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1

Hindi to Punjabi machine translation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hindi-Punjabi being closely related language pair (Goyal V. and Lehal G. S., 2008), Hybrid Machine Translation approach has been used for developing Hindi to Punjabi Machine Translation System. Non-availability of lexical resources, spelling variations ... Keywords: Hindi, Punjabi, closely related languages, computational linguistics, machine translation, natural language processing, translate Hindi to Punjabi

Vishal Goyal; Gurpreet Singh Lehal

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Morphology in Word Recognition: Hindi and Urdu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present research examined whether morphology influences word recognition independently of form-level word properties. Prevailing views attribute cross-linguistic differences in morphological processing to variations in morphological structure and/or productivity. This study tested whether morphological processing is additionally influenced by the orthographic depth of written language, by comparing primed word naming among biliterate readers of Hindu and Urdu, languages written in distinct orthographies but sharing a common morphophonology. Results from five experiments supported the view that morphological processing in orthographically shallow (transparent) Hindi script diverged significantly from that in the deeper (opaque) Urdu orthography. Specifically, morphological priming was differently affected in Hindi vs. Urdu by prim presentation conditions (Exps. 1-3): very briefly exposed (48ms), forward masked morphological primes facilitated word naming in Hindi but not in Urdu. Neither briefly presented, unmasked primes nor longer prime exposures (80ms/240ms) produced priming in Hindi, but Experiment 2 showed priming by unmasked Hindi primes at a 240 ms exposure. By contrast, Urdu exhibited morphological priming only for forward masked primes at the long exposure of 240ms. Thus, early-onset priming in Hindi resembled morpho-orthographic decomposition previously recorded in English, whereas Urdu evinced priming consistent with morpho-semantic effects documented across several languages. Hemispheric asymmetry in morphological priming also diverged across Hindi and Urdu (Exps. 4 and 5); Hindi revealed a non-significant numerical trend for facilitation by morphological primes only in the right visual field (RVF), whereas reliable morphological priming in Urdu was limited to left visual field (LVF) presentation.Disparate patterns in morphological processing asymmetry were corroborated by differences in baseline visual field asymmetries in Hindi vs. Urdu word recognition- filler words elicited a consistent RVF advantage in Hindi, whereas in Urdu, one-syllable fillers, but not two- and three-syllable words revealed the RVF advantage. Taken together, the findings suggest that the variable of orthographic depth be integrated more explicitly into mainstream theoretical accounts of the mechanisms underlying morphological processing in word recognition. In addition, this study highlights the psycholinguistic potential of the languages Hindi and Urdu for advancing our understanding of the role of orthography as well as phonology in morphological processing.

Rao, Chaitra

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hindi paired word recognition using probabilistic neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic speech recognition has been a subject of active research interest since last few decades. In the present paper, spoken Hindi (Indian national language) Paired Word Recognition (HPWR) has been examined with the help of intelligent ... Keywords: HPWR, Hindi, PNN, automatic speech recognition, broad acoustic classes, classification, hybrid computing, paired word recognition, pattern recognition, probabilistic neural networks, wavelet transforms

Dinesh Kumar Rajoriya; R. S. Anand; R. P. Maheshwari

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Strictly Bollywood? : story, camera and movement in Hindi film dance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Film dances, or filmed dance sequences accompanying film songs, are an important part of popular Indian cinema. Over the years, Hindi film dance has evolved from a cinematically simplistic, filmed documentation of performance ...

Shresthova, Sangita.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

On the role of morphosyntactic features in Hindi dependency parsing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the relative importance of different linguistic features for data-driven dependency parsing of Hindi, using a feature pool derived from two state-of-the-art parsers. The analysis shows that the greatest gain in accuracy comes from ...

Bharat Ram Ambati; Samar Husain; Joakim Nivre; Rajeev Sangal

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

We are like this only : Desis and Hindi films in the Diaspora  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Set in Boston, U.S.A, the overarching goal of this thesis is to develop a theoretical framework and a set of analytical tools that might help us understand how Hindi films are watched in the Indian- American diaspora and ...

Punathambekar, Aswin, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

8

All the King's Greeks: Mercenaries, Poleis, and Empires in the Fourth Century BCE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines Greek mercenary service in the Near East from 401- 330 BCE. Traditionally, the employment of Greek soldiers by the Persian Achaemenid Empire (more)

Rop, Jeffrey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Greek petrochemicals finds buyers for plants  

SciTech Connect

Greek Petrochemicals (Athens) has found buyers for two polyethylene (PE) plants it ordered from U.K. contractors 10 years ago and that are currently stored in Manchester. It is understood that Thai Polyethylene (Bangkok) has been selected to acquire the 70,000-m.t./year ICI process low-density PE plant engineered by Simon-Carves. Reliance Industries is in talks to by the 50,000-m.t./year Union Carbide Unipol process high-density PE unit. The plants are to be installed at Map Ta Put, Thailand and Hazira, India, respectively.

Alperowicz, N.

1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

It's all Greek to me: a case for the classics in game development education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview of Classical Greek literature as a parallel for the game development industry: we outline how the historical developments of Greek storytelling and literature inform the developmental history of video games. As the Greek ... Keywords: Aristotle, Greek literature, Homer, game curriculum, game design, game design theory, game development, game-based education, philosophy, story, storytelling

Fred Sebastian; Anthony Whitehead

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A proposal to encode the Greek Capital and Small Letter San in the UCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical Studies in Athens, Greece. 3. Information on theH. Local Scripts of Archaic Greece (Oxford, 1990) 33. GreekLocal Scripts of Archaic Greece (Oxford 1990) Plate 20 Greek

Pantelia, Maria C.; Peevers, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Monumentality and its shadows : a quest for modern Greek architectural discourse in nineteenth-century Athens (1834-1862)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation traces the sources of modern Greek architectural discourse in the first period of the modern Greek State following Independence and under the monarchy of Bavarian King Othon I (1834-1862). Its intent is ...

Fatsea, Irene D

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

IPLR: an online resource for Greek word-level and sublexical information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new online psycholinguistic resource for Greek based on analyses of written corpora combined with text processing technologies developed at the Institute for Language & Speech Processing (ILSP), Greece. The "ILSP PsychoLinguistic Resource" ... Keywords: Bigrams, Greek, Online resources, Psycholinguistics, Sublexical variables, Syllabification, Text corpora

Athanassios Protopapas; Marina Tzakosta; Aimilios Chalamandaris; Pirros Tsiakoulis

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Communal Relations in İzmir/Smyrna, 1826-1864: As Seen Through The Prism of Greek-Turkish Relations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the level of social and cultural interaction between the Greek and Turkish communities of ?zmir and the impact of the centralizing Ottoman (more)

Tansug, N. Feryal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

PARES: A Software Tool for Computer-Based Testing and Evaluation Used in the Greek Higher Education System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a prototype software platform, namely Platform for Adaptive and Reliable Evaluation of Students (PARES), for student testing and evaluation. The motivation has been to provide educators in the Greek higher education system a useful ...

Vassilis G. Kaburlasos; Catherine C. Marinagi; Vassilis Th. Tsoukalas

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Experimental Study of the Vertical Structure of the Lower Troposphere over a SmallGreek Island in the Aegean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental campaign was carried out on a small Greek island that is characterized by complex terrain; its aim was to study the local characteristics of the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The instrumentation was ...

C. G. Helmis; C. Jacovides; D. N. Asimakopoulos; H. A. Flocas

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A study on the security, the performance and the penetration of Wi-Fi networks in a Greek urban area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the expansion of urbanWi-Fi networks and the degree of users' awareness about their characteristics. It involves an experiment contacted at the area of Serres, a Greek city of around 70,000 inhabitants. The findings revealed ... Keywords: Wi-Fi networks usage, urban networks, war driving, wireless security

Savvas Mousionis; Alex Vakaloudis; Constantinos Hilas

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transient analyses and thermal-hydraulic safety margins for the Greek Research Reactor (GRRI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various core configurations for the Greek research reactor (GRR1) have been considered in assessing the safety issues of adding a beryllium reflector to the existing water reflected HEU core and the transition from HEU to an all LEU core. The assessment has included both steady-state and transient analyses of safety margins and limits. A small all fresh Be reflected HEU core with a rather large nuclear peaking factor can still be operated safely, and thus adding a Be reflector to the larger depleted HEU core should not pose a problem. The transition mixed core with 50% LEU elements has larger void and Doppler coefficients than the HEU reference core and gives a lower peak clad temperature under transient conditions. The transition cores should give ever increasing margins to plate melting and fission product release as LEU elements are added to the core.

Woodruff, W.L.; Deen, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Harmonic voltages and currents on two Greek islands with photovoltaic stations: Study and field measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the harmonic distortion present to the electric grid of two small Greek islands (Arki and Antikythera) where Photovoltaic Stations are installed, to study their inverters harmonic behavior and to present the measurements of the harmonic voltages and currents obtained at field tests on these two islands. It is shown that the harmonics injected by the Photovoltaic Stations to the electric grid are not very high and at most cases they can not cause significant problems to the appliances to he customers. On the other had, a theoretical analysis of the installed inverters technology is also presented, showing that the results from the measurements and those of the presented analysis are quite identical. From both measurements and theoretical analysis remarkable conclusions concerning the problem of harmonics are drawn.

Vokas, G.A.; Machias, A.V. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Electric Power Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery 3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

22

Bhot deshiya vibhinna Baudha Sampradhyon ki Utpatti (Hindi)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cfl(OI ~ it ~ ~ ~ I ~ qer it ~ 'SfCPR cnr \\3m'lf ;nft ~ ~ I ~"IJid 1 ctT ~ ~ <4T Ji~'1lf fC4fi(l~ ~ ~, Cf41Fcf; ~31'1lf cnr +rrf <4T ~lf1QI~lfctl ~ ~ 3i1't4I(OI ~ rnT ~ ~ ~ ~ I Ji~'1lf it ~ ~ ~~llfCfl ~ ~ it ijt;rud ~ ~ ~4)QI~lf ctT !Q;;g:dl ~ CflI(OI Cfl...

Acharya, Chowang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improving the Raster Scanning Methods used with X-ray Fluorescence to See the Ancient Greek Text of Archimedes (SULI Paper)  

SciTech Connect

X-ray fluorescence is being used to detect the ancient Greek copy of Archimedes work. The copy of Archimedes text was erased with a weak acid and written over to make a prayer book in the Middle Ages. The ancient parchment, made of goat skin, has on it some of Archimedes most valuable writings. The ink in the text contains iron which will fluoresce under x-ray radiation. My research project deals with the scanning and imaging process. The palimpsest is put in a stage that moves in a raster format. As the beam hits the parchment, a germanium detector detects the iron atoms and discriminates against other elements. Since the computer scans in both forwards and backwards directions, it is imperative that each row of data lines up exactly on top of the next row. There are several parameters to consider when scanning the parchment. These parameters include: speed, count time, shutter time, x-number of points, and acceleration. Formulas were made to relate these parameters together. During the actual beam time of this project, the scanning was very slow going; it took 30 hours to scan 1/2 of a page. Using the formulas, the scientists doubled distance and speed to scan the parchment faster; however, the grey scaled data was not lined up properly causing the images to look blurred. My project was is to find out why doubling the parameters caused blurred images, and to fix the problem if it is fixable.

Griffin, Isabella B.; /Norfolk State U. /SLAC, SSRL

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), Professor of Greek and a Naval Architect: A New Light on the 16th-century Manuscript Misure di vascelli etc. diproto dellArsenale di Venetia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the significant role that the Venetian humanist Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), professor of Greek at the School of Saint Mark, played during the first half of the 16th century in Venetian naval architecture. Early in the 16th century, the maritime power of Venice was seriously threatened by the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman II in the East and by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in the West. In order to regain its naval power in the Mediterranean, the Republic of Venice strongly encouraged Venetian shipwrights to submit new designs for war galleys. The undisputed founder and champion of this naval program was not a skilled shipwright but a young professor of Greek in the School of Saint Mark named Vettor Fausto, who in the heat of this renewal programme, proposed marine architecture as a new scientia. In 1529, Vettor Fausto built a quinqueremis whose design, he claimed, was based upon the quinquereme used by the Romans during their wars and that he had derived the shipbuilding proportions from the most ancient Greek manuscripts. The recovery of Classical traditions resulted in major changes in many fields. It included shipbuilding practices as well, especially after Fausto introduced in the Venetian Arsenal a new scientia, that of marine architecture, in opposition to the fabrilis peritia, the empirical shipbuilding practice. This work examines several Renaissance sources and archival material in order to illuminate the technical features and the design of Faustos quinquereme. Based on the study of the anonymous 16th-century Venetian manuscript Misure di vascelli etc. diproto dellArsenale di Venetia from the State Archive of Venice, this thesis presents a general overview of Faustos life and his cultural background in order to better understand the humanistic foundations that led him to propose the construction of the quinquereme. Also presented in this thesis is a theoretical reconstruction of Faustos quinquereme and the suggestion that the shipbuilding instructions contained in the anonymous manuscript are connected to the work of Fausto in the Venetian Arsenal.

Campana, Lilia 1975-

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Origins of Logic Greek mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ 2007/08-1ab ­ p. 10/4 #12;Esoteric / exoteric. Aristotle: Esoteric works: lecture notes and textbooks), designed for the general public. Plato Aristotle Exoteric survive lost Esoteric ? mostly survive Core Logic ­ 2007/08-1ab ­ p. 11/4 #12;Esoteric / exoteric. Aristotle: Esoteric works: lecture notes and textbooks

Löwe, Benedikt

26

Enhanced recognition rate of spoken Hindi paired word using probabilistic neural network approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic neural network (PNN) shows efficient capability in recognising low level signal patterns. PNN is a sequential arrangement of radial basis layer and a competitive transfer function layer, which picks up the highest probabilities ...

Dinesh Kumar Rajoriya; R. S. Anand; R. P. Maheshwari

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Marine accident report - collision of greek bulk carrier M/V Irene S. Lemos and Panamanian bulk carrier M/V Maritime Justice, lower Mississippi River, near New Orleans, Louisiana, November 9, 1978  

SciTech Connect

At 0640 c.s.t., on November 9, 1978, the Greek bulk carrier M/V IRENE S. LEMOS and the Panamanian bulk carrier M/V MARITIME JUSTICE collided in the lower Mississippi River at mile 78.3 AHP, about 15 statute miles below New Orleans, Louisiana. Because of dense fog, the visibility at the time of the collision was less than 400 feet. The vessels struck nearly head-on, damaging the bows of both vessels. There were no deaths or injuries. Cost of repairs to the two vessels was estimated at $4 million. About 1,800 barrels of fuel oil were discharged into the Mississippi River and resulted in local health officials securing the municipal water intake 1/2 mile downriver. The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the poor judgment of the pilots of the MARITIME JUSTICE and the IRENE S. LEMOS when they agreed to meet and pass, in near zero visibility conditions, at English Turn Bend where the risk of collision was much greater than in a straight portion of the river and the failure of the vessels to move to the extreme right of the channel.

Not Available

1980-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Terra Terror: An Interdisciplinary Study of Earthquakes in Ancient Near Eastern Texts and the Hebrew Bible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social Domains of Disaster Response. Pages 5266 inUnlocking Social Domains of Disaster Response, in Mappingin Natural Disasters, Cultural Responses: Case Studies

Roberts, Ryan Nathaniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Outdoor Education in the Greek Mathematics Textbooks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Outdoor education is a promising educational field that can support indoor education and provide benefits beyond the evidentknowledge. Outdoor and indoor education together can (more)

Skouroupathis, Nicolas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Impurity and gender in the Hebrew Bible : ideological intersections in the books of Leviticus, Ezekiel and Ezra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

menstruous (hdn) land, by the pollution/menstruation (hdn)menstruous (hdn) land, by the pollution/menstruation (hdn)out of this pollution that has filled the land ?from end to

Goldstein, Elizabeth Wayne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Overview Tsvi Piran Racah Institute for Physics Abstract. Magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Strong thirty years, after the discovery of Gamma-Ray bursts (GRBs) we have now a reasonable GRB model

Jensen, Grant J.

32

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

33

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

34

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

35

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

36

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

37

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

38

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

39

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

40

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

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41

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

42

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

43

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

44

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

45

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

46

Word Order, Focus, and Clause Linking in Greek Tragic Poetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a 46OT.5960. 19 focus marker. The structure is shown in Fig. 10 (=Ch. 6, Fig. 3):47 IP VP Fig. 10 tovde wJ" pa'" ti" auJto;n tou' pevla" ma'llon filei' Adv. V a[rti gignwvskei...

Fraser, Bruce L

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin  

SciTech Connect

The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

Karakitsios, V. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Rigakis, N. [Public Petroleum Corp., Athens (Greece)

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

Automatic script identification from images using cluster-based templates  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a technique for automatically identifying the script used to generate a document that is stored electronically in bit image form. Our approach differs from previous work in that the distinctions among scripts are discovered by an automatic learning procedure, without any handson analysis. We first develop a set of representative symbols (templates) for each script in our database (Cyrillic, Roman, etc.). We do this by identifying all textual symbols in a set of training documents, scaling each symbol to a fixed size, clustering similar symbols, pruning minor clusters, and finding each cluster`s centroid. To identify a new document`s script, we identify and scale a subset of symbols from the document and compare them to the templates for each script. We choose the script whose templates provide the best match. Our current system distinguishes among the Armenian, Burmese, Chinese, Cyrillic, Ethiopic, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Korean, Roman, and Thai scripts with over 90% accuracy.

Hochberg, J.; Kerns, L.; Kelly, P.; Thomas, T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Research Challenges for CMOS Scaling: Industry Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... English French Russian German Italian Spanish Brazilian Portuguese Arabic Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Hindi Tamil Thai Korean

50

Improving Bitext Word Alignments via Syntax-based Reordering of English  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cross- #12;English: Hindi: use of plutonium is to manufacture nuclear weapons plutoniyama kaa 's NP plutonium weapons to Figure 2: Original Hindi-English sentence pair with gold-standard word-alignments. English': Hindi: plutoniyama plutonium kaa 's istemaala use paramaanu nuclear hathiyaara banaane ke lie

51

Simulation of Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Deep Turbulent Convective Clouds Using a Spectral Microphysics Mixed-Phase Cumulus Cloud Model. Part I: Model Description and Possible Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An updated version of the spectral (bin) microphysics cloud model developed at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem [the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM)] is described. The model microphysics is based on the solution of the equation system for ...

A. Khain; A. Pokrovsky; M. Pinsky; A. Seifert; V. Phillips

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science and TechnologySpecial Inaugural Issue, 1(1), (2011) SKILLS Languages: English, Hindi, Punjabi, Urdu (spoken) Computing skills: Microsoft office,

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Birth of the Mob: Representations of Crowds in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schnapp, Jeffrey T. Mob Porn. In Schnapp and Tiews 2006 (Samuels. Schnapp, Mob Porn. Jonsson Burstein Connolly.public spaces (Schnapp, Mob Porn 3). to say about crowds

Schwab, Justin Jon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Developing a localisation indicator for chain hotel websites: a Greek case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web visitors differ across regional, linguistic and country boundaries and their requirements are strongly influenced by their local cultural perspective. The localisation of a website is the process of adapting it to a particular language, culture and ... Keywords: Greece, business information systems, collectivism, cultural perspectives, culture, evaluation models, femininity, hospitality industry, hotel chains, hoteliers, individualism, internet, language, linguistic factors, local, localisation indicators, masculinity, power distance, quantitative measurement, tourism, uncertainty avoidance, websites, world wide web

Dimitris Kanellopoulos; Fotis Lazarinis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Horizontal Inequity and Vertical Redistribution with Indirect Taxes: the Greek Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, unequal treatment of equals and hence horizontal inequity may arise because of the specific intention of treating distinct groups differently (married, single, homeowners, etc.) or different sources of income or categories of expenditure differently...

Kaplanoglou, G; Newbery, David

56

Analyses of Greek Research Reactor with mixed HEU-LEU Be reflected core  

SciTech Connect

The fuel-cycle analyses presented in this paper provide specific steps to be taken in the transition from a 36-element water-reflected HEU core to a 33-element LEU equilibrium core with a Be reflector on two faces. The first step will be to install the Be reflector and remove the highest burnup HEU fuel. The smaller Be-reflected core will be refueled with LEU fuel. All analyses were performed using a planar 5-group REBUS3 model benchmarked to VIM Monte Carlo. In addition to fuel cycle results, the control rod worth, reactivity response to increased fuel and water temperature and decreased water density were compared for the transition core and the reference HEU core.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, K. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

A study of Cappadocian Greek nominal morphology from a diachronic and dialectological perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?????????? ?. ??????) and the George and Marie Vergottis Fund of the Cambridge European Trust, which generously funded my doctoral studies. I also wish to express my appreciation to the Department of Linguistics and to Wolfson College for providing me... with additional funding to attend various conferences both in the United Kingdom and abroad. My work has benefited greatly from the insightful and constructive comments of my supervisor, Bert Vaux, whom I would like to thank for all his help and guidance during...

Karatsareas, Petros

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of energy use in typical Greek residential buildings and proposed retrofit strategies .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In each country, the concept of housing exists in relationship between the ways people live, the local climate, the social and political factors that affect (more)

Davaki, Maria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Birth of the Mob: Representations of Crowds in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Aggregation in Ancient Greece. Journal of Politicalin Archaic and Classical Greece. Hyperboreus 6 (2000), 79-Literary Form in Ancient Greece. Ithaca: Cornell University

Schwab, Justin Jon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Linguistic practices in Cyprus and the emergence of Cypriot Standard Greek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

language situation in Greece: A sociological approach to theidentities and practices in Greece and Cyprus. Athens:134. Trudgill, P. (2000). Greece and European Turkey: From

Arvaniti, Amalia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Resistance and relief, Greece in World War II and the Greek War Relief Association, an exhibit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project was installed at the Tsakopoulos Gallery of the California State University, Sacramento Library. In preparation for this exhibit, the author worked in several (more)

Kreatsoulas, Despina M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Genizah MS T-S AS 153.118  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letter addressed to ?uviah b. ?Eli he-?aver; Judaeo-Arabic in the margin; writing exercises in Arabic and Hebrew on verso....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Genizah MS T-S AS 145.94  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recto: letter from Ephraim b. Shemariah to the Nasi; mentions the elder Ab? Sa??d. Verso: Hebrew legal document (power of attorney); mentions ?adoq Av Bet Din....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probability Distribution of the Flux in the Lya Forest Vincent Desjacques Hebrew University, Jerusalem Abstract: I will present a measurement of the probability distribution...

67

Employing post-DEA Cross-evaluation and Cluster Analysis in a Sample of Greek NHS Hospitals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To increase Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) discrimination of efficient Decision Making Units (DMUs), by complementing "self-evaluated" efficiencies with "peer-evaluated" cross-efficiencies and, based on these results, to classify the DMUs using cluster ... Keywords: Benchmarking, Cluster analysis, Cross-efficiency, Data envelopment analysis, Hospital

Angeliki Flokou; Nick Kontodimopoulos; Dimitris Niakas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of an on-line ash analysis system for low-grade and inhomogeneous Greek lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of using commercial on-line analysis systems for monitoring the ash content of low-grade lignites was investigated by carrying out numerous bench- and pilot-scale trials in the mines of Public Power Corporation SA, Greece. Pilot-scale trials were based on a dual-energy {gamma}-ray transmission analyzer, which was installed on the conveyor belt that transports lignite from the pit to the bunker of Kardia mine, Ptolemais. According to the obtained results, the accuracy of the on-line measurements was not adequate and did not allow lignite quality monitoring in real time. The deterioration of the on-line measurements' accuracy, compared to previous applications in other mining sites, was related to the intense variation of the lignite ash content and ash composition, which distorted the calibration of the analyzer. The latter is based on certain assumptions regarding the average atomic number of the organic and mineral matter contained in the lignite. Further experimental work is needed to investigate solutions for successful implementation of this method to low-grade lignites that exhibit large variation in ash content and composition. 17 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Konstantinos V. Kavouridis; Francis F. Pavloudakis [Public Power Corporation SA, Athens (Greece). General Division of Mines

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.79 *t Bible translation *s 6.9 x 6.5; 5 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Translation of Genesis 18:32; Hebrew incipits. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.9 *t Grammar *s 7.2 x 7.3; 11 lines (recto); 10 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Ibn Jan??, Kit?b al-U??l ('The Book of Hebrew Roots') (Neubauer (ed.) (1875): 524:926)...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.97  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.97 *t Bible translation *s 8.8 x 6.4; 8 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Translation of Exodus 5:16-20 and 5:23-6:1. Hebrew incipits with decorative signs. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Genizah MS T-S AS 140.7B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 140.7B *t Grammar *s 22.8 x 11.8; 20 lines + marginalia *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, many holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Ibn Jan??, Kit?b al-U??l ('The Book of Hebrew Roots') (Neubauer (ed.) (1875): 407...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Power Triangle: Military, Security, and Politics in the Shaping of the Egyptian, Iranian, and Turkish Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Greeks occupied Izmir (Smyrna) and other cities inthe Greek occupation of Izmir (Smyrna) had sent shockwaves1977 municipal election in Izmir, but he lost. Months before

Kandil, Hazem Khaled

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Theognis of Megara and the Divine Creating Power in the Framework of Semiotic Textology: An Application of Jnos Sndor Petfi's Theory to Archaic Greek Literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a demonstration of an application of Semiotic Textology to a limited case study. The main aspects of Semiotic Textology, the theory elaborated by Petfi, are presented; secondly the linguistic aspects of the interpretation of lines ... Keywords: Jnos Sndor Petfi, Semiotic Textology, Text processing, Theognis of Megara, Theoretical interpretation

Mauro Giuffr

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Simulation of Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Deep Turbulent Convective Clouds Using a Spectral Microphysics Mixed-Phase Cumulus Cloud Model. Part II: Sensitivity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of different size distributions of cloud condensational nuclei (CCN) on the evolution of deep convective clouds under dry unstable continental thermodynamic conditions are investigated using the spectral microphysics Hebrew University ...

A. Khain; A. Pokrovsky

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Influence of Time-Dependent Melting on the Dynamics and Precipitation Production in Maritime and Continental Storm Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of one maritime and four continental observed cases of deep convection are performed with the Hebrew University Cloud Model that has spectral bin microphysics. The maritime case is from observations made on 18 September 1974 during ...

Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Andrei Pokrovsky; Alexander Khain

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.6 *t Glossary *s 8.4 x 11.7; 10 lines *m Paper; Explanation1 leaf; torn, holes, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Explanation of words from Talmud...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.175  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.175 *t Rabbinics *s 5.2 x 5.9; 3 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified discussion mentioning mi?vah. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.377  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.377 *t Rabbinics *s 6.1 x 5.5; 6 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified discussion, mentioning Solomon and ???????. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.443  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.443 *t Unidentified *s 7.5 x 5.5; 3 lines + marginalia (recto); 6 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Technical Report TTIC-TR-2009-4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shalev-Shwartz Toyota Technological Institute, Chicago, USA shai@tti-c.org Ohad Shamir The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel ohadsh@cs.huji.ac.il Karthik Sridharan Toyota Technological Institute, Chicago

82

he Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog provides the procedures and policies in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tries have developed mariculture by hacking down their coastal wetlands, losing valuable protection from.Sc. and doctor of dental medicine degrees from Hebrew University and trained in prostho- dontics at Louisiana

Gelfond, Michael

83

Genizah MS T-S AS 161.126  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 161.126 *t Bible commentary *s 9.5 x 9.9; 10 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Biblical commentary. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Unschooling media : participatory practices among progressive homeschoolers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Rehoboth, the name of my hometown in southern Massachusetts, comes from the Hebrew work for "crossroads." Indeed there's not much in this rural town besides Route 44 and Route 118, with smatterings of horse ...

Bertozzi, Vanessa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

2013Supelcowinner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

z FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 12, 2013 SUPELCO/Nicholas Pelick AOCS Research Award Urbana, Illinois, USA The AOCS is pleased to announce that Nissim Garti, Professor, The Hebrew Uni

86

The automaton theater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hero of Alexandria was a Greek geometrician, engineer, and inventor who lived in Alexandria probably during the first century A.D. He wrote in Greek a number of theoretical treatises revealing a thorough knowledge of ...

Xagoraris, Zafirios

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

248 Weed Science 50, MarchApril 2002 Weed Science, 50:248260. 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Evolutionary Anthropology (www.eva.mpg.de) 7 pm Dinner at Greek restaurant Ambrosia (www.ambrosia

Bradford, Kent

88

Energy and Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... Contribution to the Energy Optimization in the Pyrometallurgical Treatment of Greek Nickeliferous Laterites: Konstantinos Karalis1; Charalabos...

89

Using TectoMT as a preprocessing tool for phrase-based statistical machine translation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic comparison of preprocessing techniques for two language pairs: English-Czech and English-Hindi. The two target languages, although both belonging to the Indo-European language family, show significant differences in morphology, ... Keywords: phrase-based translation, preprocessing, reordering

Daniel Zeman

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference Crown Plaza, Gold Coast, Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Department: Karen Falconer Al-Hindi Women's & Gender Studies/Geography&Geology Sharon Wood History/ Women helped me revise and resubmit my paper "Oil and Water? The Philosophical Commitments of Peace Studies of "`Japan Bashing' in the 1980s and Today's `China Threat': Is History Repeating Itself?" Karen Falconer Al

Halgamuge, Saman

91

Interview of Ben Shneiderman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

come by a much more conscious, systematic approach, working on the problem; I am quite flexible in the way I work; I don't carry a notebook with me; I am a list-maker and very persistent on things; my favourite way is socially working through; I work... with music in the background nor go jogging with music in my ears 26:26:17 My father had more of a religious training at a traditional Heder, and he was quite knowledgeable and skilled at reading from the Torah in Hebrew; I went to a Hebrew school after...

Shneiderman, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The textbook's nation : How is the Greek nation portrayed in the main history textbook of the 6th grade of elementary schools in Greece, especially with regards to the Turkish nation?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study I set out to evaluate the history schoolbook taught in grade 6 of the elementary schools in Greece, In the contemporary years (more)

Paraskelidi, Ioanna

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ogmios 31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and proceeded to make ourselves at home with the other guests, including the bandar log. The Conference, on Vital Voices: Endangered languages and Multilingualism, started with a Keynote address by L. M. Khubchandani: this attempted to capture the scene of oral... can be typed using any English key board of a computer. He is interested in studies on lan- guage endangerment, ethnolinguistics, trans- lations (though he knows only six Indian languages - Tamil, Malayalam, Kurux, Car Nicobarese, Kannada & Hindi - he...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Publications Received Books listed below that are marked with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

978-94-007-1757-2, $109.99 Biblical Hebrew Grammar Visualized Francis I. Andersen1 and A. Dean Forbes2 in Ancient West Semitic, volume 6), 2012, xvi+394 pp; hardbound, ISBN 978-1-57506-229-7, $64.50 Introduction Language Technologies, edited by Graeme Hirst, volume 16), 2012, xiv+165 pp; paperbound, ISBN 978-1

95

Genizah MS T-S AS 158.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 158.2 *t Rabbinics *s 19.7 x 15.1; 16 lines (recto); 17 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Recto: mentions the title 'Book of Numbers' (??? ?????), followed by citation...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

Genizah MS T-S AS 161.38  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 161.38 *t Glossary; responsum (?) *s 15.1 x 10; 17 lines + 11 lines (recto); 21 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic, Hebrew (isolated Tiberian vocalisation) *c Recto: a vocabulary list of unclean...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.43C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.43C *t Glossary *s 14.2 x 4.6; 29 lines (recto); 28 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (occasional Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list from 1 Kings 18:32-Isaiah 3:23 *e Belongs...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.72 leaf 3 + 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.72 leaf 3 + 4 *t Glossary *s 6.1 x 7.3; 6 lines *m Vellum; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Hosea 2:2025 and 4:2, 1013 *e Lines are ruled...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

99

Genizah MS T-S AS 161.129  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 161.129 *t Glossary *s 8.7 x 14.6 (1 leaf: 8.2); 412 lines + marginalia *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); badly torn, holes, faded, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (isolated Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list from Joshua 9...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.67  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.67 *t Glossary *s 10 x 15; 12 lines, arranged in two double columns *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, badly faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Isaiah 48:2149:19 *e Belongs with T-S AS 141.68AB...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.41  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.41 *t Glossary *s 16 x 11.3; 14 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list from Ezekiel 13:1022, quoting Job 6:6; Genesis 31:6; Ezekiel 38:22; Leviticus 14...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

102

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.66  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.66 *t Glossary *s 12.5 x 12; 17 lines, arranged in two double columns *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, large hole, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Exodus 15:2417:12 *e Lines are ruled...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.68B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.68B *t Glossary *s 4.6 x 5; 5 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, many holes, badly faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Isaiah 40:2224 and 40:2731 *e Belongs with T-S AS 141.67, 68A...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.71  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.71 *t Glossary *s 5.5 x 4.6; 11 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list possibly from Isaiah (identified Isaiah 8:79) *e The text on verso is inverted in relation to recto...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Genizah MS T-S AS 73.170  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 73.170 *t Glossary *s 18.3 x 13.8; 20 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; many large holes, badly rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list/exegetical notes on selected verses from Isaiah 30:114 (quotes Numbers 32:14; Exodus 9:10; Isaiah 64...

Unknown

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Genizah MS T-S AS 160.16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 160.16 *t Glossary *s 18.4 x 7.6; 19 lines (recto); 20 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list based on Psalms 42:948:5, quoting 2 Samuel 5:8; Jeremiah 51:27; Proverbs 3...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.29  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.29 *t Glossary; unidentified; notes *s 9.3 x 9; 10 lines + interlinear and marginal lines (recto); 9 lines + interlinear and marginal lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.35 *t Glossary *s 9.5 x 10.8; 10 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list on Psalms 85:2 to Psalms 89:10...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.24 *t Glossary *s 17.3 x 13.6; 19 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list from Psalms 102:21 to 105:28, quoting Genesis 37:18...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.60  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.60 *t Glossary *s 8.1 x 8; 8 lines, arranged in two columns (recto); 7 lines, arranged in two columns (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from 2 Kings 10:2018:21...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.57  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.57 *t Glossary *s 34.2 x 7.5; 47 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Mishnah ?Eruvim 10:14 to Pesa?im 5:9 *e A rotulus formed from two pieces...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.70  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.70 *t Glossary *s 7.3 x 12.3; 8 lines *m Vellum; 2 leaves (bifolium); badly torn, holes, faded, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Joshua 13:12; 20:35 and Joshua 22:1819; Judges 1:314...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Genizah MS T-S AS 162.27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 162.27 *t Glossary *s 10.8 x 6.5; 11 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, stained *h Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Probably vocabulary list on 1 Kings 18. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.45C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.45C *t Glossary *s 7.1 x 10.6; 8 lines (recto); 7 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Psalms (including probably Psalms 53:4) *e Belongs with T...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.26A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.26A *t Glossary *s 17.1 x 15.2; 20 lines, arranged in two columns *m Paper; 1 leaf; holes, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Ezekiel 15:2 to 16:16 *e Lines are ruled...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.63  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.63 *t Glossary *s 17.8 x 20.6; 18 lines, arranged in three columns (recto); 16 lines, arranged in three columns (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *n Vocabulary list from Numbers 7:1311:4 *e Lines...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.44D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.44D *t Glossary *s 18.2 x 16.3; 18 lines (recto); 9 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, faded, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary list from Leviticus 4:1519 and 4:2125 *e Additions...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Genizah MS T-S AS 118.153  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 118.153 *t Glossary *s 7.3 x 9.3; 4 lines (recto); 5 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list on Psalms 74:6 and 74:1920 *e Belongs with T-S AS 118.154...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.44A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.44A *t Glossary *s 8.5 x 12.4; 8 lines, arranged in two columns (recto); 6 lines, arranged in two columns (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, badly faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.72 leaf 1 + 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.72 leaf 1 + 6 *t Glossary *s 5.8 x 9.2; 6 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Vellum; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Hosea 7:4 *e Lines are ruled...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.16 *t Glossary; grammar *s 18.8 x 13.4; 21 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Aramaic *c Dictionary of difficult words from Maimonides' Mishneh Torah with similarities to Tan?um b...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.61  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.61 *t Glossary; jottings *s 16.2 x 4.4; 7 lines (recto); numerous lines (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Recto: vocabulary list. Verso: jottings...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.59  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.59 *t Glossary *s 11.3 x 8.7; 11 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Probably vocabulary list (underlying principle is not clear), explaining words from Judges 18:16; 1 Samuel 25...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.27 *t Glossary *s 5.7 x 19.4; 6 lines (recto); 5 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list (unidentified); mentions the name Abraham b. Mevora?...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Genizah MS T-S AS 73.214  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 73.214 *t Unidentified; glossary *s 10.2 x 13.9 (1 leaf: 7); 714 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Fol. 1: unidentifed. Fol. 2: vocabulary list of selected phrases from 1...

Unknown

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.93  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.93 *t Unidentified *s 8 x 5.3; 13 lines (recto); 13 lines + marginalia (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (isolated Tiberian vocalisation) *c Unidentified. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Genizah MS T-S AS 132.80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 132.80 *t Piyyu?; unidentified *s 5.3 x 10.2; 10 lines (verso); 1 line (recto) *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: unidentified text in Arabic *e Verso is written transversely in relation to recto...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Genizah MS T-S AS 160.260  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 160.260 *t Glossary *s 14.7 x 10.2; 14 lines (recto); 13 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; holes, rubbed, stained *h semi-cursive script with *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (isolated Tiberian vocalisation); Aramaic *c Vocabulary list on Mishnah...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Genizah MS T-S AS 160.18  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 160.18 *t Liturgy *s 6.4 x 5.3; 8 lines (recto); 3 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic (isolated Arabic vocalisation) *c Recto: probably instructions for a?arit. Verso: unidentified Arabic. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.170  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.170 *t Rabbinics *s 11.6 x 14.5; 13 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified discussion. *e Possibly belongs with T-S AS 155.171....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.158 *t Rabbinics *s 12.9 x 11; 23 lines + intralinear additions and corrections *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion with citations, such as Deuteronomy 32:36. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.137  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.137 *t Hala?a (?) *s 4 x 5.1; 6 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion about food, in particular grain, with citations from Nehemiah 5:10, Ezekiel 36:29 and Psalms 78:25. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Genizah MS T-S AS 161.54  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 161.54 *t Commentary: Maimonides *s 25 x 17.2; 24 lines (recto); 23 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Maimonides' commentary on Mishnah Yomah 1:13. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.176  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.176 *t Unidentified *s 7.4 x 13.1; 7 lines (recto); 8 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Genizah MS T-S AS 148.5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 148.5 *t Memorial list *s 23 x 7.5; 23 lines (recto); 19 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; holes, slightly rubbed *l Hebrew; Judaeo-Arabic *c Memorial list of the families of Ibn ?ulayb Kohanim, T?j al-Ma??n?, Ibn al-Dayy?n and Ibn Naf?? al...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

136

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.506  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.506 *t Bible translation *s 12.9 x 19 (9.5 one leaf); 12-14 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, rubbed, faded, mirrored script, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (with Tiberian vocalisation) *c Translation of Psalms 4...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.189  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.189 *t Bible commentary (?) *s 5.5 x 8.4; 8 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Possibly commentary on Leviticus (including 17:13). *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

138

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.522  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.522 *s *m Paper *l *c 49 minute fragments, of which the majority are written in Judaeo-Arabic, a few are written in Arabic and Hebrew, there are a few examples of Tiberian vocalisation. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.449  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.449 *t Bible commentary *s 10.1 x 8.3; 14 lines (recto); 15 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Bible commentary on Ezra; with citations from Ezra 7:9 and 1 Kings 7:24. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.393  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.393 *t Liturgy (?) *s 7.4 x 11.8; 8 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, holes, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Possibly a liturgical fragment referring to prayers, including the prayer based on 1 Kings 18:37. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.419  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.419 *t Hala?a *s 4.7 x 4.1; 7 lines *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion concerning fruits and trees. *e Belongs with T-S AS 156.414....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Genizah MS T-S AS 151.204  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 151.204 *t Document *s 6.7 x 11; 18 lines (recto); 2 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (?) *c Unidentified document, mentions currency such as dinars. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.153  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 152.153 *t Letter *s 5.9 x 5.8; 8 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter to the sage ?alfon. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.250  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.250 *t Unidentified *s 10.9 x 10.6; 14 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified. *e Seems to belong with T-S AS 156.249....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Genizah MS T-S AS 145.282  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 145.282 *t Legal document *s 7.3 x 5; 9 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Legal document (includes divorce formula); mentions Sa?adya. *e Probably belongs together with T-S AS 145.283....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Genizah MS T-S AS 125.184  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 125.184 *t Piyyu?; document *s 19.6 x 15.1; 17 lines (recto); 4 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: an official letter or document in Arabic *e Verso is inverted...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.416  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.416 *t Rabbinics *s 5.5 x 6.6; 5 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion mentioning the diaspora and the Messiah. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.36 *t Rabbinics *s 8.3 x 8; 9 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion, citing Job 1:3 and mentioning Habakkuk. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Genizah MS T-S AS 149.63  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 149.63 *t Letter *s 7 x 10.7; 10 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (occasional Arabic vocalisation) *c Short letter to Ab? Na?r, asking for money. Mentions the poll tax...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.44  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.44 *t Unidentified *s 7.5 x 8.3; 8 lines (recto); 9 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Unidentified, mentioning Jonathan. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

Genizah MS T-S AS 150.5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 150.5 *t Trousseau list *s (a) 10.5 x 21.3, (b) 1.5 x 3.1; (a) 9 lines (recto); 14 lines (verso); (b) 1 line (recto); 3 lines (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf and a small fragment; torn, holes, rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Trousseau...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Genizah MS T-S AS 120.172  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 120.172 *t Piyyu?; unidentified *s 5 x 6.5; 6 lines (recto); numerous lines (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; badly torn, faded, stained *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: unidentified text in Arabic *e Interlinear addition...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

153

Genizah MS T-S AS 153.177  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 153.177 *t Letter *s 13 x 9.4; 7 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter mentioning Beirut and Tiberias (?); 'the land is in possession of his cousin Ab? l-Mun?qib'. Cites Job...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.456  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.456 *t Bible commentary *s 11.4 x 10.3; 13 lines (recto); 16 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, stained, holes, rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Commentary on Isaiah, with citations such as Isaiah 18, citing 1, 2 and 7. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.69  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.69 *t Bible commentary *s 6.7 x 11.6; 11 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Translation of several verses from Genesis 9 and 10, with translation and commentary, such as Genesis 9:19, 9...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.388  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.388 *t Bible commentary *s 9 x 20.6 (13.1 one leaf); 11-12 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Commentary and translation of Exodus, with citations from Exodus 2:3-10; mentions...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.410  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 152.410 *t Accounts *s 20.3 x 22.4; ca. 9 lines + marginalia (recto); 13 lines (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn *l Hebrew; Judaeo-Arabic *c Accounts, mentioning spices and quantities. *e Lines of perforated dots all over the leaf....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Genizah MS T-S AS 149.54  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 149.54 *t Rabbinics *s 9.7 x 16.5 (11.8 one leaf); 3-9 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Hebrew; Aramaic; Judaeo-Arabic *c Unidentified rabbinical discussion. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.312  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.312 *t Letter *s 2.6 x 15.1; 2 lines + marginalia (recto); 4 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Fragment from a letter. *e Verso is inverted in relation to recto....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Genizah MS T-S AS 147.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 147.2 *t Letter *s 21 x 19.5; 29 lines (recto); 3 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Letter of ?Eli ha-Kohen b. Ezekiel in Jerusalem to All?n b. Ya?? Eli ha-Kohen b. Ya?y? in Fus??? (ca. 1055 CE...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Genizah MS T-S AS 107.87  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 107.87 *t Bible commentary *s 7.2 x 10.8; 8 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, stained *l Hebrew; Judaeo-Arabic *c Commentary on commandment no. 74, referring to Numbers 29:1 *e One crossing out and an interlinear...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Genizah MS T-S AS 146.373  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 146.373 *t Order of payment; document *s 6.4 x 7.6; 2 lines (recto); 4 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, badly rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: order of payment by Ab? Zikr? Kohen, instructing Ab? l...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Genizah MS T-S AS 151.216  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 151.216 *t Accounts; unidentified *s 16.9 x 12.5; 16 lines (recto); 9 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (sporadic Tiberian vocalisation) *c Recto: accounts, mentioning Ibn al...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Genizah MS T-S AS 150.90  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 150.90 *t Letter (?); document *s 18.4 x 7.5; 8 lines (recto); 2 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: letter of excommunication (?). Verso: Arabic document. *e Verso...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.182  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.182 *t Rabbinics *s 6 x 7.7; 9 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Probably from a rabbinic treatise; mentions periods of 7 months and 7 years, impurity and the burial of enemies...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Genizah MS T-S AS 118.362  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 118.362 *t Poetry; piyyu?; jottings *s 18 x 9.9; 18 lines + marginalia (recto); numerous lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, large holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Arabic; Hebrew; Judaeo-Arabic *c Recto: a poem in Arabic. Verso: piyyu?...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Genizah MS T-S AS 127.123  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 127.123 *t Piyyu?; letter (?) *s 5.3 x 8.5; 7 lines (recto); 4 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed, creased, stained *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: Arabic: unidentified Arabic text, possibly a letter *e Verso...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

168

Genizah MS T-S AS 147.141  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 147.141 *t Letter *s 5.8 x 6.8; 7 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter, mentioning Minyat Zifta and Mal?j. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.303 *t Mishnah commentary *s 13. 8 x 17.9 (9 one leaf); f. 1r 18 lines (ff. 1v, 2r, 2v are blank) *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (occasional Tiberian vocalisation) *c Mishnah...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.366  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.366 *t Magical *s 6.7 x 11.8 (8.5 one leaf); 6-9 lines; 2v blank with mirrored script from 1r *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Aggressive recipes and magical characters. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.417  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.417 *t Accounts *s 14.5 x 14.9 (7.5 one leaf); 8-10 lines (ff. 1v, 2r are blank) *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic *c Accounts with Coptic and Hebrew numerals. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

Genizah MS T-S AS 147.158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 147.158 *t Letter *s 6 x 9.7; 3 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter, on verso either motto or name of the sender: Yeshu?ah. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.300  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.300 *t Rabbinics *s 14.4 x 21.3 (9.7 one leaf); 17 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, holes, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion, including citations from Genesis 6:5 (possibly 6:6), 6:12, Deuteronomy 4:31 and 10...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Genizah MS T-S AS 151.21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 151.21 *t Letter *s 9.7 x 11.6; 7 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, slightly rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter or note, mentioning the arrival of the addressee in al-Ma?r?sa Damascus. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Genizah MS T-S AS 144.170  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 144.170 *t Calendrical *s 9.7 x 9.0; 9 lines (recto); 8 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, stained, holes *l Judaeo-Arabic (Hebrew terminology) *c Calendrical work mentioning the terms for a leap year and a moon cycle. Includes a...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Genizah MS T-S AS 117.291  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 117.291 *t Piyyu?; notes *s 15.9 x 8.2; 14 lines (recto); 4 lines + 1 line (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: notes in Arabic...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Genizah MS T-S AS 154.478  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 154.478 *t Liturgy *s 8.2 x 5; 17 lines (recto); 18 lines (verso) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, faded, stained, creased *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Instructions for the Sabbath readings, with reference made to Sa?adya. *e Seems to belong...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.45  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.45 *t Rabbinics *s 8.2 x 9.9; 13 lines (recto); 14 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, faded *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Discussion, mentioning psalms, such as Psalms 40:6 and 106:2. *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

Genizah MS T-S AS 110.225  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 110.225 *t Liturgical *s 12.8 x 8.2; 16 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, slightly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Instructions for the recitation of Psalms...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.19 *t Theology (?) *s 7.5 x 9; 9 lines (recto); 12 lines + marginalia (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Possibly theological work. *e Interlinear additions....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Genizah MS T-S AS 139.156  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 139.156 *t Grammar *s 9.6 x 10.4 (1 leaf: 6.8); 217 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); torn, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c A work on grammar...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Genizah MS T-S AS 148.60  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 148.60 *t Letter *s 3.9 x 53; numerous lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Vellum; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Drafts of letters on a strip of vellum. A teacher is reminded to send a certain Ab? l...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Genizah MS T-S AS 124.34  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 124.34 *t Piyyu?; exercises *s 10 x 14.5; 9 lines (recto); 3 lines + 5 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, badly faded, stained *l Hebrew; Arabic *c Recto: probably piyyu?. Verso: writing practice in Arabic *e The 5 lines on verso...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.293  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 152.293 *t Legal document *s 12.9 x 5.9; 13 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed *l Hebrew; Aramaic; Judaeo-Arabic *c Small strip from the right hand side of a legal document. Mentions names (mostly broken...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.49  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.49 *t Bible commentary *s 12 x 15.3; 9 lines (recto); 10 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Translation and commentary of Deuteronomy 4:37-39 and 4:41-43; with full citation...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Genizah MS T-S AS 116.280  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 116.280 *t Piyyu?; letter *s 7.7 x 9.6; 10 lines (recto); 3 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Arabic; Hebrew (Tiberian vocalisation) *c Recto: piyyu?. Verso: part of a letter in Arabic *e Verso...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

InternetSecurity 58 Published by the IEEE Computer Society 1089-7801/10/$26.00 2010 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the *) This article includes an Etymological Appendix by Yigal Bloch, Department of Jewish History, The Hebrew in human history, which leads to reliable reconstructions. Yet it belongs to an era before the rise of the history of chemistry and technology reveals the long and tortuous path involved in this endeavor (Singer

Wool, Avishai

188

Genizah MS T-S AS 146.26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 146.26 *t Letter *s 25.7 x 5.9; 21 lines + marginalia (recto); 13 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, small holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Letter, mentioning a certain Ab? l-Fa?l. *e Verso is inverted in relation to recto...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.45D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.45D *t Glossary *s 12.7 x 16 (1 leaf: 8.7); 1116 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); badly torn, holes, badly rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (isolated Tiberian vocalisation) *c Vocabulary...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.44C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.44C *s 6.3 x 8; 6 lines, arranged in two columns *m Paper; 1 leaf; holes, faded, badly stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Leviticus 2:12; 3:5 *e Belongs with T-S AS 141.44A-B, D...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Genizah MS T-S AS 140.6D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 140.6D *t Grammar *s 6.2 x 3.7; 4 lines (recto); 3 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; badly torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic *c Ibn Jan??, Kit?b al-U??l ('The Book of Hebrew Roots') (Neubauer (ed.) (1875): 687:1112; 2224) *e...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Genizah MS T-S AS 156.141  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 156.141 *t Legal document *s 8.1 x 7.3; 7 lines (recto; verso blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, rubbed *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Legal document. *e In the hand of ?alfon b. Manasseh....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 152.109 *t Legal document *s 9.7 x 5.7; 11 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, small holes *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew (occasional Arabic vocalisation) *c Legal document. *e In the hand of ?alfon b. Manasseh. Mirrored...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

Genizah MS T-S AS 157.7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 157.7 *t Legal document *s 7.4 x 7.8; 10 lines (recto; verso is blank) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Legal document. *e In the hand of ?alfon b. Manasseh; belongs with T-S AS 157.6....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Genizah MS T-S AS 149.72  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 149.72 *t Legal document *s 4.9 x 6.9; 7 lines (recto); 10 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, slightly rubbed *l Hebrew; Aramaic; Judaeo-Arabic *c Parts of legal documents. *e In the hand of ?alfon b. Manasseh. Verso...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.93  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 152.93 *t List *s 18.8 x 11.4; 10-20 lines (recto); jottings (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic *c Two columns of numerals with Hebrew letters for 1-90 on the right and 100-1000 on the left side...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Genizah MS T-S AS 161.125  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 161.125 *t Bible translation; Bible commentary *s 11.2 x 18.7 (1 leaf: 11.3); 1013 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); badly torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Translation of Exodus 25:15 and commentary, quoting...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.48  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.48 *t Bible commentary *s 11.6 x 18.3; 11 lines (recto); 10 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic (?) *c Possibly a commentary on Job; mentions Job and 'seven bulls and seven...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

HYBRID GRASP HEURISTICS PAOLA FESTA AND MAURICIO G.C. RESENDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power, petroleum, natural gas), and telecommunications (design, location). To deal with hard optimization problems. The term meta- heuristic derives from the composition of two Greek words: meta

Resende, Mauricio G. C.

200

Fermilab's 2008 Nature of Science Symposium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ratner Mark Ratner (Northwestern University) Nano 201: A Gentle Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Watch the talk (running time 49:59) While the Greek root nano just...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA Energy Kids - Geothermal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geothermal Basics What Is Geothermal Energy? The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within ...

202

Glossary Term - Prometheus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Positron Previous Term (Positron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Proton) Proton Prometheus In Greek mythology, Promethus was the son of the Titan Iapetus. He fought with Zeus...

203

Glossary Term - Niobe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Emission Previous Term (Neutron Emission) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Nucleus) Nucleus Niobe In Greek mythology, Niobe was the daughter of Tantalus. She was punished by...

204

About Fermilab - The Fermilab Campus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

covering the pumping stations at Casey's Pond and a distinctive series of high voltage transmission lines which resemble the Greek letter pi (n). Feynman Computing Center...

205

Contextualizing the Nabataeans: A Critical Reassessment of their History and Material Culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monsoon winds by Roman traders traveling to India. 344 Thiswinds comes from Periplus de Mari Erythraeo, the famous Greek handbook on trade routes between the Mediterranean and India;

Pearson, Jeffrey Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSF LBNL DOE NSF languages esky Chinese USA Site Taiwan Site Deutsch Dutch Espanol USA Site Spain Site Franaise Greek Italiano Norsk Polski Portugus Romanian...

207

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

208

Welcome to the Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sprachen: Espaol (USA) Espaol (Spain) Franaise Greek Italiano Polski Portugus Slovenska Deutsch Supported by US DOE and NSF Die Particle Data Group des Lawrence Berkeley...

209

Welcome to the Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

y: Espaol (USA) Espaol (Spain) Franaise Greek Italiano Polski Portugus Slovenska Supported by US DOE and NSF The Particle Data Group of Lawrence Berkeley National...

210

Nationalism in Modern Greece.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this project is the nature of nationalism viewed from different approaches and Greek nationalism in particular manifested in the support for the (more)

Flethj, Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Secondary teachers' understandings of dyslexia in England and Greece.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is a comparative study about secondary teachers understandings of dyslexia in England and Greece. Specifically the study focused on English and Greek teachers professional (more)

Papalouka, Aikaterini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The global capital leviathan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of crisis as manifest in Greece, Spain, Portugal, Irelandspending cuts and austerity. Greece provides the textbookof transnational investors into Greece, advising Greek

Robinson, William I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Energy Secretary Bodman in Turkey to Highlight Importance of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Foreign Minister of Turkmenistan. From Turkey, Secretary Bodman will travel to Greece to meet with his Greek counterparts and celebrate the opening of the Turkey-Greece...

214

Solar Cells Hellas SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cells Hellas SA Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Cells Hellas SA Place Athens, Greece Product Greek manufacturer of PV wafers, cells and modules. References Solar Cells...

215

Samaras Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Samaras Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Samaras Group Place Greece Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Greek consultancy services provider with...

216

Journeys in the Palimpsest: British women's travel to Greece,1840-1914.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Discussions of British travel to Greece in the nineteenth century have been dominated by the work of Lord Byron. Byrons contemporary Greeks were Orientalised, while (more)

Mahn, Churnjeet Kaur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Section 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... producing lightface (that is, regular) or boldface letters of the Latin or Greek alphabets in ... N A, Avogadro constant, A Avogadro, R, molar gas constant. ...

218

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Tidal Stream Energy Conversion Devices * Ocean Energy - HydroKinetic Energy - Marine Energy Terminology 4 Terminology: HydroKinetic * Hydro Greek word for water (hydor) *...

219

Country Profile -Greece What are my chances of getting a job?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as their main language, or in UK/US companies. #12;2 Where can I work? Major industries: tourism, food, ANT1 Group, Hellenic Telecommunications Organisation (OTE), Intracom, Motor Oil (Hellas), ANEK Lines Hellenic Chamber of Commerce, Greek Yellow Pages and Greek Export Directory. Major cities: Athens (capital

Martin, Ralph R.

220

AMALIA ARVANITI CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, diglossia and the emergence of Cypriot Standard Modern Greek [in Greek]. Recherches en linguistique grecque: Actes du 5e colloque international de linguistique grecque, pp. 75-78. Paris: L'Harmattan. 47. Arvaniti songs. Recherches en linguistique grecque: Actes du 5e colloque international de linguistique grecque

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Women @ Energy: Julia Laskin | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Julia Laskin Julia Laskin Women @ Energy: Julia Laskin April 1, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis Dr. Julia Laskin's career has taken her from Leningrad, USSR, to Washington State via Israel. She earned her master's degree from Leningrad Polytechnical Institute, her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and worked at the University of Delaware on the East Coast until coming to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington State. Dr. Julia Laskin's career has taken her from Leningrad, USSR, to Washington State via Israel. She earned her master's degree from Leningrad Polytechnical Institute, her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and worked at the University of Delaware on the East Coast until coming to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington State.

222

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.48  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.48 *t Glossary *s 13.6 x 9.2; 16 lines *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c Vocabulary list from Ezekiel 29:433:30, quoting Leviticus 11:9; Numbers 24:24; Judges 4:2; Jonah 4:6; 2 Kings 18:17; Job 40...

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Genizah MS T-S AS 141.5C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 141.5C *t Grammar *s 9.7 x 13.3 (1 leaf: 6.7); 58 lines *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); holes, rubbed, faded, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew *c David ben Abraham al-F?s?, Kit?b J?mi? al-Alf?z (Skoss (ed.) (19361945): II, 478, 479... and unidentified) *e Belongs with T-S AS 5AB, D...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Monte Carlo simulation in financial engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the use of Monte Carlo simulation in the field of financial engineering. It focuses on several interesting topics and introduces their recent development, including path generation, pricing American-style derivatives, evaluating Greeks ...

Nan Chen; L. Jeff Hong

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Physics Out Loud - Hadron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gluons Previous Video (Gluons) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Hybrid Meson) Hybrid Meson Hadron David Lawrence, a physicist, uses a little Greek in his description of a...

226

"Sabiha Gk?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advance of the Greek army from Izmir towards the Anatolianthe fatherland: ?For a Turk, Izmir and Sivas are the same.and Samsun are the same. If Izmir is occupied, then it means

Ulgen, Fatma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Glossary Term - Helios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Half-life Previous Term (Half-life) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Isotope) Isotope Helios The sun seen in Hydrogen-alpha light. In Greek mythology, Helios was god of the sun....

228

Glossary Term - Titans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thor Previous Term (Thor) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Tritium) Tritium Titans In Greek mythology, the Titans are the offspring of Earth and Sky and ruled before being overthrown...

229

Lettuce and Its Relatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vitamin A. Endive, another relative which is a close cousin to Chicory, is a native of India but was cultivated by the early Egyptians and Greeks. It has a more bitter taste...

230

The Shorthorn: Casey Crane Robert Arrowood, Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. representative, takes local homeowners' questions about on-campus natural gas drilling in an Arlington office complex Tuesday.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a room with three apses.18 And purely as a result of this linguistic "accident," the triconch has suggesting the Greek capital letter r (e.g., a covered bazaar at Damascus so named in an inscrip- tion

Chiao, Jung-Chih

231

The Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Until after the time of Christopher Columbus, most people believed that this world was flat, like a table top. Some of the ancient Greeks, however, had reasoned that the earth...

232

Adaptive reuse and revitalization of water heritage in Nicosia, Cyprus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bi-communal sewerage system developed for the divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus has been lauded as a rare example of cooperation between the Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities. The story of how the project ...

Lau, Marisa (Marisa May-Lan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Athens 1833-1979 : the dynamics of urban growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

His thesis deals with the urban development of the city of Athens since its foundation as the capital of the newborn Greek State (1833) , until our days. The study focuses on two particular characteristics that dominate ...

Loukopoulos, Dimitris

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Lexicographic Slips: Gathering and Organising Contextual Data for Dictionary Entries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the process of incorporating contextual information in bilingual dictionaries, with especial focus on the task of organising the textual source-material for a Greek-English dictionary. A description is given of the two functions...

Fraser, Bruce L

235

User:Calpak | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calpak Jump to: navigation, search calpak Name Calpak A.E. Location Athens, Greece Edits 2 Calpak A.E. is the first Greek company since 1976 that deals in solar water heaters and...

236

The Persian Alexander: The Numismatic Portraiture of the Pontic Dynasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the east and brought glory to Greece. 3 As Pollitt suggests,he was pushed back out of Greece and forced into a peacePersian invaders out of Greece, he will liberate the Greeks

Gavryushkina, Marina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The 2005 Chios Ancient Shipwreck Survey: New Methods for Underwater Archaeology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005 a Greek and American interdisciplinary team investigated two shipwrecks off the coast of Chios dating to the 4th-century b.c. and the 2nd/1st century. The project pioneered archaeological methods of precision ...

Foley, Brendan

238

The biostratigraphy, palaeoecology and geochemistry of a long lacustrine sequence from NW Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-print of his paper on Greek soils; Charles Turner (Open University), for introducing me to the sights and sites of Epirus; Phil Gibbard (GIQR, University of Cambridge) and Jamie Woodward (University of Leeds), for discussion and the retrieval of bedrock... -print of his paper on Greek soils; Charles Turner (Open University), for introducing me to the sights and sites of Epirus; Phil Gibbard (GIQR, University of Cambridge) and Jamie Woodward (University of Leeds), for discussion and the retrieval of bedrock...

Frogley, Michael Reginald

239

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zachariah, Michael R. (Michael R. Zachariah) - Departments of Chemistry & Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota Zakarian, Armen (Armen Zakarian) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Zare, Richard N. (Richard N. Zare) - Department of Chemistry, Stanford University Zargarian, Davit (Davit Zargarian) - Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal Zeiri, Yehuda (Yehuda Zeiri) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Zewail, Ahmed (Ahmed Zewail) - Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology Zhang, John Z.H. (John Z.H. Zhang) - Department of Chemistry, New York University Zhang, Qi (Qi Zhang) - Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York, Albany,

240

Genizah MS T-S AS 145.39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 145.39 *t Legal document *s 15.3 x 15.5 (7.7 one leaf); 4-15 lines (1v and 2r blank) *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); slightly torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Testimony concerning an oath; mentions M?s? ibn... H?r?n al-?m? and Faraj Allah ibn Joseph ibn F??il. *e 4 lines on f. 2v written transversely in f. 1r....

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Marginalised social groups in contemporary weee management within social enterprises investments: A study in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the creation of appropriate conditions aimed at developing social services for reuse and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), by the inclusion of handicapped and Roma people in the workforce. Application areas for the project are the Hellenic (Greek) regions of Thessaly and North Aegean, where these groups suffer from professional and social exclusion. The efforts to reduce unemployment in the two aforementioned groups, together with the efforts to implement related Greek and European legislation for sustainable WEEE management, are examined here. Furthermore, networking and cooperation at local, regional and central levels between small enterprises, entrepreneurships and local authorities are examined, so that these social enterprises and their corresponding investments may support the development of the Greek alternative WEEE recycling system.

Papaoikonomou, K. [Department of Planning and Regional Development, University of Thessaly, 38334 Volos (Greece)], E-mail: epapaoik@uth.gr; Kipouros, S.; Kungolos, A. [Department of Planning and Regional Development, University of Thessaly, 38334 Volos (Greece); Somakos, L. [Arvis S.A. Environmental Enterprises of Greece, 10433, Athens (Greece); Aravossis, K. [Sector of Industrial Management and Operations Research, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780, Athens (Greece); Antonopoulos, I.; Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mycenaean -pi and pa-ro in the light of TH Uq 434  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Mycenologists and specialists in the Aegean cultures, but also for scholars working on the history of the Greek language, Greek religion and institutions, and Indo-European. ISBN978-90-429-2909-8 (Peeters Leuven) ISBN978-2-7584-0186-5 (Peeters France... he demonstrates record standing flocks involved in the production of lambs and wool (KILLEN 1964); mutatis mutandis he argues for a similar function for these Pylian records. If so, the pa-ro formulae would record the herdsmen under whose care...

Thompson, Rupert John Ernest

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRGWORKINGPAPER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-flow transactions on the transit pipelines to Greece and Turkey to access the LNG terminals in these countries pipelines to access the Greek and Turkish LNG terminals, as well as gas from Azerbaijan. Secondly, opening of the Revithoussa LNG terminal During the crisis, Greece easily met its domestic daily gas demand thanks

Aickelin, Uwe

244

Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation www.archipelago.gr VOLUNTEER RESEARCHER GUIDE of Marine Conservation. As an Archipelagos volunteer researcher, you are expected to abide by these policies. Introduction Archipelagos, Institute of Marine Conservation is a Greek, non-profit, non- governmental

245

AMALIA ARVANITI CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greek]. Recherches en linguistique grecque: Actes du 5e colloque international de linguistique grecque] in the early 20c.: Evidence from folk and rebetika songs. Recherches en linguistique grecque: Actes du 5e colloque international de linguistique grecque, pp. 67- 70. Paris: L'Harmattan. 45. Arvaniti, A. & T

246

A taxonomy of argumentation models used for knowledge representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding argumentation and its role in human reasoning has been a continuous subject of investigation for scholars from the ancient Greek philosophers to current researchers in philosophy, logic and artificial intelligence. In recent years, argumentation ... Keywords: Argumentation models, Argumentation theory, Courses of action, Knowledge representation

Jamal Bentahar; Bernard Moulin; Micheline Blanger

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management Conservation of the precious Greek land for future usage Empowerment of the energy balance10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios MANAGEMENT IN GREECE & POTENTIAL FOR WASTE - TO - ENERGY ISWA Beacon Conference - Strategic Waste Management

Columbia University

248

The Classification of Climates from Pythagoras to Koeppen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper attempts are made to trace the ways in which climates were shown on maps of the world beginning with the Greek philosopher Pythagoras and ending with Koeppen. Much of the information was obtained by examining original maps in the ...

Marie Sanderson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY RADIATION ANNUAL REPORT 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Environment and Public Works and the Greek Atomic Energy Commission). Taking into account that the nuclear fuel of the Experimental Nuclear Reactor suffices for a considerable number of years, the continuing with the pertroleum industry), R&D in issues of porous material - and especially nano-material ­ structure

250

SOLAR TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH AND SPACE WEATHER ACTIVITIES Anastasios Anastasiadis, Ioannis A. Daglis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a suitable background for creating a national space weather initiative that is still missing. 1. BACKGROUND in five cities (see Fig. 1). We ought to mention that the numerous Greek space scientists living as well as in the Section of Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics (http://www.uoa.gr). The personnel

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

251

ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Evans, Jason

252

METR 4713/5713 Private Sector Meteorology Spring 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

253

Modeling Animal Landscapes* * This article was prepared as an overview of a symposium at "Molecules to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and Viet Nam. Industry Greek Community of toronto Greenhill Group Iv Solar HayGroup Helios Energy Inc. Hockey night in Canada Capital Partners Pacific & western Bank of Canada Pacific Carbon trust Pelmorex Inc. the weather network

Williams, Jos. B.

254

International Journal of Thermal Sciences 48 (2009) 535546 www.elsevier.com/locate/ijts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the work- ing fluid in the capillary tube. The presence of liquid­vapor menisci, local void fraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m/s x vapor mass fraction Greek symbols vapor void fraction vap|eq mass rate of vapor generation the right or the left arms. Since the overall average void fraction integrated over the loop is fixed, #12

Khandekar, Sameer

255

1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

film and annular flow patterns spanned over the entire range of the void fraction. In general the two occurring in vertical downward flow and occupying the entire range of void fraction and compare it against phase velocity (m/s) P pressure (Pa) Pr Prandtl number Greek symbols void fraction µ phase dynamic

Ghajar, Afshin J.

256

COMPUTATION OF TWO-PHASE FLOW IN STEAM GENERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m/s x vapor mass fraction Greek symbols vapor void fraction vap|eq mass rate of vapor generation of the work- ing fluid in the capillary tube. The presence of liquid­vapor menisci, local void fraction the right or the left arms. Since the overall average void fraction integrated over the loop is fixed, #12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

TheFreshKitchen 100% Organic Hot Oatmeal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bananas & Honey $4.29 The Big Fat Greek Wrap Flatbread filled with Chickpea Fritters,Lettuce Tomato,Jack,Mozzarella Cheese & choice of one side $5.99 Tuscan Chicken All White Meat Chicken,Spinach Artichoke Spread White Meat Chicken or Dolphin Free Tuna to any salad for an additional $2.59 Organic 5 Bean & 5 Pepper

de Lijser, Peter

258

Letter counting: a stem cell for Cryptology, Quantitative Linguistics, and Statistics Bernard Ycart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the city, a stubborn old Greek born in Damascus. Sophronius was a man who was about to do the hardest thing things. The accident of the Dome of the Rock was that it was made so extraordinarily beautiful. That accident saved the building because of the impact it makes visually. Everybody has repaired it

259

R E S E A R C H The research magazine of the University of Cambridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the city, a stubborn old Greek born in Damascus. Sophronius was a man who was about to do the hardest thing things. The accident of the Dome of the Rock was that it was made so extraordinarily beautiful. That accident saved the building because of the impact it makes visually. Everybody has repaired it

Kim, Tae-Kyun

260

EUROMED SUSTAINABLE CONNECTIONS ANNA LINDH FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their overall objectives. 6.0 The History of Olive Oil EUROMED Sustainable Connections: Case Study Project.C., the Greek physician, Herodicus, perhaps history's first sports physician, prescribed olive oil massages most common to the Mediterranean region ­ the production of Olive Oil. The focus of the project, then

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

What has happened to ontology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology as the study of being as such dates back to ancient Greek philosophy, but the term itself was coined in the early 17th century. The idea termed in this manner was further studied within academic circles of the Protestant Enlightenment. ...

Peter hrstrm; Jan Andersen; Henrik Schrfe

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Acronyms, initialisms, and abbreviations: Fourth Revision  

SciTech Connect

This document lists acronyms used in technical writing. The immense list is supplemented by an appendix containing chemical elements, classified information access, common abbreviations used for functions, conversion factors for selected SI units, a flowcharting template, greek alphabet, metrix terminology, proofreader`s marks, signs and symbols, and state abbreviations.

Tolman, B.J. [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Review: Knowledge management and knowledge management systems: conceptual foundations and research issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge is a broad and abstract notion that has defined epistemological debate in western philosophy since the classical Greek era. In the past few years, however, there has been a growing interest in treating knowledge as a significant organizational ... Keywords: knowledge management, knowledge management review, knowledge management systems, organizational knowledge management, research issues in knowledge management

Maryam Alavi; Dorothy E. Leidner

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spatial and Temporal Variation of Precipitation in Greece and Surrounding Regions Based on Global Precipitation Climatology Project Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation in the broader Greek area is investigated for the 26-yr period 19792004 by using monthly mean satellite-based data, with complete spatial coverage, taken from the Global ...

N. Hatzianastassiou; B. Katsoulis; J. Pnevmatikos; V. Antakis

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Polarimetric and Dual-Doppler Radar Observations of the Lipscomb County, Texas, Supercell Thunderstorm on 23 May 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarimetric and dual-Doppler observations of a supercell observed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) S-band Polarimetric (SPOL) radar, two Doppler-On-Wheels (DOW) radars, and the Greek XPOL radar on 23 May 2002 during the ...

Jeffrey Frame; Paul Markowski; Yvette Richardson; Jerry Straka; Joshua Wurman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Argonne Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA Argonne National Laboratory B.B. Back, R.V.F. Janssens, W.F. Henning, T.L. Khoo, J.A. Nolen, D.H. Potterveld, G. Savard, D. Seweryniak Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel M. Paul University of Massachusetts Lowell P. Chowdhury, C.J. Lister University of Maryland W.B. Walters University of Edinburgh P.J. Woods Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory K. Gregorich Oregon State University W. Loveland Date: February 11, 2013 Abstract As the premier stable-beam user facility in the USA, ATLAS is currently being upgraded to provide high intensity (>1 pμA) stable beams. The combination of new high- efficiency detectors and intense beams will move ATLAS to the forefront as a world

267

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ha, Taekjip (Taekjip Ha) - Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Haas, Yehuda (Yehuda Haas) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Hagadorn, John R. (John R. Hagadorn) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder Hahn, David W. (David W. Hahn) - Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida Haller, Gary L. (Gary L. Haller) - Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon (Sharon Hammes-Schiffer) - Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Han, Jeong Woo (Jeong Woo Han) - Laboratory for Electrochemical Interfaces, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

268

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Baer, Roi (Roi Baer) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Baik, Mu-Hyun (Mu-Hyun Baik) - School of Informatics & Department of Chemistry, Indiana University Baker, David (David Baker) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Baltisberger, Jay H. (Jay H. Baltisberger) - Department of Chemistry, Berea College Bang, Duhee (Duhee Bang) - Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University Bao, Xinhe (Xinhe Bao) - State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Barash, Danny (Danny Barash) - Department of Computer Science, Ben Gurion University Barbas III, Carlos F. (Carlos F. Barbas III) - Departments of

269

Celebrating Einstein A Series of Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Series of Articles A Series of Articles "Albert Einstein is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating and influential figures of the modern era. As a preeminent physicist, he radically transformed our understanding of the universe." - Edited excerpt from Albert Einstein, Albert Einstein Archives, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem In this series about Albert Einstein’s body of work, his discoveries are related to today’s research, technology, and common knowledge. Series themes include "How did Einstein know that?" and "How did Einstein figure that out?" and they focus either on conveying a major concept or on the reasoning that led to it. These articles will also cover Einstein’s major 1905 writings and address his general theory of relativity. In consideration of 2005 being designated as the World Year of Physics, the release of these articles is especially appropriate.

270

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Fajans, Joel (Joel Fajans) - Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley Fiore, Catherine L. (Catherine L. Fiore) - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Fisch, Nathaniel J.(Nathaniel J.Fisch).- Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory & Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University Fisher, Vladimir (Vladimir Fisher) - Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science Fitzpatrick, Richard (Richard Fitzpatrick) - Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin Friedland, Lazar (Lazar Friedland) - Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Froyland, Gary (Gary Froyland) - School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New South Wales

271

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

272

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

M N O P Q R S M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Lan, Ruiting (Ruiting Lan) - School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales Lang, Matthew (Matthew Lang) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University Langmead, Christopher James (Christopher James Langmead) - Ray and Stephanie Lane Center for Computational Biology & School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University Laurenzi, Ian J. (Ian J. Laurenzi) - Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University Laux, Thomas (Thomas Laux) - Institut für Biologie III, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Lebendiker, Mario (Mario Lebendiker) - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Lee, Doheon (Doheon Lee) - Department of Bio and Brain Engineering,

273

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry,

274

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry, University of Maine Anderson, James B. (James B. Anderson) - Department of Chemistry,

275

Bread  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bread Bread Nature Bulletin No. 175-A January 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BREAD Housewives who bake their own bread buy a cake of compressed yeast, crumble it in a half-cup of warm water, mix it with a little flour and a pinch of sugar, and put the cup in a warm place. Presently, little bubbles begin to form and burst. The mixture swells and foams and rises. It is fermenting. Fermentation -- the name is derived from a Latin word meaning "to boil" -- has been known and used in making bread, beer and wine since early times. Yeast, or leaven, was used in the days of the Hebrew patriarchs. A portion of the uncooked dough was left from each baking and allowed to sour. This dough "starter", mixed with fresh dough, caused the whole to ferment, gas to form, and the bread raised or "leavened".

276

Questions and Answers - Where does the word atom come from and who first  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why does rubbing plastic and wooltogether create electricity? Why does rubbing plastic and wool<br>together create electricity? Previous Question (Why does rubbing plastic and wool together create electricity?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Are Democritus' theories of atoms still relevant today?) Are Democritus' theories ofatoms still relevant today? Where does the word atom come from and who first used this word? Around 2,500 years ago this Greek dude name Democritus was sitting around just thinking. He was thinking about cutting stuff up and came up with the idea that there must be a point where you could no longer cut something any smaller. He named the atom after the Greek word atomos, which means 'that which can't be split.' The cool part is that he was right. Well, 90% right. We can split atoms, but if you split an atom it becomes something else. An

277

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

278

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

279

Copyright:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book addresses a relevant issue which has been largely overlooked in health sciences until recently. Knowledge-in-practice or practice-wisdom refers to the professional know-how of actual clinical practice as opposed to the theoretical knowledge or know-what. The tension between know-what and know-how is not new. The introduction and Chapters 1 and 2 provide an excellent review of the origins of this debate. Jacobs introduces in Chapter 1 the Greek term Metis as equivalent to everyday practices. The meaning of Metis is very complex and may not have a single word equivalent in English. Homer used this term to describe Odysseus, as crafty, skilful, and resourceful. The equivalent of Odysseus in Greek mythology is the Titan Prometheusalso derived from metiswho surpassed

Book Review

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Music meter and tempo tracking from raw polyphonic audio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for the extraction of music meter and tempo from raw polyphonic audio recordings, assuming that music meter remains constant throughout the recoding. Although this assumption can be restrictive for certain musical genres, it is acceptable for a large corpus of folklore eastern music styles, including Greek traditional dance music. Our approach is based on the selfsimilarity analysis of the audio recording and does not assume the presence of percussive instruments. Its novelty lies in the fact that music meter and tempo are jointly determined. The method has been applied to a variety of musical genres, in the context of Greek traditional music where music meter can be 2 3 4 5 7 9 12 4, 4, 4, 4, 8, 8, 8 and tempo ranges from 40bpm to 330bpm. Experiments have, so far, demonstrated the efficiency of our method (music meter and tempo were successfully extracted for over 95 % of the recordings).

Aggelos Pikrakis; Iasonas Antonopoulos; Sergios Theodoridis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bank Reform in Greece with reference to Eastern Europe The Case of The Hellenic Industrial Development Bank S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is Greece a reforming economy? The purpose of this paper is to present the evolution and structure of the banking sector in Greece, with reference to the parallel experiences of the Eastern European (EE) countries. In Section 2, we are concerned with the domestic economic environment within which the Greek Banking System (GBS) operates. and the pressures building up within the system encouraging reform. In Section 3, we look into the evolution of the Greek Banking System, both in terms of structures and in terms of policy. Changes in the instruments of monetary policy are also considered in this section. In Section 4, we present the case of the Hellenic Industrial Development Bank, currently undergoing a thorough restructuring plan. In Section 5, we examine some of the main similarities and differences between Greece and the EE countries in relation to banking sector problems and reforms.

Marica Frangakis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Greece poised for oil and gas development  

SciTech Connect

The first indigenous crude oil in Greece will be produced by late 1980, and commercial operations are expected to start in early 1981 from the offshore oil and gas field in the North Aegean Sea. The discovery of oil in Greek waters started a new era in the economic development of Greece and could be considered a milestone in the development of the country. The discovery also had international political implications. Many analysts consider it as the main cause of the dispute between Greece and Turkey over the delineation of the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea. The Greek Government, after the collapse of the dictatorial regime in 1974, has enacted new legislation regarding oil exploration and exploitation activities in Greece. Oil found so far amounts to 12% of present domestic consumption, and there is hope of more as the Public Petroleum Corporation turns its attention westward.

Vougaris, C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

CLST 321 2011 CLST 321: Research starting points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A digital library of Greek texts from Homer to A.D. 200. Monograph: https://qcat.library.queensu.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo by bibliographies. https://qcat.library.queensu.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=2827799 Texts The Loeb Classical Library?bibId=3130708 Translated texts for historians (monograph series) E.g. The acts of the Council of Chalcedon https://qcat.library.queensu.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo

Graham, Nick

284

Chemical Engineering Journal 86 (2002) 343368 Dioxin characterisation, formation and minimisation during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is in solution." CHAPTER 3 p. 63 Table 3.1 title, first line, subscript is cg not cw so change Dcw to Dcg p. 66 4 replace DAw with Dcw. p. 70 First line below eq. 3-39, change subscript from A to G or VA,b to VG,b Eq. 3/DAw with DCw First line after equation 6-76, symbol is a not Greek letter alpha so replace Ja"a:a with Jaaa

Columbia University

285

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cultural Influences on the Discipline of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the history of humankind, people have engaged in activities we associate in some way with chemistry. But people have done so within a framework of their own culture, not within a Western science cultural framework in which the discipline of chemistry exists. To understand the cultural framework of chemistry taught in universities today, we need to step out of the comfort of our own scientific culture we live in today. In other words, the cultural influences on chemistry are found by looking at alternative cultures. I am following the old adage, If you want to learn about water, dont ask a fish. History is a convenient vehicle to help us understand cultural influences. Because our scientific culture today has strong Greek roots, let me first explore Aristotles ideas about matter and then follow those ideas when they are placed in a different culture, Arabic culture, for instance. We shall then see what gets lost in translation between Greek and Arabic cultures. This discovery will shed light on some cultural influences on todays chemistry and will have direct implications for the instruction of students. Greek Culture Aristotles ideas about matter rejected an atomic-like model of matter in favour of a continuum model. His model is summarized by Figure 1, representing the four elements, which when combined in various proportions produce different qualities of matter.

Dr. Glen; S. Aikenhead

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 2 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particularly propitious zone for the proliferation of the Buddhist creed and River Krishna (Maisolos of the Greeks) was the life giving arterial water-way that united together the trading patrons given to far flung voyages and devoted monks who annihilated... )lars to underestimate the Indian context. These scholar:; are ol.wiously ignotant of the fact that the Mahlyana which spread over Tibet and Mongolia was nursed and nourished in ;he Him:.>l3yas in a typically Indian climate. [Besides such meth:)dobgy would warrant...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1965-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cults of Artemis in Ancient Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the divine order. fJ To A.L. Pierris Ta BE rravTa OLaKCCEl KEpauvos Herael. fr. 64 (Diels-Kranz) III ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS From the invaluable help that I have received from Dr P. Cartledge throughout my studies in Cambridge I would like to single out... unskillfulness alone is to blame. There are LAOL but there are also LhaToL. Among the Greeks of the student-diaspora it is customary to thank parents for financial support and continuous emotional assistance. However, if, in his traditional reply...

Rangos, Spyridon

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Astronomy, Astrophysics, and Space Physics in Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present document I review the current organizational structure of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Physics in Greece. I briefly present the institutions where professional astronomers are pursuing research, along with some notes of their history, as well as the major astronomical facilities currently available within Greece. I touch upon topics related to graduate studies in Greece and present some statistics on the distribution of Greek astronomers. Even though every attempt is made to substantiate all issues mentioned, some of the views presented have inevitably a personal touch and thus should be treated as such.

V. Charmandaris

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Arabic Lexical Contributions to the English Language  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arabic lexical contributions to the English language (2nd ed.) contains extensive additions to the main entries and their data from the original 1994 edition by Harrassowitz Verlag of Wiesbaden. It continues Cannons series on loans into English, refining the principles and procedures developed in the preceding German, Arabic, and Japanese books, and comprehensive articles on Mandarin Chinese, Malaysian, Spanish Turkish, and Welsh loans in English. The chief purpose is to advance the historical study of comprehensive, mainly lexical borrowing between languages in contact. The ancillary purpose is to show how a collected corpus of loans can shed light on multiple disciplines and the cultures represented therein. This wide-ranging 2007 book is the largest, most up-to-date collection of English words and multiword lexical units borrowed from Arabic, directly or sometimes through a mediating language such as Hindi or Urdu, Persian, or Turkish. All general English dictionaries were searched, particularly relying on electronic retrieval from the second edition of the Oxford English dictionary, Random House Websters unabridged dictionary, New shorter Oxford English dictionary, and Websters third international dictionary of the English language (W3s two earlier editions were manually searched, as were smaller general collections, new-word collections, and college editions). Each dictionary entry gives its first known recorded date in written English, its semantic field, any modern variant forms and labels, etymology including native and English meaning(s) in historical order when determinable, derivative forms including functional shifts and compounds, sometimes a grammatical note, the principal symbolized sources where the loan is recorded, and the degree of naturalization based on the procedure developed by Cannon. The Introduction and an essay that analyzes the loans by history and semantics are mainly reproduced from the 1994 edition, treating the 35 semantic fields so as to throw light on the individual field and make the book useful for specialists in religion, cloth(ing), the military, politics, rugs, botany, language, and linguistics, ethnology, etc. So is the final essay, which analyzes the data linguistically, with special attention to language sources, grammar, and variant forms, in order to cast more light on how languages interact and ultimately influence each others culture.

Cannon, Garland; Kaye, Alan S.

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

Glossary Term - Uranus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Tritium Previous Term (Tritium) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Van de Graaff Generator) Van de Graaff Generator Uranus Uranus as seen by the Voyager II spacecraft. Uranus is the seventh planet from the sun and takes 84 years to orbit the sun once. Uranus is about 4 times larger than the Earth and is about 14.5 times as massive. Uranus was discovered on March 13, 1781 by William Herschel. In greek mythology, Uranus was Father Sky. Planetary Data Distance from Sun Length of Day Length of Year Radius Mass 19.191 AU 17.2 hours 84.01 years 25,559 km 8.68*1025 kg Known Satellites Name Distance from Uranus Rotational Period Orbital Period Radius Cordelia 49,770 km -unknown- 0.335034 days 21 km Ophelia 53,790 km -unknown- 0.376400 days 23 km Bianca 59,170 km -unknown- 0.434579 days 27 km

293

It's Elemental - The Element Technetium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molybdenum Molybdenum Previous Element (Molybdenum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Ruthenium) Ruthenium The Element Technetium [Click for Isotope Data] 43 Tc Technetium 98 Atomic Number: 43 Atomic Weight: 98 Melting Point: 2430 K (2157°C or 3915°F) Boiling Point: 4538 K (4265°C or 7709°F) Density: 11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none Radioactive and Artificially Produced What's in a name? From the Greek word for artificial, technetos. Say what? Technetium is pronounced as tek-NEE-she-em. History and Uses: Technetium was the first artificially produced element. It was isolated by Carlo Perrier and Emilio Segrè in 1937. Technetium was created by bombarding molybdenum atoms with deuterons that had been accelerated by a

294

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Basics Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

295

It's Elemental - The Element Cobalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Previous Element (Iron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nickel) Nickel The Element Cobalt [Click for Isotope Data] 27 Co Cobalt 58.933195 Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight: 58.933195 Melting Point: 1768 K (1495°C or 2723°F) Boiling Point: 3200 K (2927°C or 5301°F) Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word for goblin or evil spirit, kobald and the Greek word for mine, cobalos. Say what? Cobalt is pronounced as KO-bolt. History and Uses: Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt, a Swedish chemist, in 1739. Brandt was attempting to prove that the ability of certain minerals to color glass blue was due to an unknown element and not to bismuth, as was commonly

296

Eco Sun Hellas Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Place Thessaloniki, Greece Zip 54248 Product Greek PV system installer for industrial and residential use; works with RWE SCHOTT. Coordinates 40.63955°, 22.937075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.63955,"lon":22.937075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

297

Microsoft Word - Armenian Cookbook.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presents an presents an Armenian Cooking Demonstration Thursday, January 24, 2013 Chez Leon 10:30 a.m - 1 p.m. Pauline Berberian, organizer and recipe source, assisted by Susan Kayser, Rose Moore and Mady Newfield 1 Appetizers and Salads Jajik (Cucumber salad) Ingredients: 4 cups cucumbers, finely chopped 3 cups Madzoon (yogurt, Greek style) 3 teaspoons mint leaves (fresh if possible), chopped 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon sugar 1 clove garlic, mashed Mix all ingredients and chill. Serves 9. Babaganosh (Eggplant dip) Ingredients: 2 eggplants 2 tablespoons Taheen (tahini - i.e. sesame seed paste) 1 teaspoon cumin Juice of 1 fresh lemon 1 garlic clove, mashed 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

298

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments at the Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT MINERvA MiniBooNE MINOS NOvA LBNE Cosmic Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments ArgoNeuT ArgoNeut detector at Proton Assembly Building Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT The Argon Neutrino Teststand or ArgoNeuT detector, nicknamed for Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, is a liquid argon neutrino detector at Fermilab. Argon is a noble, non-toxic element that in its gaseous form constitutes about 1 percent of air. It exists as a colorless liquid only in the narrow temperature range of minus 186 to minus 189 degrees Celsius. Neutrinos passing through a large volume of argon can interact with an argon atom, producing secondary particles such as muons and protons, which then ionize other argon atoms. An electric field within the detector causes

299

It's Elemental - The Element Bromine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Previous Element (Selenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Krypton) Krypton The Element Bromine [Click for Isotope Data] 35 Br Bromine 79.904 Atomic Number: 35 Atomic Weight: 79.904 Melting Point: 265.95 K (-7.2°C or 19.0°F) Boiling Point: 331.95 K (58.8°C or 137.8°F) Density: 3.11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for stench, bromos. Say what? Bromine is pronounced as BRO-meen. History and Uses: The only nonmetallic element that is a liquid at normal room temperatures, bromine was produced by Carl Löwig, a young chemistry student, the summer before starting his freshman year at Heidelberg. When he showed his

300

It's Elemental - The Element Barium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cesium Cesium Previous Element (Cesium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lanthanum) Lanthanum The Element Barium [Click for Isotope Data] 56 Ba Barium 137.327 Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight: 137.327 Melting Point: 1000 K (727°C or 1341°F) Boiling Point: 2170 K (1897°C or 3447°F) Density: 3.62 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? From the Greek word for heavy, barys. Say what? Barium is pronounced as BAR-ee-em. History and Uses: Barium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist, in 1808 through the electrolysis of molten baryta (BaO). Barium is never found free in nature since it reacts with oxygen in the air, forming barium oxide

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301

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

302

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toxicity Profiles Toxicity Profiles These profiles were prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM many years ago. Although the toxicity values presented in the formal and condensed toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, the toxicity values are subject to change. Also note that some of the special characters, such as Greek letters and math symbols, in the original document format may not have translated well to html. Select a Profile Analyte CAS Number Formal Version Condensed Version Acenaphthene 83329 Formal Summary Acetone 67641 Formal Summary Aluminum 7429905 Formal Summary Anthracene 120127 Formal Summary Antimony (metallic) 7440360 Formal Summary Aroclor-1254 11097691 Formal Summary Aroclor-1260 11096825 Formal Summary Arsenic 7440382

303

Definition: Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques The objective of electromagnetic (EM) techniques is to image the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface through the measurement of naturally- or artificially-generated electromagnetic fields.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental interactions in nature, the other three being the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and gravitation. This force is described by electromagnetic fields, and has innumerable physical instances including the interaction of electrically charged particles and the interaction of uncharged magnetic force fields with electrical conductors. The word electromagnetism is a compound form of two Greek terms, ἢλεκτρον, ēlektron, "amber", and μαγνήτης, magnētēs, "magnet". The science

304

Small Hydropower Systems: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse (EREC) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you're considering building a small you're considering building a small hydropower system on water flowing through your property, you have a long tradition from which to draw your inspi- ration. Two thousand years ago, the Greeks learned to harness the power of running water to turn the massive wheels that rotated the shafts of their wheat flour grinders. And in the hydropower heyday of the 18th century, thousands of towns and cities worldwide were located around small hydropower sites. Today, small hydropower projects offer emissions-free power solutions for many remote communities throughout the world-such as those in Nepal, India, China, and Peru-as well as for highly industrialized countries, like the United States. This fact sheet will help you determine whether a small hydropower system will

305

TEI Piraeus students' knowledge on the beneficial applications of nuclear physics: Nuclear energy, radioactivity - consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent nuclear accident in Japan revealed the confusion and the inadequate knowledge of the citizens about the issues of nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences In this work we present the first results of an ongoing study which aims to evaluate the knowledge and the views of Greek undergraduate students on the above issues. A web based survey was conducted and 131 students from TEI Piraeus answered a multiple choice questionnaire with questions of general interest on nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences. The survey showed that students, like the general population, have a series of faulty views on general interest nuclear issues. Furthermore, the first results indicate that our educational system is not so effective as source of information on these issues in comparison to the media and internet

Pilakouta, Mirofora

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

It's Elemental - The Element Astatine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polonium Polonium Previous Element (Polonium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radon) Radon The Element Astatine [Click for Isotope Data] 85 At Astatine 210 Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight: 210 Melting Point: 575 K (302°C or 576°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: about 7 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen Radioactive What's in a name? From the Greek word for unstable, astatos. Say what? Astatine is pronounced as AS-teh-teen or as AS-teh-ten. History and Uses: Astatine was produced by Dale R. Carson, K.R. MacKenzie and Emilio Segrè by bombarding an isotope of bismuth, bismuth-209, with alpha particles that had been accelerated in a device called a cyclotron. This created

307

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

308

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Enlarge image The Trojan Goat incorporates recycled materials, including copper cladding reclaimed from a roof, wood panels reclaimed from shipping pallets, and paving stones reclaimed from the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. (Credit: Chris Gunn/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: University of Virginia What: Trojan Goat Where: Private residence Crozet, VA 22932 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2002 University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts Like the Trojan horse that launched the Greeks to victory, the Trojan Goat earned the University of Virginia second place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2002. Since then, the house has gone on to inspire

309

The Universe Adventure - Magnitude, Luminosity and Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apparent Magnitude Apparent Magnitude Some astronomical objects and their magnitudes. Some astronomical objects and their apparent magnitudes from Earth. Before telescopes, people looked at the sky and classified the objects they saw by their brightness. Hipparchus, a Greek mathematician, classified over 850 cosmic objects into six categories of brightness. Scientists later adopted the word magnitude, keeping and extending the scale developed by Hipparchus. The brightest stars were called first magnitude stars, the next brightest being second magnitude stars, etc. Today, we measure the brightness of an object using this same scale, but with much more precision and using a much larger scale. The scale is formatted so that the lower the magnitude the brighter the object, which means a star with a magnitude of

310

X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links: Related Links: May 2005 Headlines TIP Article Press Release Walters Art Museum SSRL Home Page SLAC Home Page Stanford Home Page Tuesday, 31 May 2005 X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text (contact: Uwe Bergmann, bergmann@slac.stanford.edu) Archimedes Figure Image provided by Will Noel, The Walters Art Museum An early transcription of Archimedes' mathematical theories has been brought to light through the probing of high-intensity x-rays at SSRL's BL6-2. The text contains part of the Method of Mechanical Theorems, one of Archimedes' most important works, which was probably copied out by a scribe in the tenth century. The parchment on which it was written was later scraped down and reused as pages in a twelfth century prayer book, producing a document known as a palimpsest (which comes from the Greek,

311

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 It takes 8,900 kilowatt hours to provide electricity to one U.S. house for a year. With the energy saved annually through Infrastructure on Demand, LANL can power 216 homes. | Photo Courtesy of LANL Los Alamos' New Virtualized Data Center Saves Energy and Cash Data centers are responsible for nearly 2% of U.S. electricity consumption -- a price tag of $4.5 billion. Learn how Los Alamos is helping to reduce that price tag. March 4, 2011 An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Bonneville Power Administration celebrates big windy milestone and

312

HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA Jump to: navigation, search Name HelioSphera (formerly Next Solar SA) Place Athens, Greece Zip 11523 Product Greek thin-film silicon PV module manufacturer with a 60MW plant in Tripolis. Coordinates 37.97615°, 23.736415° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.97615,"lon":23.736415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Definition: Geothermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Geothermal energy Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth ( Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat) )[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Thermal energy is the energy that determines the temperature of matter. The geothermal energy of the Earth's crust originates from the original formation of the planet (20%) and from radioactive decay of minerals (80%). The geothermal gradient, which is the difference in temperature between the core of the planet and its surface, drives a continuous conduction of thermal energy in the form of heat from the core to the surface. The adjective geothermal originates from the Greek roots γη (ge), meaning earth, and θερμος (thermos), meaning hot. At the

314

MST: Organizations: Precision Meso Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precision Meso Manufacturing Precision Meso Manufacturing Many engineers and product realization teams at Sandia National Laboratories are currently engaged in efforts to create revolutionary national security products that feature unprecedented functionality in ever-smaller, more portable configurations. In the course of development, the Sandia technology community has realized the need for manufacturing capabilities that expand upon what traditional microfabrication provides. The term “meso,” derived from the Greek mesos, meaning “intermediate” or “in the middle,” describes operations on a length scale that typically ranges from hundreds of micrometers to one centimeter. Meso Manufacturing involves a suite of innovative fabrication and metrology tools that compliment each other to make these products a reality. The Meso

315

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

316

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theta Theta Name: Laramy Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: GA Country: USA Date: N/A Question: I read your response to why we use the letter x in Algebra, but my question is why we use the Greek letter Theta in Trigonometry to represent an angle? Replies: Laramy It is just a convention. Nothing really dictates that folks use theta to represent angles in trigonometry. But when a lot of folks use the same letter the same way it increases understanding about what is being talked about. It is like, "Why does a red traffic light mean stop and a green light mean go? Why is it not the other way around?" This has become an international convention so people can drive in other countries without having to learn new rules all of the time. Sincere regards,

317

Heliodynami Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heliodynami Ltd Heliodynami Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Heliodynami Ltd Place Athens, Greece Zip 176 72 Product Greek project developer. Coordinates 37.97615°, 23.736415° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.97615,"lon":23.736415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

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Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

319

It's Elemental - The Element Phosphorus  

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Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur The Element Phosphorus [Click for Isotope Data] 15 P Phosphorus 30.973762 Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight: 30.973762 Melting Point: 317.30 K (44.15°C or 111.47°F) Boiling Point: 553.65 K (280.5°C or 536.9°F) Density: 1.82 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for light bearing, phosphoros. Say what? Phosphorus is pronounced as FOS-fer-es. History and Uses: In what is perhaps the most disgusting method of discovering an element, phosphorus was first isolated in 1669 by Hennig Brand, a German physician and alchemist, by boiling, filtering and otherwise processing as many as 60

320

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

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Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

A Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Representing A Geothermal Field Subject To Site-Specific Information Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Representing A Geothermal Field Subject To Site-Specific Information Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This work develops a model of the geothermal field in the Nea Kessani region (Greece) by means of the Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method, which describes the temperature variations across space in the underground geological formations. The geothermal field is formed by a thermal reservoir consisting of arcosic sandstones. The temperature distribution vs depth was first investigated by the Greek Institute of

322

RHIC | Why Does Quark Matter Matter?  

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Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? The history of modern technological development can be viewed as a series of investigations, with ever increasing resolution, into the microscopic structure of matter. Since the days of the early Greek philosophers, science has been on a continual quest to find the smallest piece - the most fundamental building block - forming the substance of the universe. STAR researchers During that journey, many beautiful and exotic properties of the subatomic world have been discovered: particles with wave-like properties the ultimate position of which can never be known; "particles" of light that deliver a fixed amount of energy when they strike the atoms of a material's surface; particles in some types of electrical conductors that

323

Why sequence Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus?  

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Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? The term Pisolithus is derived from Greek, where piso means pea-shaped and lithos means stone. The fungal species under this category get their name from the pea-shaped spore capsules that break down to disperse spores, and thrive in temperate regions as well as in less-than-ideal conditions such as high levels of heavy metals, highly acidic soils and drought. They form associations with a wide range of woody plants, including trees, which act as carbon sinks and could be feedstocks for cellulosic biofuels. Interactions with mycorrhizal fungi help trees access scarce nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphate. By sequencing the genomes of fungi related to others previously sequenced by the DOE JGI, researchers hope to better understand the symbiosis

324

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! November 15, 2010 - 5:01pm Addthis Scott Minos Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Believe it or not, this Friday, November 19 is World Toilet Day, an annual event hosted by the World Toilet Organization since 2001 to raise awareness for proper sanitation world-wide. From outhouses to water closets, humans devising creative ways to relieve themselves of nature's call can be traced back at least as far as 3,000 B.C., when Scottish settlements featured stone huts equipped with drains extending from recesses in their walls. Later, around 1,700 B.C., the Greeks built definite latrines featuring large, earthenware pans connected

325

It's Elemental - The Element Neon  

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Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium The Element Neon [Click for Isotope Data] 10 Ne Neon 20.1797 Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight: 20.1797 Melting Point: 24.56 K (-248.59°C or -415.46°F) Boiling Point: 27.07 K (-246.08°C or -410.94°F) Density: 0.0008999 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 18 Group Name: Noble Gas What's in a name? From the Greek word for new, neos. Say what? Neon is pronounced as NEE-on. History and Uses: Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist, shortly after their discovery of the element krypton in 1898. Like krypton, neon was discovered through the

326

Glossary Term - Ceres  

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Catalyst Catalyst Previous Term (Catalyst) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Cloud Chamber) Cloud Chamber Ceres Ceres is an asteroid located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Discovered on January 1, 1801 by Giuseppi Piazzi, Ceres was the first asteroid ever discovered. With a diameter of 1025 kilometers (637 miles), Ceres is also the largest known asteroid. Ceres is also the Roman name for the Greek goddess Demeter, the elder sister of Zeus and daughter of Cronus and Rhea. Demeter was the goddess of grain and helped the crops grow. One day her daughter, Persephone, was abducted by Hades. While Demeter searched for her missing daughter, no crops grew and people starved. Persephone was eventually found, but Hades refused to let her leave the underworld. As a compromise, Persephone is

327

It's Elemental - The Element Molybdenum  

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Niobium Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium The Element Molybdenum [Click for Isotope Data] 42 Mo Molybdenum 95.96 Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight: 95.96 Melting Point: 2896 K (2623°C or 4753°F) Boiling Point: 4912 K (4639°C or 8382°F) Density: 10.2 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for lead, molybdos. Say what? Molybdenum is pronounced as meh-LIB-deh-nem. History and Uses: Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Welhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, in 1778 in a mineral known as molybdenite (MoS2) which had been confused as a lead compound. Molybdenum was isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Today,

328

Definition: Stereo Satellite Imagery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Stereo Satellite Imagery Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stereo Satellite Imagery Stereo Satellite Imagery is a form of Stereoscopy or 3D imaging. Two pictures are a take of the subject from two slightly different angles to produce the illusion of depth. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Stereoscopy (also called stereoscopics or 3D imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision. The word stereoscopy derives from the Greek "στερεός" (stereos), "firm, solid" + "σκοπέω" (skopeō), "to look", "to see". Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images

329

Secretary Bodman Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector Secretary Bodman Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector November 18, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Pipeline ushers first link between gas suppliers of Central Asia and European consumers KIPI CROSSING, GREECE - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today celebrated the opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector (TGI) pipeline, ushering the first link between the gas suppliers of Central Asia and the consumers of Europe. This pipeline will expand the region's oil and gas infrastructure and increase the diversity of energy sources and suppliers. During the TGI's groundbreaking ceremony, Secretary Bodman congratulated Turkish and Greek leaders for their commitment to opening up the European

330

Definition: Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids intersected by a well. These petrophysical data are fundamental to developing the understanding of a geothermal reservoir.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Petrophysics (from the Greek πέτρα, petra, "rock" and φύσις, physis, "nature") is the study of physical and chemical rock properties and their interactions with fluids. A major application of petrophysics is in studying reservoirs for the hydrocarbon industry. Petrophysicists are employed to help reservoir engineers and geoscientists understand the rock properties of the reservoir, particularly how pores in

331

Effective deployment of photovoltaics in the Mediterranean countries: Balancing policy risk and return  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Mediterranean region is blessed with abundant solar resources, photovoltaic energy currently represents a very small share of power production. In Germany however, a much less sunny country, the photovoltaic (PV) industry is booming. This country has become a front runner in the adoption of PV because of effective policy incentives. Based on a cross-case study analysis of the German, Spanish and Greek PV markets, this paper investigates factors determining the effectiveness of PV policies. Our analysis shows that, above a certain level of return, risk-related factors (such as policy instability and administrative hurdles) play a more important role in influencing investment decisions than return-related factors (such as the level of a feed-in tariff). (author)

Luethi, S. [IWOe-HSG, Institute for Economy and the Environment, University of St. Gallen, Tigerbergstr. 2, CH-9000 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Application of information and complexity theories to public opinion polls. The case of Greece (2004-2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general methodology to study public opinion inspired from information and complexity theories is outlined. It is based on probabilistic data extracted from opinion polls. It gives a quantitative information-theoretic explanation of high job approval of Greek Prime Minister Mr. Constantinos Karamanlis (2004-2007), while the same time series of polls conducted by the company Metron Analysis showed that his party New Democracy (abbr. ND) was slightly higher than the opposition party of PASOK -party leader Mr. George Papandreou. It is seen that the same mathematical model applies to the case of the popularity of President Clinton between January 1998 and February 1999, according to a previous study, although the present work extends the investigation to concepts as complexity and Fisher information, quantifying the organization of public opinion data.

Panos, C P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

European Macro-economic Policy and Technological Development: the case of Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies on economic and technological transformation in less developed countries emphasise that improvement of their performance in terms of competitiveness and successful integration into the world economy requires both economic stabilisation at the macroeconomic level and technological development. Greece is a typical case, which during the last twenty years has had to deal with specific imperatives: European integration, technological catch-up and macro-economic stability. These processes are envisaged under the pressure of the opening of the economy, which in principle could facilitate dissemination of new technologies on the one hand but constrain the development of national capabilities on the other. In this paper we present the specificities of the Greek productive system that have shaped its integration into the EC and attempt to link the process of European integration with its technological development. Special reference is made to the macroeconomic policy of the EU and its impact on technological transformation. 2

Ioanna Kastelli

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

2012), Financial Globalization, Economic Growth, and the Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peterson Institute for International Economics. All rights reserved. Greece has been at the epicenter of the European debt crisis. It is the only industrial nation since the 1930s that has been forced to restructure public debt with forgiveness. Financial contagion from Greece contributed to debt stress in the euro area periphery, at first in Ireland and Portugal but eventually even in the large and stronger economies of Italy and Spain, which encountered punitive risk spreads on sovereign debt by late 2011. By the second quarter of 2012 political turmoil in Greece and the temporary specter of a Greek exit from the euro, together with heightened banking problems in Spain, sparked another round of stress in debt markets. Then at midyear the sharp escalation of potential European Central Bank (ECB) support through purchases of government bonds in Outright Market Transactions restored a measure of calm.

In Greece; William R. Cline; William R. Cline; Senior Fellow; Earlier Draft

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

It's Elemental - The Element Titanium  

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Scandium Scandium Previous Element (Scandium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Vanadium) Vanadium The Element Titanium [Click for Isotope Data] 22 Ti Titanium 47.867 Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight: 47.867 Melting Point: 1941 K (1668°C or 3034°F) Boiling Point: 3560 K (3287°C or 5949°F) Density: 4.5 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word Titans, the mythological "first sons of the Earth." Say what? Titanium is pronounced as tie-TAY-nee-em. History and Uses: Titanium was discovered in 1791 by the Reverend William Gregor, an English pastor. Pure titanium was first produced by Matthew A. Hunter, an American metallurgist, in 1910. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the

336

It's Elemental - The Element Osmium  

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Rhenium Rhenium Previous Element (Rhenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iridium) Iridium The Element Osmium [Click for Isotope Data] 76 Os Osmium 190.23 Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight: 190.23 Melting Point: 3306 K (3033°C or 5491°F) Boiling Point: 5285 K (5012°C or 9054°F) Density: 22.57 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for a smell, osme. Say what? Osmium is pronounced as OZ-mee-em. History and Uses: Osmium and iridium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Osmium and iridium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

337

It's Elemental - The Element Antimony  

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Tin Tin Previous Element (Tin) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tellurium) Tellurium The Element Antimony [Click for Isotope Data] 51 Sb Antimony 121.760 Atomic Number: 51 Atomic Weight: 121.760 Melting Point: 903.78 K (630.63°C or 1167.13°F) Boiling Point: 1860 K (1587°C or 2889°F) Density: 6.685 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words anti and monos, which together mean "not alone." Antimony's chemical symbol comes from its historic name, Stibium. Say what? Antimony is pronounced as AN-the-MOH-nee. History and Uses: Antimony has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores stibnite (Sb2S3) and

338

Definition: Electrical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Methods Electrical Methods Electrical methods aim to map the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface. Electrical resistivity (inverse of electrical conductivity) is a measure of the ability for electrical current to flow and depends on parameters such as rock type, porosity and permeability, fluid type and saturation, and temperature. The SI unit of measure for resistivity is the ohm meter. [1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electrical resistivity (also known as resistivity, specific electrical resistance, or volume resistivity) quantifies how strongly a given material opposes the flow of electric current. A low resistivity indicates a material that readily allows the movement of electric charge. Resistivity is commonly represented by the Greek letter ρ. The SI unit of

339

Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Manhattan Project: The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn, Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute, Berlin THE DISCOVERY OF FISSION Berlin, Germany (1938-1939) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The English word "atom" derives from the Greek word "atomon" ("ατομον"), which means "that which cannot be divided." In 1938, the scientific community proved the Greek philosophers wrong by dividing the atom. Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. Fission, the basis of the atomic bomb, was discovered in Nazi Germany less than a year before the beginning of the Second World War. It was December 1938 when the radiochemists Otto Hahn (above, with Lise Meitner) and Fritz Strassmann, while bombarding elements with neutrons in their Berlin laboratory, made their unexpected discovery. They found that while the nuclei of most elements changed somewhat during neutron bombardment, uranium nuclei changed greatly and broke into two roughly equal pieces. They split and became not the new transuranic elements that some thought Enrico Fermi had discovered but radioactive barium isotopes (barium has the atomic number 56) and other fragments of the uranium itself. The substances Fermi had created in his experiments, that is, did more than resemble lighter elements -- they were lighter elements. The products of the Hahn-Strassmann experiment weighed less than that of the original uranium nucleus, and herein lay the primary significance of their findings. It folIowed from Albert Einstein's E=mc2 equation that the loss of mass resulting from the splitting process must have been converted into energy in the form of kinetic energy that could in turn be converted into heat.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Platonic Cosmopolitanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the content of a meaningful cosmopolitan theory? Contemporary cosmopolitanism offers numerous global theories of liberalism, democracy, republicanism, and postmodernism, but is there anything of the cosmos or polis within them? I argue these theories, though global, are not cosmopolitan. Ancient Greek philosophy holds a more meaningful, substantive conception of cosmopolitanism. From Homer to the Stoics and Cynics, ancient Greece was a hotbed for thinking beyond the confines of local tradition and convention. These schools of thought ventured to find universal understandings of humanity and political order. Conceiving of the world as a beautiful order, a cosmos, they sought a beautiful order for the association of human beings. Within that tradition is the unacknowledged legacy of Platonic cosmopolitanism. Rarely do political philosophers find cosmopolitan themes in the dialogues of Plato. Correcting this omission, I argue that Platos dialogues, from the early through the late, comprise a cosmopolitan journey: an attempt to construct a polis according to an understanding of the cosmos. The early dialogues address questions of piety, justice, and righteous obedience. More than that, they inquire into why a good man, Socrates, is persecuted in his city for nothing more than being a dutiful servant of the gods and his city. The middle dialogues construct a true cosmopolis, a political association in harmony with the natural laws of the world. Furthermore, they explain why those who know how to construct such a polis live best in such arrangements. In the late dialogues, Plato revises his political plans to accord with a more developed understanding of cosmic and human nature. Platonic cosmopolitanism constructs a true polis according to the beautiful order of the cosmos. Such a feat of philosophy is remarkable in the Greek tradition, and inspires contemporaries to rethink their own conception of what is truly cosmopolitan versus merely global.

Betti, Daniel Vincent

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Rope and the art of knot-tying in the seafaring of the ancient Eastern Mediterranean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fibers woven into cords or ropes and tied together with knots form one of mankind's earliest tools. When he first went out onto the water on anything more sophisticated than a simple paddle-driven dugout canoe he had to have done so with the assistance of some type of cordage. He may have needed a line tied around a stone that would serve as an anchor, a line to retrieve.his fishing spear, and a line to moor his craft on the beach. And soon he would need lines to hold a mast erect so he could raise a sail. In fact, no waterborne vessel, in ancient times, as today, could function without rope. As ships got larger and more complicated, the requirement for many different types and sizes of cordage became increasingly important. Depictions of seagoing vessels from the ancient eastern Mediterranean-Egyptian, Greek, Phoenician, or Roman--give some idea of the great quantities of cordage that would have been required to keep these ships at sea. Yet, when rope has been found on ancient shipwrecks, or in other nautical contexts, those examples have received comparatively little attention. Likewise, the overall subjects of the making of rope and the art of knot-tying in the ancient world, both without which ships could not have set sail, have received little attention. Evidence from antiquity that can open these subjects up to the modern world does exist. The Greek and Roman writers reveal a great deal about rope, and the materials used in its manufacture, although they are less open about knots. Ancient artists were less revealing with specific detail on rope and knots, but there is some information there. Archaeological remains of ancient rope are found on many shipwrecks and, while it occurs less often, a few knots have also been found on ancient sites. This thesis is a review of this material from the ancient world. It will provide insight into an important, but little known subject, and will add to our understanding of seafaring in the Mediterranean area during antiquity.

Charlton, William Harrison

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Calendars  

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Calendars Calendars Nature Bulletin No. 447-A March 4, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CALENDARS This is a Leap Year with 366 days instead of the usual 365, and 29 days in February. Julius Caesar was responsible for that. The Roman calendar was patterned after those of the ancient Greeks and Egyptians which, in turn, had been modeled on that of the early Sumerians in Babylonia. The Sumerians had 12 lunar months in a year but every so often, to make up for the difference between that year and the year of the natural seasons, their astronomer-priests inserted an extra month. The Roman year was too short. It had had only 365 days for so many centuries that their calendar was badly out of step with the seasons and something had to be done about it. The summer months were coming in spring. Caesar's astronomers told him the reason: instead of being exactly 365 days long, a year was 365 and one-quarter days in length. Julius then solved the problem -- so he thought -- by establishing a leap year of 366 days every fourth year. He put the extra day in February because that was the last month on the old Roman calendar. Their new year started on the first day of March.

344

Owls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owls Owls Nature Bulletin No. 267-A April 29, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OWLS The owls, of all our native birds, are least understood. Most kinds remain hidden, motionless and silent during the day and hunt only at night or in the dim twilight of morning and evening. Only a few, like our common Short-eared Owl and those big owls of the far north -- the Snowy Owl, the Great Gray Owl and the Hawk Owl -- habitually hunt in daytime. Because an owl' s feathers are peculiarly soft and fluffy, it flies as silently as a passing shadow, swoops upon its prey unheard, and its Indian name was "hush-wing". Since ancient times there have been many superstitions and legends about these birds. They have been regarded as the companions of sorcerers, witches, ghosts, hobgoblins and Satan himself. Their weird nocturnal hootings, gobblings and screams were and are believed to predict death, illness or disaster. Even today, in our southern states, the plaintive quavering cry of the Little Screech Owl -- which they call the "Shivering" Owl -- will cause some people to get out of bed and turn over their left shoe; others to throw a nail or other iron object into the fire. To the Greeks and Romans, the owl was a symbol of wisdom and was the companion of their goddess of wisdom.

345

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

346

A Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging an Arsenic-Loving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern For many people, arsenic is synonymous with poison, so it is perhaps a surprise that some plants, such as the fern Pteris vittata (Figure 1) seem to quite deliberately accumulate large amounts of it. What is more, the plant converts it to the most toxic inorganic form known. How does it do this? First some background; while there is some evidence that arsenic is required for health [1], this is debatable. On the other hand, the poisonous nature of arsenic compounds was understood by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and it has been used throughout history as a homicidal and suicidal agent. It is found in two environmentally common oxy acids; arsenous acid (H3AsO3), and arsenic acid (H3AsO4), whose salts are known as arsenites and arsenates, respectively. Of these, the trivalent arsenic species are the most toxic. The infamous agent of murder is arsenic trioxide (white arsenic or As2O3), which is simply the (reputedly tasteless) anhydride of arsenous acid.

347

Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic luster, but show bright colors which range from red, violet or blue, depending upon the size of the nanoparticles (2,3). Colloidal gold has traditionally been used to color materials such as glass (e.g. gold ruby glass and cranberry glass) and enamels (e.g. famille rose enamels) since the 16th century. The earliest report of a colloidal gold preparation may be in the Bible. The book of Exodus reports that Moses destroyed the golden calf in a manner that may have resulted in an aqueous (water-based) gold colloid, which he then forced the Israelites to drink. In modern times gold colloids are imbibed for a variety of ailments (despite little or no evidence of any health-related benefits), but the most important applications may be in the field of nano-technology (see 1, and refs therein).

348

Asters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asters Asters Nature Bulletin No. 431-A October 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ASTERS One of the charms of our American autumn is the profusion of asters that decorate the landscape from late August until the killing frosts of October or November. Some kinds, last wildflowers of the dying year, are still blooming when even the goldenrods are gone. Some are white; a few are pinkish; others range in color from pale blue to purple. They are very hardy but people who gather armloads of asters are disappointed to find that they close up and lose their beauty almost as soon as picked. The asters belong to that largest of all plant families, the Composites, which includes such common flowers as goldenrods, daisies, sunflowers, thistles and dandelions. The name aster, from the Latin and Greek word meaning "star", was given them because the flower head has a showy ring of rays or florets -- similar to those of a daisy, sunflower and chicory -- around a yellow center that turns reddish or purplish brown with age. Almost all are perennials. Each tiny seed has a short tuft of fuzz by which it is carried away in the wind.

349

Teratogens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teratogens Teratogens Name: leff Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What is a teratogen? Replies: A teratogen is a chemical that causes a fetus to develop incorrectly, there are many examples of these. Perhaps one of the most common is alcohol. When a pregnant woman drinks excessively the baby is born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome which includes a combination of physical and mental problems. psych Teratogen means, in Greek, "monster forming". Teratogens are chemicals that cause abnormalities in embryos. Alcohol certainly is one. Perhaps the most famous is thalidomide, a drug originally designed to combat morning sickness is pregnant women. It caused the long bones in the arms or legs to be absent, resulting in babies with severely stunted arms or legs. Rarely, a microorganism such as a bacterium can be teratogenic. One is Toxoplasma, which causes toxoplasmosis. It is carried by rabbits and cats and can be common in your yard, which is why doctors often advise pregnant women to wear latex gloves when gardening

350

Dates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dates Dates Nature Bulletin No. 511-A December 15, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DATES When the wise men from the east, guided by a mysterious new star, traveled to Jerusalem and thence to Bethlehem where they worshipped the infant Jesus and presented Him with gifts, you can be sure that, in addition to gold and frankincense and myrrh, they carried dates as food to sustain them on their long journey. The Date Palm had been cultivated along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers since the time of the Sumerians, 3000 years before the birth of Christ. This tree, like the coconut palm, is unknown today in its wild state but is believed to have originated in Ethiopia. In early times it was abundant in Palestine and the scientific name, Phoenix, given to the date palm by the Greeks, may be due to the fact that they first saw it in Phoenicia. The "tree of life, " variously referred to in the Bible, was probably this palm.

351

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

352

It's Elemental - The Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon The Element Chlorine [Click for Isotope Data] 17 Cl Chlorine 35.453 Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight: 35.453 Melting Point: 171.65 K (-101.5°C or -150.7°F) Boiling Point: 239.11 K (-34.04°C or -29.27°F) Density: 0.003214 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for greenish yellow, chloros. Say what? Chlorine is pronounced as KLOR-een or as KLOR-in. History and Uses: Since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. Chlorine was first produced by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) with

353

Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit  

SciTech Connect

Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along nanowire appendages. We present a 3.2 crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split ?-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Thermal-hydraulic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect

The thermal-hydraulic analysis performed for the needs of the conversion of the open pool 5MW Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) to a pure Low Enrichment (LEU) configuration is presented. The methodology was based on a complete set of neutronic calculations performed for the new core configuration, in compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. The hottest channel analysis approach was adopted, and peaking factors were used to account for fabrication or measuring uncertainties. Calculations were carried out using the numerical codes NATCON, PLTEMP and PARET provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two main different classes of conditions were considered, namely i) steady state normal operating conditions and ii) transient cases related to accidental events including reactivity feedback effects. For steady state operating conditions the behaviour of the new configuration was examined both for forced and natural convection cooling modes. Transient calculations considered several initiating events including reactivity insertion accidents (slow or fast reactivity insertion) and total or partial loss-of-flow accidents, i.e. in accordance to guidelines provided by the IAEA for research Reactors. (author)

Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus); Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis [Department of Mechanical Engineering Educators, ASPETE, N. Iraklio, GR 14121 (Greece); Tsoutsos, Theocharis [Environmental Engineering Dept., Technical University of Crete, Technical University Campus, GR 73100, Chania (Greece); Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), 19th km Marathon Ave., GR 19001, Pikermi (Greece)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

"That the Truth of Things May Be More Fully Known:" Understanding the Role of Rhetoric in Shaping, Resolving, and Remembering the Salem Witchcraft Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project investigates how rhetorical texts influenced the witch trials that were held in Salem in 1691-1692, how rhetoric shaped the response to this event, and how rhetorical artifacts in the twentieth and twenty first centuries have shaped American public memory of the Salem witchcraft crisis. My analysis draws from three different chronological and rhetorical viewpoints. In Chapter II, I build upon work done by scholars such as McGee, White, and Charland in the area of constitutive rhetoric to address the question of how the witchcraft crisis was initiated and fueled rhetorically. Then, as my examination shifts to the rhetorical artifacts constructed immediately after the trials in Chapter III, I rely on the tradition of apologia, rooted in the ancient Greek understanding of stasis theory to understand how rhetorical elements were utilized by influential rhetors to craft a variety of different explanations for the crisis. And finally in Chapter IV, I draw from individuals such as Halbwachs, Kammen, Zelizer, and Bodnar, working in the cross-disciplinary field of public memory, to respond to the questions of how we remember the trials today and what impact these memories have on our understanding of the themes of witchcraft and witch hunting in contemporary American society. Therefore, this project uses the lens of rhetorical analysis to provide a method for examining and understanding how individuals, both in the seventeenth century and today, have engaged in the act of updating their reflections about this facet of American history.

Lemley, Lauren

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modelling Information Flows in Financial Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of information-based asset pricing. In this approach, an asset is defined by its cash-flow structure. The market is assumed to have access to "partial" information about future cash flows. Each cash flow is determined by a collection of independent market factors called X-factors. The market filtration is generated by a set of information processes, each of which carries information about one of the X-factors, and eventually reveals the X-factor. Each information process has two terms, one of which contains a "signal" about the associated X-factor, and the other of which represents "market noise". The price of an asset is given by the expectation of the discounted cash flows in the risk-neutral measure, conditional on the information provided by the market. When the market noise is modelled by a Brownian bridge one is able to construct explicit formulae for asset prices, as well as semi-analytic expressions for the prices and greeks of options and derivatives. In particular, op...

Brody, Dorje C; Macrina, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photovoltaics and the Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past five years, solar energy usage has grown by about 43 percent a year, giving rise to a billion-dollar industry in photovoltaics (PV) or getting electricity from light. The word photovoltaics combines the Greek phos, or light, with the volt of electricity. PV technologies have distinct environmental advantages over conventional power technologies, such as: no noise, no emissions, no need for fuel and power lines. Compared to burning coal, a gigawatt-hour of PV-generated electricity would prevent the release of about 1,000 tons of carbon dioxide, eight of sulfur dioxide, four of nitrogen oxides, and 0.4 tons of particulates. However, manufacturing the solar cells that transform light to electricity requires the use of some toxic and flammable substances. Addressing the environmental, health, and safety concerns of the PV industry to minimize risk while ensuring economic viability and public support is the work of the National Photovoltaic Environmental Health, & Safety Assistance Center at BNL.

Fthenakis, Vasilis (BNL Environmental Sciences)

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Start Up of a Nb-1%Zr Potassium Heat Pipe From the Frozen State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The start up of a liquid-metal heat pipe from the frozen state was evaluated experimentally with a Nb-1%Zr heat pipe with potassium as the working fluid. The heat pipe was fabricated and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RF induction heating was used to heat 13 cm of the 1-m-long heat pipe. The heat pipe and test conditions are well characterized so that the test data may be used for comparison with numerical analyses. An attempt was made during steady state tests to calibrate the heat input so that the heat input would be known during the transient cases. The heat pipe was heated to 675C with a throughput of 600 W and an input heat flux of 6 W/cm 2 . Steady state tests, start up from the frozen state, and transient variations from steady state were conducted. Nomenclature English L length m . mass flow rate PS power setting r radius q heat flux q" heat flux per unit area T temperature v voltage V volume x axial location on heat pipe Greek e porosity r resist...

Since Its Founding; David E. Glass; Michael A. Merrigan; J. Tom Sena

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

NOTES ON THERMAL PROPERTIES AND HEAT TRANSFER OF SYNTACTIC FOAM SUBSEA INSULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. The properties that make syntactic foam an efficient buoyancy material also make it a good subsea thermal insulator: low density, high strength, and resistance to water penetration. The hollow spherical fillers in the foam contain air and prevent its compres-sion by hydrostatic force. The air in turn acts as a very effective insulator, slowing heat transfer as long as structural integrity is maintained. 2. Heat transfer textbooks list three modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Radiation is seldom a factor in wet subsea insulation, and convection plays a role only when water is free to circulate, a condition normally avoided. Therefore, this paper focuses on conduction as the principal way in which heat travels through syntactic foam insulation. 3. A glossary of heat transfer properties is given on Page 4. The following definitions apply to the terms we will be using most frequently: Density: Mass per unit volume is symbolized by the Greek letter rho (_); it is usually numerically equivalent to weight per unit volume, but caution is required to make sure the correct values are always used. Thermal Conductivity: The rate at which heat is conducted through the material in question. The higher the conductivity (k-value), the more easily heat will be transmitted from the hot to the

Lou Watkins

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Numerical investigation of the grinding process in a Beater Wheel mill with classifier  

SciTech Connect

A numerical investigation is presented for a two-dimensional simulation of the gas flow field and of the dynamic behavior of lignite particles inside Beater Wheel mills with classifier, installed in large coal-fired plants. A large number of representative particles are tracked using Lagrangian equations of motion, in combination with a stochastic model for particle turbulent dispersion. All the important mechanisms associated with the particle motion through the mill (particle-surface collisions and rebounding phenomena, fuel moisture evaporation and erosion wear of internal surfaces) are modeled. A special model is constructed to simulate the fragmentation of impacting particles and to calculate the size distribution of the final mill product. The models are regulated on the basis of available data from grinding mills of the Greek lignite power stations. The numerical code is capable of predicting the locations of significant erosion and to estimate the amount of particle mass that circulates through the mill via the classifying chamber. Mean impact velocity and impingement angle distributions along all the internal surfaces are also provided. The results indicate remarkable differences in the extent of the erosion caused at different locations of the mill. Also, the significant role of the leading blades arrangement inside the classifier on its classification performance and efficiency is elucidated.

Anagnostopoulos, J.; Bergeles, G. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Using spectroscopic information for magnetometry and magnetic microscopy obviously requires detailed theoretical understanding of spectral shape and magnitude of dichroism signals. A research team at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 has now shown unambiguously that, contrary to common belief, spectral shape and magnitude of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) are not only determined by the relative orientation of magnetic moments and x-ray polarization, but their orientation relative to the crystallographic axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when freely suspended these objects pointed north-south. Throughout the past, we have used this phenomenon-magnetism-for navigation and more recently for power production and digital information storage, all while trying to explore and understand its origins. In 1986 researchers at a facility similar to the ALS observed for the first time that the absorption of x rays depends not only on the composition of a material-that is, if it contains iron, nickel, or other elements-but also on its magnetism. The effect is unique in that it allows us to distinguish which atomic species magnetism originates from and provides information about their local atomic environment-for example, whether a magnetic species is surrounded by 4 or 6 oxygen atoms. A research team at the ALS has now shown that the relationship between magnetic order and absorption of x rays is even more complex and exciting than has been assumed for the past 20 years, leading to a reassessment of previous results.

363

Clinical Outcome and Safety of Multilevel Vertebroplasty: Clinical Experience and Results  

SciTech Connect

To compare safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) when treating up to three vertebrae or more than three vertebrae per session. We prospectively compared two groups of patients with symptomatic vertebral fractures who had no significant response to conservative therapy. Pathologic substrate included osteoporosis (n = 77), metastasis (n = 24), multiple myeloma (n = 13), hemangioma (n = 15), and lymphoma (n = 1). Group A patients (n = 94) underwent PVP of up to three treated vertebrae (n = 188). Group B patients (n = 36) underwent PVP with more than three treated vertebrae per session (n = 220). Decreased pain and improved mobility were recorded the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery per clinical evaluation and the use of numeric visual scales (NVS): the Greek Brief Pain Inventory, a linear analogue self-assessment questionnaire, and a World Health Organization questionnaire. Group A presented with a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 1.1 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.1 {+-} 1.6, 2.0 {+-} 1.5 and 2.0 {+-} 1.5 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Group B presented with a mean pain score of 8.1 {+-} 1.3 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.2 {+-} 1.3, 2.0 {+-} 1.5, and 2.1 {+-} 1.6 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Overall pain decrease and mobility improvement throughout the follow-up period presented no statistical significance neither between the two groups nor between different underlying aetiology. Reported cement leakages presented no statistical significance between the two groups (p = 0.365). PVP is an efficient and safe technique for symptomatic vertebral fractures independently of the vertebrae number treated per session.

Mailli, Leto, E-mail: lmailli@hotmail.com; Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Brountzos, Elias N.; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Alexios [Attikon University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens University School of Medicine (Greece)] [Attikon University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens University School of Medicine (Greece)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Using spectroscopic information for magnetometry and magnetic microscopy obviously requires detailed theoretical understanding of spectral shape and magnitude of dichroism signals. A research team at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 has now shown unambiguously that, contrary to common belief, spectral shape and magnitude of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) are not only determined by the relative orientation of magnetic moments and x-ray polarization, but their orientation relative to the crystallographic axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when freely suspended these objects pointed north-south. Throughout the past, we have used this phenomenon-magnetism-for navigation and more recently for power production and digital information storage, all while trying to explore and understand its origins. In 1986 researchers at a facility similar to the ALS observed for the first time that the absorption of x rays depends not only on the composition of a material-that is, if it contains iron, nickel, or other elements-but also on its magnetism. The effect is unique in that it allows us to distinguish which atomic species magnetism originates from and provides information about their local atomic environment-for example, whether a magnetic species is surrounded by 4 or 6 oxygen atoms. A research team at the ALS has now shown that the relationship between magnetic order and absorption of x rays is even more complex and exciting than has been assumed for the past 20 years, leading to a reassessment of previous results.

365

Compensatory Feeding Following a Predator Removal Program : Detection and Mechanisms, 1982-1996 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predator removal is one of the oldest management tools in existence, with evidence that ancient Greeks used a bounty reward for wolves over 3,000 years ago (Anonymous 1964). Efforts to control predators on fish have been documented in scientific journals for at least 60 years (Eschmeyer 1937; Lagler 1939; Foerster and Ricker 1941; Smith and Swingle 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959), and has likely been attempted for much longer. Complete eradication of a target species from a body of water has rarely been the objective of predator removal programs, which instead have attempted to eliminate predators from specific areas, to reduce the density or standing stock of predators, or to kill the largest individuals in the population (Meronek et al. 1996). In evaluating management programs that remove only part of a predator population, the compensatory response(s) of the remaining predators must be considered. Some potential compensatory responses by remaining individuals include increased reproductive output, increased growth rate, or increased consumption of certain prey species (Jude et al. 1987). If compensation by predators that remain in the system following a removal effort occurs, it may reduce the effectiveness of the predator control program. Northern pike-minnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis (formerly called northern squawfish) consume juvenile salmon in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. Northern pikeminnow have been estimated to consume about 11% of all juvenile salmon that migrate through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River (Rieman et al. 1991). Modeling studies suggested that removal of 20% of the northern pikeminnow population in John Day Reservoir would result in a 50% decrease in predation-related mortality of juvenile salmon migrating through this reach (Beamesderfer et al. 1991). Since the early 1940's, other programs have been implemented to remove northern pikeminnow, with hopes of improving the survival of juvenile salmon (Ricker 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959).

Petersen, James H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Making Sense of Judicial Sensemaking: A Study of Rhetorical Discursive Interaction at the Supreme Court of the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation engages previous research in political science and psychology by arguing for the importance of oral arguments from a communication perspective, examining justices' rhetorical discursive interaction in oral arguments, introducing Sensemaking as a new model of judicial decision making, and discussing the legal and cultural impact of justices' rhetorical discursive interaction in Morse v. Frederick, Kennedy v. Louisiana, and District of Columbia v. Heller. In contrast to the aggregate behavioral models and longitudinal studies conducted by political scientists and psychologists, this study examines these specific cases in order to gauge each justice's individual interaction in oral argument and to determine how certain justices may have controlled the discursive flow of information within oral arguments, which in turn may have influenced the Court's decision making ability. The dissertation begins with an introduction, providing an overview of the development and study of legal rhetoric from the Greeks to present day. A review of prior literature in law, political science, and psychology displays how fields outside of communication view oral arguments and reveals where communication may provide valuable contributions to the study of Supreme Court oral arguments. Theoretical and methodological approaches adopted for the study of oral arguments are discussed. Analysis within the dissertation begins with an overview of the inherent complexity found within oral arguments and applies the previously discussed theoretical and methodological approaches to the case of Morse v. Frederick as a means of determining theoretical and methodological validity. Following analysis of Morse v. Frederick, a second case, Kennedy v. Louisiana is analyzed to determine if similar results will occur. Final consideration is given to a third case, District of Columbia v. Heller, to understand whether justices' behavior may deviate in more socially and politically sensitive cases. The dissertation concludes with suggestions for lawyers and judges based upon this study's findings and makes recommendations to scholars for further areas of research.

Malphurs, Ryan Allen

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Water, law, science  

SciTech Connect

In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

How Tyranny Paved the Way to Wealth and Democracy: The Democratic Transition in Ancient Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: When a ruling elite is unable to commit to future growth-promoting policies, it may cede political power to a broader segment of the public, as in North and Weingast (1989). Alternatively, as we show in this paper, commitment may be achieved by moving in the opposite direction: installing a single authoritarian ruler who favors growth-promoting policies. Although this narrows the distribution of power in the short run, it may as our model illustrates be a step toward, not away from, democracy. We apply the model to ancient Greece. Many of the famously democratic poleis (city-states) of Greeces Classical period were ruled by tyrants in the earlier Archaic period. The tyrannies of Archaic Greece were transitory institutions, generally lasting only a few decades, with strong similarities across poleis in the factors that led to their appearance and the types of policies enacted. Using a unique data set, we examine the relationships between the potential for economic growth, Archaic period tyranny, and Classical period democracy. We conclude that a high potential for economic growth led to a pro-growth political institution (the tyrant) that led in turn to increased wealth and, eventually, to democracy. These findings are consistent with critical junctures theory the institutional path determines both wealth and democracy. We are deeply indebted to Josh Ober for making available to us a wealth of ancient Greek data, and for inviting us to participate in Stanford Universitys Emergence of Cooperation Colloquium. We also benefitted from numerous discussions with other Colloquium participants. For helpful comments on this paper, we thank Yoram Barzel, Ron Johnson, Ian Morris, Josh Ober, and seminar participants at Colby College, the University of Washington, and the 2009 Michael P. Malone Memorial Conference. When Greece had grown more powerful and was still more than before engaged in the acquisition of wealth, tyrannies were established in the cities.

Robert K. Fleck; F. Andrew Hanssen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

372

Plato's lysis and its influence on Kant and Aristotle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most scholarship concerning Platos Lysis focuses on the failure of Socrates elenchus in its endeavor to define friendship. However, this construal of the dialogue is shortsighted. If one analyzes the dialogues dramatic subtext then one will discover a fairly complete theory of friendship attributable to Plato. This issue is critical, for the Lysis is a significant influence on Aristotles ethical theory. Thus, unless one grasps the relationship between Aristotles ethical theory and this particular dialogue, then one could argue that one does not really understand Aristotles motivations regarding his usage of friendship as the defining normative force of his political community. Similarly, understanding the Lysis is paramount to understanding Kants theory of friendship as well, for Kant can be interpreted as a virtue ethicist. And, analogous to other virtue ethicists such as Aristotle and Plato, Kant espouses a perspective on friendship, which utilizes friendship as the social cohesion of the moral community. However, unlike Plato and Aristotle who argue that friendship exists for the sake of the other person, Kants theory claims that one must participate in friendships for the sake of duty. This departure raises various issues regarding his understanding of friendship, for example, are friendships genuine? For Kant, friendship enables those involved to gain a greater understanding of the moral law and nurture relationships which will facilitate that goal. In this respect, like good Aristotelians help one another attain eudaimonia, good Kantians help each other strive towards holiness. Hence, for Kant, the empirical facets of our relationships such as aspiring towards eudaimonia, are not as important as gaining a better understanding of the moral law. Thus, to whom the actions are geared does not matter; it is the actions themselves, which are important. In this respect, while the virtuous will genuinely desire to help their friend, they do not genuinely help their friend in the Ancient Greek sense, since their actions are performed for dutys sake. Nevertheless, Kant introduces humanistic qualities to friendship, e.g. trust, respect, and self-disclosure, which advances its study into the present day.

Oviedo, Michael Peter

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

B Flavour Tagging with Artificial Neural Networks for the CDF II Experiment  

SciTech Connect

One of the central questions arising from human curiosity has always been what matter is ultimately made of, with the idea of some kind of elementary building-block dating back to the ancient greek philosophers. Scientific activities of multiple generations have contributed to the current best knowledge about this question, the Standard Model of particle physics. According to it, the world around us is composed of a small number of stable elementary particles: Electrons and two different kinds of quarks, called up and down quarks. Quarks are never observed as free particles, but only as bound states of a quark-antiquark pair (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons), summarized as hadrons. Protons and Neutrons, the constituents forming the nuclei of all chemical elements, are baryons made of up and down quarks. The electron and the electron neutrino - a nearly massless particle without electric charge - belong to a group called leptons. These two quarks and two leptons represent the first generation of elementary particles. There are two other generations of particles, which seem to have similar properties as the first generation except for higher masses, so there are six quarks and six leptons altogether. They were around in large amounts shortly after the beginning of the universe, but today they are only produced in high energetic particle collisions. Properties of particles are described by quantum numbers, for example charge or spin. For every type of particle, a corresponding antiparticle exists with the sign of all charges swapped, but similar properties otherwise. The Standard Model is a very successful theory, describing the properties of all known particles and the interactions between them. Many of its aspects have been tested in various experiments at very high precision. Although none of these experimental tests has shown a significant deviation from the corresponding Standard Model prediction, the theory can not be complete yet: Cosmological aspects like gravity, dark matter and dark energy are not described, and open questions remain in the sector of neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations. Also no answer has been given to the question of matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the contemporary universe. Assuming that the Big Bang created equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there must be effects where nature treats matter and antimatter somehow different. This can happen through a mechanism called CP violation, which has been observed within the Standard Model, but not in the necessary order of magnitude. For all these reasons, the search for New Physics - theories beyond the Standard Model - is one of the main objectives of modern particle physics. In this global effort, flavour physics is the field of transitions between the different types of quarks, called quark flavours, wherein the examination of B meson oscillations and the search for CP violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays set the stage for the work presented in this thesis.

Schmidt, Andreas; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens  

SciTech Connect

The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully functionally characterized. On the basis of prior work, we predicted that cTHAP4 is composed of a heme-binding nitrobindin domain, making THAP4 the only human THAP protein predicted to bind a cofactor. Nitrobindin, a recently characterized protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, is structurally similar and exhibits nitric oxide (NO)-binding properties that resemble the heme-binding nitrophorins. Nitrophorins use a heme moiety to store, transport, and release NO in a pH-specific manner. Although the exact function of nitrobindin is not fully known, the similarities between the well-characterized nitrophorins imply a role in NO transport, sensing, or metabolism. To better elucidate the possible function of THAP4, we solved the hemebound structure of cTHAP4 to a resolution of 1.79 {angstrom}.

Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

Voudrias, Evangelos, E-mail: voudrias@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece); Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay mode H-> WW-> lnulnu  

SciTech Connect

The question of the nature and principles of the universe and our place in it is the driving force of science since Mesopotamian astronomers glanced for the first time at the starry sky and Greek atomism has been formulated. During the last hundred years modern science was able to extend its knowledge tremendously, answering many questions, opening entirely new fields but as well raising many new questions. Particularly Astronomy, Astroparticle Physics and Particle Physics lead the race to answer these fundamental and ancient questions experimentally. Today it is known that matter consists of fermions, the quarks and leptons. Four fundamental forces are acting between these particles, the electromagnetic, the strong, the weak and the gravitational force. These forces are mediated by particles called bosons. Our confirmed knowledge of particle physics is based on these particles and the theory describing their dynamics, the Standard Model of Particles. Many experimental measurements show an excellent agreement between observation and theory but the origin of the particle masses and therefore the electroweak symmetry breaking remains unexplained. The mechanism proposed to solve this issue involves the introduction of a complex doublet of scalar fields which generates the masses of elementary particles via their mutual interactions. This Higgs mechanism also gives rise to a single neutral scalar boson with an unpredicted mass, the Higgs boson. During the last twenty years several experiments have searched for the Higgs boson but so far it escaped direct observation. Nevertheless these studies allow to further constrain its mass range. The last experimental limits on the Higgs mass have been set in 2001 at the LEP collider, an electron positron machine close to Geneva, Switzerland. The lower limit set on the Higgs boson mass is m{sub H} > 114.4 GeV/c{sup 2} and remained for many years the last experimental constraint on the Standard Model Higgs Boson due to the shutdown of the LEP collider and the experimental challenges at hadron machines as the Tevatron. This thesis was performed using data from the D0 detector located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. Final states containing two electrons or a muon and a tau in combination with missing transverse energy were studied to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson, utilizing up to 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. In 2008 the CDF and D0 experiments in a combined effort were able to reach for the first time at a hadron collider the sensitivity to further constrain the possible Standard Model Higgs boson mass range. The research conducted for this thesis played a pivotal role in this effort. Improved methods for lepton identification, background separation, assessment of systematic uncertainties and new decay channels have been studied, developed and utilized. Along with similar efforts at the CDF experiment these improvements led finally the important result of excluding the presence of a Standard Model Higgs boson in a mass range of m{sub H} = 160-170 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% Confidence Level. Many of the challenges and methods found in the present analysis will probably in a similar way be ingredients of a Higgs boson evidence or discovery in the near future, either at the Tevatron or more likely at the soon starting Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Continuing to pursue the Higgs boson we are looking forward to many exciting results at the Tevatron and soon at the LHC. In Chapter 2 an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics and the Higgs mechanism is given, followed by a brief outline of existing theoretical and experimental constraints on the Higgs boson mass before summarizing the Higgs boson production modes. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the experimental setup. This is followed by a description of the reconstruction of the objects produced in proton-antiproton collisions in Chapter 4 and the necessary calorimeter calibrations in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 follows with an explanation of the phenomenology of the proton-antiproton colli

Penning, B.; /Freiburg U.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z