenomenon, but the prediction of its consequences is much less certain. Attempts to detect a human-caused temperature change are still inconclusive. This report presents a discussion of the scientific basis for the greenhouse effect, its relationship to the abundances of greenhouse gases, and the evidence confirming the increases in the abundances. The basis for climate modeling is presented together with an example of the model outputs from one of the most sophisticated modeling efforts. Uncertainties in the present understanding of climate are outlined.

Reck, R.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

66

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

67

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

SciTech Connect

This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Reporting Guidelines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Guidelines Reporting Guidelines Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Reporting Guidelines The purpose of the guidelines is to establish the procedures and requirements for filing voluntary reports, and to ensure that the annual reports of greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities submitted by corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit are complete, reliable, and consistent. Over time, it is anticipated that these reports will provide a reliable record of the contributions reporting entities have made toward reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. General Guidelines General Guidelines Technical Guidelines Technical Guidelines Appendices to the Technical Guidelines:

69

PPPL Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases Wins Department of Energy Award For Reducing Greenhouse Gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has received a federal Sustainability Award for reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions 48 percent since 2008 - far exceeding the U.S. government's goal of a 28 percent reduction. Members of the PPPL staff were among the 20 recipients of the Sustainability Awards in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept.

70

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

71

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse gases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 2, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon dioxide. PPPL reduced leaks of SF6 by 65 percent over three years - reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions by 48 percent between 2008 and 2011. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Tim Stevenson checks for possible leaks of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the gas used to insulate electronic equipment that has the potential to cause global warming at many times the rate of carbon

72

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Utilization of CO2 to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Effect.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse effect is the phenomenon of warming of the earth’s surface and its lower atmosphere due to increased levels of carbon dioxide and other gases,… (more)

Al-Batty, Sirhan Ibrahim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the following topics; Global distribution of the major soils and land cover types, Geographic quantification of soil and changes on their properties, Sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, Partitioning of solar energy, Soils, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Carbon dioxide, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Methane.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Agricultural Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases: Science and Policy Options Keith Paustian (keithp@nrel.colostate.edu; 970-491-1547) Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Bruce Babcock (babcock@iastate.edu; 515-294-6785) Cathy Kling (ckling@iastate.edu; 515-294-5767) Center for Agriculture and Rural Development Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-1070 Jerry Hatfield (hatfield@nstl.gov; 515-294-5723) USDA - National Soil Tilth Laboratory Ames, IA 50011 Rattan Lal (lal.1@osu.edu; 614-292-9069) School of Natural Resources The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1085 Bruce McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu; 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-2124 Sandy McLaughlin (un4@ornl.gov; 865-574-7358)

76

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Getting Started Getting Started Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Getting Started Form EIA-1605 may seem daunting at first, even for entities that have reported under the original program. That's why EIA has developed the Getting Started page to help entities take a systematic approach to reporting their emissions and reductions. The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program suggests that prospective reporters familiarize themselves with the specific requirements for reporting their entity's inventory and reductions by answering the questions embodied in the 10 steps below. In addition, EIA has prepared the interactive Getting Started tool to help reporters determine what parts of Form EIA-1605 they need to complete. Getting Started Tool Getting Started PDF Tables

77

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Why Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Why Report Why Report Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Why Report What Is the Purpose of Form EIA-1605? Form EIA-1605 provides the means for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions, reductions, and sequestration under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The purpose of the Voluntary Reporting Program is to encourage corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. Form EIA-1605 provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. How Will My Entity Benefit From Reporting? There are a number of ways for your entity to benefit from reporting, including:

78

In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

Calabro, Paolo S. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, via Graziella - loc. Feo di Vito, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.calabro@unirc.it

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:42pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For employee commuting, it is important to account for any planned or expected changes in a Federal agency's size when estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for different operating units or worksites. Considerations include: Are employment levels expected to change in the next decade at specific facilities or agency-wide? Are there any planned facility moves at major worksites? Employee commute coordinators may want to engage human resources and strategic planners in this effort to establish likely changes in employment numbers. Facility planners may be engaged to understand changes in commutes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 Planned changes in a Federal agency's size, missions, transportation needs, and vehicle inventory all impact the strategic portfolio planning efforts that target greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation for vehicles and mobile equipment. Under Section 142 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) and Section 8 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, agencies are required to develop a plan that will reduce fleet GHG emissions to meet Federally mandated petroleum reduction and alternative fuel increase targets. Agencies can use these plans as a basis for determining potential changes in fleet size and

82

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1987--1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1992, with annual updates thereafter. This is the third annual update report,covering national emissions over the period 1987--1993, with preliminary estimates of US carbon dioxide and halocarbon emissions for 1994. Calculating national aggregate emissions(or ``national inventories``) of greenhouse gases is a recently developed form of intellectual endeavor. Greenhouse gas emissions are rarely measured directly or reported to statistical agencies. Thus, to prepare emissions inventories usually requires inferring emissions indirectly from information collected for other purposes. Both the available information and the inferences drawn may be of varying reliability. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapters 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes.

NONE

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

The greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect on the Earth is identified by the difference between the effective radiating temperature of the planet and its surface temperature. The difference between the energy emitted by the surface and that emitted upward to space by the upper atmosphere quantifies it; it can therefore be defined as the long wave energy trapped in the atmosphere. Climate forcing and the response of the climate system within which climate feedback mechanisms are contained, will be defined in this review. Quantitative examples will illustrate what could happen if the greenhouse effect is perturbed by the human activities, in particular if atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations would double in the future. Recent measurements by satellites of the greenhouse effect will be given. The net cooling effect of clouds on the Earth and whether or not there will be less cooling by clouds as the planet warms, are discussed following a series of papers recently published by Ramanathan and his collaborators.

Berger, A.; Tricot, C. (Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Most countries have made commitments to limit human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases. To  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(which is soot, rather than a greenhouse gas) would both improve our ability to manage its impact GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS There are three primary methods for estimating emissions of greenhouse gases, all be used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions and sinks with sufficient accuracy at the national level

85

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gas and plays an important role in regulating the climate. Changes in water vapor from human in the atmosphere, water vapor is not counted in the United States or international greenhouse gas inventories3 . Why do greenhouse gas levels matter? Atmospheric concentrations of several important greenhouse gases

86

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The climate change induced by man-made releases of carbon dioxide and other trace gases is discussed. The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from an estimated 293 ppm in 1880 to 335 ppm in 1980, due mainly to the increased use of fossil fuels. That level is expected to double in the next century. Several carbon dioxide models are discussed, along with trends of global temperatures. The effects of the global warming are also discussed along with future research needs. (JMT)

Hileman, B.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydration of Gases to Reduce Major Greenhouse Gases Emission into the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology on replacement methane (CH4) from natural gas hydrate (NGH) with carbon dioxide (CO2) is described. And the technology is demonstrated in theoretics and experiment, respectively. Moreover, combined with the main emission channel of CH4 in ... Keywords: greenhouse effect, hydrate, CO2, CH4

Feng Xu; Lihua Zhu; Qiang Wu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

91

Addendum to Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Effect of 1992 revision of global warming potential (GWP) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  

SciTech Connect

This addendum contains 2 important messages. (1) This document supersedes all previous versions of this work. Please do not use any older versions any more. (2) The atmospheric-science community now believes that it cannot estimate confidently the ''Global Warming Potentials'' (GWPs) of the indirect effects of greenhouse gases. A GWP is a number that converts a mass-unit emission of a greenhouse gas other than CO{sub 2} into the mass amount of CO{sub 2} that has an equivalent warming effect over a given period of time. This report refers to GWPs as ''CO{sub 2}-equivalency factors.'' For example, a forthcoming report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change disavows many of the GWPs estimated in an earlier IPCC report, and states that GWPs for the indirect effects of the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases cannot be estimated accurately yet. However, this does not mean that in principle there are no GWPs for the non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases; rather, it means that some of the GWPs are uncertain, and that the earlier IPCC estimates of the GWPs may or may not turn out to be right (albeit, in at lease one case, discussed in this paper, the earlier estimates almost certainly will be wrong). In this report the author used the IPCC's 1990 estimates of the GWPs for 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons, and expressed the bottom-line results for each of these three time horizons. However, the recent uncertainty about the GWPs affects how you should interpret the results. Because the IPCC has disclaimed some of its GWPs, the GWPs as a group no longer are the best estimates of the warming effects over 20, 100, and 500 years. Instead, they are just a collection of possible values for the GWPs--in short, scenarios. Therefore, you should interpret the ''20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons'' as three general GWP scenarios--say, scenarios, A, B, and C.--and not as time-period scenarios. For example, you should not think that the results shown here under the ''100-year time horizon'' actually embody the scientific community's best estimates of the relative warming potentials of the various greenhouse gases over a 100-year period. Instead, you should understand the results to be the outcome of making a particular set of assumptions about what the GWPs might be. The ''time horizons'' no longer necessarily represent time horizons, but rather general scenarios for, or assumptions about, the GWPs.

DeLuchi, M. A.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Acceleration of the Brewer–Dobson Circulation due to Increases in Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acceleration of the Brewer–Dobson circulation under rising concentrations of greenhouse gases is investigated using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model. The circulation strengthens as a result of increased wave driving in the ...

Rolando R. Garcia; William J. Randel

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000 Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Executive Summary on the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992: General Guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, Congress authorized a voluntary program for the public to report achievements in reducing those gases. This document offers guidance on recording historic and current greenhouse gas emissions, emissions reductions, and carbon sequestration. Under the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) reporters will have the opportunity to highlight specific achievements. If you have taken actions to lessen the greenhouse gas effect, either by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions or by sequestering carbon, the Department of Energy (DOE) encourages you to report your achievements under this program. The program has two related, but distinct parts. First, the program offers you an opportunity to report your annual emissions of greenhouse gases. Second, the program records your specific projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Although participants in the program are strongly encouraged to submit reports on both, reports on either annual emissions or emissions reductions and carbon sequestration projects will be accepted. These guidelines and the supporting technical documents outline the rationale for the program and approaches to analyzing emissions and emissions reduction projects. Your annual emissions and emissions reductions achievements will be reported.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Peru mitigation assessment of greenhouse gases: Sector -- Energy. Peru climate change country study; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study is to determine the Inventory and propose Greenhouse Gases Mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting without delaying the development process required to improve Peruvian standard of living. The main idea of this executive abstract is to show concisely the results of the Greenhouse Gases Mitigation for Peru in the period 1990--2015. The studies about mitigation for the Energy Sector are shown in this summary.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Documentation for Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Aerosols..... 163 Table 4-5. Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Solvent Applications ..... 164 Table 4-6. Data Sources for High ...

97

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, ... Short, timely articles with graphics on energy, facts, issues, and trends. FAQs Glossary For Teachers.

98

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

carbon dioxide emissions, total greenhouse gas emissions, sector-specific emissions, and emissions by fuel type. Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels, principally petroleum,

99

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What are...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ago. Currently, about 75 percent of human-made carbon dioxide emissions are from burning fossil fuels. This rapid increase in greenhouse gas concentrations within the lower levels...

100

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

Rayner, S.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimating Hydro's Contribution to the control of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the environmental effects of hydropower operation that should be evaluated in licensing decisions is the general benefit to air quality. Hydropower's contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is an increasingly important component of these air quality benefits. The Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) computer model is one method that can be used to quantify these benefits. ORCED provides a relatively simple method that is applicable and cost-effective and that has been successfully applied in other GHG studies. ORCED can be used to calculate a region-specific value of the carbon intensity factor (CIF, kg carbon/MWh) that would be associated with likely replacement power (i.e., a regionally representative mix of coal, gas, and other energy sources). The project's plant factor and operational mode (e.g, baseload versus peaking) can also be incorporated in the CIF calculation. The resulting parameter can then be multiplied by the energy output of the hydropower project that is being analyzed to estimate a CO{sub 2} emission value that is avoided by the project's operation.

Sale, Michael J [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A simple demonstration of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

One of the greatest threats humankind may face in the future is the expected warming of the atmosphere within the next decades, caused by the release of infrared-absorbing gases especially carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere. For an increase of atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration to twice its present value, model calculations predict an increase in temperature of the lower atmosphere of 1.5 to 4.5 C, with concomitant dramatic effects on vegetation, climate, and ocean levels. Much has been published about causes, effects, and possible strategies for abatement of this greenhouse effect', and this important topic in science curricula.

Adelhelm, M.; Hoehn, E.G. (Paedagogische Hochschule Ludwigsburg (Germany))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management - A South African perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

The economics of controlling stock pollutants: An efficient strategy for greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

Optimal control theory is applied to develop an efficient strategy to control stock pollutants such as greenhouse gases and hazardous waste. The optimal strategy suggests that, at any time, the marginal costs of abatement should be equated with the present value of the marginal damage of timely unabated emission. The optimal strategy calls for increasingly tight abatement over time as the pollutant stock accumulates. The optimal policy applied to greenhouse gases suggest moderate abatement efforts, at present, with the potential for much greater future efforts. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

Falk, I. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Mendelsohn, R. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects temperatures have increased much more than can be explained by changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases traffic round the clock and around the globe which is contributing to higher concentrations of greenhouse

Murty, Katta G.

107

Greenhouse-effect spurs legislation  

SciTech Connect

Senator Timothy E. Wirth (D-Colo.) reintroduced legislation on February 1, 1989, to establish a national energy policy that would slow down the emission of pollutants contributing to the greenhouse effect. Wirth's comprehensive bill to combat the greenhouse effect includes initiatives to: increase energy-efficiency in all sectors of the US economy; expand research and development of nonfossil fuel sources such as solar; encourage technologies to reduce carbon dioxide emission from coal-fired power plants and other sources; direct the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to develop policies to stop tropical deforestation; and research the greenhouse effect, its causes, and the steps needed to cope with a changing climate.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Documentation for Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare an inventory of aggregate U.S. national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987-1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report documents the methodology for the seventeenth annual inventory, covering national emissions over the period 1990-2008.

Information Center

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - About the 1605(b)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the 1605(b) Program About the 1605(b) Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program About the 1605(b) Program History Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (also known as the 1605(b) Program) encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. The Voluntary Reporting Program began operations in 1994 under the auspices of the Energy Information Administration, the statistical branch of the Department of Energy. Under the original guidelines, the Program released annual reports and a public database for each reporting cycle from the 1994 through the 2005 data years.

111

Greenhouse effect and the global climate. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning terrestrial climatic changes known as the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is an accumulation of carbon dioxide and other gases that retain solar-induced heat, thereby increasing the average global temperature. Modeling studies, measurements of atmospheric gases, pollutants and temperatures, studies of climatic records for occurrence of similar changes (paleoclimatology), prediction of environmental changes due to the greenhouse effect, government energy policy as a result of possible climate change, and the contributions of manmade and natural pollutants to the greenhouse effect are among the topics discussed. (Contains a minimum of 52 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE/EIA-0573(2009)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009 ii Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry. lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have

113

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original 1605(b)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Program Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Original 1605(b) Program Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 established the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program. The Program operated under the original 1994 guidelines through the 2005 data year (for reports containing data through 2005). Reports containing data through 2007 and beyond submitted beginning in 2008 will be conducted under the revised General and Technical Guidelines issued in 2006 and 2007, respectively. More about the original 1605(b) Program. Old Program Reporting Guidelines Old Program Electricity Emissions Factors Old Program Calculation Tools Old Program Forms and Software Old Program Reports for the reporting years 1994 to 2004. Old Program Data for the reporting years 1994 to 2005.

114

On Surface Temperature, Greenhouse Gases, and Aerosols: Models and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight ...

J. F. B. Mitchell; R. A. Davis; W. J. Ingram; C. A. Senior

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Eliminating the effects of greenhouse gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1993 to 1997, more than $600 million will be invested in about 190 new landfill gas energy projects, 75% of which will generate 400 megawatts of electric power. Most of the others will pump methane (CH{sub 4}) directly into natural gas transmission lines or be used to power steam generators. U.S. landfills now produce about 40 million tons of landfill gas per year, and half that tonnage is CH{sub 4}, an alternate fuel. By the year 2000, 90% of all federal and state fleet vehicles must be powered by alternate fuels. Twenty-million tons of CH{sub 4}, converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) at municipal and private landfill refueling stations, could power 8 million natural gas vehicles (NGV). In addition to conserving 8 billion gallons of gasoline per year that would help to reduce this nation`s trade unbalance, the clean-burning CNG would also reduce airborne pollutants.

Straitz, J.F. III [NAO Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The reality of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The Earth's surface absorbs solar radiation, to which the atmosphere is mostly transparent, and re-emits infrared radiation that is absorbed primarily by carbon dioxide and water vapor. Without the consequent warming, or ''greenhouse'' effect, the Earth's mean surface temperature of 15/sup 0/C would be well below freezing. Changes in the concentration of CO/sub 2/ and other greenhouse gases can perturb the present climate. Theoretical models constructed to generate quantitative estimates of these changes suggest that a doubling of the CO/sub 2/ concentration could raise global-average temperatures by 1.5 to 4.5/sup 0/C. Global temperatures appear to have risen about 0.5/sup 0/C over the past hundred years, in part probably due to the 25% rise in CO/sub 2/ concentration. There are important questions, however, regarding the rate and history of the warming and the spatial pattern of the changes. The projected climatic changes could induce significant societal impacts, especially if society is viewed as unresponsive. Sea level rise, reduced water resources, and stressed agricultural systems may be the most important consequences, but uncertainties in the estimated climatic effects and the long lead time make assessment difficult. Developing and evaluating options for slowing the rate and magnitude of and adapting to the projected changes require accelerated research.

MacCracken, M.C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Scientists studying the greenhouse effect challenge fears of global warming  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses the controversy in the scientific community about the significance of the increased gases causing the greenhouse effect to be detrimental to the earth's ecosystems. He states that the most important aspect of the controversy is the fact that governments are embarking on foolish activities in order to prevent global warming. The fact that scientists offer research with contradicting results furthers the confusion as to what the best course of action is. The government agencies that control policy need to appropriate funds to study specific climatic changes and what effect carbon dioxide and other gases have on the atmosphere.

Wheeler, D.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Section 1605 Text  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Section 1605 Text Section 1605 Text Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Section 1605 Text Energy Policy Act of 1992 [Full Text] (a) NATIONAL INVENTORY.- Not later than 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, through the Energy Information Administration, shall develop, based on data available to, and obtained by, the Energy Information Administration, an inventory of the national aggregate emissions of each greenhouse gas for each calendar year of the baseline period of 1987 through 1990. The Administrator of the Energy Information Administration shall annually update and analyze such inventory using available data. This subsection does not provide any new data collection authority. (b) VOLUNTARY REPORTING.- (1) ISSUANCE OF GUIDELINES.-Not later than 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, after opportunity for public comment, issue guidelines for the voluntary collection and reporting of information on sources of greenhouse gases. Such guidelines shall establish procedures for the accurate voluntary reporting of information on-

119

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Understanding Land–Sea Warming Contrast in Response to Increasing Greenhouse Gases. Part I: Transient Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate model simulations consistently show that surface temperature over land increases more rapidly than over sea in response to greenhouse gas forcing. The enhanced warming over land is not simply a transient effect caused by the land–sea ...

Buwen Dong; Jonathan M. Gregory; Rowan T. Sutton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Greenhouse effect, sea level and drought  

SciTech Connect

Four parts of this book relate successively to greenhouse effects, sea level, drought and water deficiency, and management techniques and case studies.

Paepe, R.; Fairbridge, R.W.; Jelgersma, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a non-technical review of the problems associated with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the resulting greenhouse effect. (TEM)

Firestine, M.W. (ed.)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Greenhouse effect already here. Scientists call for action  

SciTech Connect

This summer, as one of the century's worst heat waves and droughts plagued much of the United States, a climatologist from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration told a Senate committee that high global temperatures over the past few years can almost certainly be attributed to the greenhouse effect. It was the first time that a scientist had so publicly and positively linked recent weather patterns with the global climate changes predicted to occur in response to increasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Other scientists have remained cautious, maintaining that higher temperatures over the past few years can be explained by natural climate fluctuations. Nevertheless, scientists and many policy makers are calling for action on the greenhouse effect.

Tangley, L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gauging the biological impacts of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

For years some climatologists have warned that greenhouse gases, by preventing excess solar energy from radiating back into space, could raise average global temperatures 3/degree/ to 5/degree/C within the next century, change rainfall patterns, melt some glaciers and polar ice, raise sea levels, flood low-lying coasts, and otherwise alter climate and environment. Only recently, however, have biologists begun to ask how the greenhouse effect might affect living organisms. How, for example, will individual species respond to changing climate. will they adapt to new conditions or migrate to new environs. Which species might benefit and which might go extinct. Will communities of plants and animals remain intact. What are the implications for wildlife managers and park planners. Such questions were addressed at a recent conference on biological consequences of the greenhouse effect.

Cohn, J.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling the Interaction of Transport Mechanisms through Bedded Manure to Evaluate the Effects on Ammonia and Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the foremost contributor to global warming is the release of greenhouse gases. Greenhouse gases have been… (more)

Williams, Marlyse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Scientific basis for the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide and a wide variety of other industrial gases, including methane, ozone, and freon, trap a portion of the earth's thermal radiation that would otherwise escape into space. This radiative trapping of energy produces the heating of the atmosphere popularly labeled the greenhouse effect. Detailed observations from remote stations show that the carbon dioxide concentration of the atmosphere has increased from 316 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1958 to 350 ppmv in 1986. The exponential growth in carbon dioxide levels parallels the increased worldwide use of carbon-based fuels. Methane concentrations are increasing at a rate of one to two percent per year, lower atmosphere ozone at a somewhat smaller rate, and freons at a current rate of five percent per year. Calculations of the expected increase in the average temperature of the earth's surface since 1900 lead to a value of about 0.5/degree/C if the moderating effect of the earth's oceans is taken into account. Calculations are based on models that range in complexity from simple energy balance considerations to detailed three-dimensional calculations that strain the capacity of current digital computers. Detailed analysis of tens of millions of surface-temperature observations indicate an average warming of about 0.5/degree/C since the turn of the century and a greater warming of 2/degree/C in high latitudes. Major climatic shifts can be expected as the warming proceeds at an increasing pace. The rate of anticipated warming is historically unprecedented.

MacDonald, G.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimating thermal forcings of greenhouse gases from ancient climates: The problem of statistical confounding  

SciTech Connect

Data from ice cores show that CO[sub 2] and air temperature are highly correlated over the last 157,000 yr. Although this correlation can be taken as evidence that CO[sub 2] amplifies orbital forcing of temperature and is thus a strong greenhouse gas, this paper argues that estimating the strength of the CO[sub 2] warming effect from statistical evaluations of past climates based on CO[sub 2] and orbital forcing is hampered by strong multiple correlations between CH[sub 4], CO[sub 2], ocean currents, ice volume (and therefore albedo), dust, and nonseasalt sulfate. To estimate the strength of the greenhouse warming effect of CO[sub 2] from historical data, these correlations and multiple forcings should be taken into account. 21 refs., 21 figs.

Loehle, C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Sustainable ForestManagement: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases  

SciTech Connect

The International Workshop on Sustainable Forest Management: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 29-31, 1996. The main objectives of the workshop were to: (1) assemble key practitioners of forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) or carbon offset projects, remote sensing of land cover change, guidelines development, and the forest products certification movement, to offer presentations and small group discussions on findings relevant to the crucial need for the development of guidelines for monitoring and verifying offset projects, and (2) disseminate the findings to interested carbon offset project developers and forestry and climate change policy makers, who need guidance and consistency of methods to reduce project transaction costs and increase probable reliability of carbon benefits, at appropriate venues. The workshop brought together about 45 participants from developed, developing, and transition countries. The participants included researchers, government officials, project developers, and staff from regional and international agencies. Each shared his or her perspectives based on experience in the development and use of methods for monitoring and verifying carbon flows from forest areas and projects. A shared sense among the participants was that methods for monitoring forestry projects are well established, and the techniques are known and used extensively, particularly in production forestry. Introducing climate change with its long-term perspective is often in conflict with the shorter-term perspective of most forestry projects and standard accounting principles. The resolution of these conflicts may require national and international agreements among the affected parties. The establishment of guidelines and protocols for better methods that are sensitive to regional issues will be an important first step to increase the credibility of forestry projects as viable mitigation options. The workshop deliberations led to three primary outputs: (1) a Workshop Statement in the JI Quarterly, September, 1996; (2) the publication of a series of selected peer-reviewed technical papers from the workshop in a report of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. 40501); and (3) a special issue of the journal ''Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change'', Kluwer Academic Publishers. The outputs will be distributed to practitioners in this field and to negotiators attending the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) deliberations leading up to the Third conference of Parties in Kyoto, in December 1997.

Sathaye (Ed.), Jayant; Makundi (Ed.), Willy; Goldberg (Ed.),Beth; Andrasko (Ed.), Ken; Sanchez (Ed.), Arturo

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Hearings were held to examine when the impacts of the greenhouse effect would begin to be seen, how severe these impacts will be, and how the government's research programs on this phenomenon will proceed. A review of the Department of Energy's research program was initiated.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Greenhouse effect, sea level and drought  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the proceedings of a NATO sponsored symposium in 1989. The book is divided into five parts: (1) Greenhouse Effects (6 papers); (2) Sea Level (4 papers); (3) Drought and Water Deficiency (10 papers); (4) Management, Techniques, and Case Studies (20 papers); and (5) Conclusions (1 paper).

Paepe, R.; Fairbridge, R.; Jelgersma, S. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Relative Contribution of Greenhouse Gases and Ozone-Depleting Substances to Temperature Trends in the Stratosphere: A Chemistry–Climate Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature of the stratosphere has decreased over the past several decades. Two causes contribute to that decrease: well-mixed greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). This paper addresses the attribution of temperature ...

Richard S. Stolarski; Anne R. Douglass; Paul A. Newman; Steven Pawson; Mark R. Schoeberl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Great Lakes fish and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This short article discusses data presented at the Second North American Conference on Preparing for Climate Change, held in Washington, D.C. Magnuson and Regier predicted that Great Lakes fish productivity may increase as a result of the increased water temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect. However, they also predicted that other indirect alterations could do more harm than good; for example, the effects of warming on lake oxygen levels, or wind, which affects the mixing of warm, cool, and cold water.

Mlot, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A research program on radiative, chemical, and dynamical feedback progresses influencing the carbon dioxide and trace gases climate effects: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986--July 15, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the up-to-date progress. The program includes two tasks: atmospheric radiation and climatic effects and their objective is to link quantitatively the radiation forcing changes and the climate responses caused by increasing greenhouse gases. Here, the objective and approach are described. We investigate the combined atmospheric radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases (H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/O, CFCs, and O/sub 3/), aerosols and clouds. Since the climatic effect of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases is initiated by perturabtion to the longwave thermal radiation, it is critical to understand better the radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases and their relationship to radiatively-important aerosols and clouds; the latter reflect solar radiation (a cooling of the surface) and provide a greenhouse effect (a warming to the surface). Therefore, aerosol and cloud particles are an integral part of the radiation field in the atmosphere. 9 refs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Agriculture and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses research of the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division to anticipate the effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on American agriculture. Experiments involving exposure of plants to elevated CO/sub 2/ and attempts to model the productivity of crops as atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases are described. The scientists quoted in the article are optimistic, emphasizing the beneficial effects of the elevated CO/sub 2/ on crops and speculating that problems caused by associated climate changes can be accommodated by movement of crop regions and by introduction of new varieties.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Greenhouse effect and nature reserves  

SciTech Connect

Global warming would diminish biological diversity by causing extinctions among reserve species. Patterns of climatic change are discussed, including global patterns of surface temperature increase, as predicted by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and global changes in moisture patterns. The concept of biological reserves (essentially the same concept as biological refugia) is discussed, and the effect of climatic changes on reserves is discussed. The types of biological communities particularly at risk due to climatic changes are identified. 67 references, 3 figures.

Peters, R.L.; Darling, J.D.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Canada, carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

One of the major contributors to the greenhouse effect is carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas. Even with its low population density, Canada, on a per capita basis, has the dubious distinction of being the world's fourth largest producer of carbon from carbon dioxide. This paper considers the impact of Canadian carbon dioxide emissions on the greenhouse effect in light of the 1988 Conference on the Changing Atmosphere's recommendations. A computer model has been developed that, when using anticipated Canadian fossil fuel demands, shows that unless steps are taken immediately, Canada will not be able to meet the conference's proposed carbon dioxide reduction of 20 percent of 1988 levels by the year 2005, let alone meet any more substantial cuts that may be required in the future.

Hughes, L.; Scott, S. (Dept. of Mathematics and Computing Science, Saint Mary' s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Scroll down to find Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, a subheading under the broader heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases, etc.) CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to isotopes in greenhouse gases includes: • Monthly atmospheric 13C/12C isotopic ratios for 10 SIO stations, (2005) (Trends Online) • Mixing ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and isotope ratios of associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Monta±a de Oro, California, USA (2004) • Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A., (2004) (Trends Online) ?13C in CO2 from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network (Trends Online) • In Situ 13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (2001) (Trends Online) • In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (1995) • Carbon-13 Isotopic Abundance and concentration of Atmospheric Methane for Background Air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989 (1995) • Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) • 14CO 2 Observations from Schauinsland, Germany (1997) (Trends Online) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Atmospheric CO 2 from Northern and Southern Hemisphere Sites, 1962-1992 (1996) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 (1998) (Specialized Interface)

140

The detection of climate change due to the enhanced greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect is accepted as an undisputed fact from both theoretical and observational considerations. In Earth's atmosphere, the primary greenhouse gas is water vapor. The specific concern today is that increasing concentrations of anthropogenically introduced greenhouse gases will, sooner or later, irreversibly alter the climate of Earth. Detecting climate change has been complicated by uncertainties in historical observations and measurements. Thus, the primary concern for the GEDEX project is how can climate change and enhanced greenhouse effects be unambiguously detected and quantified. Specifically examined are the areas of: Earth surface temperature; the free atmosphere (850 millibars and above); space-based measurements; measurement uncertainties; and modeling the observed temperature record.

Schiffer, R.A.; Unninayar, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

142

Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and coastal zone management  

SciTech Connect

Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are expected to warm the earth several degrees in the next century by a mechanism known as the greenhouse effect. Such a warming could cause sea level to rise two to five feet by expanding ocean water, melting mountain glaciers, and perhaps eventually causing polar glaciers to melt and slide into the oceans. A rise in sea level of even three feet could cause substantial erosion of beaches and coastal wetlands, increased flooding, and intrusion of salt water into rivers, bays, and aquifer. Fortunately, many of the adverse consequences can be avoided by taking timely measures in anticipation of sea level rise. Nevertheless, many coastal zone managers are reluctant to take these measures until the prospect of sea level rise becomes more certain. This article examines the implications of future sea level rise and identifies anticipatory measures that may be appropriate today in spite of current uncertainties. 46 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Titus, J.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Changes of Variability in Response to Increasing Greenhouse Gases. Part I: Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study documents the temperature variance change in two different versions of a coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model forced with estimates of future increases of greenhouse gas (GHG) and aerosol concentrations. The variance ...

R. J. Stouffer; R. T. Wetherald

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geological Assessment of the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the ...

Thomas J. Crowley

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

On the Cause of the Relative Greenhouse Strength of Gases such as the Halocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note examines some of the factors important in determining the large radiative impact, relative to carbon dioxide, of increased concentrations of gases in the optically thin limit (such as the halocarbons at their present day concentrations)...

Keith P. Shine

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Greenhouse effect and sea level rise: a challenge for this generation  

SciTech Connect

These papers elaborate on how to deal with a catastrophic result of the ''greenhouse effect'' -- a global warming that could raise the sea level several feet by the end of the century. Topics of discussion include: physical impact of sea level rise, coastal geomorphic responses, climate sensitivity to increasing greenhouse gases and control of erosion. Inundation and salinity intrusion is reviewed, as well as economic analysis and planning for coastal disasters. There is a section which reviews implications for hazardous waste sites and siting in coastal floorplains.

Barth, M.C.; Titus, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

148

The greenhouse effect and acid rain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Modeling the infrastructure dynamics of China -- Water, agriculture, energy, and greenhouse gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive critical infrastructure analysis of the People`s Republic of China was performed to address questions about China`s ability to meet its long-term grain requirements and energy needs and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in China likely to result from increased agricultural production and energy use. Four dynamic computer simulation models of China`s infrastructures--water, agriculture, energy and greenhouse gas--were developed to simulate, respectively, the hydrologic budgetary processes, grain production and consumption, energy demand, and greenhouse gas emissions in China through 2025. The four models were integrated into a state-of-the-art comprehensive critical infrastructure model for all of China. This integrated model simulates diverse flows of commodities, such as water and greenhouse gas, between the separate models to capture the overall dynamics of the integrated system. The model was used to generate projections of China`s available water resources and expected water use for 10 river drainage regions representing 100% of China`s mean annual runoff and comprising 37 major river basins. These projections were used to develop estimates of the water surpluses and/or deficits in the three end-use sectors--urban, industrial, and agricultural--through the year 2025. Projections of the all-China demand for the three major grains (corn, wheat, and rice), meat, and other (other grains and fruits and vegetables) were also generated. Each geographic region`s share of the all-China grain demand (allocated on the basis of each region`s share of historic grain production) was calculated in order to assess the land and water resources in each region required to meet that demand. Growth in energy use in six historically significant sectors and growth in greenhouse gas loading were projected for all of China.

Conrad, S.H.; Drennen, T.E.; Engi, D.; Harris, D.L.; Jeppesen, D.M.; Thomas, R.P.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Global warming potentials; Part 7 of 7 supporting documents. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the general guidelines for voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992; Public review draft  

SciTech Connect

This document provides methods to account for the different effects of different gases on the atmosphere. It discusses the rationale and uses for simplified measures to represent human-related effects on climate and provides a brief introduction to a major index, the global warming potential (GWP) index. Appendix 7.A analyzes the science underlying the development of indices for concerns about climate, which is still evolving, evaluates the usefulness of currently available indices, and presents the state of the art for numerical indices and their uncertainties. For concerns about climate, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been instrumental in examining relative indices for comparing the radiative influences of greenhouse gases. The IPCC developed the concept of GWPs to provide a simple representation of the relative effects on climate resulting from a unit mass emission of a greenhouse gas. Alternative measures and variations on the definition of GWPs have also been considered and reported.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Greenhouse effect may not be all bad  

SciTech Connect

Evidence is presented that indicates US temperatures decreased by a fraction of a degree during the past 70 years contrary to the estimates of some researchers concerned with the greenhouse effect. There is general agreement that the carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere will double by the late or mid 21st century. Experiments on cotton growth under increased temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations indicate sizeable gains in yield. This increased yield is exhibited by citrus trees and is projected for other crops. There is a concomitant need for more water and fertilizer. Increased populations of parasitic mites and insects also occur. Climatic changes are seen as being more gradual than previously thought. The possible increases in food production under these changes in climate are one positive element in the emerging scenario.

Senft, D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Policy implications of greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

Contents: background; the greenhouse gases and their effects; policy framework; adaptation; mitigation; international considerations; findings and conclusions; recommendations; questions and answers about greenhouse warming; background information on synthesis panel members and professional staff; and membership lists for effects, mitigation, and adaptation panels.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Possible Change of Extratropical Cyclone Activity due to Enhanced Greenhouse Gases and Sulfate Aerosols—Study with a High-Resolution AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the possible impacts of enhanced greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols on extratropical cyclone activity, two 20-yr time-slice experiments—the control run and the global warming run—are performed with a high-resolution AGCM (T106) ...

Quanzhen Geng; Masato Sugi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The greenhouse effect and acid rain  

SciTech Connect

The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change?, Science 319:1238–40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most prior studies have found that substituting biofuels for gasoline will reduce greenhouse gases because biofuels sequester carbon through the growth of the feedstock. These analyses have failed to count the carbon emissions that occur as farmers worldwide respond to higher prices and convert forest and grassland to new cropland to replace the grain (or cropland) diverted to biofuels. Using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20 % savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. This result raises concerns about large biofuel mandates and highlights the value of using waste products.

Timothy Searchinger; Ralph Heimlich; R. A. Houghton; Fengxia Dong; Amani Elobeid; Jacinto Fabiosa; Simla Tokgoz; Dermot Hayes; Tun-hsiang Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Simulations of greenhouse trace gases using the Los Alamos chemical tracer model  

SciTech Connect

Through three-dimensional global model studies on atmospheric composition and transport, we are improving our quantitative understanding of the origins and behavior of trace gases that affect Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. We will focus, in this paper, on the simulations of three individual trace gases including CFC-11, methyl chloroform, and methane. We first used our chemical tracer model to study the global distribution and trend of chemically inert CFC-11 observed by the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment. The results show that the model has the ability to reproduce the time-series of the observations. The purpose of this CFC-11 simulation was to test the transport of the model. We then used to model introduce methyl chloroform into the atmosphere according to the known emission patterns and iteratively varied OH fields so that the observed concentrations of methyl chloroform from the observations could be simulated well. The rationale behind this approach is that the reaction with OH is the dominant sink for metyl chloroform and the transport of the model has been tested in the previous CFC-11 study. Finally, using the inferred OH distributions, we conducted a steady-state simulation to reproduce the current methane distribution. The general agreement between the modeled an observed methane surface concentrations has laid a foundation for the simulation of the transient increase of methane.

Kao, C.Y.J.; Morz, E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Tie, X. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Simulations of greenhouse trace gases using the Los Alamos chemical tracer model  

SciTech Connect

Through three-dimensional global model studies on atmospheric composition and transport, we are improving our quantitative understanding of the origins and behavior of trace gases that affect Earth`s radiative energy balance and climate. We will focus, in this paper, on the simulations of three individual trace gases including CFC-11, methyl chloroform, and methane. We first used our chemical tracer model to study the global distribution and trend of chemically inert CFC-11 observed by the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment. The results show that the model has the ability to reproduce the time-series of the observations. The purpose of this CFC-11 simulation was to test the transport of the model. We then used to model introduce methyl chloroform into the atmosphere according to the known emission patterns and iteratively varied OH fields so that the observed concentrations of methyl chloroform from the observations could be simulated well. The rationale behind this approach is that the reaction with OH is the dominant sink for metyl chloroform and the transport of the model has been tested in the previous CFC-11 study. Finally, using the inferred OH distributions, we conducted a steady-state simulation to reproduce the current methane distribution. The general agreement between the modeled an observed methane surface concentrations has laid a foundation for the simulation of the transient increase of methane.

Kao, C.Y.J.; Morz, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tie, X. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The greenhouse effect: Physiological changes in plants  

SciTech Connect

Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide is timely topic of study for all biology students at all levels. The stimulatory effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (700 {mu}l/l) on plant growth, flower induction, protein production and the Calvin-Benson cycle can be easily demonstrated in seedlings in student laboratories. In our lab, the shoot growth of rapid cycling brassicas (Wisconsin fast plants) was measured under ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} conditions for three weeks. Plants grown under elevated CO{sub 2} conditions were significantly taller and showed earlier flower development. These plants also contained greater protein content per gram fresh weight. Crude leaf extracts was used as a source of pentose-5-isomerase which controls the conversion of ribose-5-phosphate to ribulose-5-phosphate in carbon fixation. The activity of this enzyme was measured spectrophotometrically and found to be somewhat greater in plants grown under the higher CO{sub 2} conditions. These physiological changes associated with elevated CO{sub 2} can be used as an introduction to the greenhouse effect as well as to study the regulation of carbon fixation.

Beard, R.; Harrison, M. (Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Simple model of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a simple model that breaks new ground by attempting to encompass the whole cause and effect of the greenhouse effect caused by the emission of carbon dioxide. The model includes a carbon dioxide emissions module, a carbon cycle module, and an atmospheric temperature module. Each of the component modules is considerably less elaborate than the current state-of-the-art modules. In addition to the three modules, the simple model simulates the impact of climate change on the production of food and simulates the impact of both expensive food and expensive energy on world GNP. The report presents the detailed equations of the model and sample results. A key assumption is that the world GNP will increase by about a factor of 12 in the next 200 years (an average rate of about 1% per year). If the world GNP increases at this rate, by 2000 the world must begin a major shift to solar energy or nuclear power if the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is to be kept below 600 ppM. 19 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Reister, D.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Methane level rise blamed in greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

As scientists continue to probe effects of global warming trends and the greenhouse effect, increasing attention is being placed on the impact of methane. Last year, scientists at the University of California in Irvine found there were almost 1.7 parts per million of methane in the troposphere- 11% higher that a decade ago and climbing at 1% annually. European scientists came up with similar analyses, and the belief is that methane is currently 2.4 times higher than it has ever been in the last 160,000 years. The big challenge now is to identify the sources of the methane. About 15 to 20% can be traced to oil and gas wells, coal mining and other tapping of the gas trapped in the planet's crust. Other sources are bacteria working in tropical rain forests, burned-off clearings, etc. Cattle figure high on the list of methane generators. When domesticated herds of sheep, goats, pigs, etc. are figured, the total rises to 73 million metric tons per year- a 435% increase since 1890. Rice paddies are also rated a major source of methane. It's estimated that 115 million metric tons rise from rice paddies a year, as much as is coming from natural swamps and wetlands. When scientists added up all the published estimates of methane production, the total ranged from 400 million to 640 million metric tons a year. Estimates of how much methane the atmosphere can handle are similarly uncertain, ranging from 300 million to 650 million metric tons a year.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geological assessment of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the sensitivity of the system to greenhouse gas changes cannot yet be constrained by paleoclimate data below its present large range. Geologic records do not support one of the major predictions of greenhouse models-namely, that tropical sea surface temperatures will increase. Geologic data also suggest that winter cooling in high-latitude land areas is less than predicted by models. As the above-mentioned predictions appear to be systemic features of the present generation of climate models, some significant changes in model design may be required to reconcile models and geologic data. However, full acceptance of this conclusion requires more measurements and more systematic compilations of existing geologic data. Since progress in data collection in this area has been quite slow, uncertainties associated with these conclusions may persist for some time. 106 refs., 6 figs.

Crowley, T.J. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:58am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 After identifying petroleum reduction strategies, a Federal agency should estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies for vehicles and mobile equipment. The table below provides steps for identifying optimal vehicle acquisition strategies. Table 1. Framework for Identifying Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Strategies Step Summary Purpose PLAN and COLLECT 1 Determine vehicle acquisition requirements Establish a structured Vehicle Allocation Matrix (VAM) to determine the numbers and types of vehicles required to accomplish your fleet's mission

164

Atmospheric greenhouse effect and climates on various planets  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect of the planetary atmospheres is considered and its evolution as a result of variations in the chemical composition and in gas abundances of the atmospheres as well as in the chemical composition, size distribution and concentration of aerosol components. A computer modelling gave the values of the greenhouse effect of the atmospheres of the Earth, Mars, Venus, Jupiter, and Titan. It is shown that the atmospheric greenhouse effect plays a decisive role in the formation of the planetary climates and that it has substantially changed in the process of the planetary evolution. The greenhouse effect mechanism has always been and still is a major factor of the mean global planetary climate.

Kondratev, K.Y.; Moskalenko, N.I.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Variations in the Tropical Greenhouse Effect during El Niño  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation and sea surface temperature are combined to examine the evolution of the tropical greenhouse effect from colder La Niña conditions in early 1985 to warmer El Niño conditions in late 1987. ...

Brian J. Soden

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluación de la generación de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment of greenhouse gases emissions associated to colombian biofuels lifecycle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth (2012) Evaluación de la generación de gases de efecto invernadero asociados al ciclo de vida de los biocombustibles colombianos = Assessment… (more)

Valencia Botero, Monica Julieth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Variations in the tropical greenhouse effect during El Nino  

SciTech Connect

Observations of the clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation and sea surface temperature are combined to examine the evolution of the tropical greenhouse effect from colder La Nina conditions in early 1985 to warmer El Nino conditions in late 1987. Although comparison of individual months can suggest a decrease in greenhouse trapping from cold to warm conditions, when the entire 4-yr record is considered a distinct increase in tropical-mean greenhouse trapping of {approximately}2 W m{sup -2} is observed in conjunction with a {approximately}0.4 K increase in tropical-mean sea surface temperature. This observed increase compares favorably with GCM simulations of the change in the clear-sky greenhouse effect during El Nifio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Superimposed on top of the SST-driven change in greenhouse trapping are dynamically induced changes in tropical moisture apparently associated with a redistribution of SST during ENSO. The GCM simulations also successfully reproduce this feature, providing reassurance in the ability of GCMs to predict both dynamically and thermodynamically driven changes in greenhouse trapping. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Soden, B.J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Trace gases could double climate warming  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric concentrations of several trace gases capable of changing the climate are increasing. Researchers are concerned about the trace gases despite their miniscule concentrations because they are such efficient absorbers of far-infrared radiation. The trace gases that concern climatologists are methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons or CFC's. The increase in atmospheric concentrations of these gases are discussed and atmospheric models predicting their greenhouse effect are described.

Kerr, R.A.

1983-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas · A gas, natural or anthropogenic, that absorbs the paradox of the faint young Sun. Near-infrared greenhouse gas absorption bands (Fig. 3.13) near infrared trace gas concentrations to radiative forcing: the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global

Wolfe, Alexander P.

170

SciTech Connect: "Greenhouse Effect"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Greenhouse Effect" Find Greenhouse Effect" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

171

The Sweet Taste of Defeat: American Electric Power Co v. Connecticut and Federal Greenhouse Gas Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribute findings for greenhouse gases under section 202(Connecticut and Federal Greenhouse Gas Regulation KatherineWHAT NEXT? REDUCING GREENHOUSE GASES THROUGH STATE PUBLIC

Trisolini, Katherine A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rapid development of coal-bed methane was spurred by amethane and other gases. Some of this coalbed gas is stored in the coal bed

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Physics of greenhouse effect and convection in warm Oceans  

SciTech Connect

Sea surface temperatures (SST) in roughly 50% of the tropical Pacific Ocean is warm enough (SST > 300 K) to permit deep convection. This paper examines the effects of deep convection on the climatological mean vertical distributions of water vapor and its greenhouse effect over such warm oceans. The study also examines the link between SST, vertical distribution of water vapor, and its greenhouse effect in the tropical oceans. The radiation model calculations do not include the effects of clouds. The data are grouped into nonconvective and convective categories using SST as an index for convective activity. On average, convective regions are more humid, trap significantly more longwave radiation, and emit more radiation to the sea surface. The greenhouse effect in regions of convection operates as per classical ideas, that is, as the SST increases, the atmosphere traps the excess longwave energy emitted by the surface and reradiates it locally back to the ocean surface. The important departure from the classical picture is that the net (up minus down) fluxes at the surface and at the top-of-the atmosphere decrease with an increase in SST; that is, the surface and the surface-troposphere column lose the ability to radiate the excess energy to space. The cause of this upper greenhouse effect at the surface is the rapid increase in the lower-troposphere humidity with SST; that of the column is due to a combination of increase in humidity in the entire column and increase in the lapse rate within the lower troposphere. The increase in the vertical distribution of humidity far exceeds that which can be attributed to the temperature dependence of saturation vapor pressure; that is, the tropospheric relative humidity is larger in convective regions. The positive coupling between SST and the radiative warming of the surface by the water vapor greenhouse effect is also shown to exist on interannual time scales. 35 refs., 17 figs. 4 tabs.

Inamdar, A.K.; Ramanathan, V. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

On the Scattering Greenhouse Effect of CO2 Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors offer some remarks on the greenhouse effect due to high clouds that reflect thermal infrared radiation, but do not absorb or emit it. Such clouds are an idealization of the CO2 ice clouds that are thought to have existed early in the ...

R. T. Pierrehumbert; C. Erlick

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A game of climate chicken : can EPA regulate greenhouse gases before the U.S. Senate ratifies the Kyoto Protocol?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA's legal authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act is reviewed. While EPA clearly does not have the authority to implement the precise terms of the Kyoto Protocol, arguments could be put ...

Bugnion, Véronique.; Reiner, David M.

176

Changes in ENSO and Associated Overturning Circulations from Enhanced Greenhouse Gases by the End of the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With data from 12 coupled models in the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), climate under year 2000 greenhouse gas (GHG) + aerosol forcing was compared with climate under preindustrial ...

Zhengqing Ye; William W. Hsieh

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gases. 2.3.5 Synthetic natural gas (SNG) systems Asynthetic natural gas (SNG) can be manufactured from coal orthe use of biomass-derived SNG in motor vehicles. SNG from

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Testimony to the US Senate on the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This testimony was presented on January 28, 1987 at the hearing on ''The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion,'' United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Subcommittee on Environmental Protection and Subcommittee on Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances. The testimony concerns the observed global warming that has occurred over the past 100 years. How this temperature record was obtained is summarized and the details of the record described, with particular reference to the most recent decades and to the differences between the records for Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The record is compared with the predicted warming over the same period due to the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The projected warming over the next 70 years is compared with global temperature changes that have occurred over the past few million years. (ACR)

Wigley, T.M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sound-Based ranging system in greenhouse environment with multipath effect compensation using artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, sound-based ranging system in greenhouse environment with compensation of measurement error caused by multipath effect using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was proposed. Greenhouse environment has special characteristic which is different ... Keywords: ANN, greenhouse, multipath effect, sound-based ranging system

Slamet Widodo; Tomoo Shiigi; Naing Min Than; Yuichi Ogawa; Naoshi Kondo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction. Greenhouse gases correlate directly to global warming, which impacts arctic sea ice. This image shows current arctic sea ice formation. The red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Greenhouse Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2008 ... This U. S. EPA webpage gives an overview of greenhouse gases and a description of greenhouse gas inventories. It provides emission trends ...

182

Analyzing R and D options for the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the methodology. The remainder of the paper is organized into four main sections. The first of these sections provides an overview of the analytic framework and R and D and policy issues relevant to the greenhouse effect. The next section describes the model that the authors have developed to evaluate alternative emissions, climate changes, and effects scenarios. The next section of the paper outlines how the model can be used to facilitate R and D planning decisions. The paper concludes with a summary of the authors approach and directions for future work.

Judd, B.R.; Olmsted, E.; Pollenz, L.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Greenhouse effect and climatic change. Revised edition. Current issue review No. 79-2E  

SciTech Connect

This current issues paper covers the following topics: The relationship between atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate, sources of carbon dioxide (fossil fuels and deforestation), sinks of carbon dioxide (vegetation and oceans), evidence of an increase in greenhouse gases, implications of increased atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2}, and parliamentary action. A chronology and bibliography conclude the paper.

Milko, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Household carbon dioxide production in relation to the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

A survey of 655 households from eastern suburbs of Melbourne was undertaken to determine householders[prime] attitudes to, and understanding of, the greenhouse effect. Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from car, electricity and gas use were computed and household actions which could reduce CO[sub 2] emissions were addressed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that householders in this area are aware of, and concerned about, the greenhouse effect, although their understanding of its causes is often poor. Many appreciate the contribution of cars, but are unclear about the relative importance of other household activities. Carbon dioxide emissions from the three sources examined averaged 21[center dot]2 tonnes/year per household and 7[center dot]4 tonnes/year per person. Electricity was the largest contributor (8[center dot]6 tonnes/year), cars the next largest (7[center dot]7 tonnes/year) and gas third (5[center dot] tonnes/year) per household. Emissions varied considerably from household to household. There was a strong positive correlation between availability of economic resources and household CO[sub 2] output from all sources. Carbon dioxide production, particularly from car use, was greater from households which were most distant from a railway station, and from larger households, and numbers of children in the household had little effect on emissions. There were also some economics of scale for households containing more adults. Understanding the causes of the greenhouse bore little relation to change in CO[sub 2] emissions; being concerned about it was associated with a small reduction; but actual actions to reduce car use and household heating, however motivated, produced significant reductions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Stokes, D.; Lindsay, A.; Marinopoulos, J.; Treloar, A.; Wescott, G. (Deakin Univ., Clayton (Australia))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

IMAGE: An integrated model to assess the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book is the result of a research project entitled Reference Function for Global Air Pollution CO{sub 2}. It deals with the description of a computer simulation model of the greenhouse effect. This model, IMAGE, tries to capture the fundamentals of the complex problem of climate change in a simplified way. The model is a multidisciplinary product and is based on knowledge from disciplines as economics, atmospheric chemistry, marine and terrestrial biogeochemistry, ecology, climatology, and glaciology. This book might be of interest to any one working in the broad field of climate change. Furthermore, it can be useful for model builders, simulation experts, and mathematicians.

Rotmans, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Greenhouse effect: Implications for economic development. Discussion paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a scientific perspective on the global climate change issue and establishes a comprehensive framework for efficient response to the implications for natural resource conservation and economic development. It has benefitted from extensive comment and review within the international scientific community, as well as within the World Bank. It comprises an extensive summary and critique, from a development viewpoint, of the sometimes conflicting scientific literature and opinion on the greenhouse effect, the related theoretical and empirical evidence, and prospects for global climate change. Finally, it presents a set of conclusions which are worthy of serious consideration by everyone concerned with the enlightened stewardship of the global environment.

Arrhenius, E.; Waltz, T.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Facing the greenhouse effect: Communication about energy in Germany  

SciTech Connect

Energy policy in Germany has been characterized by an irreconcilable debate about nuclear power and the potentials of renewable energy sources and energy-saving activities for more than 15 years. The question is whether the emerging greenhouse effect has changed or at least influenced this conflict. In this study the authors screened the publications of various stakeholders in the energy debate and investigated their standpoints, values, and attitudes towards energy policy after the emergence of the greenhouse effect. The study reveals that the focus of the communication is no longer nuclear power. Moreover, communication with the public tries to hide the still virulent conflict among the agents. Every agent argues for the protection of the global climate and environment. But despite this superficial consensus and the [open quotes]green[close quotes] arguments, the various agents draw different conclusions. Thus communication not only minimizes clarity, but also fails to produce any consensus on how to realize the ambitious goals of global environmental protection. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Henschel, C.; Wiedemann, P.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Comments on ''the greenhouse effect''  

SciTech Connect

Lee (1973) suggests that the so-called greenhouse effect for a real greenhouse is not primarily a result of the radiation imbalance caused by the spectral absorptivity of the glass but rather the difference in the convective losses for the glass-enclosed space. The purpose of these comments is to indicate a possible error in Lee's analysis and to show that the radiation greenhouse effect is indeed a result of the spectral properties of the glass. (WDM)

Berry, E.X.

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Effects of Internet-based multiple-site conferences on greenhouse gas emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing consensus that ICT can contribute to the reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, both by increasing the efficiency of existing processes and by enabling substitution effects to usher in more energy efficient patterns ... Keywords: Greenhouse-gas emissions, ICT for energy efficiency, Multiple-site conference, Rebound effect, Substitution effect, Videoconferencing

Vlad C. Coroama; Lorenz M. Hilty; Martin Birtel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effect of infrared transparency on the heat transfer through windows: a clarification of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The various radiative, convective, and conductive components of the net heat transfer are calculated and illustrated for various infrared transparencies of covers such as would be used in architectural, greenhouse, or solar collector windows. It is shown that in the limiting cases of infrared opacity and infrared transparency the relative contributions of the three modes of heat transfer are altered, but all contribute significantly. The radiation shielding arguments pertain to the analogous greenhouse effect in the atmosphere.

Silverstein, S.D.

1976-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roundtable – Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of BiofuelsEnergy Use, and Greenhouse Gases,” Journal of Power SourcesRoundtable – Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels

Kammen, Daniel M; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew D; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions: When the Details Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ?uorinated greenhouse gases. greenhouse gas emissions. Washington,ective e?orts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. C.D. Howe

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Light-Duty CNG and Dual-Fuel Vehicles, EPA/and Driving Cycle Effects on CNG Emissions," Society offrom tests of nine 1992 CNG vans from three manufacturers.

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Implications of the greenhouse effect for the Midwest economy  

SciTech Connect

Although a great deal of research effort has been devoted to determining potential future changes in carbon dioxide concentrations, global temperature changes and ecosystem effects, relatively little attention has thus far been paid to potential regional impacts and the formulation of coherent policies to combat the problems. This paper will discuss how the Midwest might fare under conditions of higher mean temperatures or a major federal control program; it also discusses some of the research and development activities underway at Argonne National Laboratory that could help develop a balanced portfolio of technologies for combating the greenhouse effect. For the purposes of this paper we have defined a six-state region--consisting of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin--to typify the Midwest. These are the same states that comprise Federal Region 5. Temperatures were averaged for the thirty-year period 1950--1980 and do not include some of the higher summer temperatures we have been experiencing in the 1980s. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Streets, D.G.; Bloyd, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Direct radiometric observations of the water vapor greenhouse effect over the equatorial Pacific ocean  

SciTech Connect

Airborne radiometric measurements were used to determine tropospheric profiles of the clear sky greenhouse effect. At sea surface temperatures (SSTs) larger than 300 kelvin, the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect was found to increase with SST at a rate of 13 to 15 watts per square meter per kelvin. Satellite measurements of infrared radiances and SSTs indicate that almost 52 percent of the tropical oceans between 20{degrees}N and 20{degrees}S are affected during all seasons. Current general circulation models suggest that the increase in the clear sky water vapor greenhouse effect with SST may have climatic effects on a planetary scale. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Valero, F.P.J.; Collins, W.D.; Bucholtz, A. [Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Report urges greenhouse action now  

SciTech Connect

A recent report that is a product of a process initiated and monitored by three major international organizations, the United Nations Environmental Program, the World Meteorological Organization, and the International Council of Scientific Unions, brings the greenhouse effect into the public eye. The report estimates rates of temperature increase of the earth due to CO/sub 2/ plus the other greenhouse gases. Estimates of the greenhouse effect arising from unrestrained gas emissions and a highly sensitive climate or strong global restraint of emissions and a low climate sensitivity range from 0.8 to 0.06/sup 0/C per decade. Long term policies that the report recommends should be reexamined are increased efficiency in the consumption of energy and a shift toward alternative energy to reduce CO/sub 2/ emissions and reforestation to remove CO/sub 2/ from the atmosphere.

Kerr, R.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST is producing new suites of primary gas standards for carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide in air at atmospheric levels ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Reliable Muddle: Transportation Scenarios for the 80% Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal for 2050 (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation describing transportation scenarios for meeting the 2050 DOE goal of reducing greenhouse gases by 80%.

Melaina, M.; Webster, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Sensitivity to a Sea Surface Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Considering geographical distributions ...

J. Ph Duvel; F. M. Bréon

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Policy implications of greenhouse warming: Mitigation, adaptation, and the science base  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the policy implications of greenhouse warming by examining three major areas: general summary of information about the greenhouse effect leading to a framework for policy; the science basis for the greenhouse effect; mitigation of greenhouse warming. Each section contains 9-13 chapters on specific subjects including the following: overview of greenhouse gases; policy implications; internations considerations; climate records and models; sea levels; temperature rise estimation; energy management at several levels; nonenergy emission reduction; human populations; deforestation. Conclusions are summarized at the end of each section.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of inexpensive continuous emission monitors for feedback control of combustion devices that minimize greenhouse gases, toxic emissions, and ozone damaging products  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Combustion is the major cause of poor urban air quality, of depletion of the ozone layer, and a major source of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. Careful control of combustor conditions is important for minimizing the effects of combustion on the environment. The authors have developed sensitive, inexpensive continuous emission monitors that will assist in direct feedback of turbine power systems and provide assurance to the public and the operators of the facilities that their facility emissions lie within the accepted bounds. These include a robust solid-state Fourier transform spectrometer for rapid gas analysis, based on the use of ferroelectric liquid crystal technology, and an infrared helium-neon probe for real time measurement of combustor air-to-fuel ratios.

Funk, D.J.; Moore, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Mongia, R.K.; Tomita, E.; Hsu, F.K.; Talbot, L.; Dibble, R.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US); Lovett, J. [Pratt and Whitney (US); Yamazaki, Akira [Tsukuba Univ. (Japan)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Greenhouse's Effect: NETL and Phipps Join Forces to Study Water |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Greenhouse's Effect: NETL and Phipps Join Forces to Study The Greenhouse's Effect: NETL and Phipps Join Forces to Study Water The Greenhouse's Effect: NETL and Phipps Join Forces to Study Water August 15, 2013 - 4:19pm Addthis Photo credit: © Denmarsh Photography, Inc. Photo credit: © Denmarsh Photography, Inc. What does this project do? Interested in more information on sustainable research initiatives? Check out: Phipps' Center for Sustainable Landscapes At first glance, one of the world's greenest greenhouses and an energy lab may seem an unlikely pair, but they share more than their Pittsburgh, Pa., location. The Phipps Conservatory Botanical Gardens and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) also share a concern for water. Phipps showcases lush gardens and dazzling plants as its main attraction,

204

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. Schafer, Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.Marintek, Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships .Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Steps toward a cooler greenhouse  

SciTech Connect

In April a committee of the National Academies of Science and Engineering and the Institute of Medicine urged the Bush Administration and Congress to begin cutting emissions of greenhouse gases immediately. The risk of delay is great, and the cost of insurance against disastrous climate warming is cheap. Now the committee's panel on mitigation has issued a 500-page report describing just how cheap that hedge against a climate calamity could be. The panel found that it would not be unreasonable to expect that a 25% reduction in US greenhouse gas emissions might be achieved at a cost of less than $10 per ton of carbon dioxide or its equivalent in other greenhouse gases. In more familiar terms, that considerable reduction in greenhouse emissions would cost about $4.75 for each barrel of oil burned or $0.11 per gallon of gasoline. The most cost-effective measures for reducing emissions, are increasing the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings and activities, vehicles, and industrial processes that use electricity.

Kerr, R.A.

1991-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electronegative gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined.

Christophorou, L.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Greenhouse effect and global climate change. Hearings before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, November 9 and 10, 1987  

SciTech Connect

A two-day hearing on the environmental implications of build-up of carbon dioxide and trace gases in the atmosphere, commonly referred to as the greenhouse effect, brought testimony from atmospheric scientists and government officials. Testimony was given regarding the growing scientific concern that by the next century, the temperature of the earth's atmosphere may increase to a level unmatched in thousands of years. This temperature change will result in a climate change five to ten times as great as that caused by the last ice age.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Website: www.gtz.de/en/themen/umwelt-infrastruktur/abfall/30026.htm References: GHG Calculator for Waste Management[1] Waste Management - GTZ Website[2] Logo: GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management The necessity to reduce greenhouse gases and thus mitigate climate change is accepted worldwide. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, waste management causes a great part of the national greenhouse gas production, because landfills produce methane which has a particularly strong effect on climate change. Therefore, it is essential to minimize

209

On the Potential Change in Surface Water Vapor Deposition over the Continental United States due to Increases in Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of surface water vapor deposition (WVD) over the continental United States under the present climate and a future climate scenario reflecting the mid-twenty-first-century increased greenhouse gas concentrations were evaluated by ...

Zaitao Pan; Moti Segal; Charles Graves

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured enteric nitrousSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveE, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from animal house

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

No way to cool the ultimate greenhouse  

SciTech Connect

When the Clinton Administration announced its Climate Change Action Plan last week, some press accounts called it an effort to halt greenhouse warming. To greenhouse experts, however, cutting emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the end of the decade -- the goal of the plan -- will only delay the inevitable. Such modest conservation measures, as a recent study shows, will buy humanity valuable time to adapt to the greenhouse world, but they will have little effect on how warm the global climate ultimately becomes. Centuries down the road, humanity will have to come to grips with elevated temperatures due to increased atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels. Reducing emissions will slow the warming process and give humanity more time to adapt.

Kerr, R.A.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts For more information about greenhouse gases, contact: Mark Reichhardt Federal Energy Management Program 202-586-4788 Kimberly Peterson National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

214

Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Resources on Greenhouse Gas October 7, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis Many helpful resources about greenhouse gases (GHG) are available. Also see Contacts. GHG Reporting and Accounting Tools Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report: Lists resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist agencies with completing comprehensive GHG inventory reporting requirements under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514. General Services Administration (GSA) Carbon Footprint and Green Procurement Tool: Voluntary tool developed by GSA to assist agencies in managing GHGs as required by E.O. 13514. Also see Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools.

215

The effect of household consumption patterns on energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: Comparison between Spain and Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of the effect of increasing income on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions… (more)

Cintas Sánchez, Olivia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The role of the tropical super greenhouse effect in heating the ocean surface  

SciTech Connect

Measurements made by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroradiometer operating in the middle infrared (5 to 20 micrometers, with a spectral resolution of one inverse centimeter) imply that there is an anomalously large greenhouse effect over equatorial oceans that is caused by water vapor. As sea-surface temperature increased from 297 to 303 degrees kelvin, the net infrared cooling at the surface decreased by 30 to 50 watts per square meter. Thus, according to the FTIR data, the super greenhouse effect that has been inferred from satellite measurements contributes directly to radiative heating of the sea surface. The data demonstrate that most of this heating occurs in the middle infrared by means of the continuum emission window of water vapor and that tropical deep convection contributes substantially to this super greenhouse effect.

Lubin, D. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

217

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

218

Greenhouse politics  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the politics of the Greenhouse effect environmental issue. The Bush administration is chided for its unclear position as are the conflicting views of those within the Administration, with an example of the apparently conflicting views on the future role of coal from the President's Council on Environmental Quality and the DOE.

Ray, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Experiments on solar absorption using a greenhouse-effect gas in a thermal solar collector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates an augmentation to the thermal solar absorption of solar collectors by introducing a greenhouse gas between the glazing and the absorber part of the solar collector. Experiments are designed and conducted to compare the effect of adding the gas on the efficiency of the collector without that addition. The maximum temperature rise of the absorber

Abdul Hai M. B. Alami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A semi-empirical representation of the temporal variation of total greenhouse gas levels expressed as equivalent levels of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to examine the underlying longer-term trends in greenhouse gases, that are driven for example by anthropogenic emissions or climate change, it is useful to remove the recurring effects of natural cycles and ...

Cunnold, Derek

222

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Effects of Cloud Optical Property Feedbacks on the Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud optical properties, in particular the optical thickness, affect the earth-atmosphere radiation budget, and their potential changes associated with climate changes may induce feedback effect. A one-dimensional radiative-forcing model was ...

Gyula Molnar; Wei-Chyung Wang

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Runaway Greenhouse Effect in a Semigray Radiative–Convective Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the nongray absorption (i.e., atmospheric opacity varying with wavelength) on the possible upper bound of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) emitted by a planetary atmosphere have been examined. This analysis is based on the ...

T. Pujol; G. R. North

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Physics of Greenhouse Effect and Convection in Warm Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) in roughly 50% of the tropical Pacific Ocean is warm enough (SST > 300 K) to permit deep convection. This paper examines the effects of deep convection on the climatological mean vertical distributions of water vapor ...

A. K. Inamdar; V. Ramanathan

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGROECOSYSTEMS: SIMULATING MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON DAIRY FARM EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How does agriculture contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and what farm management scenarios decrease net emissions from agroecosystems? The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is… (more)

Sedorovich, Dawn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

CO/sub 2/ greenhouse effect and the thermal history of the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The absorption spectrum of CO/sub 2/ for a wide range of atmospheric concentrations has been computed in an attempt to study the effects of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations (which are currently increasing at a rate of 1 ppM/year) on terrestrial temperature and to contribute to the understanding of the CO/sub 2/ greenhouse effect on Venus. The atmospheric absorption of thick CO/sub 2/ layers was determined in order to understand the thermal stability on the earth's surface in spite of atmospheric composition changes (the mean chemical composition changed from CO/sub 2/ to O/sub 2/ to N/sub 2/ in the last 0.75 billion years). The calculated greenhouse effect was then combined with other long-term phenomena which influenced the temperature. It was estimated that the surface temperature increase did not reach the boiling point of water for CO/sub 2/ concentrations that were thousands of times larger than the present concentrations, however, higher energy CO/sub 2/ bands and/or an increase in atmospheric H/sub 2/O may have changed the greenhouse effect.

Marx, G. (Eotvos Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Budapest, Hungary); Miskolci, F. (Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Budapest, Hungary)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

230

Influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on the seasonal variation of precipitable water and greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

By using satellite observations and European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses, we study the seasonal variations of the precipitable water and the greenhouse effect, defined as the normalized difference between the longwave flux emitted at the surface and that emergent at the top of the atmosphere. Results show a strong systematic influence of the vertical structure of the atmosphere on geographical and seasonal variations of both precipitable water and greenhouse effect. Over ocean, in middle and high latitudes, the seasonal variation of the mean temperature lapse rate in the troposphere leads to large seasonal phase lags between greenhouse effect and precipitable water. By contrast, the seasonal variation of the clear-sky greenhouse effect over tropical oceans is mainly driven by the total atmospheric transmittance and thus by precipitable water variations. Over land, the seasonal variations of the tropospheric lapse rate acts to amplify the radiative impact of water vapor changes, giving a strong seasonal variation of the greenhouse effect. Over tropical land regions, monsoon activity generates a seasonal phase lag between surface temperature and relative humidity variations that gives a seasonal lag of about 2 months between the surface temperature and the clear-sky greenhouse effect. Generally, the cloudiness amplifies clear-sky tendencies. Finally, as an illustration, obtained results are used to evaluate the general circulation model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique.

Bony, S.; Duvel, J.P. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris (France)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Relative influence of lapse rate and water vapor on the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Observational data are employed in a radiative transfer model to simulate the mean variation in normalized greenhouse effect (NGE) between January and July. This is performed at a variety of locations, and the mean local rate of change in NGE with surface temperature is determined. The result is 1.5 times larger than the variation of NGE with surface temperature obtained by spatially correlating the aggregated data. This disagreement is ascribed to systematic differences between the two approaches and is interpreted as indicating the significant role that large-scale circulations as well as surface temperatures have on determining local thermal and humidity structures. The separate effects of water vapor and lapse rate variations are estimated, by simulating the January-July changes in NGE with each process in turn held constant: beyond the tropics the lapse rate feedback is found to dominate over the water vapor feedback, particularly over land; in the inter-tropics, lapse rate variations account for about a third of the change in greenhouse trapping, contributing substantially to the `super-greenhouse effect.` Utilizing a radiative-convective model, the possible effects on climate change of both lapse rate changes and water vapor feedback are compared: a global mean model cliamte is perturbed by a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide and equilibrium surface temperatures obtained for a variety of lapse rates. If, under conditions of climate change, the global mean lapse rate varies with surface temperature in the same manner as in the present-day mean seasonal cycle (increasing the lapse rate magnitude by 6%), then the lapse rate feedback amplifies the modeled water vapor feedback by 40%; conversely, a 12% reduction in the magnitude of the lapse rate completely nullifies the water vapor feedback.

Sinha, A. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change and its mitigation is rapidly becoming an item of social concern. Climate change mitigation involves reduction of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations through emissions reduction and or sequestration enhancement (collectively called offsets). Many have asked how agriculture and forestry can participate in mitigation efforts. Given that over 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions arise from the energy sector, the role of agriculture and forestry depends critically on the costs of the offsets they can achieve in comparison with offset costs elsewhere in the economy. A number of researchers have examined the relative offset costs but have generally looked only at producer level costs. However there are also costs incurred when implementing, selling and conveying offset credits to a buyer. Also when commodities are involved like bioenergy feedstocks, the costs of readying these for use in implementing an offset strategy need to be reflected. This generally involves the broadly defined category of transaction costs. This dissertation examines the possible effects of transactions costs and storage costs for bioenergy commodities and how they affect the agriculture and forestry portfolio of mitigation strategies across a range of carbon dioxide equivalent prices. The model is used to simulate the effects with and without transactions and storage costs. Using an agriculture and forestry sector model called FASOMGHG, the dissertation finds that consideration of transactions and storage costs reduces the agricultural contribution total mitigation and changes the desirable portfolio of alternatives. In terms of the portfolio, transactions costs inclusion diminishes the desirability of soil sequestration and forest management while increasing the bioenergy and afforestation role. Storage costs diminish the bioenergy role and favor forest and sequestration items. The results of this study illustrate that transactions and storage costs are important considerations in policy and market design when addressing the reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in climate change related decision making.

Kim, Seong Woo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB/sup SM/, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. The process has been described in detail. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. The original thrust of this process is to produce a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. In this regard, we believe this process is unique; no other process can make this claim. We are convinced that the HYDROCARB Process would be of substantial benefit, economically as well as environmentally, let alone psychologically, to the coal and fossil fuel industry. 12 refs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.A. Angers. 2005. Greenhouse gas contributions ofchange and the impact on greenhouse gas exchange in northprimary productivity and greenhouse gas emissions in annual

Ryals, Rebecca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

238

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Can we delay a greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

The author comments on the EPA report dated September 1983 Can We Delay A Greenhouse Warming. He takes exception to the widely-held interpretation that the answer is not much. The contribution of other greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide to the EPA scenarios is pointed out, and the lack of understanding of their role is emphasised. (ACR)

Perry, A.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: might they be connected  

SciTech Connect

Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {+-} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming.

Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M. (Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A7)

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Greenhouse Gases - Part 2 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Soy diesel vehicles: range, fuel storage, and energy use. Soydiesel has been added as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles. ... (Motor Vehicle Manufacturer's Association, ...

242

Greenhouse Gases Part 1 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coproducts of the corn-to-ethanol conversion process: conceptual background 37. ... and change the process fuel to 50% natural gas and 50% corn stover, ...

243

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with an overlying pie chart Government GHG Inventories Review comprehensive GHG inventory and performance data. Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory...

244

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Emissions Profile to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting

246

Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

Kulprathipanja, S.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

Seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect: The role of changes in atmospheric temperatures and humidities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the factors which control the seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect, based on satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations. The satellite observations include the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the total column moisture content derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The simulations were performed with the SAMSON system described in an earlier paper, using atmospheric temperatures and humidities from operational analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. At low latitudes, the magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is dominated by the strong thermodynamic link between the total column moisture content of the atmosphere and sea surface temperatures, with minimal seasonal variations. In contrast, at middle to high latitudes there are strong seasonal variations, the clear-sky greenhouse effect being largest in winter and smallest in summer. These variations cannot be explained by the seasonal cycle in the total column moisture content, as this is largest in summer and smallest in winter. The variations are controlled instead by the seasonal changes in atmospheric temperatures. The colder atmosphere in winter enhances the temperature differential between the atmosphere and the sea surface, leading to a larger greenhouse effect despite the lower moisture contents. The magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is thus controlled by atmospheric humidity at low latitudes, but by atmospheric temperature at middle and high latitudes. These controls are illustrated by results from sensitivity experiments with SAMSON and are interpreted in terms of a simple model.

Webb, M.J.; Slingo, A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stephens, G.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation as a Structural Change and Policies that Offset Its Depressing Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current economic modeling of emissions limitations does not embody economic features that are likely to be particularly important in the short term, yet the politics of limiting greenhouse gas emissions are often ...

Babiker, Mustafa H.M.

249

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are performed in order to investigate the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on fluid recovery and matrix depletion in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The model used is that of a well producing at a constant bottomhole pressure from a two-phase fractured reservoir. The results obtained have received a complex fracture-matrix interaction due to the thermodynamics of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Although the matrix initially contributes fluids (liquid and gas) to the fractures, later on, the flow directions reverse and the fractures backflow fluids into the matrix. The amount of backflow depends primarily upon the flowing gas saturation in the fractures; the lower the flowing gas saturation in the fractures the more backflow. It is shown that the recoverable fluid reserves depend strongly on the amount of CO/sub 2/ present in the reservoir system.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Gaulke, S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Global sea level rise and the greenhouse effect: Might they be connected  

SciTech Connect

Secular sea level trends extracted from tide gauge records of appropriately long duration demonstrate that global sea level may be rising at a rate in excess of 1 millimeter per year. However, because global coverage of the oceans by the tide gauge network is highly nonuniform and the tide gauge data reveal considerable spatial variability, there has been a well-founded reluctance to interpret the observed secular sea level rise as representing a signal of global scale that might be related to the greenhouse effect. When the tide gauge data are filtered so as to remove the contribution of ongoing glacial isostatic adjustement to the local sea level trend at each location, then the individual tide gauge records reveal sharply reduced geographic scatter and suggest that there is a globally coherent signal of strength 2.4 {plus minus} 0.90 millimeters per year that is active in the system. This signal could constitute an indication of global climate warming. 15 refs., 8 figs.

Peltier, W.R.; Tushingham, A.M. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1989-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................................................20 3 Transportation biofuels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Emissions Offsets: The Key Role of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets in a U.S. Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For U.S. industries with operations that emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), climate policy is no longer a distant possibility it is being planned and, in some cases, implemented today. While debate on a federal GHG trade program continues in Congress, CO2 emission reduction requirements have been put in effect in Northeastern States (i.e., the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative RGGI), are being developed in California (to implement the state's "Global Warming Solutions Act" AB32), and are being designed in th...

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Retrospective on CDIAC's Activities in U.S.-China Research on the Greenhouse Effect  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center under a joint research program on the greenhouse effect conducted by the US and the People's Republic of China. The focus is on efforts in the areas of computing systems; data quality assurance, documentation, and publication; data analysis; data exchange and distribution; project summary and bibliography publication; and visitor exchange.

Boden, T.A.; Cushman, R.M.; Farrell, M.P.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Kanciruk, P.; Mitchell, E.E.; Nelson, T.R.; Sepanski, R.J.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

The potential of U.S. cropland to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The book describes the greenhouse processes and global trends in emissions as well as the three principal components of anthropogenic global warming potential; presents data on US emissions and agriculture`s related role; examines the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in soils of the US and its loss due to cultivation; provides a reference for the magnitude of carbon sequestration potential; analyzes the primary processes governing greenhouse gas emission from the pedosphere; establishes a link between SOC content and soil quality; and outlines strategies for mitigating emissions from US cropland.

Lal, R.; Kimble, J.M.; Follett, R.F.; Cole, C.V. [eds.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 1994 Volume 2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides information on greenhouse gases GHGs) as required by Section 503 a(4) and b(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT).

Fred Mayes

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

New PANDA Tests to Investigate Effects of Light Gases on Passive Safety Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large- scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland), has been used over the last few years for investigating different passive decay- heat removal systems and containment phenomena for the next generation of light water reactors (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: SBWR; European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: ESBWR; Siedewasserreaktor: SWR-1000). Currently, as part of the European Commission 5. EURATOM Framework Programme project 'Testing and Enhanced Modelling of Passive Evolutionary Systems Technology for Containment Cooling' (TEMPEST), a new series of tests is being planned in the PANDA facility to experimentally investigate the distribution of non-condensable gases inside the containment and their effect on the performance of the 'Passive Containment Cooling System' (PCCS). Hydrogen release caused by the metal-water reaction in the case of a postulated severe accident will be simulated in PANDA by injecting helium into the reactor pressure vessel. In order to provide suitable data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code assessment and improvement, the instrumentation in PANDA has been upgraded for the new tests. In the present paper, a detailed discussion is given of the new PANDA tests to be performed to investigate the effects of light gas on passive safety systems. The tests are scheduled for the first half of the year 2002. (authors)

Paladino, D.; Auban, O.; Candreia, P.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Greenhouse gases andGreenhouse gases and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CO22 removal on power plantremoval on power plant thermal efficiency and emissionsthermal efficiency controlemissions control for fossil fuel - fired power plantsfor fossil fuel - fired power plants Process type CO22 UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 COCO22 emissions andemissions and thermal process efficiencythermal

Zevenhoven, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

The greenhouse effect: Chicken Little and our response to global warming  

SciTech Connect

In this article the author suggests that global warming studies are ambiguous and have generated a chicken little response in the public and in policymakers. Uncertainties in studies of ocean warming and ozone depletion are discussed as well as the role of other trace gases such as methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrogen oxides.

Michaels, P.J.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Confounding effects of aqueous-phase impinger chemistry on apparent oxidation of mercury in flue gases  

SciTech Connect

Gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and chlorine are a possible pathway to producing oxidized mercury species such as mercuric chloride in combustion systems. This study examines the effect of the chemistry of a commonly used sample conditioning system on apparent and actual levels of mercury oxidation in a methane-fired, 0.3 kW, quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, NOx, SO{sub 2}) and quench rate were varied. The sample conditioning system included two impingers in parallel: one containing an aqueous solution of KCl to trap HgCl{sub 2}, and one containing an aqueous solution of SnCl{sub 2} to reduce HgCl{sub 2} to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}). Gas-phase concentrations of Cl{sub 2} as low as 1.5 ppmv were sufficient to oxidize a significant fraction of the elemental mercury in the KCl impinger via the hypochlorite ion. Furthermore, these low, but interfering levels of Cl{sub 2} appeared to persist in flue gases from several doped rapidly mixed flames with varied post flame temperature quench rates. The addition of 0.5 wt% sodium thiosulfate to the KCl solution completely prevented the oxidation from occurring in the impinger. The addition of thiosulfate did not inhibit the KCl impinger's ability to capture HgCl{sub 2}. The effectiveness of the thiosulfate was unchanged by NO or SO{sub 2}. These results bring into question laboratory scale experimental data on mercury oxidation where wet chemistry was used to partition metallic and oxidized mercury without the presence of sufficient levels of SO{sub 2}. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; Joann S. Lighty; Jost O.L. Wendt; Andrew Fry; Constance L. Senior [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

title Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and

265

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

266

Separating the Dynamical Effects of Climate Change and Ozone Depletion. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separate effects of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on forcing circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere extratropical troposphere are investigated using a version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (...

Charles McLandress; Theodore G. Shepherd; John F. Scinocca; David A. Plummer; Michael Sigmond; Andreas I. Jonsson; M. Catherine Reader

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climate Change Effects on Hydropower Potential in the Alcantara River Basin in Sicily (Italy)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to hydropower generation, since it is a renewable, efficient, and reliable source of energy, as well as an effective tool to reduce the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases resulting ...

G. T. Aronica; B. Bonaccorso

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Climate change effects on hydropower potential in the Alcantara river basin in Sicily (Italy)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years an increasing attention has been paid to hydropower generation, since it is a renewable, efficient, and reliable source of energy, as well as an effective tool to reduce the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases resulting ...

G. T. Aronica; B. Bonaccorso

269

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on Climate—Heating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Model Simulations of the Competing Climatic Effects of SO2 and CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide-derived cloud condensation nuclei are expected to enhance the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the planet. This effect might counteract the global warming expected from enhanced greenhouse gases. A detailed treatment of the ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Ming-Dah Chou

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Life cycles on earth complicate climate research studies of trace gases  

SciTech Connect

The Exchange of Trace Gases between Atmosphere and Biosphere was the theme of the 57th workshop held by the Dahlem Conferences of the Stifterverband fuer die Deutsche Wissenschaft (Donors Association for the Promotion of Arts and Sciences in Germany), in which the experts focused their attention on the trace gases methane (CH{sub 4}) and the nitrous oxides (N{sub 2}O, NO, NO{sub 2}). Although these substances only exist in minute quantities in comparison to carbon dioxide, they contribute just as much to the greenhouse effect.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Greenhouse gas emissions related to ethanol produced from corn  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report confers the details of a panel meeting discussion on greenhouse gases. The topic of this discussion was ethanol. Members discussed all aspects of growing corn and producing ethanol. Then the question was raised as to whether or not this is a suitable substitute to fossil fuel usage in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Marland, G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Executive overview of World Wildlife's conference on consequences of the greenhouse effect for biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

World Wildlife Fund organized the first Conference on Consequences of the Greenhouse Effect for Biological Diversity, which was held October 4--6, 1988 at the National Zoological Park in Washington, DC. This meeting was the first to focus on how conservation of natural ecosystems would be effected by global warming. Prior to this meeting there existed no aggregated body of information about possible ecological effects, and very few scientists were doing relevant research or interpreting existing data in terms of climate change. Because effects had not been identified, biological diversity was largely overlooked in conferences and reports on global warming. Therefore, this conference had the groundbreaking role of pulling together existing information, stimulating scientists whose work could be relevant into focusing their efforts on global warming, drawing general conclusions about conservation consequences, and communicating these conclusions to the scientific, policy, funding, and management communities. 18 refs.

Peters, R.L. (World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1992  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

276

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

277

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

CO{sub 2} allowance allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the effect on electricity investors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an effort by nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states to develop a regional, mandatory, market-based cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector. The initiative is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the RGGI region and beyond. The implications of these changes for the value of electricity-generating assets and the market value of the firms that own them depends on the initial allocation of carbon dioxide allowances, the composition of generating assets owned by the firm, and the locations of those assets. Changes in asset values inside the RGGI region may be positive or negative, whereas changes outside of the RGGI region are almost always positive but nonetheless vary greatly. Viewing changes at the firm level aggregates and moderates both positive and negative effects on market value compared with what would be observed by looking at changes at individual facilities. Nonetheless, a particular firm's portfolio of assets is unlikely to reflect the overall composition of assets in the industry as a whole, and some firms are likely to do substantially better or worse than the industry average. 16 refs., 4 figs.

Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmerook

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

280

Castlevalley Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Castlevalley Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Castlevalley Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Castlevalley Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Castlevalley Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Newcastle, Utah Coordinates 37.6666413°, -113.549406° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

enhancing greenhouse gas "sinks," such as forests). The report identifies strategies that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enhancing greenhouse gas "sinks," such as forests). The report identifies strategies that appear-term. Setting a Greenhouse Gas Budget Many important efforts to limit green- house gases are underway by state and natural ecosys- tems around the world. The largest overall source of greenhouse gas emissions

282

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact to the final greenhouse gas balance. One experimental site (involving a maize-wheat-barley-mustard rotation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada Paul Steenhof a,*, Clarence committed to reducing its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012 annual reduction of greenhouse gases of 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012. The transportation

284

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

285

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

286

Greenhouse gas emission impacts of electric vehicles under varying driving cycles in various countries and US cities  

SciTech Connect

Past studies have shown that use of electric vehicles (EVs) can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, relative to emissions from gasoline-fueled internal-combustion-engine vehicles. However, those studies have not considered all aspects that determine greenhouse gas emissions from both gasoline vehicles (GVs) and EVs. Aspects often overlooked include variations in vehicle trip characteristics, inclusion of all greenhouse gases, and vehicle total fuel cycle. In this paper, the authors estimate greenhouse gas emission reductions for EVs, including these important aspects. They select four US cities (Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.) and six countries (Australia, France, Japan, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the US) and analyze greenhouse emission impacts of EVs in each city or country. These selected cities and countries have distinct differences in electric power-plant fuel mixes. They also select six driving cycles developed around the world. They choose one specific driving cycle for a given city or country and estimate the energy consumption of four-passenger compact electric and gasoline cars in the given city or country. Thus, the city- or country-specific vehicle energy consumption estimates reflect effects of both vehicle driving cycles and electric power-plant mixes. Finally, they estimate total fuel cycle greenhouse gas emissions of both GVs and EVs by accounting for emissions from primary energy recovery, transportation, and processing; energy product transportation; and power-plant and vehicle operations. They estimate that relative to GVs, EVs reduce greenhouse gas emissions in all selected US cities and countries.

Wang, M.Q.; Marr, W.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

New greenhouse report puts down dissenters  

SciTech Connect

Recent media coverage has given the impression that scientists can't agree among themselves whether the buildup of greenhouse gases is going to scorch the globe or merely leave it imperceptibly warmed. But a soon-to-be-published report, the most broadly based assessment of the greenhouse threat conducted to data, presents a very different impression: There's virtual unanimity among greenhouse experts that a warming is on the way and that the consequences will be serious. The report, produced by a working group of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), will be the basis for discussions at a major international meeting in October that is intended to provide governments with options for responding to greenhouse warming. Some researchers argue that there has been no clear sign of global warming in the past century, even though carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have been accumulating in the atmosphere at an accelerating rate. Their conclusion: computer climate models are probably greatly exaggerating the warming predicted for the next century.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

The U.S. Department of Energy and the People's Republic of China' Academy of Sciences Joint Research on the Greenhouse Effect: 1985–1991 Research Progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and the People's Republic of China's Academy of Sciences signed an agreement on 19 August 1987 to carry out a joint research program on the study of global warming due to enhanced greenhouse effect. The joint study ...

M. R. Riches; Zhao Jianping; W-C. Wang; Tao Shiyan

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Technology-Based Handling of Science Misconceptions: The GeoDist Tool on the Distinction of Greenhouse Effect and Ozone Depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The didactic utilization of the conceptual obstacles constitutes an alternative approach for the design of learning situations in science education, in order to produce a conceptual change and overcome them. Adopting this positive perspective, a relative ... Keywords: conceptual obstacles, GeoDist (Greenhouse Effect and Ozone Depletion Dis-tinction), Science Misconceptions

Sofia J. Hadjileontiadou; Theoxaris Vasilakoglou

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases catalog of databases and reports  

SciTech Connect

Data products and reports made available by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provide coverage in a number of areas relevant to the greenhouse effect and global climate change. Such areas include records of the concentration of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. Currently, in its eighth revision, this catalog provides information about the data products and reports available through CDIAC.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin [Toyo Gakuen Univ. Chiba (Japan)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With Climate Change legislation on the horizon, the need to integrate energy reduction initiatives with greenhouse gas reduction efforts is critical to manufactures competitiveness and financial strength going forward. MPC has developed an integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System that allows companies to reduce energy and carbon intensity at the same time all the while bolstering bottom line performance. Reducing energy use and greenhouse gases is not an option but a necessity today. All manufacturing companies need to develop in-house capabilities to manage these important resources or pay the price of high carbon taxes and/or face a depletion in operating margins. MPC will present a case history highlighting the steps taken, the results obtained and the lessons learned in developing an integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System with a major industrial manufacturing company in the Midwest. Key subject areas covered include: Integration of Climate Change and Energy Management Strategies- a winning approach to meet the challenge; Turn a potential cost of compliance into a new cash flow source; Leveraging Energy Management Systems to optimize savings; Navigating through the new Greenhouse Gas reporting requirements; Utilizing Plant and Corporate Energy Management Dashboards to Control Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas emissions.

Spates, C. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

299

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Table-Figure Notes and Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A1. Notes and Sources A1. Notes and Sources Tables Chapter 1: Greenhouse gas emissions overview Table 1. U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Global warming potentials: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Errata (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008), website http://ipcc-wg1.ucar.edu/wg1/Report/AR4WG1_Errata_2008-12-01.pdf. Table 2. U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the

300

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

"GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" "(From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP" ,,,"TAR1","AR42" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2","CO2",1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4","CH4",23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O","N2O",296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)",15,"CHF3",12000,14800 "HFC-32 (difluoromethane)",16,"CH2F2",550,675 "HFC-41 (monofluoromethane)",43,"CH3F",97,92 "HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane)",17,"CHF2CF3",3400,3500

302

Climate missing links: Aqueous greenhouse species in clouds, fogs and aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been considerable interest regarding possible greenhouse effects due to combustion and energy-related pollution. This concern has been due to the release and secondary production of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, freons, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. These gases can absorb infrared radiation as it comes back from the heated ground and therefore effectively trap the infrared radiation in the troposphere, leading to climatic change. Beyond these gases, clouds, aerosols, and fogs may also play important roles in affecting, the radiation balance by scattering incoming radiation. This work describes the measurement of water soluble infrared absorbers that are known to be derived from pollution. Polluted precipitation is likely to be an important contributor to radiation balance that is currently being neglected. Pollutants characterized include sulfate, nitrate, formate, acetate, oxalate, phenol, p-nitrophenol, ammonium, carbonate, bicarbonate, formaldehyde (dihydroxy methane), methanol, and ethanol. Band positions and band strengths have been determined. These species show measurable infrared absorption bands in the atmospheric window regions (i.e., 900--1600 cm{sup {minus}1}). These data are discussed with regard to the reported discrepancies in the radiatively important water infrared absorption region commonly referred to as the ``foreign broadened continuum.``

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Cunningham, M.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar greenhouse training project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To train twenty teams, each from a different region, to organize and run workshops to build inexpensive, practical solar greenhouses. (2) To help create working solar greenhouse experts in the field available to respond to their community's needs. (3) To establish a national model program for solar greenhouse construction workshops. (4) To determine whether the barn-raising style used in the greenhouse construction workshops could be taught in the format of a 3 1/2 day seminar with a follow-up workshop. (5) To determine whether the audio-visual exhibit and printed materials used in the seminar were effective. (MOW)

Davis, L.; Kensil, D.; Lazar, B.; Yanda, B.; Yanda, S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

THE POTENTIAL OF RECLAIMED LANDS TO SEQUESTER CARBON AND MITIGATE THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

SciTech Connect

Reclaimed mine lands have the potential to sequester carbon. The use of amendments to increase fertility and overall soil quality is encouraging. Waste amendments such as sewage sludge and clarifier sludge, as well as commercial compost were tested to determine their effects on carbon sequestration and humic acid formation in reclaimed mine lands. Sewage sludge and clarifier sludge have the potential to work as reclaimed mine lands amendments. C:N ratios need to be understood to determine probability of nutrient leaching and water contamination. Microbial activity on the humic acid fraction of sludge is directed toward the readily degradable constituents containing single chain functional groups. This finding indicate that amendments with lower molecular constituents such as aliphatic compounds are more amenable to microbial degradation, therefore serves as better nutrient sources to enhance the formation of vegetation in mine lands and leads to more efficient carbon sequestration.

Terry Brown; Song Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Idaho National Laboratory's FY11 Greenhouse Gas Report  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

Kimberly Frerichs

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Idaho National Laboratory FY12 Greenhouse Gas Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

Kimberly Frerichs

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform  

SciTech Connect

Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nonlinear Aspects of the Climate Response to Greenhouse Gas and Aerosol Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a series of equilibrium experiments the climate response to present-day radiative forcings of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and aerosol particles is calculated. The study was performed with a model system consisting of the ECHAM4 atmospheric ...

Johann Feichter; Erich Roeckner; Ulrike Lohmann; Beate Liepert

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling & learning from the design recommendations for California's Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change has become a Major issue beginning with our generation. Governments the world over are now recognizing that industry cannot continue to pollute in a business-as-usual manner. Emitting Greenhouse gases has a ...

Fernandes, Chester, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered include basic studies of gaseous dielectrics, direct current breakdown strengths of gases/mixtures, environmental effects studies and decomposition analyses, impulse studies, breakdown strengths of binary mixtures with concentric cylinder geometry, and a discussion of the experimental apparatus. (GHT)

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effect of non condensable gases on the performance of geothermal steam power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influencce of dissolved carbon dioxide on the thermodynamic performance of geothermal steam systems is analyzed. The system is divided into its main component: the flash tank, the turbine, the condenser and the gas extraction system, and the effect of non condensables is studied for each. The effect of the noncondensable gas on the output of the whole system is deduced from its effect on the individual components. The analysis of actual systems is preceded by an analysis of an ideal system. The optimum condenser pressure for actual systems is obtained for different gas extraction system efficiencies. Economic considerations, however, are only qualitatively addressed.

Khalifa, H.E.; Michaelides, E.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry.lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have been possible. In particular we would like to thank Erin Beddingfield, Keith Forbes, Kristin Igusky, Makely Lyon, Michael Mondshine, and Richard Richards. We also wish to acknowledge the

314

Peru`s national greenhouse gas inventory, 1990. Peru climate change country study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study has been to determine the Inventory and to propose greenhouse gases mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting, improving in this way the Peruvian standard of life. The main objective of this executive summary is to show concisely the results of the National Inventory about greenhouse gases emitted by Peru in 1990.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Review: Effect of ventilator configuration on the distributed climate of greenhouses: A review of experimental and CFD studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation processes inside the greenhouse strongly affect air renewal and internal climatic conditions, which themselves interact with the growth and homogeneity of the crop. Natural ventilation is often chosen since it is the most economic method ... Keywords: Buoyancy, Climate models, Convection, Navier-Stokes equations, Ventilation efficiency

Pierre-Emmanuel Bournet; Thierry Boulard

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy policy in the greenhouse  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the problems of global warming. The authors start with an analysis of the driving forces of the greenhouse effect and develop a budget for future carbon dioxide releases to meet specified limits on the risks of human-induced climate change. They also provide guidelines for the formulation of an international convention on climate stabilization and sustainable development.

Krause, F.; Koomey, J.; Bach, W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

(Limiting the greenhouse effect)  

SciTech Connect

The Dahlem Conference on controlling CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere focused on research needs broadly defined. The RD D needs discussed tended to be social-institutional rather than technically oriented perhaps because of the propensity of most attendees, but many important ideas emerged, including those related to questions on technology adoption by both developed, emerging, or transition economics. The European attendees appeared to be strongly devoted to reducing emissions, and doing it soon using efficiency improvement and ultimately renewables. The importance of efficiency improvement was universally accepted, but the extent to which it can be relied upon is a major uncertainty for everyone except the most zealous. There was no detailed discussion of what could be done to encourage the more rapid adoption of renewables. Most attendees seemed to have discounted nuclear, but, at any rate, the problems of reviving nuclear worldwide were not discussed in detail.

Fulkerson, W.

1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Comprehensive Model for Evaluation of Carbon Footprint and Greenhouse Gages Emission in Household Biogas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on Life Cycle Assessment and other related methods, this paper introduced a comprehensive model for the evaluation of the carbon footprint and greenhouse gases emission in household biogas plants including nearly all the processes of the household ... Keywords: Biogas Plant, Carbon Footprint, Life Cycle, Greenhouse Gas

Jie Zhou; Shubiao Wu; Wanqin Zhang; Changle Pang; Baozhi Wang; Renjie Dong; Li Chen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

320

Please cite this article in press as: Preisig, M., Prvost, J.H., Coupled multi-phase thermo-poromechanical effects. Case study: CO2 injection at In Salah, Algeria. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2010.12.006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-poromechanical effects. Case study: CO2 injection at In Salah, Algeria. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10 of Greenhouse Gas Control xxx (2011) xxx­xxx Contents lists available at ScienceDirect International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Coupled multi-phase thermo

Prevost, Jean-Herve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Urban Forestry Carbon Sequestration Workbook Version 9.0. Recycling, Source Reduction and Composting Workbook Version 9.0. Both workbooks were last updated April 24 ...

322

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

fossil fuels also resulted in carbon sequestration equal to 300.9 MMTCO 2e in 2005, a 3.3-percent decrease from the 2004 level of 311.1 MMTCO 2e. The major fossil fuel

323

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration from Urban Trees, Yard Trimmings, and Food Scraps, 1990, 1995, and 2000-2005. . . . . 40 Energy Information Administration / Emissions of ...

324

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... your emissions inventory must meet the minimum quality requirement (quantity-weighted average quality rating of at least 3.0). Additionally ...

325

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

produced from biomass (plant) feedstocks, used primarily for transportation. Biogas: The gas produced from the anaerobic decomposition of organic material in a landfill....

326

Greenhouse Gases - Part 4 - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uncontrolled emissions from utility boilers. I have updated the factors for uncontrolled emissions from coal and fuel-oil utility boilers (Table D.4) ...

327

Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The team incorporates requirements for energy efficiency and...

328

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 - 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A diminishing portion of municipal solid waste is landfilled each year as recycling and composting programs expand (Figure 6). Also, ...

329

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Sequestration,of its energy since the Industrial Revolution from fossilenergy requirements for adding capture to traditional fossil-

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases 1997 - 1. Voluntary ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... an availability improvement project at a nuclear power plant typically involves the adoption of new maintenance ... systems; and ... forest management ...

331

Fischer-Tropsch Liquids from Greenhouse Gases: A Novel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All are ready-to-use feeds for SOFCs and syngas is a valuable precursor for the Fischer-Tropsch process. The concept uses inexpensive catalysts (a metal or its ...

332

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

activities by all UNFCCC members * Establish the Technology Mechanism to assist developing countries with identification, transfer, and application of appropriate...

333

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What's New  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This tool guides entities through a series of simple ... California Climate Action Registry ... (If your entity participates in the Environmental Protection ...

334

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Abstract This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies...

335

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

stationary combustion—primarily from wood com-bustion for residential heating—increased. • Emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2O) increased by 0.4 MMTCO 2e (0.1 ...

336

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for 1990 through 2001 and Reporting Year reports for 1991 through 2002. Use Emission Inventory factors to estimate indirect emissions from the consumption of purchased...

337

EIA's "Enhanced" Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases (1605b ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The President made the following directives to the Department of Energy: •Directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, ...

338

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Revolution from fossil fuels, which are the mainprojections are that fossil fuels will remain the dominantdisadvantage relative to fossil fuels which provide over 80%

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA and NHTSA Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.epa.govoms...

340

EIA - Voluntary Reporting of the Greenhouse Gases 2004 - 6. HFCs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The reductions were accomplished, respectively, by replacing SF 6 with helium in test procedures ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past emissions. Sober projections suggest energy consumption2 in the atmosphere, and projections are that fossil fuelsprimary energy supply with projections of growth to 13% by

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future DOE projects Data center acceleration campaign DOE is planning a 2.5 million strategic energy efficiency plan for its information technology infrastructure. The plan...

343

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

immediately. Please see the Getting Started page for further instructions. Please feel free to contact the Communications Center at InfoGHG@eia.gov or toll-free at 1-800-803-5182...

344

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Under Constructi...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

us via e-mail, phone, fax, or U.S. mail: E-Mail: InfoGHG@eia.doe.gov Phone: Toll-Free: 800-803-5182 Local: 202-586-0688 Fax: 202-586-3045 U.S. Mail: Voluntary Reporting of...

345

Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Permian­Triassic boundary in the continental realm of the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa, Palaeoworld­Triassic boundary in the continental realm of the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa Louise Coneya,, W. Uwe Reimolda Province) in the southern Karoo Basin, South Africa, have been undertaken to provide further input

Svensen, Henrik

346

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect including estimates for reduced CO/sub 2/ emissions technologies  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. The option concerns a ''hydrogen economy'' based on coal. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. This process produces a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and either mainly or only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Should the greenhouse effect be found to be a myth in the future, the carbon would be taken out of storage and utilized as a clean fuel, the impurities having been previously removed. This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. Total capital cost estimates have been made to replace all conventional coal burning power plants in the US with technologies that eliminate emissions of CO/sub 2/. These include removal, recovery and disposal of CO/sub 2/, nuclear, solar, photovoltaics, biomass, and HYDROCARB. 12 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Suppressant: Inert Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Influencing the Reported Extinguishing Concentrations of Inert Gases.. ... for the Protection of Machinery Spaces and Gas Turbine Enclosures in ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Quantum Coulomb Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures on Quantum Coulomb gases delivered at the CIME summer school on Quantum Many Body Systems 2010

Jan Philip Solovej

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Humidity fluctuations in solar greenhouse-residences  

SciTech Connect

The thermal performance of solar greenhouse-residences is well-documented. Data concerning temperature fluctuations and horticultural yield are obtainable and provide a clear picture of greenhouse-residence temperature extremes. However, both human comfort and plant growing environment are not dependent upon temperature alone. Air movement, radiation, and humidity are other criteria that can influence thermal comfort and growing conditions. The effect a vegetable peoducing greenhouse has on thermal comfort of an adjoining residence is illustrated in terms of temperature and humidity. An analysis of dewpoint conditions will further indicate the effect of moisture within the individual components. A solar greenhouse-residence with an integrated heating collection and distribution system exhibited higher internal humidities than conventional housing. The greenhouse exhibited greater diurnal swings than the adjoining residence. Transfer of moisture occurred from greenhouse to residence and caused infrequent dewpoint levels in the house. An analysis of two such buildings indicated a higher average relative humidity in the solar greenhouse-residence over conventional housing in the southeast.

Davis, M.A. (Clemson Univ., SC); Harrison, R.E.; Godbey, L.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Stationary Combustion Guidance[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for stationary combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

353

Examining the relationships between land cover and greenhouse gas concentrations using remote-sensing data in East Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of land-cover changes suggest that such shifts may alter atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases GHGs. However, owing to the lack of large-scale GHG data, a quantitative description of the relationships between land-cover changes ...

Meng Guo; Xiufeng Wang; Jing Li; Hongmei Wang; Hiroshi Tani

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar greenhouses in Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

After a discussion of solar greenhouse phenomena and the potential for heat collection and food production, design recommendations are provided for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces and for attached food producing solar greenhouses. Also, design of a single solar structure to maximize heat collection and food production is considered. A method of predicting the performance for attached heat collecting solar sunspaces is given in which the solar savings fraction is calculated. (LEW)

Polich, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Solar heating of integrated greenhouse-animal shelter systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical procedure to determine the effectiveness of greenhouses as solar collectors was presented. This procedure was used to predict the effect of several construction parameters on solar radiation input to greenhouses. The orientation of the greenhouse was found to be the most effective construction parameter controlling solar radiation input to greenhouses. The effective albedo of the plant canopy was also found to be a significant factor. A new solar greenhouse design, suitable for high latitude regions was developed. The results showed that an internal solar collector could be incorporated as an integral part of the greenhouse design. The concept developed could be used as a free-standing greenhouse or in a combination with livestock building. The efficiency of the solar input was investigated for the conventional and the shed greenhouses, both as a free-standing unit and a greenhouse-animal shelter system, using computer simulation analyses. The results indicated that the efficiency of solar input is highly dependent on location; the effect of location on the shed type design is more profound. A typical case of a greenhouse-hog barn production system was investigated using computer simulation analyses. The results showed that such a food production system achieves a significant reduction in conventional fuel consumption due to both animal waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization.

Ben-Abdallah, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgCO2 Allowance Allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the Effect on Electricity Investors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an effort by nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states to develop a regional, mandatory, market-based cap-and-trade program to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electricity sector. The initiative is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the RGGI region and beyond. The implications of these changes for the value of electricity-generating assets and the market value of the firms that own them depends on the initial allocation of carbon dioxide allowances, the composition of generating assets owned by the firm, and the locations of those assets. Changes in asset values inside the RGGI region may be positive or negative, whereas changes outside of the RGGI region are almost always positive but nonetheless vary greatly. Viewing changes at the firm level aggregates and moderates both positive and negative effects on market value compared with what would be observed by looking at changes at individual facilities. Nonetheless, a particular firm’s portfolio of assets is unlikely to reflect the overall composition of assets in the industry as a whole, and some firms are likely to do substantially better or worse than the industry average. Key Words: emissions trading, allowance allocations, electricity, air pollution, auction, grandfathering, generation-performance standard, output-based allocation, costeffectiveness,

Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmer; Dallas Burtraw; Danny Kahn; Karen Palmer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Solar greenhouse training project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this project were: (1) To train twenty teams, each from a different region, to organize and run workshops to build inexpensive, practical solar greenhouses. (2) To help create working solar greenhouse experts in the field available to respond to their community's needs. (3) To establish a national model program for solar greenhouse construction workshops. (4) To determine whether the barn-raising style used in the greenhouse construction workshops could be taught in the format of a 3 1/2 day seminar with a follow-up workshop. (5) To determine whether the audio-visual exhibit and printed materials used in the seminar were effective. (MOW)

Davis, L.; Kensil, D.; Lazar, B.; Yanda, B.; Yanda, S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Efficiency and Emerging Markets for Greenhouse Gas Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy industry is evolving into a competitive and globally integrated commodity market. The development of the Ozone Transport Commission NOx market has closely followed that of the SO2 market. The cost of these commodities has become an important economic input into the generation of electricity in the United States. The commoditization of the Greenhouse Gases will likely develop in a similar fashion but on a global scale, becoming another economic input into electricity generation. It will be critical to the future competitiveness of each energy related company to closely monitor the Greenhouse Gas Market.

Ferguson, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Latent heat accumulating greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention relates to a latent heat accumulating greenhouse utilizing solar heat. The object of the invention is to provide a greenhouse which is simple in construction, of high efficiency for heat absorbing and capable of much absorbing and accumulating of heat. A heat accumulating chamber partitioned by transparent sheets is provided between the attic and a floor surface facing north in the greenhouse. A blower fan is disposed to confront an opening provided at the lower portion in said heat accumulating chamber. Also, in the heat accumulating chamber, a heat accumulating unit having a large number of light transmitting windows and enclosing a phase transformation heat accumulating material such as CaC1/sub 2/.6H/sub 2/O, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.10H/sub 2/O therein is detachably suspended in a position close to windowpanes at the north side.

Yano, N.; Ito, H.; Makido, I.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Observed dependence of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect on sea surface temperature: Comparison with climate warming experiments  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a comparison of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect dependence on sea surface temperature for climate variations of different types. Firstly, coincident satellite observations and meteorological analyses are used to examine seasonal and interannual variations and to evaluate the performance of a general circulation model. Then, this model is used to compare the results inferred from the analysis of observed climate variability with those derived from global climate warming experiments. One part of the coupling between the surface temperature, the water vapor and the clear-sky greenhouse effect is explained by the dependence of the saturation water vapor pressure on the atmospheric temperature. However, the analysis of observed and simulated fields shows that the coupling is very different according to the type of region under consideration and the type of climate forcing that is applied to the Earth-atmosphere system. This difference, due to the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, is analyzed in detail by considering the temperature lapse rate and the vertical profile of relative humidity. Our results suggest that extrapolating the feedbacks inferred from seasonal and short-term interannual climate variability to longer-term climate changes requires great caution. It is argued that our confidence in climate models` predictions would be increased significantly if the basic physical processes that govern the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, and its relation to the large-scale circulation, were better understood and simulated. For this purpose, combined observational and numerical studies focusing on physical processes are needed. 44 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Bony, S.; Le Treut, H. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France); Duvel, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Greenhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Lakeview, Oregon Coordinates 42.1887721°, -120.345792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

362

Edward's Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edward's Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Edward's Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Edward's Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Edward's Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

363

Hunter Hot Spring Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunter Hot Spring Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunter Hot Spring Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunter Hot Spring Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunter Hot Spring Greenhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Springdale, Montana Coordinates 45.738268°, -110.2271387° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

364

Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Crook's Greenhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cassia County, Idaho Coordinates 42.358036°, -113.5728501° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

365

Warm Springs Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Banks, Idaho Coordinates 44.0804473°, -116.1240151° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

366

Flint Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Flint Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Flint Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

367

High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility High Country Rose Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Helena, Montana Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

368

Liskey Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liskey Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Liskey Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Liskey Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Liskey Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

369

Bliss Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bliss Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bliss Greenhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Bliss, Idaho Coordinates 42.9268461°, -114.9495057° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

370

Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bigfork Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Bigfork, Montana Coordinates 48.0632864°, -114.0726134° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

371

Wards Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wards Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Wards Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wards Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Wards Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Garden Valley, Idaho Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

372

Jackson Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Ashland, Oregon Coordinates 42.1853257°, -122.6980457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

373

Modeling Greenhouse Gas Energy Technology Responses to Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of the global energy system can help shed light on the competition and complementarities among technologies and energy systems both in the presence and absence of actions to affect the concentration of greenhouse gases. This paper explores the role of modeling in the analysis of technology deployment in addressing climate change. It examines the competition among technologies in a variety of markets, and explores conditions under which new markets, such as for hydrogen and carbon disposal, or modern commercial biomass, could emerge. Carbon capture and disposal technologies are shown have the potential to play a central role in controlling the cost of stabilizing the concentration of greenhouse gases, the goal of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, John F.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Framework for Hedging the Risk of Greenhouse Gas Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential policies to limit emissions of greenhouse gases pose a significant uncertainty to energy company asset managers. This report introduces an analytical framework for incorporating climate policy uncertainty in a modern-finance approach for valuing assets. The framework is used to assess the value of a coal-fired power plant with and without climate uncertainty, and to explore the value of options to switch the plant to natural gas or to shut it down. Approaches for hedging carbon risk are demonst...

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Greenhouse: Planning for climate change  

SciTech Connect

The author reviews the proceedings of a workshop held in Melbourne, Australia in 1987. Participants at the workshop were asked to investigate the impacts of the greenhouse effect on their own particular sector (e.g. energy policy, water resources, coastal engineering, agriculture). Most of the 54 chapters in the proceedings indicate that the climate scenario would not have catastrophic consequences for Australia. However, it could have serious implications for conservation management. In addition, international pressure for reduced use of hydrocarbons could cause severe problems because of the heavy demand for transport fuels. Increased public awareness is needed for developing a response to climate change.

Pearman, G.I.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

2, 77102, 2005 Greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 2, 77­102, 2005 Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian rice fields H. Pathak et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian Commons License. 77 #12;BGD 2, 77­102, 2005 Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian rice fields H. Pathak et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy ...creating a sustainable future August 2007 #12;Yale is a greenhouse gas re- duction goal. This goal has guided the development of an aggressive and in- formed to similar commitments to greenhouse gas reductions by other institutions of higher learning nationally

Haller, Gary L.

378

4, 23292384, 2007 Greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 2329­2384, 2007 Greenhouse gas balance of NE Siberian tundra M. K. van der Molen et al The seasonal cycle of the greenhouse gas balance of a continental tundra site in the Indigirka lowlands, NE, 2329­2384, 2007 Greenhouse gas balance of NE Siberian tundra M. K. van der Molen et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Observation of Water Vapor Greenhouse Absorption over the Gulf of Mexico Using Aircraft and Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through its interaction with radiation, water vapor provides an important link between the ocean and atmosphere. One way this occurs is through the greenhouse effect; observations of water vapor greenhouse absorption in the Gulf of Mexico during ...

David Marsden; Francisco P. J. Valero

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Mitigation Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning October 7, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency. Learn more about the benefits of portfolio-based planning for GHG mitigation. Also see information about greenhouse gas mitigation planning data and tools. Step-by-Step The GHG mitigation planning process follows six key steps. Click on a step

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TY RPRT T1 Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS Model A1 J Greenblatt AB p A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet GHGIS model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas GHG and regional criteria pollutant emissions The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy including those outside the energy sector such as high global warming potential gases waste treatment agriculture and forestry in varying degrees of detail and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources Starting from basic drivers such as population numbers

382

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1580e/i1580e00.pdf Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Screenshot References: Forestry Industry Impacts[1] "This book examines the influence of the forest products (roundwood, processed wood products and pulp and paper) value chain on atmospheric greenhouse gases. Forests managed for natural conservation, for protection

383

Water Vapor, Surface Temperature, and the Greenhouse Effect—A Statistical Analysis of Tropical-Mean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor feedback is one of the important factors that determine the response of the atmosphere to surface warming. To take into account the compensating drying effects in downdraft regions, averaging over the whole Tropics is necessary. ...

Hu Yang; Ka Kit Tung

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

426 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE VOLUME 16 Solar and Greenhouse Gas Forcing and Climate Response in the Twentieth Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble experiments with a global coupled climate model are performed for the twentieth century with time-evolving solar, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol (direct effect), and ozone (tropospheric and stratospheric) forcing. Observed global warming in the twentieth century occurred in two periods, one in the early twentieth century from about the early 1900s to the 1940s, and one later in the century from, roughly, the late 1960s to the end of the century. The model’s response requires the combination of solar and anthropogenic forcing to approximate the early twentieth-century warming, while the radiative forcing from increasing greenhouse gases is dominant for the response in the late twentieth century, confirming previous studies. Of particular interest here is the model’s amplification of solar forcing when this acts in combination with anthropogenic forcing. This difference is traced to the fact that solar forcing is more spatially heterogeneous (i.e., acting most strongly in areas where sunlight reaches the surface) while greenhouse gas forcing is more spatially uniform. Consequently, solar forcing is subject to coupled regional feedbacks involving the combination of temperature gradients, circulation regimes, and clouds. The magnitude of these feedbacks depends on the climate’s base state. Over relatively cloud-free oceanic regions in the subtropics, the enhanced solar forcing produces greater evaporation. More moisture then converges into the precipitation convergence zones, intensifying the regional monsoon and

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems annual variations of greenhouse gas emissions from cropping systems and effects of land management a powerful tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. INDEX TERMS: 1610 Global

388

Regional Climate Change in Tropical and Northern Africa due to Greenhouse Forcing and Land Use Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human activity is supposed to affect the earth’s climate mainly via two processes: the emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols and the alteration of land cover. While the former process is well established in state-of-the-art climate model ...

Heiko Paeth; Kai Born; Robin Girmes; Ralf Podzun; Daniela Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technologies for a greenhouse-constrained society  

SciTech Connect

This conference explored how three technologies might help society adjust to life in a greenhouse-constrained environment. Technology experts and policy makers from around the world met June 11--13, 1991, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to address questions about how energy efficiency, biomass, and nuclear technologies can mitigate the greenhouse effect and to explore energy production and use in countries in various stages of development. The conference was organized by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Energy efficiency biomass, and nuclear energy are potential substitutes for fossil fuels that might help slow or even reverse the global warming changes that may result from mankind`s thirst for energy. Many other conferences have questioned whether the greenhouse effect is real and what reductions in greenhouse gas emissions might be necessary to avoid serious ecological consequences; this conference studied how these reductions might actually be achieved. For these conference proceedings, individuals papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Kuliasha, M.A.; Zucker, A.; Ballew, K.J. [eds.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technologies for a greenhouse-constrained society  

SciTech Connect

This conference explored how three technologies might help society adjust to life in a greenhouse-constrained environment. Technology experts and policy makers from around the world met June 11--13, 1991, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to address questions about how energy efficiency, biomass, and nuclear technologies can mitigate the greenhouse effect and to explore energy production and use in countries in various stages of development. The conference was organized by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Energy efficiency biomass, and nuclear energy are potential substitutes for fossil fuels that might help slow or even reverse the global warming changes that may result from mankind's thirst for energy. Many other conferences have questioned whether the greenhouse effect is real and what reductions in greenhouse gas emissions might be necessary to avoid serious ecological consequences; this conference studied how these reductions might actually be achieved. For these conference proceedings, individuals papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Kuliasha, M.A.; Zucker, A.; Ballew, K.J. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Measurement and Estimation of Uncertainty of GHG Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: GHG Uncertainty Guide[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Uncertainty Tool is designed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative estimation of uncertainty associated with a

392

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Refrigerant Guide[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for refrigeration is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

393

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Climate Focus Area: - Central Plant, Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: CHP Guidance v1.0[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for allocation of GHG emissions from a combined heat and power (CHP) plant is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator

394

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Electricity Heat, and Steam Purchase Guidance v1.2[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for purchased electricity is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

395

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion[2] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources[3]

396

A reduced-form approach to characterizing sulfate aerosol effects on climate in integrated assessment models. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to devise a methodology for estimating the spatial patterns of future climate change accounting for the effects of both greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols under a wide range of emissions scenarios, using the results of General Circulation Models.

Wigley, T.M.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from freight transport This guidance provides clear instructions on calculating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from freight and report your greenhouse gas emissions', by providing more specific information and examples relating

399

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide when you burn the gasoline in your car. ? ? #12;#12;WHERE DOES YOUR ELECTRIC ENERGY COME FROM? 50 40 30 20 10 0 PercentofTotal Coal Natural Gas Oil Hydro Geothermal Solar Wind Biomass Nuclear SOURCES

Schwartz, Stephen E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflectance of the target; ( )uL spectral path radiance. All these techniques rely upon MODTRAN (MODerate (1). These techni- ques typically access a Look-Up-Table, which is precompu- ted using MODTRAN over (MODTRAN, PHYSICAL MODEL [Schott, 1999]) PBFM (MODTRAN, PHYSICAL MODEL [Ientilucci, 2005]) FLAASH (MODTRAN

402

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics on...

403

Federal Energy Management Program: Establish Internal Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction...

404

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG . 2 . Carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied

Escher, Christine

405

Federal Energy Management Program: Prioritize Greenhouse Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies on Facebook Tweet...

406

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Contacts on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Contacts on...

407

The quest for greenhouse-constrained technologies amid other concerns for environment and energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As we approach the 21st century, sentiments run high in the US for improved air quality in our cities and for a more secure energy future, hopefully to be manifest in lesser dependence on foreign supplies of oil. These sentiments are reflected in intense political activity on both the federal and state levels to enact legislation that will help alleviate both problems. At the same time though, the recent emergence of awareness of a threat of global warming due to ever increasing emissions of greenhouse gases has only served as an additional complicating factor, one which has not been fully dealt with either socially or politically in the US. Much discussion and deliberation on the issue of the greenhouse effect is underway in the US and aimed at understanding the size of the problem as well as identifying options for solutions. This paper will review the recent political climate on issues of environment and energy and will include brief descriptions of the recent US Clean Air Act Amendments, the California Clean Air Act, the National Energy Strategy, and the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These policies and programs form a backdrop for the additional and more recent challenges brought about by the issue of global warming. To integrate all of these concerns will require complex solutions. First an understanding and discussion of all the options must exist. It is that integration process that is currently underway in the US. The paper will also review the current understanding of greenhouse gas emissions as well as options for mitigating them, especially as related to the transportation sector. 15 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

McGill, R.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

An example of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate changes  

SciTech Connect

As an example of the technique of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate change, a multivariate signal or fingerprint of the enhanced greenhouse effect is defined using the zonal mean atmospheric temperature change as a function of height and latitude between equilibrium climate model simulations with control and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations. This signal is compared with observed atmospheric temperature variations over the period 1963 to 1988 from radiosonde-based global analyses. There is a signiificant increase of this greenhouse signal in the observational data over this period. These results must be treated with caution. Upper air data are available for a short period only, possibly, to be able to resolve any real greenhouse climate change. The greenhouse fingerprint used in this study may not be unique to the enhanced greenhouse effect and may be due to other forcing mechanisms. However, it is shown that the patterns of atmospheric temperature change associated with uniform global increases of sea surface temperature, with El Nino-Southern Oscillation events and with decreases of stratospheric ozone concentrations individually are different from the greenhouse fingerprint used here. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Karoly, D.J.; Cohen, J.A. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Meehl, G.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 2: Part 4, Transportation sector; Part 5, Forestry sector; Part 6, Agricultural sector  

SciTech Connect

This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and address programmatic issues such as minimum reporting requirements, time parameters, international projects, confidentiality, and certification. Together, the General Guidelines and the guidance in these supporting documents will provide concepts and approaches needed to prepare the reporting forms. This second volume of sector-specific guidance covers the transportation sector, the forestry sector, and the agricultural sector.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport or Transport or Mobil Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for mobile combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically from mobile combustion sources, including vehicles under the direct control

412

Stationary light in cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss stationary light created by a pair of counter-propagating control fields in Lambda-type atomic gases with electromagnetically induced transparency for the case of negligible Doppler broadening. In this case the secular approximation used in the discussion of stationary light in hot vapors is no longer valid. We discuss the quality of the effective light-trapping system and show that in contrast to previous claims it is finite even for vanishing ground-state dephasing. The dynamics of the photon loss is in general non exponential and can be faster or slower than in hot gases.

Gor Nikoghosyan; Michael Fleischhauer

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Studies say - tentatively - that greenhouse warming is here  

SciTech Connect

Published studies on greenhouse warming have been ambivalent as to whether warming has arrived. Now two independent studies of the climate record have incriminated the green-house effect in global warming, although they fall short of convicting it. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg are confident they have exonerated natural climatic variability, saying the observed global warming seems to large to account for the warming effect. A group from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory directly implicates greenhouse warming by finding its geographic `fingerprinting` in the climate record of the past century. This article discusses both studies and how the results will affect future concerns in the area of greenhouse warming.

Kerr, R.A.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis At this point in the analysis for using renewable energy in buildings, after estimating costs to implement strategies, there should be a list of sites and promising renewable energy technologies. The next step in the analysis is to prioritize those sites and technologies to achieve cost-effective reductions in greenhouse (GHG) emissions. In prioritizing the locations for cost-effective renewable energy project development, start with the sites that have the: Best resources Best financial incentives Highest energy rates. These factors are the most important for determining the economic viability

415

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4 of 2007, Ea Energy Analyses and Risø DTU developed a number of greenhouse gas emissions reduction

416

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 is to identify and quantify the major sources of greenhouse q y j g gas emissions which result from the operation of the University.y #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 · Major sources

McConnell, Terry

417

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Zevenhoven, Ron

418

Modeling of a greenhouse equipped with a solar rockbed system and with carbon dioxide enrichment  

SciTech Connect

Various ways of greenhouse environmental modification, energy conservation, solar collection, and energy storage and utilization were investigated to utilize the available solar energy more efficiently. A computer simulation model describing the greenhouse thermal behavior was developed and programmed for a greenhouse with a solar rockbed system to evaluate numerous energy conservation designs. Validation of the model was made based on the measured greenhouse performance data sets obtained from a prototype greenhouse. For validation, eight periods were chosen to encompass a wide range of prevailing weather and environmental conditions inside the greenhouse. The accuracy of the values predicted by this model was very high. Based on the developed model, a sensitivity analysis was made to determine the effect of key parameters on certain simulated results. Generally, the key parameters related with the greenhouse environmental modifications showed high sensitivities.

Suh, W.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Transitional strategies for the reduction of "greenhouse gas" emission in the United States electric power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental issues have become increasingly important in the political arena, particularly with growing concern over the "greenhouse effect," a potential global climatic warming caused by increases in anthropogenic ...

Monroe, Burt L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ozone depletion, the Greenhouse effect, and climate change. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Environmental Pollution of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 10 and 11, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Witnesses at a two-day hearing on the nature and magnitude of possible risks from the greenhouse effect and depletion of the ozone layer and the government's role in addressing these problems included representatives of universities, international environmental and resource institutes and organizations, manufacturers of fluorocarbons, historians, and government agencies. Prompting the hearings was a DOE report on the risks and need for intensive research and international cooperation in the area of environmental policy. Technical presentations were given by experts in atmospheric chemistry and oceanography. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of the 16 witnesses.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effect of Using Inert and Non-Inert Gases on the Thermal Degradation and Fuel Properties of Biomass in the Torrefaction and Pyrolysis Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research presented focuses on the use of Carbon-dioxide (CO?), Nitrogen (N?) and Argon (Ar) as purge gases for torrefaction. Torrefaction using CO? as a purge gas may further improve the fuel characteristics of the torrefied fuel when compared to N? and Ar (which are entirely inert), making it better suited for use as a fuel for co-firing with coal or gasification. Three different biomasses were investigated: Juniper wood chips, Mesquite wood chips, and forage Sorghum. Experiments were conducted using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA, TA Instruments Model Q-600) to determine the effect of the purge gas over a wide range of torrefaction temperatures (200-300°C). TGA weight traces (thermograms) showed an increased mass loss when using CO2 as a purge gas when compared to N?. The increased mass loss when CO? was used is attributed to a hypothesized reaction between the CO? and fixed Carbon contained within the biomass. Torrefaction of biomass, using Ar as the purge gas, produced results similar to torrefaction using N?. Derivative Thermo-Gravimetric analysis (DTG) was done to determine the temperature ranges over which the three main components of biomass (hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin) decomposed. The DTG results are in agreement with previously published research. From TGA thermograms and DTG analysis it was determined that torrefaction at higher temperatures (>260°C) likely result in the breakdown of cellulose during torrefaction, an undesired outcome. Proximate, ultimate, and heat value analysis was done on all three biomasses. All three contain a relatively high Oxygen content, which serves to decrease the higher heating value (HHV) of the biomass. The HHV of Juniper, Mesquite, and Sorghum on a dry ash-free (DAF) basis were 20,584 kJ/kg, 20,128 kJ/kg, and 19,389 kJ/kg respectively. The HHV of the three biomasses were relatively constant as expected for agricultural biomass. From TGA analysis (thermograms and DTG), an optimal torrefaction temperature was determined (240°C) based upon the amount of mass lost during torrefaction and estimates of energy retained. Batch torrefaction of all three biomasses at the optimal torrefaction temperature was completed using a laboratory oven. All three biomasses were torrefied using CO?, N?, and Ar as a purge gas. Proximate, ultimate, and heat value analysis was done for each of the torrefied fuels and compared. Results of the fuel property analysis showed torrefaction reduced the moisture content and oxygen percentage of the fuel resulting in the torrefied biomass having a larger HHV when compared to raw biomass. Due to inherent mass lost during torrefaction, the amount of energy retained in the torrefied biomass was calculated to determine the percentage of the virgin biomass energy content that remained. Torrefaction using CO2 resulted in the lowest amount of energy retention of all three purge gases tested (78.86% for Juniper); conversely, Nitrogen resulted in the highest amount of energy retention (91.81% for Sorghum.) Torrefaction of the biomass also increased the fixed carbon (FC) content of the fuel. The grindability of the torrefied biomass was investigated via size distribution analysis of the raw and ground biomass. Initial size distribution analysis showed that torrefaction of Mesquite and Juniper resulted in smaller particle sizes; with a greater fraction of the torrefied biomass passing through smaller meshes. Analysis of the ground biomass samples showed that torrefaction improved the grindability of the fuel. The percent of torrefied biomass that passed through an 840 micrometer mesh increased by over 20% for both Mesquite and Juniper when ground. Sorghum exhibited similar increases; however, the amount of increase is less apparent due to the smaller particle size distribution of the raw Sorghum.

Eseltine, Dustin E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis After all cost-effective energy efficiency projects have been explored as part of a Federal agency's planning efforts for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings, renewable energy may be considered as an option for meeting the agency's GHG reduction goals. Renewable energy can reduce emissions in all three GHG emission scopes by displacing conventional fossil fuel use. The focus of this guidance is prioritizing on-site renewable energy projects that will best support GHG reduction goals. It is intended to provide a high-level screening approach for on-site renewable energy projects to support agency- or program-level portfolio planning. General

423

Determine Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources Determine Largest Mobile Greenhouse Gas Emission Sources October 7, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For the purposes of portfolio planning, a Federal agency's first data analysis step is to determine which mobile emissions sources represent the largest contributors to the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agencies can use agency-level data to determine which fleets/locations, which vehicle assets (e.g., fleet vehicles, non-fleet equipment, etc.), and which fuel types are producing the largest amounts of emissions. Based on this analysis, the agency can better define which mitigation strategies will be most effective. For instance, if a single fleet comprises over half of the agency's vehicle and equipment emissions, the

424

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs October 7, 2013 - 10:18am Addthis Analyzing the cost of implementing each greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure provides an important basis for prioritizing different emission reduction strategies. While actual costs should be used when available, this guidance provides cost estimates or considerations for the major emission reduction measures to help agencies estimate costs without perfect information. Cost criteria the agency may consider when prioritizing strategies include: Lifecycle cost Payback Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e, metric tonne carbon dioxide equivalent avoided). Implementation costs should be analyzed for each emissions source:

425

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis Employee commuting is the single largest source of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. The establishment of Federal telework and transportation coordination programs over the past decade creates a strong foundation for commute behavior change. However few agencies have achieved substantial commuting emissions reductions from their fiscal year 2008 baseline inventories. Effective planning for aggressive commute reductions starts with the location of agency facilities. Facility siting and design decisions should be made with public transportation access in mind to make it easier for

426

Science and Technology Development to Integrate Energy Production and Greenhouse Gas Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the carbon cycle from the point of view of past and present human influence. Potential future human input to the cycle through science and technology to manage atmospheric greenhouse gas are considered. The review suggests that humans will need to ingeniously exploit even more energy to integrate its use with control of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Continuing development and application of energy is essential if the development of human society is to be sustained through the coming centuries. The continuing development of nuclear energy seems an essential energy supply component.

Pendergast, D.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

The effects of interactions between federal and state climate policies : implications for federal climate policy design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the absence of a federal policy to cap greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions many states are moving forward with their own initiatives, which currently range from announcements of commitments to reduce greenhouse gases to a ...

McGuinness, Meghan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Greenhouse-gas emissions from biofuel use in Asia.  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a primary fuel for much of the world's population. In some developing countries it can contribute 80-90% of total primary energy consumption. In Asia as a whole we estimate that biomass contributes about 22 EJ, almost 24% of total energy use. Much of this biomass is combusted in inefficient domestic stoves and cookers, enhancing the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PIC), many of which are greenhouse gases. An inventory of the combustion of biofuels (fuelwood, crop residues, and dried animal waste) in Asia is used to develop estimates of the emissions of carbon-containing greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2},CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) in Asian countries. The data are examined from two perspectives: total carbon released and total global warming potential (GWP) of the gases. We estimate that blofuels contributed 573 Tg-C in 1990, about 28% of the total carbon emissions from energy use in Asia. China (259 Tg-C) and India (187 Tg-C) were the largest emitting countries by far. The majority of the emissions, 504 Tg-C, are in the form of CO{sub 2}; however, emissions of non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases are significant: 57 Tg-C as CO, 6.4 Tg-C as CH{sub 4}, and 5.9 Tg-C as NMHC. Because of the high rate of incomplete combustion in typical biofuel stoves and the high GWP coefficients of the products of incomplete combustion, biofuels comprise an even larger share of energy-related emissions when measured in terms of global warming potential (in CO{sub 2} equivalents): 38% over a 20-year time frame and 31% over 100 years. Even when the biofuel is assumed to be harvested on a completely sustainable basis (all CO{sub 2} emissions are reabsorbed in the following growing season), PIC emissions from biofuel combustion account for almost 5% of total carbon emissions and nearly 25% of CO{sub 2} equivalents in terms of short-term (20-year) GWP.

Streets, D. G.; Waldhoff, S. T.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

429

Greenhouse-gas emissions from biofuel use in Asia.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a primary fuel for much of the world's population. In some developing countries it can contribute 80-90% of total primary energy consumption. In Asia as a whole we estimate that biomass contributes about 22 EJ, almost 24% of total energy use. Much of this biomass is combusted in inefficient domestic stoves and cookers, enhancing the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PIC), many of which are greenhouse gases. An inventory of the combustion of biofuels (fuelwood, crop residues, and dried animal waste) in Asia is used to develop estimates of the emissions of carbon-containing greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2},CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) in Asian countries. The data are examined from two perspectives: total carbon released and total global warming potential (GWP) of the gases. We estimate that blofuels contributed 573 Tg-C in 1990, about 28% of the total carbon emissions from energy use in Asia. China (259 Tg-C) and India (187 Tg-C) were the largest emitting countries by far. The majority of the emissions, 504 Tg-C, are in the form of CO{sub 2}; however, emissions of non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases are significant: 57 Tg-C as CO, 6.4 Tg-C as CH{sub 4}, and 5.9 Tg-C as NMHC. Because of the high rate of incomplete combustion in typical biofuel stoves and the high GWP coefficients of the products of incomplete combustion, biofuels comprise an even larger share of energy-related emissions when measured in terms of global warming potential (in CO{sub 2} equivalents): 38% over a 20-year time frame and 31% over 100 years. Even when the biofuel is assumed to be harvested on a completely sustainable basis (all CO{sub 2} emissions are reabsorbed in the following growing season), PIC emissions from biofuel combustion account for almost 5% of total carbon emissions and nearly 25% of CO{sub 2} equivalents in terms of short-term (20-year) GWP.

Streets, D. G.; Waldhoff, S. T.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

GHGFarm: a software tool to estimate and reduce net-greenhouse gas emission from farms in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision support software tools and computer simulation models help us to better understand the structure and functioning of agricultural ecosystems - how to better manage them in a sustainable way. They assist in the synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge ... Keywords: agriculture, ecosystems, greenhouse gases, mitigation, software

Nathaniel K. Newlands

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cycling with air and other nonhydrocarbon gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injecting lean gas into condensate reservoirs is a practice currently used to increase recovery. The process reduces condensation and increases liquid recovery by revaporization. However, delaying natural gas sales for long periods of time is economically unattractive. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of nonhydrocarbon gases (i.e., air, N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/) for improving recovery from retrograde condensate reservoirs. A compositional model that uses the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) was developed to evaluate condensate reservoir performance. A 15-component hydrocarbon system and extensive experimental data were used in the study. The simulator was tuned to match the available experimental data. The model shows that nonhydrocarbon gases can vaporize hydrocarbon liquids effectively, with CO/sub 2/ the most effective nonhydrocarbon for vaporizing heavy fractions.

Striefel, M.A.; Ahmed, T.H.; Cady, G.V.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts A fact sheet about the myths versus facts of ethanol and greenhouse...

433

Greenhouse Gas Management: Local Efforts to Curb a Global Phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SB 375 seeks to lower greenhouse gas emissions by changing2020 and 2035 greenhouse gas targets. The regional targetsburden to accomplish its greenhouse gas target. But setting

Matute, Juan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effects Of Porosity And Mineral Composition On Cement Alteration During Geological Carbon Sequestration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases such as CO2, it is likely that major climate change will occur by the end of the century if… (more)

Brunet, Jean-patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

MEASUREMENT OF RADIOIODINE IN PUREX STACK GASES  

SciTech Connect

The chemical behavior of iodine-131 in stack air from this site's Purex process is reported. The radioiodine in the stack gases apparently consists of variable proportions of molecular vapor and other forms of iodine, thus causing the efficiencies for most collection media to vary widely. Activated charcoal is a satisfactory collection medium although Process gases (ammonia and oxides of nitrogen) lower the efficiency of the charcoal from 99 to 88%. Ambient temperature and humidity had no effect on deposition and retention of iodine in long stainless steel sampling lines. Process conditions did have an effect and estimates of iodine released were 10 to 15% low due to this line loss. (auth)

Jacobsen, W.R.; Jolly, L. Jr.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Building and using the solar greenhouse  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thorough directions are given for planning, constructing and using a solar greenhouse attached to a house. Included is a method of calculating the savings accruing from the use of the greenhouse. (LEW)

Not Available

437

A Greenhouse for Mars and Beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed design study for a deployable greenhouse for Mars mission is has been completed. The greenhouse has been designed so that it has a life span of at least 20 years

Paul A. Czysz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Greenhouse Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2008 ... This European Environment Agency webpage includes links to a downloadable report entitled Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and ...

439

Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Topic Title: Slashing Greenhouse Emissions from Magnesium Production Topic Summary: CSIRO, an Australia's national science agency ...

440

Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Consulting · Riitta Pipatti, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Dennis Rolston Agency · Fabian Wagner, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Wilfried Winiwarter

442

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June greenhouse gas multiplied by a Global Warming Potential (GWP) factor. (3) "Global Warming Potential factor" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative

Escher, Christine

443

4, 277316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks et al greenhouse gas balance of an abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks, J. van Huissteden, A. J. Dolman, and M (dimmie.hendriks@falw.vu.nl) 277 #12;BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

444

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program of oxygen. (2) "Carbon dioxide equivalent" (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative to an equivalent unit of carbon dioxide over

Escher, Christine

445

The contribution that reporting of greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The contribution that reporting of greenhouse gas emissions makes to the UK meeting its climate that reporting of greenhouse gas emissions makes to the UK meeting its climate change objectives: A review leadership. The UK has published guidance on how organisations should measure and report their greenhouse gas

446

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C. Flynn and Pete Smith #12;Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C or boundaries. #12;3Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends About

Levi, Ran

447

CSEM WP 166 California's Greenhouse Gas Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSEM WP 166 California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem? James. 2547 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;California's Greenhouse Gas Policies a broad portfolio of policies and regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper

Kammen, Daniel M.

448

Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Forestry., White, M. and Yamulki, S. (2012). Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests

449

Regional Simulations of Greenhouse Warming Including Natural Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The perception of the hypothesized greenhouse effect will differ dramatically depending upon the location on the earth at which the effect is analyzed. This is due mainly to two causes: 1) the warming signal depends upon the position on the earth,...

Kwang-Y. Kim; Gerald R. North

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Title Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6541E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Greenblatt, J. Date Published 10/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHGemitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 μm) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

451

The El Nino-Southern Oscillation in the second Hadley Centre coupled model and its response to greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) interannual variability simulated in the second Handley Centre coupled model under control and greenhouse warming scenarios. The model produces a very reasonable simulation of ENSO in the control experiment--reproducing the amplitude, spectral characteristics, and phase locking to the annual cycle that are observed in nature. The mechanism for the model ENSO is shown to be a mixed SST-ocean dynamics mode that can be interpreted in terms of the ocean recharge paradigm of Jin. In experiments with increased levels of greenhouse gases, no statistically significant changes in ENSO are seen until these levels approach four times preindustrial values. In these experiments, the model ENSO has an approximately 20% larger amplitude, a frequency that is approximately double that of the current ENSO (implying more frequent El Ninos and La Ninas), and phase locks to the annual cycle at a different time of year. It is shown that the increase in the vertical gradient of temperature in the thermocline region, associated with the model's response to increased greenhouse gases, is responsible for the increase in the amplitude of ENSO, while the increase in meridional temperature gradients on either side of the equator, again associated with the models response to increasing greenhouse gases, is responsible for the increased frequency of ENSO events.

Collins, M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Climate Change Standards Working Group, SUDS Policy and Planning Committee Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transit Abstract: This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement by laying out a standard methodology for transit agencies to report their greenhouse gas emissions in a transparent, consistent and cost-effective manner.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:52pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure

454

Solid-state greenhouses and their implications for icy satellites  

SciTech Connect

The 'solid-state greenhouse effect' model constituted by the subsurface solar heating of translucent, high-albedo materials is presently applied to the study of planetary surfaces, with attention to frost and ice surfaces of the solar system's outer satellites. Temperature is computed as a function of depth for an illustrative range of thermal variables, and it is discovered that the surfaces and interiors of such bodies can be warmer than otherwise suspected. Mechanisms are identified through which the modest alteration of surface properties can substantially change the solid-state greenhouse and force an interior temperature adjustment. 34 references.

Matson, D.L.; Brown, R.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mercury typically forms the sulfide (HgS) #12;4 because of the prevalence of sulfides in volcanic gases Aq + 2e-- ´ Hg0 Atmos Equation 1 Ionic mercury can form from the oxidation of elemental mercury Coal is known to contain mercury as a result of testing done upon the flue gas emitted from power plant

Laughlin, Robert B.

456

Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH{sub 4} oxidation in landfill soil covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane (CH{sub 4}), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH{sub 4} is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH{sub 4} oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} (V{sub max}) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O{sub 2} from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH{sub 4} slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O{sub 2} decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O{sub 2} under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O{sub 2} into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH{sub 4}.

Im, J.; Moon, S.; Nam, K.; Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.Y. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jaeykim@snu.ac.kr

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Can we delay a greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews a book published by the Environmental Protection Agency. The book discussed the Greenhouse Effect which is a warming of the earth's atmosphere caused by the doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The excess carbon dioxide is pollution derived from the burning of fossil fuels. The report suggested that the warming of the atmosphere would cause thawing of the polar regions which in turn would cause a rise in sea levels and flooding of the coastal lowlands. In addition to the flooding, the report predicted climate changes that would effect the productivity of croplands in the west. The authors of the report stressed that there was no way to avoid this warming of the earth. They suggested that people should start preparing for the inevitable.

Seidel, S.; Keyes, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The role of forests in addressing the CO/sub 2/ greenhouse  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a transcript of a presentation that describes the potential effect of complete reforestation on diminishing the greenhouse effect. Other, more practical, less drastic alternatives are also discussed. 31 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Marland, G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system is described wherein the radiant energy of the sun or wasted thermal energy is accumulated in the soil below the floor of the greenhouse over a prolonged period of time, and spontaneous release of the accumulated energy into the interior of the greenhouse begins in the wintertime due to a time lag of heat transfer through the soil. The release of the accumulated energy lasts throughout the winter.

Fujie, K.; Abe, K.; Uchida, A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greenhouse gases effect" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Management at PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Management at PPPL Sustainability Assistance Network Conference Call December 20, 2012 Robert Sheneman, PG Deputy Head Environment, Safety, Health &...

462

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against the national benchmark. Computer Platform Internet-based Programming Language Java Strengths Unique tool for providing insight into the actual energy and greenhouse...

463

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

464

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG...

465

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mobile Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment on Facebook Tweet...

466

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

467

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business Travel to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

468

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Commuting to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

469

Greenhouse gases and future long-term changes in the stratospheric temperature and the ozone layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical two-dimensional (2D) interactive dynamical-radiative-photochemical model including aerosol physics is used to examine the expected long-term changes in stratospheric temperature and the Earth's ozone layer due to anthropogenic pollution of ...

I. G. Dyominov; A. M. Zadorozhny

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Mean Climate Controls on the Simulated Response of ENSO to Increasing Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate model experiments are analyzed to elucidate if and how the changes in mean climate in response to doubling of atmospheric CO2 (2xCO2) influence ENSO. The processes involved the development, transition, and decay of simulated ENSO events ...

Pedro N. DiNezio; Ben P. Kirtman; Amy C. Clement; Sang-Ki Lee; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Andrew Wittenberg

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Are greenhouse gases changing ENSO precursors in the Western North Pacific?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using multiple observational and model datasets, we document a strengthening relationship between boreal winter sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the western North Pacific (WNP) and the development of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (...

Shih-Yu Wang; Michelle L’Heureux; Jin-Ho Yoon

472

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flared Gas Landfill Gas Figure 1. Fuel-Cycle Pathways Included in GREET 1.5 3. Computer System in either gaseous or liquid form; either form may be selected for simulation. Pathways from flared gas CIDI vehicles: diesel Compressed natural gas vehicles: Bi-fuel Dedicated fuel Dedicated liquefied

Argonne National Laboratory

473

Wave Forcing of the Tropical Upwelling in the Lower Stratosphere under Increasing Concentrations of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simulations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, covering the periods 1950–2003 and 1980–2050, are used to investigate the nature of the waves that force the increase of the tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere as the ...

Natalia Calvo; Rolando R. Garcia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

AIRS: Improving Weather Forecasting and Providing New Data on Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its two companion microwave sounders, AMSU and HSB were launched into polar orbit onboard the NASA Aqua Satellite in May 2002. NASA required the sounding system to provide high-quality research data for ...

Moustafa T. Chahine; Thomas S. Pagano; Hartmut H. Aumann; Robert Atlas; Christopher Barnet; John Blaisdell; Luke Chen; Murty Divakarla; Eric J. Fetzer; Mitch Goldberg; Catherine Gautier; Stephanie Granger; Scott Hannon; Fredrick W. Irion; Ramesh Kakar; Eugenia Kalnay; Bjorn H. Lambrigtsen; Sung-Yung Lee; John Le Marshall; W. Wallace McMillan; Larry McMillin; Edward T. Olsen; Henry Revercomb; Philip Rosenkranz; William L. Smith; David Staelin; L. Larrabee Strow; Joel Susskind; David Tobin; Walter Wolf; Lihang Zhou

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

PROPOSED RULE FOR MANDATORY REPORTING OF GREENHOUSE GASES Office of Air and Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. Total U.S. Emissions................................................................................................................................3 b. Emissions to be Reported..........................................................................................................................3

Eletric Power Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2007-Land Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Updated data from Municipal Solid Waste Generation, Recycling, and Disposal in the United States: 2007 Facts ...