National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for green roof cxs

  1. Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    :Cost comparison for new construction: ­­ Green roofGreen roof -- $10$10--$30 per square foot$30 per square foot ­­ Traditional roofTraditional roof -- $5$5--$15 per square foot$15 per square foot Roof load evaluation required Building Council: The Leadershipg pg p in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)in Energy and Environmental

  2. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  3. Green Roof Effect on Arthropod Biodiversity By Caitlin Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Green Roof Effect on Arthropod Biodiversity By Caitlin Race A green roof is a roof. Green roof technology has become increasingly popular due to several benefits including, insulation, runoff protection, and aesthetic value. This project was designed to see if a green roof would benefit

  4. FIELD STUDY COMPARING RUNOFF QUALITY FROM A GREEN ROOF AND A GALVANIZED METAL ROOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    FIELD STUDY COMPARING RUNOFF QUALITY FROM A GREEN ROOF AND A GALVANIZED METAL ROOF Brett V. Long1 of this research is the impact of green roofs on urban stormwater quality. This research builds on a laboratory with minimal maintenance. The third question raised by the researchers was whether the green roof, at the low

  5. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.

    2006-01-01

    by the University of Central Florida’s Stormwater Management Academy under a grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). While the primary purpose of the project is to evaluate rainwater runoff benefits of the green roof, FDEP... OF A FLORIDA GREEN ROOF Jeffrey K. Sonne Senior Research Engineer Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL ABSTRACT Previous green roof studies have found that planted roofs significantly reduce roof temperatures and roof heat flux...

  6. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance Lucheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance ......................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof .............................................................................. 13 4. Methods of Storm Analysis and Green Roof Performance Analysis

  7. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof Part 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.; Parker, D.

    2008-01-01

    the roof heat flux results and equipment efficiency assumptions. Based on this analysis the total estimated cooling and heating season savings for the green roof compared with the conventional roof, if the entire 3,300 square foot project roof were green...

  8. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    1 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System Plans and Specifications Created By: David Carothers Date: 2/17/05 #12;2 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Date: 2/14/05 Created By: David and the flumes shall be water tight. (Figures 1&2) · The connection between the flume and the green roof membrane

  9. UAB's four campus buildings featuring green vegetative roofs have performed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    UAB's four campus buildings featuring green vegetative roofs have performed well through the years vegetative roof on the second floor of the Hill University Center. The roof is the first pilot-scale green Maintenance, Campus Services & Grounds, and Energy Management and student groups including Science

  10. Designing Urban Green Roofs for Modularity and Recyclability Objective: Develop alternative designs for green roofs responsive to the special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    a significant payoff in reduced heat loss and higher energy efficiency. However, current green roof proposals, energy supply systems, and monitoring systems. From an architectural perspective, develop schematic greenDesigning Urban Green Roofs for Modularity and Recyclability Objective: Develop alternative designs

  11. Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, B.

    2010-01-01

    Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

  12. Green Roofs: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholz-Barth, K.; Tanner, S.

    2004-09-01

    In a ''green roof,'' a layer of vegetation (e.g., a roof garden) covers the surface of a roof to provide shade, cooler indoor and outdoor temperatures, and effective storm-water management to reduce runoff. The main components are waterproofing, soil, and plants. There are two basic kinds: intensive and extensive. An intensive green roof often features large shrubs and trees, and it can be expensive to install and maintain. An extensive green roof features shallow soil and low-growing, horizontally spreading plants that can thrive in the alpine conditions of many rooftops. These plants do not require a lot of water or soil, and they can tolerate a significant amount of exposure to the sun and wind. This Federal Technology Alert focuses on the benefits, design, and implementation of extensive green roofs and includes criteria for their use on federal facilities.

  13. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  14. Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1 ; Shirley E. Clark, F: rdb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT Green roofs are a best management practice for urban areas where land roofs that will improve roof runoff quality while maintaining the known water retention benefits

  15. Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long1 , Shirley E. Clark1 roofing is an accepted stormwater control technology, little is known about the quality of the roof runoff. In Phase I of this research, several green roof media (formed from commonly-used expanded minerals

  16. Uncertainty analysis and validation of the estimation of effective hydraulic properties: application to green roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : application to green roof substrate A. Mesgoueza,b, , S. Buisb,a , S. Ruyb,a , G. Lefeuve on determining the effective properties at the Darcy scale of green roof substrates (GRS), highly heterogeneous of composite porous materials in order to improve the hydraulic functioning of green roof sub- strates

  17. Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks Krista L of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America Abstract In urban environments, green roofs provide. However, little research has been done on the non-plant biota associated with green roofs, which likely

  18. GREEN ROOFS -A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    GREEN ROOFS - A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1 , A.M.ASCE, Shirley E. Clark2 , M: khb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT The focus of this research is the impact of green roofs on urban stormwater quality and builds on a laboratory study that evaluated several potential green roof media to produce

  19. Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ BRENT JACOBSEN: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ 2 Project Introduction Over the past 50 years is green roof technology. It utilizes an untapped resource in urban areas, and presents an opportunity

  20. Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    187 Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates S. Charpentier UR EPHor Agrocampus-Ouest Centre d'Angers 2, rue Le Nôtre, F49045 Angers France Keywords: green roof roofs increases in Western European and North American cities. It is estimated that 12% of all flat

  1. Comparison of the Perception of Facility Managers on Green Roofs Attributes and Barriers to their Implementation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrer Garcia, Eduardo R

    2014-07-24

    questionnaire containing 21 statements related to green roof attributes and 14 statements related to green roof barriers for their implementation was used and responses were measured on a five-point Likert scale. Two types of questionnaires were used to collect...

  2. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  3. Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    -- $10$10--$30 per square foot$30 per square foot ­­ Traditional roofTraditional roof -- $5$5--$15 per square foot$15 per square foot Roof load evaluation required for retrofitsRoof load evaluation required Illustrations courtesy of the Federal Energy Management Program Swarthmore College Swarthmore, PA Montgomery

  4. Sustainable design for a subtropical green roof with local, recyclable substrates and native plant species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Angelica

    2011-01-11

    As sustainable development becomes the norm, such innovations as the green roof are becoming more commonplace around the world. However, designs tailored for specific climatic regions are still in their infancy. Vegetation and substrate are elements...

  5. Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long, Dr. Shirley E. Clark, Dr. Katherine Baker, Dr. Robert Berghage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long, Dr. Shirley E. Clark, Dr, Middletown, PA 17057 and Center for Green Roof Research at University Park, PA 16802 Introduction Green roofs (vegetative roof covers) are a relatively-new stormwater management practice for urban areas where land

  6. Scaling of economic benefits from Green Roof implementation in Washington, DC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, H.; Clark, C. E.; Zhou, J.; Adriaens, P.; Environmental Science Division; Dalian Univ. of Technology; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-06-01

    Green roof technology is recognized for mitigating stormwater runoff and energy consumption. Methods to overcome the cost gap between green roofs and conventional roofs were recently quantified by incorporating air quality benefits. This study investigates the impact of scaling on these benefits at the city-wide scale using Washington, DC as a test bed because of the proposed targets in the 20-20-20 vision (20 million ft{sup 2} by 2020) articulated by Casey Trees, a nonprofit organization. Building-specific stormwater benefits were analyzed assuming two proposed policy scenarios for stormwater fees ranging from 35 to 50% reduction for green roof implementation. Heat flux calculations were used to estimate building-specific energy savings for commercial buildings. To assess benefits at the city scale, stormwater infrastructure savings were based on operational savings and size reduction due to reduced stormwater volume generation. Scaled energy infrastructure benefits were calculated using two size reductions methods for air conditioners. Avoided carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide (NOx), and sulfur dioxide emissions were based on reductions in electricity and natural gas consumption. Lastly, experimental and fugacity-based estimates were used to quantify the NOx uptake by green roofs, which was translated to health benefits using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency models. The results of the net present value (NPV) analysis showed that stormwater infrastructure benefits totaled $1.04 million (M), while fee-based stormwater benefits were $0.22-0.32 M/y. Energy savings were $0.87 M/y, while air conditioner resizing benefits were estimated at $0.02 to $0.04 M/y and avoided emissions benefits (based on current emission trading values) were $0.09 M-0.41 M/y. Over the lifetime of the green roof (40 years), the NPV is about 30-40% less than that of conventional roofs (not including green roof maintenance costs). These considerable benefits, in concert with current and emerging policy frameworks, may facilitate future adoption of this technology.

  7. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit a cost benefit analysis and choose the most efficient and cost effective modification. Metal or shingle roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  8. Green Roof Water Harvesting and Recycling Effects on Soil and Water Chemistry and Plant Physiology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminack, Kirk Dickison

    2014-04-17

    pressures put on fresh water supplies in urban ecosystems. Alternative irrigation sources can include grey water, sewage effluent (black water) and harvested rainwater which can be a) water captured from an impervious roof and b) stormwater captured from...

  9. Energy saving potential of various roof technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2010-01-01

    Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

  10. Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-08-08

    In recent years, roof-spraying and rooftop lawns have proven effective on roofs with poor thermal insulation. However, the roofs of most buildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation during the winter. The effects of insulation has not previously been quantified. In this study, the authors collected measurements of an insulated building to quantify the thermal effects of roof-spraying and rooftop lawns. Roof-spraying did not significantly reduce cooling loads and required significant amounts of water. The conclusion is that roof spraying is not suitable for buildings with well-insulated roofs. Rooftop lawns, however, significantly stabilized the indoor temperature while additionally helping to mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  11. Roof Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The roof of a Federal building is a common placement for a number of renewable energy technologies, so they should be addressed anytime a roof renovation is undertaken, including roof-mounted...

  12. White Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu discusses the benefits of switching to white roofs and light colored pavements.

  13. Cool Roofs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    strikes the roof it is either reflected or it is absorbed by the roof. The reflected radiation or solar reflectance is that fraction which is reflected. It's a scale of zero...

  14. Rainwater Harvesting for Non-potable Reuse in Gardens: Green vs. Traditional Roofing Natasha T. Nicholson, Brett V. Long, Shirley E. Clark, Julia M. Spicher, Kelly A. Steele, Christine Y.S. Siu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Rainwater Harvesting for Non-potable Reuse in Gardens: Green vs. Traditional Roofing Natasha T be included both as a source in modeling and as a location needing remediation. Rainwater harvesting from) Field Data over 1 year of life Evaluate runoff quality in relation to plant toxicity for harvesting

  15. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  16. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01

    e l Atmosphere ceiling, back panel roof, exposed roof insideSAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A Thesis submitted i no n Convection Exposed Roof Temperature Seasonal Temperature

  17. Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    materials generated by the fossil fuel industry. Materials such as coal fly ash, coal gasification char, and charred biomass may be successfully incorporated into green roof...

  18. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  19. Promising Technology: Cool Roofs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A cool roof increases the solar reflectance of the roof surface. By reflecting more sunlight, the roof surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the roof into the building below. During the cooling season, the addition of a cool roof can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  20. Cool Roofs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar presented by Blaise Stoltenberg and Kosol Kiatreungwattana of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory about roofs designed to maintain a lower roof temperature than traditional roofs in order to reduce energy bills.

  1. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01

    temperature between the solar panel and the roof would havedirectly underneath the solar panel, and the temperatures ofsensor between the solar panel and the roof for the flush

  2. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  3. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  4. One Cool Roof

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 134,629 sq. ft. (about 3 acres) roof of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is now officially a "Cool Roof" -- making it energy efficient in ways that darker roofs are not. Cool roofs are light in color, and therefore, reflect rather than absorb sunlight.

  5. Roof bolting improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-11-15

    Suppliers partner with mine operators to offer safer, more productive tools for roof bolting. 4 figs.

  6. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  7. Guide to Cool Roofs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    beautify your home. The immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun have made cool roofing the fastest growing sector of the building industry. Studies...

  8. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of Secretary Chu's favorites techniques, cool roofs mean energy savings through use of reflective materials to regulate building temperatures.

  9. Runoff Quality From Roofing Materials During Early Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    quality) q y than the runoff from traditional roofing? · Suitability for Rainwater Harvesting-based products and green roofs (for P). · Rainwater harvesting potential based on water-quality? ­ Materials neutralized the acidic rainwater to above 7.0. Galvanized metal neutralized to near 7.0. Cedar shakes runoff

  10. green

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  11. B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System Page 1 of 4 Attachment C 05/07/09 SYSTEM AUDIT INSPECTION REPORT SUMMARY B4-Roof System Facility Name: Facility #: Audit By: Audit Date: SYSTEM CONDITION RATING WORK ORDER/CIP # #12;B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System Page 2 of 4 Attachment C 05/07/09 Sub

  12. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  13. Roofing Moisture Tolerance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To use the calculator, simply supply the following information and click on the "Check Roof" button at the bottom of the form. Insulation Type and Thickness (in inches):...

  14. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  15. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  16. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this edition of Energy 101 we take a look at one of Secretary Chu’s favorite energy efficiency techniques, cool roofs.

  17. Cool Roofs: An Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I've been hearing a lot about cool roof technologies, so I welcomed the chance to learn more at a recent seminar.

  18. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  19. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  20. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  1. Roof bolting equipment & technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-04-15

    Technology provides an evaluator path to improvement for roof bolting machines. Bucyrus offers three different roof bolts models for various mining conditions. The LRB-15 AR is a single-arm boiler recommended for ranges of 32 inches and above; the dual-arm RB2-52A for ranges of 42 inches and above; and the dual-arm RB2-88A for ranges of 54 inches and above. Design features are discussed in the article. Developments in roof bolting technology by Joy Mining Machinery are reported. 4 photos.

  2. Why Cool Roofs?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple,...

  3. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1981-01-01

    dampened. A presentation was made at the 1940 semi-annual meeting of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers entitled 'Summer Cooling Load as Affected by Heat Gain Through Dry, Sprinkled and Water Covered Roofs.' Solar evaporative roof...

  4. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1982-01-01

    Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the application of a thin film of water, in the form of a mist, on the roof of the building, roof temperatures can be reduced from as high as 165o to a cool 86oF. Thus, under-roof ...

  5. Roofs and Convexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Uhlmann

    2011-08-16

    Convex roof extensions are widely used to create entanglement measures in quantum information theory. The aim of the article is to present some tools which could be helpful for their treatment. Sections 2 and 3 introduce into the subject. It follows descriptions of Wootter's method, of the "subtraction procedure", and examples on how to use symmetries.

  6. Roofs and Convexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Armin

    2011-01-01

    Convex roof extensions are widely used to create entanglement measures in quantum information theory. The aim of the article is to present some tools which could be helpful for their treatment. Sections 2 and 3 introduce into the subject. It follows descriptions of Wootter's method, of the "subtraction procedure", and examples on how to use symmetries.

  7. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    , and water harvesting through them, such as asphalt and con- systems or cisterns. This new fact sheet crete storage of rainwater. Permeable pavements are least expensive a

  8. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  9. City of Boston - Green Power Purchasing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    municipal properties to be evaluated for the feasibility of installing solar, wind, bio-energy, combined heat and power (CHP), and green roofs. (The executive order updated an...

  10. Mine roof geology information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Sasaoka, T.; Tang, D.X.; Wilson, Y.; Wilson, G.

    2005-05-01

    A project sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Industry of Future (Mining) program was initiated five years ago. In this project a patented drill control unit (DCU) installed DIN. the J.H. Flecher & Co.'s roof bolter was used to record the drilling parameter for experiments conducted in the mines and laboratory. Today, the drilling parameters have been recorded for more than 1,000 roof bolt holes. This article summarizes the results to date including the methods for determining quantitatively the location of voids/fractures and estimation of roof rock strength from the recorded roof bolter drilling parameters. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.

    2010-01-01

    Savings of High-Albedo Roofs. Energy and Buildings, vol. 25,Cooling Savings of Light Colored Roof Surfacing in FloridaInfra-red photograph of roof-coating edge at Gilroy. This

  12. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steblay, Bernard J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  13. Roof control strategies for underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.C. (Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Roof support, an important aspect of ground control, involves maintaining roof competency to ensure a safe and efficient mining environment. Wide variability in rock quality and stress distributions requires a systematic approach to roof support design that satisfies specific goals. The success of past roof support in reducing the incidence of roof falls has been primarily attributed to safer roof bolting practices. However, roof falls continue to be the number one occupational hazard in underground coal mines. This US Bureau of Mines report presents a general overview of roof bolting and other roof support methods used in the United States. Characteristics of bad roof and associated roof failure theories are briefly presented as background to roof support. Methods of detecting and monitoring roof behavior and/or bolt performance provide essential feedback on roof support requirements. A discussion follows on roof bolt design that assimilates roof and support parameters into useful equations or nomographs to help decide what bolt types to use and how they should be installed under different roof conditions. 35 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes evaporative spray roof cooling systems, their components, performance and applications in various climates and building types. The evolution of this indirect evaporative cooling technique is discussed. Psychrometric and sol...

  15. New "Cool Roof Time Machine" Will Accelerate Cool Roof Deployment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards. Research is underway to adapt the method for use in China, India, and Europe. The laboratory practice involves putting a piece of the roof material in a commercial...

  16. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of the study. The market potential is enhanced through construction activity levels in target marke

  17. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated aging of roofing surfaces Hugo Destaillats, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory HDestaillats@LBL.gov (510) 486-5897 http:HeatIsland.LBL.gov April 4, 2013...

  18. Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When Secretary Chu announced that the Department of Energy had installed a “cool roof” atop the west building of our Washington, DC headquarters, it elicited a fair number of questions from his Facebook fans. We decided to reach out to the people behind the project for their insight on the specific benefits of switching to a cool roof, and the process that went into making that choice.

  19. Roof screening for underground coal mines: recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, C.S.; Gallagher, S.; Molinda, G.M.; Mark, C.; Wilson, G.

    2008-06-15

    The use of screens to control falls of the immediate roof or roof skin (that is between the installed primary and secondary roof supports) is described. 5 figs.

  20. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-04-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. More field tests have been performed. A trendline analysis method has been developed. This method would improve the accuracy in detecting the locations of fractures and in determining the rock strength.

  1. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-10-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Additional field tests have been performed in this quarter. The development of the data interpretation methodology and other related tasks are still continuing.

  2. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-01-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Additional field tests have been performed. It is found that the drilling power can be used as a supplementary method for detecting voids/fractures and rock interfaces.

  3. Rehab guide: Roofs. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Nine volumes will eventually make up The Rehab Guide in its entirety, and they are listed on the back cover of this volume. Each one is devoted to distinct elements of the house, and within each volume is a range of issues that are common to that element of home rehabilitation work. This volume, Roofs, for example, covers the major roofing systems including framing and sheathing; protective strategies such as underlayments and flashing; energy and air infiltration issues; roofing materials; and gutters and down-spouts. Each volume addresses a wide range techniques, materials, and tools, and recommendations based on regional differences around the country. Throughout The Rehab Guide, special attention is given to issues related to energy efficiency, sustainability, and accessibility.

  4. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans 107 (absorption of solar radiation.   roof cooling load [Wm ] a) exposed roof PV covered roof b) GHI [W m ] Time [PST

  5. Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Roofs Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs July 20, 2014 - 4:29pm Addthis Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs If you've ever stood on a roof on a hot summer day, you know how hot...

  6. Rent Controls in Ontario: Roofs or Ceilings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lawrence B.; Tomlinson, Peter

    1981-01-01

    quot;Rent Controls in Ontario: Roofs or Ceilings? "35Mu1tip1e unit starts in Ontario were approximate1y one-PAPER 81-39 RENT CONTROLS-IN ONTARIO: ROOFS OR CEILINGS? BY

  7. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  8. Cool roof Q+A 011.doc 29 July 2009 Cool Roof Q & A (draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cool roof Q+A 011.doc 29 July 2009 Cool Roof Q & A (draft) Ronnen Levinson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory RML27@cornell.edu July 29, 2009 The following information is intended for use in cool-roof brochures issued by the California Air Resources Board and/or the Cool Roof Rating Council. See also http

  9. A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy (FAR) SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING EISG AWARDEE PowerLight Corporation 2954 San Pablo://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Sunguard: A Roofing Tile For Natural Cooling EISG Grant # 99-07 Awardee: Power

  10. ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help? We can work with occupants to act as a liaison with Facili- ties Management and the contractor to identify ways to reduce odors. Contact us at 491­ 6745. Roof work is a necessary part of building preservation. Roofing odors are generated during these projects when hot asphalt

  11. Generalized Roof Duality Fredrik Kahl, Petter Strandmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Generalized Roof Duality Fredrik Kahl, Petter Strandmark Centre for Mathematical Sciences Lund University, Sweden Abstract The roof dual bound for quadratic unconstrained binary optimization is the basis by introducing auxiliary variables and then apply the quadratic roof dual bound, but this may lead to loose

  12. SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER THE SKY'S THE LIMIT: BERNADETTE MOKE SITS ON THE ROOF, ARE 160 SOLAR PANELS, SOME OF WHICH AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW THE PATH OF THE SUN. 10 NJITMAGAZINE COVER STORY'S THE LIMIT: SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER "The solar panels even move a little at night," says

  13. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1980-01-01

    payback of 18 to 24 months. As one prominence in recent years, due to the energy plant manager said, "I pay more than that shortage and the increased cost of electricity each year, just to sweep my floors." -- Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation....

  14. Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-10-01

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting designs. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the mechanisms of modern roof bolting systems including both the tension and fully grouted bolts. Parameters to be studied are: bolt length, bolt spacing, bolt size/strength, grout annulus, in-situ stress condition, overburden depth, and roof geology (massive strata, fractured, and laminated or thinly-bedded). Based on the analysis of the mechanisms of both bolting systems and failure modes of the bolted strata, roof bolting design criteria and programs for modern roof bolting systems were developed. These criterion and/or programs were combined with the MRGIS for use in conjunction with roof bolt installation.

  15. Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 feet,1 Physical Plant staff should implement an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 ½ feet,1 Physical Plant staff practical fall protection method. Most roofs at CSUF qualify as monolithic roofing systems. It may involve a single layer of sealed rubber. Multiple unit roofing systems utilize shingles or tiles. The two roofing

  16. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-10-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. The retrofitting works for a dedicated roof bolter for this research has been completed. The laboratory tests performed using this machine on simulated roof blocks have been conducted. The analysis performed on the testing data showed promising signs to detect the rock interface, fractures, as well as the rock types. The other tasks were progressing as planned.

  17. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-07-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. In this quarter, retrofitting work to build a dedicated roof bolter for this research has been started. A number of numerical methods have been developed to improve the quality of and to analyze the collected drilling parameters. Finite element modeling of roof bolting mechanism is continuing.

  18. DOE Cool Roof Calculator for Low-Slope or Flat Roofs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Roof Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating Savings for Flat Roofs with Non-Black Surfaces - Developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

  19. Measured Energy Savings from the Application of Reflective Roofs in 3 AT and T Regeneration Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashen; Rainer, Leo

    2000-11-01

    Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in three AT and T regeneration buildings during the summer of 2000. These buildings are constructed with concrete and are about 14.9 m2 (160 f2; 10x16 ft)in size. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. Then, the roofs of the buildings were painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original roof reflectances were about 26 percent; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72 percent. In two of these buildings, we monitored savings of about 0.5kWh per day (8.6 kWh/m2 [0.8 kWh/ft2]). The third building showed a reduction in air-conditioning energy use of about 13kWh per day. These savings probably resulted from the differences in the performance (EER) of the two dissimilar AC units in this building. The estimated annual savings for two of the buildings are about 125kWh per year; at a cost of dollar 0.1/kWh, savings are about dollar 12.5 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote location of the buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them with white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence the payback time for having reflective roofs is nil, and the reflective roofs save an accumulated 370kWh over 30 years of the life of the roof.

  20. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2008-01-01

    indicates that the species Gloeocapsa is prevalent on damp4] has identified Gloeocapsa Magma as the most frequentthat the cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa infests mineral roofing

  1. Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.

    2010-01-01

    hour of monitoring period roof surface temperature (deg F)hour of monitoring period outdoor drybulb temperature (degmonitoring of air-conditioning electricity use, temperature

  2. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-07-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The selected site and the field testing plan enabled us to test all three aspects of roof geological features. The development of the data interpretation methodologies and the geology mapping computer program have also been preceding well.

  3. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallenges |1-01ConcentratingDesign » Design for Efficiency » Cool Roofs

  4. Caprock Roofing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: EnergyCounty,NewHatteras ElecPoint JumpRoofing

  5. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    for steep-sloped nonresidential roofs in Title 24. Online atof SSP90.1 for Reflective Roofs. ASHRAE Transactions, 104(pp. 984-995. Evolution of cool roof standards in the United

  6. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-01-01

    requirements for residential roofs in Title 24. Online atAkbari, H. 1998. Cool roofs save energy. ASHRAE Transactionsfor steep-sloped nonresidential roofs in Title 24. Online at

  7. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    PGE. 2007. Pacific Gas & Electric cool-roof rebate program.at http://www.pge.com/res/rebates/cool_roof/ . ROH. 2001.California Edison cool-roof rebate program. Online at

  8. Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cost to adding the cool roof as part of the roof replacement project and it will save taxpayers 2,000 every year in building energy costs. Cool roofs use lighter-colored...

  9. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-01-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. A new mechanical approach to estimate rock strengths using the acquired drilling parameters has been proposed. This approach takes a number of important factors, that have never been studied in the previous researches, into the considerations. Good results have been shown using the new approach on the testing data.

  10. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-04-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. More laboratory tests have been performed in this quarter. The analysis performed on the testing data showed: (1) abnormal rotational accelerations can be used as the indicator of the rock interfaces, and (2) the sharp drops of drilling thrust and torque agree well with the locations of fractures.

  11. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  12. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  13. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  14. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar...

  15. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    the energy performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans A thermal model for photovoltaic systems, Solar Energy, Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer 

  16. Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters Building to Save Money by Saving Energy Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

  17. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-06-05-12.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1795 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-06-05-12.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Roof Coating... of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially available roof coatings...

  18. Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P.E.Shirley E. Clark at: http://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain #12;2 Roof Dissolved: 35 Not givenRusty galvanized roof roof (plywood

  19. ROOF CHARACTERISATION RELATED TO FIRE PROPAGATION RISK BY A NUMERICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ROOF CHARACTERISATION RELATED TO FIRE PROPAGATION RISK BY A NUMERICAL APPROACH L. Fournier1 , A by thé roof: - one is thé use of intumescent strips on thé roof, - thé other consists of extending thé fire walls (typically 70 cm or 1 m) above thé roof levé1 in order to prevent thé flame from being blown

  20. RIS-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS Jørn Roed Abstract. In order to find the run-off from roof material a roof has been constructed with two different slopes (30° and 45°). Beryllium-7 and caesium-137 has been used as tracers. Considering new roof material the pollution removed by runoff processes has been shown

  1. Green Roofs - Federal Technology Alert | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Alert Federal Technology Alert provides summary information on candidate energy-saving technologies. ftagreenroofs.pdf More Documents & Publications Guidelines...

  2. Green Roofs in the New York Metropolitan Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of New York and Regional Plan Association Stuart Gaffin, Center for Climate Systems Research Hodges, Hunter College, City University of New York Paul Mankiewicz, Gaia Institute Franco Montalto, eDesign and Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, Columbia University Cynthia Rosenzweig, NASA

  3. Design considerations for retractable-roof stadia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazer, Andrew H., 1981-

    2005-01-01

    As existing open-air or fully enclosed stadia are reaching their life expectancies, cities are choosing to replace them with structures with moving roofs. This kind of facility provides protection from weather for spectators, ...

  4. Next Generation Roofs and Attics for Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Prototype residential roof and attic assemblies were constructed and field tested in a mixed-humid U.S. climate. Summer field data showed that at peak day irradiance the heat transfer penetrating the roof deck dropped almost 90% compared with heat transfer for a conventional roof and attic assembly. The prototype assemblies use a combination of strategies: infrared reflective cool roofs, radiant barriers, above-sheathing ventilation, low-emittance surfaces, insulation, and thermal mass to reduce the attic air temperature and thus the heat transfer into the home. The prototype assemblies exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor air temperature. Field results were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for the densely populated, hot and dry southeastern and central-basin regions of California. New construction in the central basin could realize a 12% drop in ceiling and air-conditioning annual load compared with a code-compliant roof and attic having solar reflectance of 0.25 and thermal emittance of 0.75. In the hot, dry southeastern region of California, the combined ceiling and duct annual load drops by 23% of that computed for a code-compliant roof and attic assembly. Eliminating air leakage from ducts placed in unconditioned attics yielded savings comparable to the best simulated roof and attic systems. Retrofitting an infrared reflective clay tile roof with 1 -in (0.032-m) of EPS foam above the sheathing and improving existing ductwork by reducing air leakage and wrapping ducts with insulation can yield annual savings of about $200 compared with energy costs for pre-1980 construction.

  5. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Build San Antonio Green, San Antonio, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    PNNL, FSEC, and CalcsPlus provided technical assistance to Build San Antonio Green on three deep energy retrofits. For this gut rehab they replaced the old roof with a steeper roof and replaced drywall while adding insulation, new HVAC, sealed ducts, transfer grilles, outside air run-time ventilation, new lighting and water heater.

  6. Raising the Roof: California Housing Development Projections and Constraints, 1997-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, John D.

    2000-01-01

    2000-01 Raising the Roof: California Housing Developmentreport, “Raising the Roof: California Housing Developmentat Berkeley Raising the Roof: California Housing Development

  7. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electronic equipment and computing resources. Energy Conservation Efficient Water Use & Management High Performance Sustainable Buildings Greening...

  8. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  9. Building Energy Efficiency Standards Approved Default Cool Roof Performance Values for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Energy Efficiency Standards Approved Default Cool Roof Performance Values for Low-Sloped Roofs That Use Aggregate As the Surface Layer Aggregate used as the surface layer of low-sloped roofs shall have the default cool roof properties

  10. Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

    2004-01-01

    of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems...

  11. June 2009 UWMREPORT 15 solar cells turn Bolton roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    June 2009 · UWMREPORT · 15 solar cells turn Bolton roof into an energy lab By Laura L. Hunt hanks are behind the acquisition of 74 solar panels that were recently installed on the second-floor roof of Bolton

  12. PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

  13. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of the roof under the solar panel (Fig.  2).  An air temperature of the  solar panel is similar to the roof 

  14. Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 The...

  15. Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE and Across the Federal Government Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE and Across the Federal...

  16. Procedure for measuring the solar reflectance of flat or curved roofing assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof can decrease cooling-electricity use, cooling-power

  17. Cool Roof Resource Guide for Federal Agencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Resource guide containing information and links for the evaluation and installation of cool roofs within the Federal Government

  18. Solar Domestic Water Heating: a Roof-Integrated Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-03

    This fact sheet describes an evaluation of the performance of a roof-integrated solar water heating system.

  19. Poster No.: 169 Sulci and Curvature: Detection of the Roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Poster No.: 169 Sulci and Curvature: Detection of the Roof Christophe Renault, Michel Desvignes] used the superficial trace of sulci, we detect the roof of the sulci, which presents less intersection the curvature K1 et K2 are equal. Results We have presented a method to extract roof of sulci with a sub

  20. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1 and Jennifer M. Jacobs, M.ASCE2 Abstract: A five parameter, daily vegetated roof water balance model (VR-WBM) was developed, calibrated, and validated by using experimental vegetated roof data from the Seacoast, New

  1. what is a cool roof? what is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    what is a cool roof? what is the solar reflectance index (sri)? SRI combines SR and TE approach. SRI val- ues range from 0 to 100, with the higher value, the better. cool roof requirements The Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC), at www.coolroofs.org, is the sole entity the California Energy

  2. Practical Approach to Designing Wood Roof Truss Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rakesh

    Practical Approach to Designing Wood Roof Truss Assemblies Rakesh Gupta, M.ASCE1 ; and Pranueng to evaluate "system effects" in light-frame roof truss assemblies. The goal of this study was to develop an improved and practical design method for 3D roof truss assemblies used in residential construction. A truss

  3. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation, and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA.

  4. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of thermal mass, ceiling insulation and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate energy/cost savings between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft Irwin, CA.

  5. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tadolini, Stephen C. (Lakewood, CO); Dolinar, Dennis R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  6. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  7. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  8. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2007-06-01

    Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

  9. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  10. Evaluation of convex roof entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geza Toth; Tobias Moroder; Otfried Gühne

    2014-10-20

    We show a powerful method to compute entanglement measures based on convex roof constructions. In particular, our method is applicable to measures that, for pure states, can be written as low order polynomials of operator expectation values. We show how to compute the linear entropy of entanglement, the linear entanglement of assistance, and a bound on the dimension of the entanglement for bipartite systems. We discuss how to obtain the convex roof of the three-tangle for three-qubit states. We also show how to calculate the linear entropy of entanglement and the quantum Fisher information based on partial information or device independent information. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method by concrete examples

  11. Generalized roof duality and bisubmodular functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmogorov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Consider a convex relaxation $\\hat f$ of a pseudo-boolean function $f$. We say that the relaxation is {\\em totally half-integral} if $\\hat f(\\bx)$ is a polyhedral function with half-integral extreme points $\\bx$, and this property is preserved after adding an arbitrary combination of constraints of the form $x_i=x_j$, $x_i=1-x_j$, and $x_i=\\gamma$ where $\\gamma\\in\\{0, 1, 1/2}$ is a constant. A well-known example is the {\\em roof duality} relaxation for quadratic pseudo-boolean functions $f$. We argue that total half-integrality is a natural requirement for generalizations of roof duality to arbitrary pseudo-boolean functions. Our contributions are as follows. First, we provide a complete characterization of totally half-integral relaxations $\\hat f$ by establishing a one-to-one correspondence with {\\em bisubmodular functions}. Second, we give a new characterization of bisubmodular functions. Finally, we show some relationships between general totally half-integral relaxations and relaxations based on the roof...

  12. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-01-15

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) one more field test has been conducted in an underground coal mine, (2) optimization studies of the control parameters have been conducted, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (4) about 98% of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed, (5) A real time roof geology mapping system for roof bolters in limestone mine, including a special version of the geology mapping program and hardware, has already been verified to perform very well in underground production condition.

  13. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of green chemistry and green engineering and by consideringResearch, Green Chemistry and Green Engineering Center, YaleOF GREEN CHEMISTRY AND GREEN ENGINEERING Julie Zimmerman By

  14. Theory vs. Practice in Direct Evaporative Roof Spray Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. L.; Smith, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    mechanical air conditioning, roof spray cooling applies it directly to the largest source of external heat on a typical 1-2 story commercial/ industrial facility by spraying the roof with a fine mist of water and allowing the water to evaporate.../O SPRAY ROCCI Y/ SPRAY DIFFERUlCE (-0 ('0 (OF) ELECTRICAL CONPONENTS NANUFACTURING PLAKT, RIO PIEDRAS, PR This test was performed by company employees in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the roof spray cooling system recently installed...

  15. Cool Roof Systems; What is the Condensation Risk?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A white roof, or cool roof, is constructed to decrease thermal loads from solar radiation, therefore saving energy by decreasing the cooling demands. Unfortunately, cool roofs with a mechanically attached membrane have shown a higher risk of intermediate condensation in the materials below the membrane in certain climates (Ennis & Kehrer, 2011) and in comparison with similar constructions with a darker exterior surface (Bludau, Zirkelbach, & Kuenzel, 2009). As a consequence, questions have been raised regarding the sustainability and reliability of using cool roof membranes in northern U.S. climate zones.

  16. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy...

  17. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy...

  18. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    2000 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings 1:1-11 (to energy efficiency standards for buildings. Online ataddress cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards

  19. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittanceuse photovoltaic, solar- thermal, or roof-garden systems2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittance

  20. Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to provide technical support to partnering nations. International activities include tracking the deployment of cool roofs on public and private sector buildings, sharing best...

  1. Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

    2003-04-07

    We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

  2. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a decision on the PV installation, the Department of Energy Tiger Team has investigated potential indirect benefits of installing a solar PV system on the Convention Center roof....

  3. Evaluation of a Direct Evaporative Roof-Spray Cooling System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasco, A.; Pittard, R.; Kondepudi, S. N.; Somasundaram, S.

    1987-01-01

    of Evaporative Cooling of Roofs", Project Report, I (1986). JULY 29 * EXP-Wcr + EXP-DRY --- MOO-WET -- MOD-DRY TIME OF DAY IN DECIMAL HOURS Figure 3. Heat Flux Through the Roof - July 29 TIME OF DAY IN DECIMAL HOURS 150- v, W W 140- CC Z: P 130... gunny bags on the temperatures and heat flux at the ceiling surface of thick roofs. They concluded that, in the tropics, for the effect of reduced indoor temper- atures to be more effective, the roofs needed to be treated. They further confirmed...

  4. Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Adoption of infrared-reflective paints is one of the major advances in roofing in our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    . Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Adoption of infrared-reflective paints is one of the major advances in roofing in our century. ORNL's Building Envelopes Program has conducted research for many roofing consortiums and their affiliates to help them develop cool roof products. Based

  5. A few words about intermodulation dynamic range and roofing filters: "Roofing filter" is the current buzzword in high-end radios. Just what does it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    A few words about intermodulation dynamic range and roofing filters: "Roofing filter" is the current buzzword in high-end radios. Just what does it mean? Basically, a roofing filter is simply to be effective. The term "roofing" stems from the fact that it protects the rest of the radio following it from

  6. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  7. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, EtInformationRoof Calculator Jump to:

  8. Ethnography of Cool Roof Retrofits: The Role of Rebates in the Materials Selection Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur-Stommen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    mind  when  I  say  ‘cool  roof’?   “Light  color.  Long  the  idea  for  a  cool  roof?   What  kind  of  research  the  idea  for  a  cool  roof?   Where  did  you  first  

  9. Procedure for measuring the solar reflectance of flat or curved roofing assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    energy-use effects of cool roofs on California commercialfrom the application of reflective roofs in two small non-saving potentials of light-colored roofs for residential and

  10. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavana, Medhi

    2011-01-01

    on Heating Performance of Roof Pond XSL803-6664 Fig. 4.on Heating Performance of Roof Pond Phoenix, Arizona Auguston Cooling Performance of Roof Pond HOur of the doy (solar

  11. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  12. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  13. Effect of Surface Mass on Roof Thermal Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.; Shipp, P. H.; Sanders, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    -rmrur.~ and nut nuua for tha Pmr Irt Mlly war. Twc hr1.d: bm&q T-r.rur.s CInm ter .r.d1sr1- BARE ROOF, MAY 1 -- MAY 7, 1986 *CAM 0- CmalwNs I70 BARE ROOF, MAY 1 -. MAY 7, 1986 wc1mu WUNY~ cwnms , ,---- ---"- .- - - nuc, MR. . -. El EXPWl...

  14. Hygrothermal Performance of West Coast Wood Deck Roofing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of roofing assemblies are necessary in order to understand and adequately predict actual the hygrothermal performance. At the request of GAF, simulations have been setup to verify the difference in performance between white and black roofing membrane colors in relation to critical moisture accumulation for traditional low slope wood deck roofing systems typically deployed in various western U.S. Climate Zones. The performance of these roof assemblies has been simulated in the hygrothermal calculation tool of WUFI, from which the result was evaluated based on a defined criterion for moisture safety. The criterion was defined as the maximum accepted water content for wood materials and the highest acceptable moisture accumulation rate in relation to the risk of rot. Based on the criterion, the roof assemblies were certified as being either safe, risky or assumed to fail. The roof assemblies were simulated in different western climates, with varying insulation thicknesses, two different types of wooden decking, applied with varying interior moisture load and with either a high or low solar absorptivity at the roof surface (black or white surface color). The results show that the performance of the studied roof assemblies differs with regard to all of the varying parameters, especially the climate and the indoor moisture load.

  15. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Efficient Economy. This paper summarizes measured cooling energy savings from the application of white roofefficient cooling equipment. In the nonresidential-building overall-envelope approach, the roof’efficient than that required in new construction. Measured Building Energy Savings Cool roofs

  16. Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceived Justice behind Disruptive Tactics of Migrant Wage Claimants in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X; Wang, L; Su, Y

    2013-01-01

    bs_bs_banner Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceivedmigrant workers perch on roof tops or towering construction

  17. Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

  18. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Energy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating SystemEnergy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating SystemEnergy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating System

  19. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-04-15

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) one more field test has been conducted in an underground coal mine, (2) optimization studies of the control parameters have been conducted, (3) the relationship among feed pressure, penetration rate and rotation rate seems to be a good indicator for estimating rock strength when both penetration rate and rotation rate are controlled or kept constant, (4) the empirical equations for eliminating the machine effect on drilling parameters were developed and verified, and (5) a real time roof geology mapping system for roof bolters in limestone mine, including a special version of the geology mapping program and hardware, performs very well in underground production condition.

  20. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-04-15

    In this quarter, the research effort is to develop the drill control unit (DCU) that acquire, store drilling parameters and control the drilling operation. The relevant publications have been reviewed and the methodology developed by previous researchers has been evaluated using the collected data in our laboratory and field tests conducted prior to the start of this project. Numerical modeling for exploring roof bolting mechanism has been started.

  1. Flexible shaft and roof drilling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanz, John H. (Carlisle, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for drilling holes in the roof of a mine has a flexible shaft with a pair of oppositely wound, coaxial flat bands. One of the flat bands defines an inner spring that is wound right handed into a helical configuration, adjacent convolutions being in nesting relationship to one another. The other flat band defines an outer spring that is wound left handed into a helical configuration about the inner band, adjacent convolutions being nesting relationship with one another. A transition member that is configured to hold a rock bit is mounted to one end of the flexible shaft. When torque and thrust are applied to the flexible shaft by a driver, the inner spring expands outwardly and the outer spring contracts inwardly to form a relatively rigid shaft.

  2. Buying green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, William B., II

    2006-01-01

    Green development has received much attention over the past decade, with the greatest interest coming from designers. However, the development and investment communities have been slower to adopt green principles, and the ...

  3. Green Houston 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spanjian, L.

    2012-01-01

    Laura Spanjian, Sustainability Director www.greenhoustontx.gov www.codegreenhouston.org www.houstongoc.org www.greenhoustontx.gov/houstondriveselectric Follow Houston, the green City greenhoustontx More information on all Green...

  4. Green Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials Environmental Sustainability Sustainability Goals Recycling Green Purchasing Pollution Prevention Reusing Water Feature Stories More Like This Environmental Management...

  5. Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX SECTION 02072 - REMOVAL OF INTACT INCIDENTAL ASBESTOS CONTAINING ROOFING MATERIAL (Rev.9/00) PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS Roof System Components Chart" for location of asbestos containing roofing materials. 1.2 SUMMARY A

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE An experimental study of flow fields and wind loads on gable-roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    RESEARCH ARTICLE An experimental study of flow fields and wind loads on gable-roof building models the resultant wind loads acting on low-rise, gable-roof buildings induced by violent microburst-like winds State University. Two gable-roof building models with the same base plan and mean roof height

  7. Generalized Roof Duality for Pseudo-Boolean Optimization Fredrik Kahl Petter Strandmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Generalized Roof Duality for Pseudo-Boolean Optimization Fredrik Kahl Petter Strandmark Centre to a quadratic pseudo-boolean function, and then use roof duality for ob- taining a lower bound. Roof duality to polynomials of higher degree, where quadratic roof duality appears as a special case. Op- timal relaxations

  8. TCD Green Campus Green Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    School of Nursing & Midwifery (D'Olier Street) College Green/Foster Place South Dunlop Oriel House#12;DIAGRAM TCD Green Campus Policies Green Campus Committee 1. Energy, Climate Change & Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2. Waste Management, Recycling & Litter Reduction 3. Water and Wastewater 4. Sustainable

  9. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    comes from both the solar panel and the sky weighted by the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of of a roof  underneath a solar panel compared to that of an 

  10. Exposure to Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyante (MDI) among polyurethane roof workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narvaez-Cuevas, Carmen Lourdes

    1996-01-01

    and humidity problems by means of polyurethane roof insulation. Concentrations of MDI produced by the spray application of polyurethane foam were measured by personal air samples. Samples were collected by drawing a known volume of air through an impregnated...

  11. Plain Talk About Condensation and Radiation Below Metal Roof Assemblies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, L.

    1992-01-01

    give rise to certain disadvantages in comfort, durability and operating costs (7) This paper provides a brief historical overview of common metal roof insulation methods as well as recent innovations for low cost/no cost performance enhancements...

  12. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identified, End Q2 3. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 4. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 Budget: Total DOE to date: 474,132 Total future DOE : 0 Key Partners:...

  13. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  14. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-10-15

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) laboratory tests have been conducted, (2) with the added trendline analysis method, the accuracy of the data interpretation methodology will be improved, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (3) about one half of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed.

  15. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    travel and commuting to and from work by 13 percent. Energy Conservation Efficient Water Use & Management High Performance Sustainable Buildings Greening...

  16. Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH-control services not specified in other sections, including the following: 1. Infrared Roof Moisture Survey 2. Alternate Roof Moisture Survey 3. Roof Drain Testing 4. Rooftop Equipment Survey/Testing 1.3 INFRARED ROOF

  17. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  18. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Miller, William A; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  19. Green Infrastructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tildwell, J.

    2011-01-01

    SWM, Green Buildings, Energy Forum, Texas Smartscape) ? Deteriorating Roadways ? ASCE Report Card on Texas Infrastructure for 2008 identified roads as the #1 infrastructure concern ? Congestion ? DFW congestion is growing over 45% faster than...? ? ASCE Sustainability ? Greenroads ? Green Streets ? SmartCode ? New York High Performance Infrastructure Guidelines ? Institute of Transportation Engineers ? American Public Works Association ? ?and many more. Planning ? City and Regional...

  20. Blending of processed pitches for the production of roofing asphalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.A.; Sawatzky, H.

    1987-01-01

    Asphalt is a natural constituent of crude oils and is presently produced from the distillation residues of refining feedstocks. The asphalt market is saturated at this time and it appears that in the near future refineries will upgrade bitumens/heavy oils and vacuum residues via technologies such as hydrocracking, H-Oil and LC-Fining to produce more transportation fuels. Therefore, there will be economic pressure for the utilization of the resulting processed residues as road and roofing asphalts rather than low grade fuels. In this work the use of processed residues for the production of roofing asphalts has been investigated. Results show that 28-30 wt% of processed residue can be blended with 150-200 penetration asphalt cement to produce Type I roofing asphalt. The physical properties of the roofing asphalts were examined in terms of the composition (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes) as well as average molecular weight of the maltenes and asphaltenes determined by gel permeation chromatography. The results are compared with two roofing asphalts obtained from petroleum refineries.

  1. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  2. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    cooling load from cool roofs. While important, the annual CO2008. Evolution of cool roof standards in the United States.2005. “Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air

  3. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2004-04-15

    A one-year non-cost extension has been granted for this project. In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) laboratory tests have been conducted, (2) with the added trendline analysis method, the accuracy of the data interpretation methodology will be improved and the interfaces and voids can be more reliably detected, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (3) about 80% of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed and a special version of the program is in the field testing stage.

  4. Reducing roof fall accidents on retreat mining sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark, C.; Zelanko, J.C. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States). Rock Mechanics Section

    2005-12-15

    Pillar recovery continues to be one of the most hazardous activities in underground mining. Global stability, achieved through proper pillar design, is a necessary prerequisite for safe pillar recovery. Local stability means preventing roof falls in the working area. It is achieved by minimizing the 'risk factors' described in this paper. Roof Control Plans developed at each underground coal mine often address both engineering parameters and human behavior issues. These plans are essential to all mining activities, but nowhere are they more important than in pillar recovery. Pillaring leaves little tolerance for error, and mistakes can be deadly. Roof Control Plans must be carefully drawn up to address site-specific conditions, and then carefully implemented and followed. Miners and foremen involved in pillar extraction should be trained to know and understand the plan prior to beginning retreat mining. More details can be found at www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/pubs/pdfs/rtrog.pdf. 3 figs.

  5. Tangles of superpositions and the convex-roof extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Osterloh; Jens Siewert; Armin Uhlmann

    2007-10-31

    We discuss aspects of the convex-roof extension of multipartite entanglement measures, that is, $SL(2,\\CC)$ invariant tangles. We highlight two key concepts that contain valuable information about the tangle of a density matrix: the {\\em zero-polytope} is a convex set of density matrices with vanishing tangle whereas the {\\em convex characteristic curve} readily provides a non-trivial lower bound for the convex roof and serves as a tool for constructing the convex roof outside the zero-polytope. Both concepts are derived from the tangle for superpositions of the eigenstates of the density matrix. We illustrate their application by considering examples of density matrices for two-qubit and three-qubit states of rank 2, thereby pointing out both the power and the limitations of the concepts.

  6. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  7. Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    1986-01-01

    in the Since the "Energy Cris is" Evaporat ive Roof process of producing fabrics. In the fifties ~nd Coo 1ing Sys terns have gained increased acceptance sixties, air conditioning became commonplace as as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost.... An ingenious irrigation engineer des igned the load on existing air conditioning systems by and ins ta lled a "sys tern" to coo1 the roof of a 25% or more and save a comparab Ie amount in new "high-rise", three-story apartment building in construction. Yet...

  8. Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption for Cool Roofing Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The spread of cool roofing has been more than prolific over the last decade. Driven by public demand and by government initiatives cool roofing has been a recognized low cost method to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back in to the atmosphere. While much of the country can benefit from the use of cool coatings it remains to be seen whether the energy savings described are appropriate in cooler climates. By use of commonly available calculators one can analyze the potential energy savings based on environmental conditions and construction practices.

  9. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Lower Cleanroom Roof Quick Load Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-11-17

    This engineering note documents calculations done to determine the margin of safety for the lower clean room roof. The analysis was done to give me a feeling of what the loads, stresses and capacity of the roof is prior to installation and installation work to be done for the helium refrigerator upgrade. The result of this quick look showed that the calculated loads produce stress values and loads at about half the allowables. Based on this result, I do not think that special precautions above personal judgement are required for the installation work.

  10. CEBAF Center Roof Work to Impact Parking Lot, Loading Dock Area...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roof Work to Impact Parking Lot, Loading Dock Area Beginning on July 20, 2015 and continuing for about two weeks, a subcontractor will be working on the CEBAF Center F Wing roof....

  11. Conservation of stone-roofs: Challenges and the effect of new Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teba, Tarek

    Stone-roofing has a great history which spans many millennia BC which witnessed a lot of development to roofing systems and geometry regarding the area and type of building demands. Therefore, this paper discusses this ...

  12. You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs for Wooden Rooftops You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs for Wooden Rooftops June 17,...

  13. Thermal performance of a Concrete Cool Roof under different climatic conditions of Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hernández-Pérez, I.; Álvarez, G.; Gilbert, H.; Xamán, J.; Chávez, Y.; Shah, B.

    2014-11-27

    A cool roof is an ordinary roof with a reflective coating on the exterior surface which has a high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance. These properties let the roof keep a lower temperature than a standard roof under the same conditions. In this work, the thermal performance of a concrete roof with and without insulation and with two colors has been analyzed using the finite volume method. The boundary conditions of the external roof surface were taken from hourly averaged climatic data of four cities. For the internal surface, it is considered that the building is air-conditioned and themore »inside air has a constant temperature. The interior surface temperature and the heat flux rates into the roofs were obtained for two consecutive days in order to assess the benefits of a cool roofs in different climates.« less

  14. Sustainable Retrofit of Residential Roofs Using Metal Roofing Panels, Thin-Film Photovoltaic Laminates, and PCM Heat Sink Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Biswas, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    During September-October 2009, research teams representing Metal Construction Association (the largest North American trade association representing metal building manufacturers, builders, and material suppliers), CertainTeed (one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of thermal insulation and building envelope materials), Unisolar (largest U.S. producer of amorphous silicone photo-voltaic (PV) laminates), Phase Change Energy (manufacturer of bio-based PCM), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) installed three experimental attics utilizing different roof retrofit strategies in the ORNL campus. The main goal of this project was experimental evaluation of a newly-developed sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing amorphous silicone PV laminates integrated with metal roof and PCM heat sink. The experimental attic with PV laminate was expected to work during the winter time as a passive solar collector with PCM storing solar heat, absorbed during the day, and increasing overall attic air temperature during the night.

  15. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptiverequirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2003-07-01

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability toreflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiateheat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittanceroofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool rooffor a non-cool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, coolingpower demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightlyincreasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywideambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasinghuman comfort.DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of acool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential (NR)building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energysavings of approximately 3.2 kW h/m2 (300 kW h/1000 ft2), average annualnatural gas deficits of 5.6 MJ/m2 (4.9 therm/1000 ft2), average annualsource energy savings of 30 MJ/m2 (2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2), and average peakpower demand savings of 2.1 W/m2 (0.19 kW/1000 ft2). The 15-year netpresent value (NPV) of energy savings averages $4.90/m2 ($450/1000 ft2)with time-dependent valuation (TDV), and $4.00/m2 ($370/1000 ft2) withoutTDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included,the average total savings (15-year NPV+equipment savings) rises to$5.90/m2 ($550/1000 ft2) with TDV, and to $5.00/m2 ($470/1000 ft2)without TDV.Total savings range from 1.90 to 8.30 $/m2 (0.18 0.77 $/ft2)with TDV, and from 1.70 to 7.10 $/m2 (0.16 0.66 $/ft2) without TDV,across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a coolroof is 0.00 2.20 $/m2 (0.00 0.20 $/ft2). Cool roofs with premiums up to$2.20/m2 ($0.20/ft2) are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 216; those with premiums not exceeding $1.90/m2 ($0.18/ft2) are expectedto be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommendsthat the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24,Part 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for NR buildings withlow-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in allCalifornia climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meetprescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an"overall-envelope" approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performanceapproach (all roof types).

  16. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in- cluding

  17. STRENGTHENING OF CONCRETE ROOF USING CFRP STRIPS Emile Shehata, Sami Rizkalla .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRENGTHENING OF CONCRETE ROOF USING CFRP STRIPS Emile Shehata, Sami Rizkalla . ISIS-Canada NCE and control the deformation of existing roof panels at the North End Winnipeg Pollution Control Center (NEWPCC old concrete roof structure. The use of epoxy-bonded CFRP laminates was selected du

  18. The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1/4 The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov 7 May 2012 Solar reflective "cool" roofs save energy, money, and CO2 when applied to air on the electrical grid by reducing late-afternoon peak power demand. Widespread use of cool roofs can lower outdoor

  19. Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX SECTION 02071 - REMOVAL OF ASBESTOS CONTAINING ROOFING MATERIAL (Rev.9/00) PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings Specification Sections, apply to this Section. B. Refer to Drawing C-1, "Existing Roof System Components Chart

  20. Development/Plasticity/Repair The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Roof Plate Chemorepellent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Samantha

    Development/Plasticity/Repair The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Roof Plate Chemorepellent Regulates, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8 Commissural spinal axons extend away from the roof plate (RP) in response to the dorsal midline and are generated by the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the roof plate (RP) (Liem

  1. BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES presents an approach to creating a polyhedral model of building roof from LiDAR point clouds using. The normal vectors are then clustered together to determine the principal directions of the roof planes

  2. Cool Roofs and Global Cooling Surabi Menon, Ronnen Levinson, Marc Fischer, Dev Millstein,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cool Roofs and Global Cooling Surabi Menon, Ronnen Levinson, Marc Fischer, Dev Millstein, Nancy potential of reflective (or white or cool) surfaces such as roofs and pavements. However, the article's results regarding white roofs are preliminary and uncertain. Moreover there are other published papers

  3. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in­ cluding

  4. ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit By Zaher Karp Reuters, July 27, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit Option By Zaher Karp ­ Reuters, July 27, 2009 A new roof and attic system developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building Technology Center. Texas-based Billy Ellis Roofing funds the research through the Building Technology Center

  5. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete ColumnSteel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement Reversals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra-Montesinos, Gustavo J.

    Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Column­Steel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement study on the seismic response of two hybrid RC column-to-steel S beam RCS roof level T longitudinal bars; and 2 confinement requirements in RCS roof level T-connections. In the first subassembly

  6. Tighter Relaxations for Higher-Order Models based on Generalized Roof Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Tighter Relaxations for Higher-Order Models based on Generalized Roof Duality Johan Fredriksson one of the most successful approaches, namely roof duality, for approximately solving such problems cone. In the sec- ond method, it is shown that the roof dual bound can be applied in an iterated way

  7. Modelling the Zn emissions from roofing materials at Crteil city scale -Defining a methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling the Zn emissions from roofing materials at Créteil city scale - Defining a methodology@cereve.enpc.fr) Abstract Today, urban runoff is considered as an important source of environment pollution. Roofing. An accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required at the city scale. This paper aims

  8. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons O. Richoux, C of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof

  9. A COST BASED APPROACH TO DESIGN OF RESIDENTIAL STEEL ROOF SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    A COST BASED APPROACH TO DESIGN OF RESIDENTIAL STEEL ROOF SYSTEMS B. Mobasher1 , S-Y.Chen2 , C-5306 Abstract A comprehensive system for the design of residential steel roof truss systems is presented automatically design a roof truss given minimal input and using the design curves as the performance constraints

  10. LITHOSPHERE | | www.gsapubs.org Formation of passive-roof duplexes in the Colombian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    with a passive-roof duplex on its hinterland side if surface mass transport is combined with efficient sedimentLITHOSPHERE | | www.gsapubs.org Formation of passive-roof duplexes in the Colombian Subandes­SANTA BARBARA, 1832 ELLISON HALL, SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 93106-4060, USA ABSTRACT Passive-roof duplexes

  11. More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature. Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount

  12. More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products, cellulose or wool is an alternative to traditional glass fiber batting. Incorporating passive solar design- heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature

  13. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q2 and Q6 2. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 and Q7 3. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 and Q8 4. Potential Manufacturing Partner, Q3 and ongoing 5. Update BTO...

  14. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-07-15

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Field tests have been performed in two underground coal mines in this quarter. It also found from the tests that the non-drilling thrust and torque should be deducted from the acquired drilling data. The non-drilling torque is actually higher than that is used to overcome the shear strength is proportional to the rotation rate.

  15. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  16. Load test of the 283W Clearwell Roof Deck and Support Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-09-12

    The 283W Clearwell roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 0, as modified below. The 283W Clearwell is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: Roof deck - concrete slab supported by columns and walls; Roof membrane - tar and gravel; Roof slope - flat (< 10 deg); and Roof elevation - approximately 6 in. above ground level. The 283W Clearwell was visited in April 1993 for a visual inspection, but could not be inspected because of the confined space requirements. It was revisited in February 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof could not be inspected, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof for personnel access.

  17. CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX A CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) A.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 8) A.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 19) A.5455 Los

  18. INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7) B.5108 Santa Susana, ETEC Bldg 462 (6th Floor, and 1st Floor (pp. 19) B.5450 Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) B.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 7) B.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 13) B

  19. Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH b. Submittals. c. Mobilization. d. Changing room trailer. e. Roofing demolition; equipment, containers & fees. f. Roofing

  20. Bridgeton Research Center Roof Replacement and Related Work December 4, 2000 DSR # 0029-99 C/D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridgeton Research Center Roof Replacement and Related Work December 4, 2000 DSR # 0029-99 C/D SECTION 07220 ­ ROOF INSULATION PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings and general provisions: contains requirements for wood blocking to be installed prior to roof insulation. 1. Roof insulation

  1. Green Weight 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Haji, A.; Al-Omair, A.

    2010-01-01

    Green-weight is a novel system designed to supply a high-rise building with all its needs of electricity using wind energy and to supplement its lighting needs with natural sunlight. David Fisher has proposed an ingenious method to harness the wind...

  2. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    chemistry as it produces green, sustainable union jobs; •jobs and industries, green remediation, and green chemistry.jobs—including those connected to the emerging field of green chemistry—and

  3. Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Washington Sawmill Facility Copper ( /L) Lead ( /L) Zinc ( /L)(g/L) (g/L) (g/L) Built-up roof (plywood COV (%) Zinc 0.42 ­ 14.7 88 7 Copper 0.01 ­ 1.4 75 24 Lead Not detected NA NA From: Tobiason, S. (2004 for Laboratory and Field Monitoring · pHpH · Conductivity · Chemical oxygen demand ­ surrogate for organics

  4. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Innovative Metal Building Roof Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Daniel James [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In order to meet the coming energy codes, multiple layers of various insulation types will be required. The demand for greater efficiency has pushed insulation levels beyond the cavity depth. These experiments show the potential for improving metal building roof thermal performance. Additional work is currently being done by several stakeholders, so the data is expanding. These experiments are for research and development purposes, and may not be viable for immediate use.

  5. New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentratingInstitutionalEnergyNew CleanNew Cool Roof

  6. A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

    2013-01-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

  7. Equilibrium thermal characteristics of a building integrated photovoltaic tiled roof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, L.; Gottschalg, R.; Loveday, D.L. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Infield, D.G. [Institute of Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Davies, D.; Berry, M. [Solarcentury, 91-94 Lower Marsh Waterloo, London, SE1 7AB (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules attain high temperatures when exposed to a combination of high radiation levels and elevated ambient temperatures. The temperature rise can be particularly problematic for fully building integrated PV (BIPV) roof tile systems if back ventilation is restricted. PV laminates could suffer yield degradation and accelerated aging in these conditions. This paper presents a laboratory based experimental investigation undertaken to determine the potential for high temperature operation in such a BIPV installation. This is achieved by ascertaining the dependence of the PV roof tile temperature on incident radiation and ambient temperature. A theory based correction was developed to account for the unrealistic sky temperature of the solar simulator used in the experiments. The particular PV roof tiles used are warranted up to an operational temperature of 85 C, anything above this temperature will void the warranty because of potential damage to the integrity of the encapsulation. As a guide for installers, a map of southern Europe has been generated indicating locations where excessive module temperatures might be expected and thus where installation is inadvisable. (author)

  8. GREEN ENGINEERING PROGRAM Green Engineering & Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    GREEN ENGINEERING PROGRAM Green Engineering & Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) at Virginia Tech Oak Ridge National Lab April 10, 2014 Dr. Sean McGinnis Director ­ VT Green Engineering Program Research Associate Professor ­ Materials Science & Engineering #12;GREEN ENGINEERING PROGRAM Virginia Tech College

  9. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01

    , Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only... in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

  10. Green Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobalADDITIONAL RESOURCESGrantsGreen

  11. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  12. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Upgrade Piping Loads on Cleanroom Roof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-08-28

    The proposed piping layout for the DO upgrade will run along the south wall of DAB. The cryogenic service pipe runs above the upper and lower cleanroom roofs and will need to be supported by the roofs beams. Calculations were done to determine the stresses in the I-beams created by the existing and additional loads due to the upgrade. Refer to drawing no. 3823.115-ME-317283 for drawings of the piping layout. Figure 1 shows the 'plan view' portion of this drawing. The weight of the individual lines were calculated in figure 2 assuming a pipe density of O.28 lbm/in{sup 3} for stainless steel (0.12% C) and a fluid density (assuming LN2 at 1 atm) of 0.03 lbm/in{sup 3}. The weights of the corrugated steel flooring, assembly hall feed cans, support beams, and roof hatch were also included in the analysis. These loads are calculated on pgs. 5-6. A floor load of 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} was also added in order to maintain the existing floor load limit in addition to the added piping loads. Measurements of the dimensions of the I-beams determined that the nominal sizes of the beams were W8 x 21 for the lower roof and W14 x 26 for the upper roof. Pipe lengths were determined from the drawing for each of the lines on pgs. 1-2 of the calculations (refer to all piping by line numbers according to figure 2). A total weight was calculated for lines 3-9 along the south wall and lines 1-2 running along the north wall of the lower cleanroom roof. To simplify the calculations these weights were assumed to be evenly distributed on the 5 I-beam supports of the lower cleanroom roof 2.5 feet in from the south wall. The stress analysis was done using FrameMac, a 2-D finite element program for the Macintosh. Beam 3 was not included in the analysis because it is structurally equivalent to beam 1. The program outputted maximum values for shear stress, bending stress, shear force, and moments in each of the beams analyzed. These values were then compared to the allowable stresses as per the specifications and codes stated in the AISC: Manual of Steel Construction. The stresses on the roof beams needed to be determined in a number of different places. The first was in the beam itself which included the flange and web sections. The second place was at the ends of the beams where the flanges were removed to make the perpendicular connections to the other beams on the lower roof. The final point was the framed beam connection which included the bolt analysis. FrameMac calculated stresses only for the beams which included the sections where the flanges were removed to make the end connections. To analyze the connections, the allowable bending and shear stresses were solved for allowable shear and moments. This was done because FrameMac does not have the capability to analyze the dimensions for the bolts and angles used in the connections were known and the program outputted values for reaction forces and moments at the ends of the beams. Multiplying the allowable shear stress for the bolts and angle connections by their respective areas gave the allowable shear force. The allowable moment for the angle connection was calculated by multiplying the section modulus of the angle by the allowable bending stress. These allowable loads are calculated on pgs. 7-8. The allowable and maximum calculated stresses by FrameMac are summarized in a table. In conclusion, the cleanroom roofs will be able to safely support the weight of the upgrade cryogenic piping, feed cans, corrugated flooring and a 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} floor load with the addition of diagonal braces at the ends of beams 1,2,3,4, and 8. The location and size of these diagonal braces are shown in fig. 4. Also, the piping supports and feed cans will all need to be placed directly above the I-beam supports. These supports will consist of unistrut structures that will be detailed and specified separate to this analysis. The output and input data from FrameMac and the drawings used in the analysis follow the calculation pages.

  13. Reflections on Cambridge: Inside the roof of King's College Chapel - 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Alan Macfarlane, a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, visits the roof above the famous Chapel and explains some of its features. Filmed in summer 2009 by Xu Bei....

  14. Ethnography of Cool Roof Retrofits: The Role of Rebates in the Materials Selection Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur-Stommen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    you  qualify  for  a  rebate?   Was  that  a  deciding  Retrofits: The Role of Rebates in the Materials Selectionwho   had  received  a  rebate  for  their  cool  roof  

  15. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  16. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  17. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  18. Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2012-06-01

    This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

  19. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartmentEnergy Air-CooledEnergySteamCool Roof

  20. Cool Roofs and Heat Islands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P JumpFarm Tool Jump to:Roofs

  1. Developing Energy Efficient Roof Systems DEERS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHELEuropeLage LandenDespatchEfficient Roof

  2. Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin theNuclear EnergyPotomacCool Roof Infrastructure Urban

  3. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2011-01-01

    49 Figure 26. Comparison of roof heat flux for East and West49 Figure 27. Roof heat flux vs. outside air temperature for8-19. 50 Figure 28. Roof heat flux vs. outside air

  4. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

  5. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  6. AUTOMATED MODELING OF 3D BUILDING ROOFS USING IMAGE AND LIDAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    AUTOMATED MODELING OF 3D BUILDING ROOFS USING IMAGE AND LIDAR DATA N. Demir* , E. Baltsavias, Detection, 3D Modelling ABSTRACT: In this work, an automated approach for 3D building roof modelling of accurate and complete 3D building models with high degree of automation. Aerial images and LiDAR data

  7. Roof Integrated Solar Absorbers: The Measured Performance of ''Invisible'' Solar Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, C. J. (Florida Solar Energy Center); Merrigan, T. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    2001-10-19

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), with the support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has investigated the thermal performance of solar absorbers that are an integral, yet indistinguishable, part of a building's roof. The first roof-integrated solar absorber (RISA) system was retrofitted into FSEC's Flexible Roof Facility in Cocoa, Florida, in September 1998. This ''proof-of-concept'' system uses the asphalt shingle roof surface and the plywood decking under the shingles as an unglazed solar absorber. Data was gathered for a one-year period on the system performance. In Phase 2, two more RISA prototypes were constructed and submitted for testing. The first used the asphalt shingles on the roof surface with the tubing mounted on the underside of the plywood decking. The second prototype used metal roofing panels over a plywood substrate and placed the polymer tubing between the plywood decking and the metal roofing. This paper takes a first look at the thermal performance results for the ''invisible'' solar absorbers that use the actual roof surface of a building for solar heat collection.

  8. Neuron, Vol. 24, 127141, September, 1999, Copyright 1999 by Cell Press BMPs as Mediators of Roof Plate Repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Samantha

    Neuron, Vol. 24, 127­141, September, 1999, Copyright ©1999 by Cell Press BMPs as Mediators of Roof., 1997). that the roof plate (RP) expresses a diffusible activity One source of FP-independent guidance

  9. Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work Dec. 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work Dec. 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH AFFIDAVIT OF NON-USE OF ASBESTOS Project: Roof Replacement and Related Work at LIBRARY OF SCIENCE & MEDICINE

  10. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranville, Frédéric; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such as polyurethane foam. On a further stage, the thermal mathematical model is replaced by a thermo-aeraulic model which is used to evaluate the thermal resistance of the roof as a function of the airflow rate. The results shows a better performance of the roof in this new configuration, which is widely used in practice. Finally, the mathematical relation between the thermal resistance and the airflow rate is proposed.

  11. Proposal for the award of a contract for the civil engineering work relating to the roof renovation of Building 867

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the civil engineering work relating to the roof renovation of Building 867

  12. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  13. 24897Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 88 / Wednesday, May 7, 1997 / Proposed Rules 1 Petition for review pending, GS Roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for review pending, GS Roofing Products Company, Inc., et al. v. Surface Transportation Board, No. 97­107 (8: In a decision in GS Roofing Products Company, Inc., Beazer West, Inc., D/B/ A Gifford Hill & Company, Bean., Docket No. 41230 (STB served Mar. 11, 1997) (GS Roofing), 1 we reviewed a fact- specific complaint

  14. HOUGH-TRANSFORM AND EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF 3D BUILDING ROOF PLANES FROM LIDAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HOUGH-TRANSFORM AND EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF 3D BUILDING ROOF PLANES reconstruction methods, the techniques allowing the detection of 3D building roof planes are of crucial even if this plane does not always represent a roof plane. So the proposed extension allows harmonizing

  15. A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc in the city of Crteil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc as an important source of environmental pollution. Roofing materials, in particular the metallic ones Directive (2000/60 CE), an accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required on the city

  16. Perspective-Dependent Color-Changing Roofing Sheets Anthony Cartwright, Joseph Karas, Steven McCarthy, Brian Paige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Perspective-Dependent Color-Changing Roofing Sheets Anthony Cartwright, Joseph Karas, Steven Mc are rendered useless in colder climates. Of all the parts of a house, the roof nearly always receives the most in the sky. In concentrated residential areas, multiple roofs will absorb and radiate energy from the sun

  17. 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic assemblies weighing up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Envelope 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic accommodates specimens of up to 606020 cm 24248 in.). 5. Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (Apparatus 3138) #12;RTRA measures effects of long-term natural weather exposure on small, low-slope roof specimens

  18. Quantum Fisher Information as the Convex Roof of Variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu

    2013-02-21

    Quantum Fisher information places the fundamental limit to the accuracy of estimating an unknown parameter. Here we shall provide the quantum Fisher information an operational meaning: a mixed state can be so prepared that a given observable has the minimal averaged variance, which equals exactly to the quantum Fisher information for estimating an unknown parameter generated by the unitary dynamics with the given observable as Hamiltonian. In particular we shall prove that the quantum Fisher information is the convex roof of the variance, as conjectured by Toth and Petz based on numerical and analytical evidences, by constructing explicitly a pure-state ensemble of the given mixed state in which the averaged variance of a given observable equals to the quantum Fisher information.

  19. An analysis of moisture accumulation in the roof cavities of manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, D.

    1995-09-01

    A detailed computer analysis is conducted to investigate whether moisture problems occur in the roof cavity of manufactured homes constructed in compliance with the current Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Standards for manufactured housing. The current HUD Standards require a ceiling vapor retarder, but do not require outdoor ventilation of the roof cavity. In cold climates, the analysis revealed that moisture accumulates at lower roof surface and poses a risk of material degradation. The analysis found the following combination of passive measures to be effective in preventing detrimental winter moisture accumulation at lower surface of the roof: (1) providing a ceiling vapor retarder; (2) sealing penetrations and openings in the ceiling construction, and (3) providing natural ventilation openings in the roof cavity. In addition, the performance of a roof cavity exposed to a hot and humid climate is investigated. The analysis revealed that outdoor ventilation of the roof cavity causes the monthly mean relative humidity at the upper surface of the vapor retarder to exceed 80%. This condition is conducive to mold and mildew growth.

  20. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San José Convention Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The City of San José is considering the installation of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the roof of the San José Convention Center. The installation would be on a lower section of the roof covering approximately 21,000 ft2. To assist city staff in making a decision on the PV installation, the Department of Energy Tiger Team has investigated potential indirect benefits of installing a solar PV system on the Convention Center roof. The indirect benefits include potential increase in roof life, as well as potential reduced heating and cooling load in the building due to roof shading from the PV system.

  1. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  2. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  3. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  4. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  5. EPA Green Power Leadership Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Green Power Leadership Awards recognize exceptional achievement among EPA Green Power Partners and among green power suppliers.

  6. Condensation Risk of Mechanically Attached Roof Systems in Cold Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A white roof, cool roof, is constructed to decrease thermal loads from solar radiation, therefore saving energy by decreasing the cooling demands. Unfortunately, cool roofs with mechanically attached membrane, have shown to have a higher risk of intermediate condensation in the materials below the membrane in certain climates (Ennis & Kehrer, 2011) and in comparisons with similar construction with a darker exterior surface (Bludau, Zirkelbach, & Kuenzel, 2009). As a consequence, questions have been raised regarding the sustainability and reliability of using cool roof membranes in Northern U.S. climate zones. A white roof surface reflects more of the incident solar radiation in comparisons with a dark surface, which makes a distinguished difference on the surface temperature of the roof. However, flat roofs with either a light or dark surface and if facing a clear sky, are constantly losing energy to the sky due to the exchange of infrared radiation. This phenomenon exists both during the night and the day. During the day, if the sun shines on the roof surface, the exchange of infrared radiation typically becomes insignificant. During nights and in cold climates, the temperature difference between the roof surface and the sky can deviate up to 20 C (Hagentoft, 2001) which could result in a very cold surface temperature compared to the ambient temperature. Further, a colder surface temperature of the roof increases the energy loss and the risk of condensation in the building materials below the membrane. In conclusion, both light and dark coated roof membranes are cooled by the infrared radiation exchange during the night, though a darker membrane is more heated by the solar radiation during the day, thus decreasing the risk of condensation. The phenomenon of night time cooling from the sky and the lack of solar gains during the day is not likely the exclusive problem concerning the risk of condensation in cool roofs with mechanically attached membranes. Roof systems with thermoplastic membranes are prone to be more effected by interior air intrusion into the roof construction; both due to the wind induced pressure differences and due to the flexibility and elasticity of the membrane (Molleti, Baskaran, Kalinger, & Beaulieu, 2011). Depending on the air permeability of the material underneath the membrane, wind forces increase the risk of fluttering (also referred as billowing) of the thermoplastic membrane. Expectably, the wind induced pressure differences creates a convective air flow into the construction i.e. Page 2 air intrusion. If the conditions are right, moisture from the exchanging air may condensate on surfaces with a temperature below dew-point. The definite path of convective airflows through the building envelope is usually very difficult to determine and therefore simplified models (K nzel, Zirkelbach, & Scfafaczek, 2011) help to estimate an additional moisture loads as a result of the air intrusion. The wind uplifting pressure in combination with wind gusts are important factors for a fluttering roof. Unfortunately, the effect from a fluctuating wind is difficult to estimate as this is a highly dynamic phenomenon and existing standards (ASTM, 2011a) only take into account a steady state approach i.e. there is no guidance or regulations on how to estimate the air intrusion rate. Obviously, a more detailed knowledge on the hygrothermal performance of mechanically attached cool roof system is requested; in consideration to varying surface colors, roof air tightness, climate zones and indoor moisture supply.

  7. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

  8. Green Energy Tax Credit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the Green Energy Tax Credit, the Carbon Tax Credit is available. This is the only carbon tax credit in the United States and it provides "certified green energy supply chain...

  9. GreenSun Hawaii

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GreenSun Hawaii is a loan loss reserve fund developed using funds from the The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). GreenSun Hawaii partners with banks and credit unions, making...

  10. Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation system. Douglas County Conservation District and the Rural Water Authority of Douglas County Present: Who: Anyone interested in rainwater harvesting as everyone can use passive rainwater applications. We

  11. Determination of immediate roof at mines of the Kutahya-Omerler coal basin, Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Konak; T. Onargan; C.O. Aksoy; H. Kose; C. Tatar; C. Pamukcu [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Department of Mining Engineering

    2006-01-15

    The estimation of the relations between excavation height, longwall advance rate, convergence around a longwall in the roof-soil direction, and load distribution on support is reported, that are of specific importance for selecting support type. The principal attention is focused on determination of the immediate roof height that depends on the mobility characteristics of overlying rocks and governs mainly the stopping convergence and load intensity on the support. Numerical modeling, laboratory and field experiments are undertaken in this study, which included evaluation of composition and physicomechanical properties of rocks, assessment of stress-strain state of rock mass and of the immediate roof height, measurements of disintegration and bulking factor of overlying rocks, convergence of stopping floor and roof, and loads on hydraulic legs of supports. The study parameters obtained by different methods for the Omerler Mine are presented.

  12. Reflections on Cambridge: Cambridge University from the roof of King's College Chapel - 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Film taken from the roof of the famous chapel, with Alan Macfarlane a Fellow of the College explaining a few of the sights. Filmed in summer 2009 by Xu Bei....

  13. Preservation of early wrought iron trusses : the 1848 roof of the Cochituate gatehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferriss, Lori (Lori E.)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the historic significance, structural condition, and preservation challenges of the wrought iron roof trusses of the Cochituate aqueduct's inlet gatehouse as the possible earliest surviving example ...

  14. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  15. Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The taxpayer must provide proof of the taxpayer’s costs for installation of a solar powered roof vent or fan and a list of the persons or corporations that supplied labor or materials for the solar...

  16. Green Event Request Name: _______________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Green Event Request Name fill out the following completely and have it emailed to our recycling coordinator, Logun Norris

  17. Green Jobs Training Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of the training available through the Green Jobs Training Center including certification courses and the apprenticeship program.

  18. Green Fund Report, Submitted to the Green University Planning Committee,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    are complete and 6 are in-progress. The following tables show the grants that have been awarded. #12;3 Green1 Green Fund Report, 2010-2012 Submitted to the Green University Planning Committee, September 2012 #12;2 ABOUT THE GREEN FUND What is the Green Fund? The Green Fund is a reserve of money that is used

  19. Evaluation of Vegetative Roofs' Performance on Energy Consumption in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, J.; Azarbayjani, M.

    2008-01-01

    policy- making. LEED standards evaluate buildings on a point system that considers site development, material selection, energy efficiency, and indoor environmental quality. Vegetative roofs qualify for up to 3 points in LEED as ?potential... technologies and strategies? under the storm water management and heat island effect categories. A vegetative roof may also accumulate points indirectly under the categories on energy efficiency and water efficient landscaping. (USGBC, 2002) Today...

  20. The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

  1. Concentration in Green Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    , energy, infrastructure or transport. Participants in this specialization area work closely with the GreenConcentration in Green Design Research and Education Opportunities Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering www.ce.cmu.edu M.S. Concentration Green Design - Course Only Track As an extension

  2. The Princeton Review's GREEN COLLEGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    .S. Green Building Council · 322 school profiles cover green highlights on the nation's most eco-friendly

  3. Analysis of DOE s Roof Savings Calculator with Comparison to other Simulation Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen; Mellot, Joe; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Childs, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on national averages and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance surfaces, HVAC duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation levels, and other parameters. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA. However, RSC gives different energy savings estimates than previous cool roof simulation tools so more thorough software and empirical validation proved necessary. This report consolidates much of the preliminary analysis for comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to that from other simulation engines.

  4. Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  5. Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the February 12, 2015, Building America webinar, High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies.

  6. Connecting Stakeholders, Achieving Green 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouse, S.; Nolan, B.

    2008-01-01

    Energy @ Work File: Green Paper Berlin Edition - R7 9092008 ? 2008 Page: 2/14 Contact: Scott.Rouse@Energy-Efficiency.com, 416 402-0525 This paper focuses on the following necessary conditions for commercial properties to reach their Green potential...% ?economic? potential from energy efficiency measures (EEM) with comparatively little risk. 1.2.2 Environmental Green House Gas (GHG) emission reduction solutions have become a public priority. Canada?s commercial facilities? direct and indirect...

  7. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  8. Green Power Offer (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes requirements, standards and procedures and a competitive bidding process to implement the green power offer program. The program is designed to make renewable energy...

  9. Lumens Placard (Green) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Green) Lumens Placard (Green) File lumensplacard-green.eps More Documents & Publications Lumens Placard (Green) Lumens Placard (Black) Lumens Placard (Black...

  10. About Singapore Green Building Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - friendly, energy efficiency building materials, design and architecture ­ reaching out to Green buildingAbout Singapore Green Building Council About SGBC Green Building Conference Conference Programme Green Building Conference In line with the mission of the Singapore Green Building Council (SGBC

  11. The Green Gazette February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    The Green Gazette February 2013 13 (number of Green Impact teams 2011/12) 27+ (number of Green Impact teams 2012/13) More than twice as many greening actions being carried out across campus and greater staff and student engagement with sustainability! Hello, welcome to the February Green Impact

  12. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

  13. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce the heat transfer penetrating its roof deck by almost 85% of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit home constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to access economics for the assembly.

  14. Convex Hulls of Varieties and Entanglement Measures Based on the Roof Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias J. Osborne

    2004-03-12

    In this paper we study the problem of calculating the convex hull of certain affine algebraic varieties. As we explain, the motivation for considering this problem is that certain pure-state measures of quantum entanglement, which we call polynomial entanglement measures, can be represented as affine algebraic varieties. We consider the evaluation of certain mixed-state extensions of these polynomial entanglement measures, namely convex and concave roofs. We show that the evaluation of a roof-based mixed-state extension is equivalent to calculating a hyperplane which is multiply tangent to the variety in a number of places equal to the number of terms in an optimal decomposition for the measure. In this way we provide an implicit representation of optimal decompositions for mixed-state entanglement measures based on the roof construction.

  15. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    SUPPORTING URBAN GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Researchers: Jenny Caldwell Catherine Cruz-Ortiz Craig Dsouza are supported at the master's and doctoral levels. #12;Supporting Urban Green Infrastructure Researchers: Jenny's Water Resources Agency, for providing information and guidance in the completion of this research. #12

  16. GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS A young men's team performing Morris & Sword dances from England Mountain (boys) and Maple Leaf (girls) will be recruiting new members in January 2009, typically 6th grade, but as a springtime dance, to awaken the earth. The Green Mountain Morris and Maple Leaf Morris are based in Norwich

  17. Sandia Energy - A Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Green Technology Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC A Green Technology A Green TechnologyTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T21:08:32+00:00 Solid-State...

  18. Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal-pillar-and-roof system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal mechanisms of the mechanical system that is composed of the stiff hosts (roof and floor) and the coal pillar using catastrophe theory. It is assumed that the roof is an elastic beam and the coal pillar is a strain

  19. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W.; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  20. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2011-01-01

    like Brazil, has strong programs on energy efficiency, andenergy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil,energy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil,

  1. Going green earns Laboratory gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

  2. TARSHA-KURDI, F., LANDES, T., GRUSSENMEYER, P., (2008). Extended RANSAC algorithm for automatic detection of building roof planes from Lidar data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008-01-01

    detection of building roof planes from Lidar data. The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland. Vol. 21, n°1, 2008, pp.97-109. EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHM FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF BUILDING ROOF PLANES FROM LIDAR the detection of 3D building roof planes are of crucial importance. For this purpose, this paper studies

  3. Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy-efficient solutions. Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    . Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls, foundation) is an obvious choice as heating needed to retrofit today's poor energy performing walls. · Partnering with the Single Ply Roofing Industry, ORNL helped in understanding the role cool roofing plays in moisture accumulation in these types

  4. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2012 Traditionally, roofers lay down tarps to collect shingles thrown off the roof. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Traditionally, roofers lay down tarps to collect shingles thrown off the roof. The shingles increases project cost. Objectives Create a device to move shingles from the roof to a waste bin the roof and rotate ± 90°. The device needs to withstand a 30 pound load of shingles. Approach Research

  5. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  6. Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    University Rising prices of crude oil and natural gas have led to renewed societal interest in application of the solar power market. As a result of our technology lead, SunPower is today a global leader in the market roofing products have been significantly improved. Fig. 2. Representative Wind Tunnel Configuration

  7. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1/33 TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL- COLORED ROOFING William (Bill) Miller, Ph for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles

  8. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    India, Mexico, and the United States have signed up to join the Cool Roofs Working Group, which was announced yesterday in Abu Dhabi at the second Clean Energy Ministerial -- a high-level global forum to promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technology, to share lessons learned and best practices and to encourage the transition to a global clean energy economy.

  9. Development of a new roof bolt technology to improve gate-road performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caggiano, V.; Rauch, G.; Beck, K.-D.; Chen, J. [Hilti, Inc. (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Hilti has developed, in conjunction with Foundation Coal, a self-drilling bolt that cuts roof bolting times. The system uses a wet, self-drilling, hollow bolt technology with a self-contained resin cartridge. The resin is dispensed using an injection adapter that provides the high pressure water needed to dispense the resin. The OneStep roof bolt contains an axially shifting mixer that ensures the resin is properly mixed as it exits the water ports near the end of the bolt near the drill head. This eliminates the opportunity for plastic materials to interface between the strata and the bolt. In 2004 the OneStep Bolt was successfully installed in DSK's Prosper Haniel Colliery in Germany, achieving a 42% reduction in single-boom roof bolt cycle time and a 36% reduction in twin-boom roof bolt cycle time. Foundation Coal will be installing 2000 6 ft active bolts in one of the North Appalachian longwall locations. 1 fig.

  10. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Cherry, Nigel J [ORNL; Allen, Richard Lowell [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ronnen, Levinson [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Akbari, Hashem [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Berhahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2010-03-01

    Aesthetically pleasing dark roofs can be formulated to reflect like a highly reflective white roof in the near infrared portion of the solar spectrum. New paint pigments increase the near infrared reflectance of exterior finishes by minimizing the absorption of near-infrared radiation (NIR). The boost in the NIR reflectance drops the surface temperatures of roofs and walls, which in turn reduces cooling-energy use and provides savings for the homeowner and relief for the utilities. In moderate and hot climates, a roof surface with high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance was shown by Akbari et al. (2004) and by Parker and Sherwin (1998) to reduce the exterior temperature and produce savings in comfort cooling. The new cool color pigments can potentially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, which in turn reduces metropolitan heat buildup and urban smog. The pigments can also help conserve water resources otherwise used to clean and process fuel consumed by fossil-fuel driven power plants. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning, retards smog formation, and improves thermal comfort. Parker, Sonne and Sherwin (2002) demonstrated that white barrel and white flat tiles reduced cooling energy consumption by 22% of the base load used by an adjacent and identical home having direct nailed dark shingles. Part of the savings was due to the reflectance of the white tiles; however, another part was due to the mass of the tile and to the venting occurring within the double batten installation. With, Cherry and Haig (2009) have studied the influence of the thermal mass and batten space ventilation and have found that, referenced to an asphalt shingle system, it can be equivalent to an additional 28 points of solar reflectivity. The double batten arrangement has wooden counter battens laid vertically (soffit-to-ridge) against the roof deck, and then the conventional battens are laid horizontally across the counter battens, providing a nailing surface for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit to the ridge. The bottom surface of the channel is formed by the roof decking and is relatively flat and smooth. The top surface is created by the underside of the roofing tiles, and is designed to be an air permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles. The resulting air flows also have a cooling influence which further complicates prediction of the heat penetrating through the deck because an accurate measure of the airflow is required to predict the heat transfer. Measured temperatures and heat flows at the roof surface, within the attic and at the ceiling of the houses are discussed as well as the power usage to help gauge the benefit of cool-pigmented reflective roof products fitted with and without ventilation above the roof deck. Ventilation occurring above the deck is an inherent feature for tile roof assemblies, and is formed by an air space between the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile s profile the greater is the effect of the ventilation which herein is termed above-sheathing ventilation (ASV). However, because of the complexity of the thermally induced flow, little credit is allowed by state and federal building codes. ASHRAE (2005) provides empirical data for the effective thermal resistance of plane air spaces. A -in. (0.0191-m) plane air space inclined at 45 with the horizontal has an RUS-0.85 (RSI-0.15) . Our intent is to help further deploy cool color pigments in roofs by conducting field experiments to evaluate the new cool-colored roofing materials in the hot climate of Southern California. The collected data will be used to showcase and market the performance of new cool-roof products and also to help formulate and validate computer codes capable of calculating the heat transfer occurring within the attic and the whole building. Field measures and computer predictions showed that the d

  11. EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    experiments on solar-powered sensor nodes. Due to constraints in cost and size, the solar panelsEPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal that periodically sample environmental parameters such as solar irradiance and temperature and transmit them

  12. Laying the Foundation for a Solar America: The Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strahs, G.; Tombari, C.

    2006-10-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technology Program embarks on the next phase of its technology acceptance efforts under the Solar America Initiative, there is merit to examining the program's previous market transformation effort, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. Its goal was to transform markets for distributed solar technologies by facilitating the installation of solar systems.

  13. Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

    2006-01-01

    was analyzed and the thermal load within each room was calculated Comparative analysis of thermal loads of these two rooms was done. Reduction of thermal load by the planting roof is clearly shown from our research work. A theoretical analysis of the effect...

  14. Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    in California's climate (Akbari et al., 1991, 1992, 1997). In Florida, field research by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) since 1993 has quantified the impact of reflective roof coatings on sub-metered air conditioning (AC) consumption in tests in a dozen...

  15. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1 ½-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team analyzed five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. These homes were chosen for testing as they are common in Minnesota and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled the team to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  16. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  17. Project Overcoat — An Exploration of Exterior Insulation Strategies for 1-½ Story Roof Applications in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, Cindy; Mosiman, Garrett; Huelman, Pat; Schirber, Tom; Yost, Peter; Murry, Tessa

    2013-04-01

    The development of an alternative method to interior-applied insulation strategies or exterior applied “band-aids” such as heat tapes and ice belts may help reduce energy needs of millions of 1-1/2 story homes while reducing the risk of ice dam formation. A potential strategy for energy improvement of the roof is borrowed from new construction best practices: Here an “overcoat” of a continuous air, moisture, and thermal barrier is applied on the outside of the roof structure for improved overall performance. The continuous insulation of this approach facilitates a reduction in thermal bridging which could further reduce energy consumption and bring existing homes closer to meeting the Building America goals for energy reduction. Research favors an exterior approach to deep energy retrofits and ice dam prevention in existing homes. The greatest amount of research focuses on whole house deep energy retrofits leaving a void in roof-only applications. The research is also void of data supporting the hygrothermal performance, durability, constructability, and cost of roof-only exterior overcoat strategies. Yet, contractors interviewed for this report indicate an understanding that exterior approaches are most promising for mitigating ice dams and energy loss and are able to sell these strategies to homeowners.

  18. What price a roof? Housing and the cost of living in 16th-century Toledo*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What price a roof? Housing and the cost of living in 16th-century Toledo* Mauricio Drelichman market. We then explore the impact of adding rent to early modern price indices and estimates of living standards. Price indices show a moderate effect. The addition of rent reduces the gap between Toledo and two

  19. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

  20. Green Colorado Credit Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Colorado Credit Reserve (GCCR) is a loan loss reserve that was created by the Colorado Energy Office (CEO) to incentivize private lenders in Colorado to make small commercial loans up to ...

  1. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    AND GREEN CHEMISTRY IN THE CLEAN-ENERGY ECONOMY Michael P.rapid development of clean-energy technologies—of the greenof economic growth in clean-energy technologies and energy

  2. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman

    2010-01-08

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing?everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  3. USPS – Lean Green Teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Institutional change case study details the U.S. Postal Service's Lean Green Teams, which collaborate across functions to identify and implement low- and no-cost ways to conserve natural resources, purchase fewer consumable products, and reduce waste.

  4. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman

    2009-11-18

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing—everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  5. NY Green Bank

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NY Green Bank 1359 Broadway, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10018 212.379.6257 | www.greenbank.ny.gov | info@nygreenbank.ny.gov Monday, October 6 th , 2014 Remarks by Nicholas Whitcombe,...

  6. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Beckman, Pete

    2013-04-19

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing?everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently. Argonne was recognized for green computing in the 2009 HPCwire Readers Choice Awards. More at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/news091117.html Read more about the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at http://www.alcf.anl.gov/

  7. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Levinson, Ronnen; Huang, Yu; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Miller, William A.; Mellot, Joe; Childs, Kenneth W.; Kriner, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  8. "Technology Wedges" for Implementing Green Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David; Wright, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Integration issues in green design and manufacturing."schematic of the green elements of design and manufacturing1. SCHEMATIC OF “GREEN” ELEMENTS OF DESIGN AND PRODUCTION,

  9. 2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top Green Power Providers See All Leaders x Renewable Energy Sales Total Customer Participants Customer...

  10. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

    2009-08-28

    Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

  11. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  12. Performance of 3-Sun Mirror Modules on Sun Tracking Carousels on Flat Roof Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraas, Dr. Lewis; Avery, James E.; Minkin, Leonid M; Maxey, L Curt; Gehl, Anthony C; Hurt, Rick A; Boehm, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Commercial buildings represent a near term market for cost competitive solar electric power provided installation costs and solar photovoltaic module costs can be reduced. JX Crystals has developed a carousel sun tracker that is prefabricated and can easily be deployed on building flat roof tops without roof penetration. JX Crystals is also developing 3-sun PV mirror modules where less expensive mirrors are substituted for two-thirds of the expensive single crystal silicon solar cell surface area. Carousels each with four 3-sun modules have been set up at two sites, specifically at Oak Ridge National Lab and at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas. The test results for these systems are presented.

  13. Green Leasing Deployment Portfolio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGetDepartment of EnergyCollarGreenGreen

  14. Seeing Green: Speculative Urbanism in the Green Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knuth, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    unconventional green resources – energy efficiency and itschallenge efficiency and energy, resource, or emissions3: Making Energy Efficiency a Resource………………………………..…. ….58

  15. Calculation of the convex roof for an open entangled harmonic oscillator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landau, Mayer A.; Stroud, C. R. Jr. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We explicitly calculate the time dependence of entanglement via the convex roof extension for a system of noninteracting harmonic oscillators. These oscillators interact only indirectly with each other by way of a zero-temperature bath. The initial state of the oscillators is taken to be that of an entangled Schroedinger-cat state. This type of initial condition leads to superexponential decay of the entanglement when the initial state has the same symmetry as the interaction Hamiltonian.

  16. Entanglement detection and lower bound of convex-roof extension of negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming; 10.1088/1751-8113/45/3/035301

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of inequalities based on mean values of quantum mechanical observables nonlinear entanglement witnesses for bipartite quantum systems. These inequalities give rise to sufficient and necessary conditions for separability of all bipartite pure states and even some mixed states. In terms of these mean values of quantum mechanical observables a measurable lower bound of the convex-roof extension of the negativity is derived.

  17. Convex-roof extended negativity as an entanglement measure for bipartite quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soojoon Lee; Dong Pyo Chi; Sung Dahm Oh; Jaewan Kim

    2003-10-04

    We extend the concept of the negativity, a good measure of entanglement for bipartite pure states, to mixed states by means of the convex-roof extension. We show that the measure does not increase under local quantum operations and classical communication, and derive explicit formulae for the entanglement measure of isotropic states and Werner states, applying the formalism presented by Vollbrecht and Werner [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 64}, 062307 (2001)].

  18. Entanglement detection and lower bound of convex-roof extension of negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Li; Tong-Jiang Yan; Shao-Ming Fei

    2011-12-30

    We present a set of inequalities based on mean values of quantum mechanical observables nonlinear entanglement witnesses for bipartite quantum systems. These inequalities give rise to sufficient and necessary conditions for separability of all bipartite pure states and even some mixed states. In terms of these mean values of quantum mechanical observables a measurable lower bound of the convex-roof extension of the negativity is derived.

  19. Effect of Photocatalytic Coatings on the Weathering of Elastomeric Roofing Membrane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkous, C. A.; Robertson, R. H.

    2006-01-01

    COATINGS ON THE WEATHERING OF ELASTOMERIC ROOFING MEMBRANE Dr. Clovis A. Linkous Senior Research Scientist Florida Solar Energy Center University of Central Florida Cocoa, FL Ross H. Robertson Senior Engineer, Systems Firestone Building... species on its outer surface. The Florida Solar Energy Center, in collaboration with Firestone Building Products Company, has been investigating the use of photocatalytic coatings to resist the growth of algae, particularly those from the genus...

  20. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

    2013-01-01

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  1. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richoux, Olivier; Pelat, Adrien; Félix, Simon; Lihoreau, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental, numerical and analytical study of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led by means of a street scale model. The numerical results are performed with a 2D Finite Difference in Time Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof. An analytical model, based on the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a horizontal plane mixed with a 2D image sources model to describe the attenuation along the street, is also proposed. Results are given for several frequencies in the low frequency domain (1000-2500 Hz). The comparison of the three approaches shows a good agreement until f=100 Hz at full scale, the analytical model and the 2D numerical simulation adapted to 3D permit to modelize the acoustic propagation along a street. For higher frequency, experimental results show that the leakeage, due to the street open roof, is not anymore uniformly distributed on a...

  2. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 24, 2015, from 1:00pm – 2:30pm EDT, EPA's Green Infrastructure Program will launch our 2015 Webcast Series with the webinar Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities. This webinar aims to...

  3. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Kosny, Jan; Kriner, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  4. GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes to yourevery day. By making basic improvements to yourevery day home, you can reduce your carbon footprint

  5. Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy With escalating concerns about global energy shortages in research related to energy deficits, sustainability and pollution. Biofuels and Alternative EnergyBioproductsInitiative: promoting sustainable farming and renewable energy through a biogas facility and the Institute for

  6. November 2011 Green Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    of which contain essential oils or other natural plant extracts targeting weeds. The majority Turf | Page 4 New Online Courses | Page 6 he public's increasing demand for safe "green" products has. Information on the efficacy of these new products is limited. However, environmental awareness groups

  7. Cooking with Green Beans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    need 2 15-ounce cans of green beans, drained 10.5-ounce can cream of mushroom soup ? cup milk 2.75-ounce can fried onion rings, divided in half black pepper (if you like) How to make it 1. Wash...

  8. NIST Presents Green Button: Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 2/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  9. NIST Presents Green Button: Technical

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 3/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  10. NIST Presents Green Button: Intro

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 1/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  11. NIST Presents Green Button: Policy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 2/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  12. NIST Presents Green Button: Technical

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 3/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  13. NIST Presents Green Button: Intro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 1/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  14. RELATED LINKS Green Technology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy efficiency continues to be the primary factor driving the green building movement, squaring Congress considers how to encourage more energy-efficient construction, it must keep affordability in mindRELATED LINKS Green Technology for 2009: See the Photos Green Building: Getting Past the Media Hype

  15. Lumens Placard (Green) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Green) Lumens Placard (Green) PDF icon Lumens: The new way to shop for light More Documents & Publications Lumens Placard (Black...

  16. City of Chicago- Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For more green power purchasing program listings, visit the U.S. Department of Energy Green Power Network.

  17. Ghana Green Building Council public launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghana Green Building Council public launch examples of green buildings in South Africa eric noir, WSP GBD 17 August 2011 #12;Ghana Green Building Council public launch | examples of green buildings in South Africa GREEN by DESIGN PLATINUM GOLD MAJORSPONSORS #12;Ghana Green Building Council public launch

  18. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part 1: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  19. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mohamad Sleiman

    2014-01-01

    thermal comfort conditions. Solar Energy 85, 3085-3102.surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance-Part I:of roofing product databases. . Solar Energy Materials and

  20. CX-007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007826: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Crittenden City Facilities Re-Roofing CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01312012 Location(s):...

  1. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    likelihood of investing in green design or energy efficienton the benefits of green design to commercial buildinginfluence the adoption of green design and energy efficiency

  2. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    of green and energy efficient buildings throughout the urbancosts of green and energy efficient buildings, barriers toof green or energy-efficient buildings across a metropolitan

  3. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    the larger diffusion of green and energy efficient buildingsowners, the costs of green and energy efficient buildings,market. Demand for Green and Energy Efficient Buildings The

  4. Seeing Green: Speculative Urbanism in the Green Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knuth, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    energy, energy efficiency and building weatherization, andthe advanced energy efficiency-building materials cluster(s)power, energy efficiency, advanced building materials, green

  5. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  6. Easy Gardening.....Green Beans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam; Parsons, Jerry; Masabni, Joseph

    2009-04-21

    This publication explains all aspects of growing green beans in a home garden. Topics include: site selection, soil preparation, varieties, planting, fertilizing, watering, harvesting, insects, diseases and serving....

  7. Squashed entanglement for multipartite states and entanglement measures based on the mixed convex roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong Yang; Karol Horodecki; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim; Wei Song

    2009-07-23

    New measures of multipartite entanglement are constructed based on two definitions of multipartite information and different methods of optimizing over extensions of the states. One is a generalization of the squashed entanglement where one takes the mutual information of parties conditioned on the state's extension and takes the infimum over such extensions. Additivity of the multipartite squashed entanglement is proved for both versions of the multipartite information which turn out to be related. The second one is based on taking classical extensions. This scheme is generalized, which enables to construct measures of entanglement based on the {\\it mixed convex roof} of a quantity, which in contrast to the standard convex roof method involves optimization over all decompositions of a density matrix rather than just the decompositions into pure states. As one of the possible applications of these results we prove that any multipartite monotone is an upper bound on the amount of multipartite distillable key. The findings are finally related to analogous results in classical key agreement.

  8. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm INIZIATIVE INDUSTRIALI SRL (IT), the lowest bidder, for the provision of minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN for three years for a total amount not exceeding 1 467 895 euros (2 258 301 Swiss francs), not subject to revision for two years. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  9. CX-012168: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Repair of Roof Leaks at 218-1H CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04232014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office C. E. Bourne, a roofing...

  10. Inside this issue: Green Dorm,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    Inside this issue: Energy Campaign 1 On Campus: Green Dorm, CFL Exchange, LLC 2 - 3 Around Town, UAlbany Outdoors 7 Project Green Challenge 8 Opportunities 9 Get Involved 10 Upcoming Events 11 September usage by 9%. Just shy of our goal of 10%. This year we hope to meet that goal! We've completed two weeks

  11. GREEN GUIDE MAISON AM GROND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    For this task, we took the ideas from Zihomara Matar. Author of the ECO2 practice guides. Task 4 ­ Laundry: GoodGREEN GUIDE MAISON AM GROND One Earth... Once Chance Team Members: Jose Miguel Lopez Becerra ­ Green Guide Task 1 ­ Garbage Separation This task is related to explain the different types of garbage

  12. Going for "Green" Sustainable Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Going for "Green" Sustainable Building Certification Statistics Europe Status May 2011 rics.org/sustainability #12;Sustainable Building Certification Statistics Europe Foreword Investors are increasingly the usefulness of sustainability certificates in mainstreaming the uptake of so-called `green' buildings across

  13. greenhouse gas inve green developmen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    greenhouse gas inve green developmen energy conservation transportation carbon offs student facult;greenhouse gas inventory green development energy conservation transportation carbon offsets student faculty. Changi natural gas as a primary fuel allowed us to find cleaner and more effici university. Both in 1988

  14. Douglas H. Green Piper & Marbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas H. Green Piper & Marbury 1200 Nineteenth St., N.W. Washington, D.C., 20036-2430 [Date Signed: April 7, 1997] Re: Reproposal of HWIR Waste Rule and Commercial Mixed Waste Dear Mr. Green waste" refers to low-level radioactive hazardous mixed wastes generated by nuclear power plants where

  15. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r -· LAWREW RADIATIONAlkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~rtment l~alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a The

  16. Green Tea and Its Antioxidant Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jason

    1999-01-01

    of effects of drinking green tea on cardiovascular and liverWeststrate JA. Effects of green tea, black tea and dietaryof low-density lipoproteins by green tea antioxidants. FASEB

  17. Energy Department Wins EPA Green Power Award

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Environmental Protection Agency honored the Energy Department with the Green Power Leadership Award, recognizing that DOE is one of America’s top green power consumers while also being a leader in advancing the green power market.

  18. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    P describe Green functions QO(u)* *). Note that the matrix is completely determined GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions

  19. CHANCELLOR'S SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE GREEN BUILDING SUBCOMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    CHANCELLOR'S SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE GREEN BUILDING SUBCOMMITTEE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST FALL 2013 GBGBGUIDELINES 2013 UPDATE #12;#12;Theseguidelineshavebeen prepared by the Green, policies and practices as they pertain to green building and LEED certification. It is our hope

  20. International Rainwater Catchment Systems Conference, March 28April 4, 2011, Taiwan, R.O.C. NGUYEN-DEROCHE et al., 2011. Quality of roof harvested rainwater from houses in le-de-France area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .O.C. NGUYEN-DEROCHE et al., 2011. Quality of roof harvested rainwater from houses in Île-de-France area, France. 1 Quality of roof harvested rainwater from houses in Île-de-France area, France. Thi Le Nhung microorganisms in the outside tanks. The difficulty to evaluate the microbial quality of roof- harvested

  1. RUNOFF QUALITY FROM ROOFING DURING EARLY LIFE Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P.E., D. WRE, Brett V. Long, Christina Y.S. Siu, Julia Spicher, Kelly A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 RUNOFF QUALITY FROM ROOFING DURING EARLY LIFE Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P.E., D. WRE, Brett V through the use of retention and reuse of water on site. One opportunity for water harvesting is the roof and several organizations have provided guidance for roofing surfaces that are appropriate for harvesting

  2. B. Mobasher, S-Y.Chen, C. Young and S. D. Rajan, "Cost-Based Design Of Residential Steel Roof Systems: A Case Study", Structural Engineering and Mechanics 8:(2) pp.165-180,1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    B. Mobasher, S-Y.Chen, C. Young and S. D. Rajan, "Cost-Based Design Of Residential Steel Roof OF RESIDENTIAL STEEL ROOF SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY S. D. Rajan 1 , B. Mobasher 2 , S-Y.Chen 3 and C. Young 3 The cost effectiveness of steel roof systems for residential buildings is becoming increasingly apparent

  3. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, suppl&mentau no3, Tome 40, mars 1979, page C2-483 ESTIMATION OF FIRING TEMPERATURES OF ANCIENT ROOFING TILES BY Fe-57 MOSSBAUER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OF FIRING TEMPERATURES OF ANCIENT ROOFING TILES BY Fe- 57 MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY M. Takeda, 0. Kawakami, H temperature of ancient ceramic artifacts manufactured in reducing atmospheres. 1. Introduction.- Roofing tiles that the ancient Japanese roofing tiles excavated at the sites of Taga castle and Hinodeyama ancient kilns (8-10th

  4. Tracing the magmatic/hydrothermal transition in regional low-strain zones: The role of magma dynamics in strain localization at pluton roof, implications for intrusion-related gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dynamics in strain localization at pluton roof, implications for intrusion-related gold deposits Eric features of a granite-pluton roof; large-scale dykes and a network of gold veins are intensively developed in this roof, recording a succession of mechanical instabilities. Our gravity survey underlines the presence

  5. Green Libraries Are More Than Just Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aulisio, George J.

    2013-01-01

    and measurable green building design, construction,Green Building Council (USGBC) certification that stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

  6. The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, R. James

    1994-01-01

    The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia R.The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia. (Ais between sustainable and unsustainable development of the

  7. Energy Innovation: Green Button Initiative Empowering Americans...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Innovation: Green Button Initiative Empowering Americans to Save Energy and Money Energy Innovation: Green Button Initiative Empowering Americans to Save Energy and Money...

  8. Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification...

  9. Greening up fossil fuels with carbon sequestration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Greening up fossil fuels with carbon sequestration 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues submit Greening up fossil...

  10. Greening Up” Cross-Coupling Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boškovi?, Žarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

  11. Green Tea and Its Antioxidant Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jason

    1999-01-01

    of effects of drinking green tea on cardiovascular and liverthe epidemiological benefits of tea drinking. FEBS Letters.Weststrate JA. Effects of green tea, black tea and dietary

  12. Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza and LITEC (CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

  13. Distribution and dynamics of entanglement in high-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soojoon Lee; Jeong San Kim; Barry C. Sanders

    2010-06-03

    We develop theories of entanglement distribution and of entanglement dynamics for qudit systems, which incorporate previous qubit formulations. Using convex-roof extended negativity, we generalize previous qubit results for entanglement distribution with isotropic states and for entanglement dynamics with the depolarizing channel, and we establish a relation between these two types of entanglement networks.

  14. Distribution and dynamics of entanglement in high-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Soojoon; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-01-01

    We develop theories of entanglement distribution and of entanglement dynamics for qudit systems, which incorporate previous qubit formulations. Using convex-roof extended negativity, we generalize previous qubit results for entanglement distribution with isotropic states and for entanglement dynamics with the depolarizing channel, and we establish a relation between these two types of entanglement networks.

  15. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    , multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative canComparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors

  16. 1. Detect ground faults in PV arrays mounted on the roofs of 2. Interrupt the fault current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    1. Detect ground faults in PV arrays mounted on the roofs of dwellings 2. Interrupt the fault current 3. Indicate that a ground fault had occurred 4. Disconnect the faulted part of the PV array 5. "Crowbar" (short-circuit) the PV array The original GFPD prototype was developed in two versions that were

  17. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  18. Project Overcoat - An Exploration of Exterior Insulation Strategies for 1-1/2-Story Roof Applications in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Mosiman, G.; Huelman, P.; Schirber, T.; Yost, P.; Murry, T.

    2013-04-01

    The development of an alternative method to interior-applied insulation strategies or exterior applied 'band-aids' such as heat tapes and ice belts may help reduce energy needs of millions of 1-1/2 story homes while reducing the risk of ice dam formation. A potential strategy for energy improvement of the roof is borrowed from new construction best practices: Here an 'overcoat' of a continuous air, moisture, and thermal barrier is applied on the outside of the roof structure for improved overall performance. The continuous insulation of this approach facilitates a reduction in thermal bridging which could further reduce energy consumption and bring existing homes closer to meeting the Building America goals for energy reduction. Research favors an exterior approach to deep energy retrofits and ice dam prevention in existing homes. The greatest amount of research focuses on whole house deep energy retrofits leaving a void in roof-only applications. The research is also void of data supporting the hygrothermal performance, durability, constructability, and cost of roof-only exterior overcoat strategies. Yet, contractors interviewed for this report indicate an understanding that exterior approaches are most promising for mitigating ice dams and energy loss and are able to sell these strategies to homeowners.

  19. Numerical evaluation of convex-roof entanglement measures with applications to spin rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röthlisberger, Beat; Loss, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We present two ready-to-use numerical algorithms to evaluate convex-roof extensions of arbitrary pure-state entanglement monotones. Their implementation leaves the user merely with the task of calculating derivatives of the respective pure-state measure. We provide numerical tests of the algorithms and demonstrate their good convergence properties. We further employ them in order to investigate the entanglement in particular few-spins systems at finite temperature. Namely, we consider ferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange-coupled spin-1/2 rings subject to an inhomogeneous in-plane field geometry obeying full rotational symmetry around the axis perpendicular to the ring through its center. We demonstrate that highly entangled states can be obtained in these systems at sufficiently low temperatures and by tuning the strength of a magnetic field configuration to an optimal value which is identified numerically.

  20. libCreme: An optimization library for evaluating convex-roof entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röthlisberger, Beat; Loss, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present the software library libCreme which we have previously used to successfully calculate convex-roof entanglement measures of mixed quantum states appearing in realistic physical systems. Evaluating the amount of entanglement in such states is in general a non-trivial task requiring to solve a highly non-linear complex optimization problem. The algorithms provided here are able to achieve to do this for a large and important class of entanglement measures. The library is mostly written in the Matlab programming language, but is fully compatible to the free and open-source Octave platform. Some inefficient subroutines are written in C/C++ for better performance. This manuscript discusses the most important theoretical concepts and workings of the algorithms, focussing on the actual implementation and usage within the library. Detailed examples in the end should make it easy for the user to apply libCreme to specific problems.

  1. Numerical evaluation of convex-roof entanglement measures with applications to spin rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roethlisberger, Beat; Lehmann, Joerg; Loss, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-10-15

    We present two ready-to-use numerical algorithms to evaluate convex-roof extensions of arbitrary pure-state entanglement monotones. Their implementation leaves the user merely with the task of calculating derivatives of the respective pure-state measure. We provide numerical tests of the algorithms and demonstrate their good convergence properties. We further employ them in order to investigate the entanglement in particular few-spins systems at finite temperature. Namely, we consider ferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange-coupled spin-(1/2) rings subject to an inhomogeneous in-plane field geometry obeying full rotational symmetry around the axis perpendicular to the ring through its center. We demonstrate that highly entangled states can be obtained in these systems at sufficiently low temperatures and by tuning the strength of a magnetic field configuration to an optimal value which is identified numerically.

  2. Entanglement monogamy of multipartite higher-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong San Kim; Anirban Das; Barry C. Sanders

    2008-11-13

    We propose replacing concurrence by convex-roof extended negativity (CREN) for studying monogamy of entanglement (MoE). We show that all proven MoE relations using concurrence can be rephrased in terms of CREN. Furthermore we show that higher-dimensional (qudit) extensions of MoE in terms of CREN are not disproven by any of the counterexamples used to disprove qudit extensions of MoE in terms of concurrence. We further test the CREN version of MoE for qudits by considering fully or partially coherent mixtures of a qudit W-class state with the vacuum and show that the CREN version of MoE for qudits is satisfied in this case as well. The CREN version of MoE for qudits is thus a strong conjecture with no obvious counterexamples.

  3. libCreme: An optimization library for evaluating convex-roof entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beat Röthlisberger; Jörg Lehmann; Daniel Loss

    2011-07-22

    We present the software library libCreme which we have previously used to successfully calculate convex-roof entanglement measures of mixed quantum states appearing in realistic physical systems. Evaluating the amount of entanglement in such states is in general a non-trivial task requiring to solve a highly non-linear complex optimization problem. The algorithms provided here are able to achieve to do this for a large and important class of entanglement measures. The library is mostly written in the Matlab programming language, but is fully compatible to the free and open-source Octave platform. Some inefficient subroutines are written in C/C++ for better performance. This manuscript discusses the most important theoretical concepts and workings of the algorithms, focussing on the actual implementation and usage within the library. Detailed examples in the end should make it easy for the user to apply libCreme to specific problems.

  4. Entanglement monogamy of multipartite higher-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeong San; Sanders, Barry C

    2008-01-01

    We propose replacing concurrence by convex-roof extended negativity (CREN) for studying monogamy of entanglement (MoE). We show that all proven MoE relations using concurrence can be rephrased in terms of CREN. Furthermore we show that higher-dimensional (qudit) extensions of MoE in terms of CREN are not disproven by any of the counterexamples used to disprove qudit extensions of MoE in terms of concurrence. We further test the CREN version of MoE for qudits by considering fully or partially coherent mixtures of a qudit W-class state with the vacuum and show that the CREN version of MoE for qudits is satisfied in this case as well. The CREN version of MoE for qudits is thus a strong conjecture with no obvious counterexamples.

  5. Numerical evaluation of convex-roof entanglement measures with applications to spin rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beat Röthlisberger; Jörg Lehmann; Daniel Loss

    2009-05-19

    We present two ready-to-use numerical algorithms to evaluate convex-roof extensions of arbitrary pure-state entanglement monotones. Their implementation leaves the user merely with the task of calculating derivatives of the respective pure-state measure. We provide numerical tests of the algorithms and demonstrate their good convergence properties. We further employ them in order to investigate the entanglement in particular few-spins systems at finite temperature. Namely, we consider ferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange-coupled spin-1/2 rings subject to an inhomogeneous in-plane field geometry obeying full rotational symmetry around the axis perpendicular to the ring through its center. We demonstrate that highly entangled states can be obtained in these systems at sufficiently low temperatures and by tuning the strength of a magnetic field configuration to an optimal value which is identified numerically.

  6. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallahi, A.; Duraschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  7. Reduced Energy and Maintenance Costs Using Polyurethane as a Replacement Roof System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, G. D.

    1992-01-01

    With CLTD and dt dete~mined, T was calculated as ene~gy savings. This is a two-sto~y administ~ative EFLH, using Ai~ Fo~ce table "Mean F~equency of office building with a basement. The building Occu~~ance of D~y Bulb Temperatu~e with Mean contains 22.....m VERIFICATION lJ ~lAV so .... EO (01:[ !lUILDI'fG ")t1E MIN UALuE \\2. '" ~UN TIME - a - .~:2Cl-: Figure 11 Typical Building Load, before foam roof, Tons vs OA Temp :ME ~. 3Q l '00-: I 30-; (.06 "';C'-" "'0- . ~ ~e? ~ 00-: ~ :20...

  8. GREEN BUILDINGS IN CHALLENGES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    science, economics, sociology, geography, philosophy, urban planning, environmental studies, history justice, conservation and renewable energy options, integrated resource planning, and technologyGREEN BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FINAL REPORT A Renewable Energy

  9. Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohns, R.

    2008-01-01

    the components “Sustainable Building Design”, “Life Cycle Cost Analysis”, “Green Building Certification” and “Natural Resources Management”. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different...

  10. Broward County- Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, Board of County Commissioners of Broward County passed a resolution creating the County Green Building Policy. All new County-owned and operated buildings must achieve a minimum...

  11. Mr. Bobby L. Green Texas Tech University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xinzhong

    ., Tanju, B. T., Gransberg, D. D., Green, B., Gransberg, N. (1998). Design a Luminance, Illuminance Using CCD Video Imaging Technology. Integrated Design and Process technology, 5. Slowik, T. J., Green, BMr. Bobby L. Green Texas Tech University (806) 742-3538 bobby.green@ttu.edu Education and Post

  12. Lean Green Skating Machine Report No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    and trying it for him/herself. The Lean Green Skating Machine is designed to help skaters recognize when Machine Report No. 1 Summary This report includes the details and design of the Lean Green Skating MachineLean Green Skating Machine Report No. 1 Lean Green Skating Machine Report No. 1 Submitted by Simon

  13. Green Data Centers: The European Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    jobs. Energy Efficiency Plan 2011 Energy Efficiency Directive #12;1st Generation FIT4Green of resources (on/off) Cooperation between Data Centers GAMES: Green Active Management of Energy in IT Service)les Iteration #12;: GreenSDA & GreenSLA Active collaboration in data centre ecosystem to reduce energy

  14. for Students, Sta & Visitors Green Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    - Recycling Guide - Water & Pollution - Green Shopping - Saving Energy Together - Sustainable Travel Pleasefor Students, Sta & Visitors Green Guide Greener Swansea University-Only if we are Green #12;Welcome ......to our new Green Guide. As students, sta or visitors we under- stand that our activities

  15. Guide to Purchasing Green Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Guide to Purchasing Green Power is intended for organizations that are considering the merits of buying green power as well as those that have decided to buy it and want help doing so. The guide was written for a broad audience, including businesses, government agencies, universities, and all organizations wanting to diversify their energy supply and reduce the environmental impact of their electricity use. The Guide can help with planning an on-site renewable generation project.

  16. The Greening of Government: A Study of How Governments Define the Green Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Greening of Government: A Study of How Governments Define the Green Agenda Executive Summary Institute for Electronic Government, IBM Corporation Page 2 This page is intentionally blank. In the green Corporation Page 3 Foreword What are governments doing to `green' themselves? How do they define their green

  17. NORTHEASTOHIONEWS www .GreenEnergyOhio .org | 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Philip L.

    on the roof should be replaced. The solar panels were dismounted while this work took place. The first chart shining from a crystal-clear sky, only to realize that the foot of snow that envelops the solar panels has for solar energy in Northeast Ohio. Homeowners or businesses who put solar panels on their roofs can

  18. Performance evaluation of Automatic Extraction System. Volume V. Geotechnical investigations of the roof conditions in the area mined by the AES machine. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.; Rafia, F.; Newman, D.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of an in-depth geotechnical investigation aimed at assessing the roof, floor, and coal pillar conditions in the area mined by an experimental Automatic Extraction System (AES), built by National Mine Service Co. The study included diamond core drilling, borescope observations, and detailed engineering geological mapping in Consolidation Coal's McElroy coal mine in West Virginia. The field investigations were accompanied by regional geology studies involving aerial photography and lineament analysis as well as by laboratory testing of 103 rock and coal samples. The roof conditions were interpreted by means of an engineering rock mass classification system, known as the Geomechanics Classification. It was found that the roof quality in the areas mined by the AES machine was poor and that the action of the AES support beams could be detrimental to the overall roof stability. Improvements in the procedures for evaluating future AES-type mining are suggested.

  19. Design and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed roof by using the developed computational tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roof by using the developed computational tools 031.PDF Keywords: Architectural Geometry, Procedural an innovative computational design tool used to edit architectural geometry interactively and demonstrates the process of designing geometry using the developed tool. The background, related work, implementation

  20. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    monas reinhardtii (green alga). Planta 214:552–561. doi:adaptation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Eurhydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  1. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01

    While it has brought green design and construction practicesand Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating Systemof sustainable design, we question how green buildings are

  2. Skinny Streets and Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment and Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piselli, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Streets and Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment andStreets and Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment anddesign. All make decisions about ratio of gray to green. In

  3. The Green Library Movement: An Overview and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonelli, Monika

    2008-01-01

    the cutting edge of green design. The article “Public InputLibrary. (2008). Green Library Design has goal of Platinum2008). Interest in green library design intensified in

  4. Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisitio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition PDF icon Green Lease Policies and...

  5. Review: Greening Citizenship: Sustainable Development, the State and Ideology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Greening Citizenship: Sustainable Development, the State andGreening Citizenship: Sustainable Development, the State andGreening Citizenship: Sustainable Development, the State and

  6. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    E, Melis A (2000) Microalgae: a green source of renewable Hmany species of green microalgae. Moreover, it has attractedutili- zation of green microalgae and the process of

  7. SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses May 24, 2012 - 5:10pm Addthis Green...

  8. Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisitio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition PDF icon Green Lease Policies and Procedures...

  9. Community Power Works: Good Jobs, Green Jobs Conference | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Works: Good Jobs, Green Jobs Conference Community Power Works: Good Jobs, Green Jobs Conference A presentation given by Community Power Works at the Good Jobs, Green Jobs...

  10. ENERGY STAR Webinar: ENERGY STAR and Green Building Rating Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    resources to help meet requirements for green building rating systems, such as the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the Green...

  11. California Households’ Willingness to Pay for “Green” Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Shapiro, Andrew A

    2007-01-01

    Consumer demand for ‘green power’ and energy efficiencyresidential demand for green power. Energy Policy, 29, pp.specific approach to “green” power retailing: Students as

  12. Status Prospects of Green Data Center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Status Prospects of Green Data Center Status Prospects of Green Data Center Information on energy-saving technology research of green data centers and the potential impacts....

  13. California Households’ Willingness to Pay for “Green” Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Shapiro, Andrew A

    2007-01-01

    demand for ‘green power’ and energy efficiency Energyparticipating in “green” energy programs for businesses.residential demand for green power. Energy Policy, 29, pp.

  14. Top 20 Ways to Go Green at Work (and Save the University Money!) Office Depot's three environmental aspirations are to "Buy Green," "Be Green" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Top 20 Ways to Go Green at Work (and Save the University Money!) Office Depot's three environmental aspirations are to "Buy Green," "Be Green" and "Sell Green." · By "Buying Green," we have achieved the widest "green product assortment" in the office products industry - approximately 3,500 products with recycled

  15. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

    2011-05-25

    Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

  16. Green Schools Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdict, M.

    2000-09-27

    The Alliance to Save Energy has responded to interest in the Green Schools concept from the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. The Alliance conducted a train-the-trainers workshop in Augusta, Maine March 17--18, 1999. This work is part of a Green Schools replication project leveraged by funds from another source, NORDAX, which contributed $80,000 to provide partial support to staff at the Maine Energy Education Project (MEEP), Vermont Energy Education Program (VEEP), and New Hampshire Governor's Office to develop Green Schools Projects. DOE funds were used to conduct training, develop a network of state and local government, business and school partners to support school efficiency activities in those three states.

  17. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Faulkner, George E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  18. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  19. Green GECCO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro Electric CoGreen ButtonGreen Fuels

  20. Green Shakti | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro Electric CoGreenHighlandLionGreenShakti

  1. The Role of the Green Party in Germany's Renewable Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Programs and other Research and Development Funding -includes the 100,000 Roof Solar Program -increased facility safety Early Renewable Influence 100 mW Wind (1989) 100 Roof Solar Program (1989) #12 Phase- Out Act Emission Trading Act Eco-tax and 100,000 Roof Program Early wind and solar programs

  2. Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response February 2004 · NREL-35618 Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response Lori Bird, Blair Swezey legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information

  3. Ramblewood Green: Order (2014-CE-23017)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Ramblewood Green Ltd. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Ramblewood Green had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Greening existing buildings with LEED-EB!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirksen, Tyson H

    2008-01-01

    The market of existing office buildings is going green. While early adopters of green buildings were owner-occupiers, there is a current wave of nonowner-occupied office buildings seeking Leadership in Energy and Environmental ...

  5. Green Systems Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1,2; basement) Pre-heats water so water heaters don't need to use as much energy Gas-powered, high efficiency

  6. A Green Laser Pointer Hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jemellie Galang; Allesandro Restelli; Edward W. Hagley; Charles W. Clark

    2010-08-09

    An inexpensive green laser pointer was found to emit 20 mW of infrared radiation during normal use. This is potentially a serious hazard that would not be noticed by most users of such pointers. We find that this infrared emission derives from the design of the pointer, and describe a simple method of testing for infrared emissions using common household items.

  7. Introduction to Green Building & LEED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    Introduction to Green Building & LEED Alistair Jackson Principal O'Brien & Company alistair Housing · Whatcom County Courthouse - LEED for Existing Buildings · Art & Children's Museum · Waterfront · Whatcom Educational Credit Union · Bisese Dental Clinic · Community Food Co-op · Gaston Bay Building #12

  8. Matthew H. Green Lab Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    neurophysiology and behavior · Presently working to build virtual reality systems for integrative behavioral cell recordings · Developed an automated tracking algorithm for analysis of behavior using high in larval zebrafish. Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Charleston, SC. [Poster] Green, M. H

  9. CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CHEVROLET | ELECTRIC | GREEN | SPARK EV | TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATION & SOLUTIONS | GREENER VEHICLES Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate...

  10. UAF Green Department Certification UAF OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    /Documentation: Computers are set to energy saving modes. Description/Documentation: GREEN DEPARTMENT PLEDGE UAF Green Department Certification UAF OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY GREEN DEPARTMENT CERTIFICATION INSTRUCTIONS & FORMS PART I: GETTING STARTED & REQUIRED ACTIONS #12; UAF Green Department Certification

  11. Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green's functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Motivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Introduction to Green's functions Matteo Gatti ETSF Users' Meeting and Training Day Ecole Polytechnique - 22 October 2010 #12;bg=whiteMotivation Green's functions The GW Approximation The Bethe-Salpeter Equation Outline 1 Motivation 2 Green

  12. UbiGreen: Investigating a Mobile Tool for Tracking and Supporting Green Transportation Habits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    green transportation behavior, and reactions to early mobile phone "green" application design concepts activity, a visual design capable of engaging users in the goal of increasing green transportation, and the results of our studies, which have implications for the design of future green applications. Author

  13. Grain Fish Money Financing Africa's Green and Blue Revolutions Financing Africa's Green and Blue Revolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grain Fish Money Financing Africa's Green and Blue Revolutions 1 Financing Africa's Green and Blue Revolutions GRAIN FISH MONEY AFRICA PROGRESS REPORT 2014 #12;AFRICA PROGRESS REPORT 2014 2 #12;Grain Fish Money Financing Africa's Green and Blue Revolutions 3 #12;#12;Grain Fish Money Financing Africa's Green

  14. Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall technologies that can be used to jump-start design and engineering proposals for green walls in a variety of urban conditions. Background: Green walls--otherwise referred to as living walls or biowalls

  15. GreenPar: Scheduling Parallel High Performance Applications in Green Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    applications in datacenters partially powered by on-site generation of renewable ("green") energy. GreenPar schedules the workload to maximize the green energy con- sumption and minimize the grid ("brown") energy consump- tion, while respecting a performance service-level agreement (SLA). When green energy

  16. GreenHadoop: Leveraging Green Energy in Data-Processing Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    GreenHadoop: Leveraging Green Energy in Data-Processing Frameworks ´I~nigo Goiri Dept. of Computer that energy demand and supply must be matched, if we are to take full advantage of the green en- ergy workload to match the green energy supply. In particular, we consider data-processing frameworks, in which

  17. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  18. Pluricomplex Green function, pluricomplex Poisson kernel and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracci, Filippo

    resem- bles completely the one dimensional equation giving rise to the Green function. More or lessPluricomplex Green function, pluricomplex Poisson kernel and applications FILIPPO BRACCI fbracci@mat.uniroma2.it Abstract. This is a small survey about the pluricomplex Green function of M

  19. GREEN IT STRATEGY WHITE PAPER BIG DATA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    GREEN IT STRATEGY WHITE PAPER BIG DATA. BIG ENERGY. #12;GREEN:ons in MassachuseUs. In one day, Odyssey's cloud compu:ng power can process the same amount of 250 more kilowaUs annually. HARVARD'S GREEN IT COMMITMENT Achieve University

  20. Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Mung

    to as `green DSL'. Using this `green DSL' approach, we quantify the power-rate trade-off for different1 Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL Paschalis Tsiaflakisa,, Yung Yib, Mung Chiangc, Marc. However, recently, reducing the total power has become a main target, as IT power consumption has been

  1. Certification Program SIX SIGMA GREEN BELT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Certification Program for SIX SIGMA GREEN BELT 20th to 24th January 2015 at Kolkata. Copies of certificates for proof of Domicile 5. A participant will be declared as certified Green Belt a Green Belt Certificate. 6. Any candidate failing to qualify the exam will be given another chance

  2. Green Computing input for better outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feng

    Journal Profile: Udi Dahan Green Maturity Model for Virtualization Profiling Energy Usage for Efficient suggests that tracking energy consumption at every level will become the factor of success for greenGreen Computing input for better outcomes Learn the discipline, pursue the art, and contribute

  3. 24 January 2014 Green Impact Environmental Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    24 January 2014 Green Impact Environmental Statement Human Resources Human Resources is one of the University of Kent's professional services departments involved in Green Impact. We gained Bronze Awards with an Excellence Project which will engage other Registry colleagues. Green Impact offers schools and departments

  4. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives EV Community...

  5. Home Articles Directions Contact Green Resources & Links The Green Building Gallery Posted by Branden Klayko: Broken Sidewalk.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Articles Directions Contact Green Resources & Links The Green Building Gallery Posted, one door, 72 light fixtu

  6. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boudreaux, Philip R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof assemblies against moisture. The key variables investigated were the leakage area from the attic to the outside, leakage area from the attic to the interior, leakage area from the interior to the outside, supply duct leakage in the attic, and interior moisture generation. These investigations are described in this report.

  7. Green Leases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial OpportunitiesDepartment of Energy SmallGoogleGreen

  8. Evaluation of the thermal resistance of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier for tropical and humid conditions: Experimental study from field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranville, Frédéric; Guichard, Stéphane; Boyer, Harry; Praene, Jean Philippe; Bigot, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier (MRRB), installed according to the state of the art, on a dedicated test cell. An existing experimental device was completed with a specific system for the regulation of the airflow rate in the upper air layer included in a typical roof from Reunion Island. Several experimental sequences were conducted to determine the thermal resistance of the roof according to several parameters and following a specific method. The mean method, well known in international standards (ISO 9869 - 1994) for the determination of the thermal resistance using dynamic data, was used. The method was implemented in a building simulation code in order to allow the determination of the thermal indicator automatically. Experimental results are proposed according to different seasonal periods and for different values of the airflow rate in the upper air layer

  9. Evaluation of the thermal resistance of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier for tropical and humid conditions: Experimental study from field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frédéric Miranville; Ali Hamada Fakra; Stéphane Guichard; Harry Boyer; Jean Philippe Praene; Dimitri Bigot

    2012-12-19

    This paper deals with the experimental evaluation of a roof-mounted multi-reflective radiant barrier (MRRB), installed according to the state of the art, on a dedicated test cell. An existing experimental device was completed with a specific system for the regulation of the airflow rate in the upper air layer included in a typical roof from Reunion Island. Several experimental sequences were conducted to determine the thermal resistance of the roof according to several parameters and following a specific method. The mean method, well known in international standards (ISO 9869 - 1994) for the determination of the thermal resistance using dynamic data, was used. The method was implemented in a building simulation code in order to allow the determination of the thermal indicator automatically. Experimental results are proposed according to different seasonal periods and for different values of the airflow rate in the upper air layer.

  10. The role of public policy in emerging green power markets: an analysis of marketer preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    1999-01-01

    13 Green Power Market Facilitation Efforts . . . . . . . .Development of Green Power Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . .to the Development of the Green Power Market: Survey

  11. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate restores Nrf2 activity and ameliorates crescentic glomerulonephritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    keratinocytes by green tea Constituent (-)-epigallocatechin-pathways by green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-RESEARCH ARTICLE Green Tea Polyphenol (?)-Epigallocatechin-

  12. City of Dallas Green Building Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basora, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Inspection City of Dallas Public Works Department City of Dallas Green Building Case Study CATEE CONFERENCE October 10, 2012 Dallas Building Inspection Take Aways ? Green Building Strategy Implementation is a process ? Awareness ? Education... Dallas Case Study 3 Dallas Building Inspection Municipal Green Building Program ? Adopted on January 22, 2003 ? all municipal projects over 10,000 s.f. to be LEED Silver Certified ? The City of Dallas has 21 LEED certified buildings, 9 gold, 11...

  13. Green's Functions in Perturbative Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhaker Upadhyay; Bhabani Prasad Mandal

    2015-04-03

    We show that the Green's functions in non-linear gauge in the theory of perturbative quantum gravity is expressed as a series in terms of those in linear gauges. This formulation is also holds for operator Green's functions. We further derive the explicit relation between the Green's functions in the theory of perturbative quantum gravity in a pair of arbitary gauges. This process involves some sort of modified FFBRST transformations which is derivable from infinitesimal field-dependent BRST transformations.

  14. Blue-green and green phosphors for lighting applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Henderson, Claire Susan; Nammalwar, Pransanth Kumar; Radkov, Emil

    2012-12-11

    Embodiments of the present techniques provide a related family of phosphors that may be used in lighting systems to generate blue or blue-green light. The phosphors include systems having a general formula of: ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.s- ub.y)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) (I), wherein 0green light. Further, the phosphors may be used in blends with other phosphors, or in combined lighting systems, to produce white light suitable for illumination.

  15. Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    efficiency investments in buildings are made, and by examining the larger diffusion of green and energy efficient buildings throughout the urbanurban variables and the overall socio-cultural and regulatory environment that may make green labeling or energy efficiency

  16. green

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR/%2Afissile4/%2A

  17. National Green Building Standard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-07-01

    DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

  18. Green Power Program Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits27,Network Newsletter Green Power NetworkPartnerR R

  19. Green Button | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMat 4"GloriaGreen Button initiative|Nancy

  20. Sandia Energy - A Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologies |Education STEMA Green Technology Home