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1

Innovators Way The Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000­ , 2,000­ . 72 Yissum ­ the Technology Transfer Company of the Hebrew University is solely and international companies. The innovations have brought benefit to man and to his general quality of life are to be found in the forefront of international research. , . 1964 15­ , "" . 7

Daniel, Rosenfeld

2

'irnnun ntrtn:r:nHn The Hebrew University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include: methodology, derivation, exploitation, and philosophical implications of multiscale interactions: * Achi Brandt, Weizmann Institute, Israel * Raanan Michael, Administrator * Sorin Solomon, Hebrew

3

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2014 Royal your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

Einat, Aharonov

4

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Annual Conference 2015 Holiday Inn your work during the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center Yearly Conference, which will be held

Simon, Emmanuel

5

Hindi phoneme-viseme recognition from continuous speech  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system performs well under restricted conditions but the performance degrades under noisy environment. Audio-visual features play an important role in ASR systems in the presence of noise. In this paper, Hindi phoneme recognition system is designed using audio-visual features. The Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) features of the lip region integrated with Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficient (MFCC) audio features are used to get better recognition performance under noisy environments. Colour intensity, hybrid method and Pseudo-Hue methods have been used for lip-localisation approach with Linear Discriminant Analyser (LDA) as a classifier. Recognition performance using Pseudo-Hue method proved best among all the methods.

A.N. Mishra; Mahesh Chandra; Astik Biswas; S.N. Sharan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

TTYYPPEE IINN HHEEBBRREEWW OONN WWIINNDDOOWWSS Installing the Hebrew Keyboard Layout in Windows XP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rather than Times New Roman for Hebrew; you can download some Hebrew fonts at: http://bet.iba.org.il/ Click on "Bet Live" at top left to stream live radio and pre-recorded television news from Israel

7

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment, Herzl Street, POB 12, Rehovot, Israel 7610001 Studies of the Hebrew University's Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment

Anat, Maril,

8

Barrington Atlas of the Greek and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World Edited by Richard J. A. Talbert Since the 1870s, all of the Barrington Atlas in 2000.With ninety- nine full-color maps spread over 175 pages, and weighing nearly ten pounds, the Atlas re-created the world of the Greeks and Romans from the British Isles to the Indian

Landweber, Laura

9

De l'anaphore la corrlation, en passant par la subordination en hindi moderne Annie Montaut, INALCO (SeDyL, UMR8202)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corrélatives hindi, puis, à partir de l'émergence du système concurrent des complétives, emprunté au persan, la

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Follow-up study of indoor radon in Greek buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Greece 3 Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Agia...the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC...exposure to radon in the home and workplace. It...m3 increase in the average radon concentration...the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC...increase in energy consumption from wood products......

A. Clouvas; S. Xanthos; M. Kolovou; C. Potiriadis; G. Takoudis; J. Guilhot

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano scale, e.g., molecular and atomic scales

Einat, Aharonov

12

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hebrew University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology UHUJ Nano-Art Annual Conference of works of art based on nanotechnology. Prizes will be awarded to top three selected works. Nano-Art features nanolandscapes, natural or manmade structures of matter at the nano (sub- micro) scale, e

Simon, Emmanuel

13

FORM AND MONEY IN WAGNER'S RING AND GREEK The evidence for the influence of Greek tragedy on Wagner includes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FORM AND MONEY IN WAGNER'S RING AND GREEK TRAGEDY The evidence for the influence of Greek tragedy.' The desirability and cursed power of the ring expresses the ambivalence of money. None of this is new.3 My own. It is the potential omnipotence of money, and its consequent near- universal desirability, that unifies the disparate

Oxford, University of

14

Onomatopoeia and Phono-Iconicity in Hebrew in the framework of LUIT : Language a Unified and Integrative Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onomatopoeia and Phono-Iconicity in Hebrew in the framework of LUIT : Language ­ a Unified). As for Phono-Iconicity, henceforth PI (the term `sound-symbolism', often used in this context, implies the opposite of what it says: we are not dealing with arbitrary symbols, but with motivated icons

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of the electromagnetic radiation that is scattered and emitted from the clouds, precipitation and the underlying surface with the cloud and precipitation particles strongly depends on their composition and size distribution

Daniel, Rosenfeld

16

The evolution of the Greek theater into the Roman theater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Boethius, Axel. 1970. Etruscan and Roman Architecture. Baltimore: Penguin Books. Canac, F. 1949. "On the Acoustics of Grecian and Roman Theaters: Investigations of the Theaters at Orange and Vaison and Practical Conclusions. " R. I. B. A. Journal. Cheney..., Sheldon. 1918. The Open-Air Theatre. New York: Mitchell Kennerley. Lawrence, A. W. 1973, GreekArchitecture. Baltimore: Penguin Books. Martin, Roland. 1980. GreekArchitecture. New York: Flecta S. p. A. Morgan, Morris Hicky. 1960. Vitruviust The Ten Books...

Zak, Marc Ryan

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

18

Skin doses to patients undergoing coronary angiography in a Greek hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......undergoing coronary angiography in a Greek hospital Miltiadis G. Delichas 1 Kyriakos Psarrakos...Medical Physics Department, Papageorgiou Hospital, N. Efkarpia, Thessaloniki 56403...skin during 93 CA procedures in a Greek hospital. The dose-area product (DAP) for......

Miltiadis G. Delichas; Kyriakos Psarrakos; Georgios Giannoglou; Elisabeth Molyvda-Athanasopoulou; Konstantinos Hatziioannou; Emmanouil Papanastassiou

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Brief History of Algebra The Greeks: Euclid, Pythagora, Archimedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Brief History of Algebra · The Greeks: Euclid, Pythagora, Archimedes · Indian and arab- matics (nowadays the only approach used). Parallel postulate: Given a line and a point P of type: xn + yn = zn, Last Fermat's Theorem x2 - Ny2 = ±1, Pell's equation 4 #12;Indian and Arab

Fioresi, Rita

20

Tourism Development in Greek Insular and Coastal Areas: Sociocultural Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tourism Development in Greek Insular and Coastal Areas: Sociocultural Changes and Crucial Policy tourism and tourism development at local, regional and national level. The analysis focuses on the role communities regarding tourism and tourists. There is consideration of the new productive structures

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monumentality and its shadows : a quest for modern Greek architectural discourse in nineteenth-century Athens (1834-1862)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation traces the sources of modern Greek architectural discourse in the first period of the modern Greek State following Independence and under the monarchy of Bavarian King Othon I (1834-1862). Its intent is ...

Fatsea, Irene D

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient greek myths Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amber Robinson on Sun, Feb 6, 2011 at 6:47 AM Summary: the Greeks borrowed imagery from Egypt and the ancient Near East, and developed a vast repertoire of richly... , and...

23

Bylaws of the Multicultural Greek Council of the University of North Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organization dues in the amount of seven dollars ($7) per member and ten dollars ($10) per new member. Section Section 1. Each member organization must operate in accordance with the Constitution, Bylaws and Policies of the Multicultural Greek Council (MGC). Section 2. Participation in the MGC and its member organizations shall

Mohanty, Saraju P.

24

Essential L A T E X ++ Jon Warbrick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 2 How Does L A T E X Work? : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 13 AMS Greek and Hebrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 14 AMS delimiters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 15 AMS arrows

Mignotte, Max

25

Essential LATEX ++ Jon Warbrick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 How Does LATEX Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 13 AMS Greek and Hebrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 14 AMS delimiters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 15 AMS arrows

Lakoba, Taras I.

26

Quality management in the logistics function: a study of the Greek industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an exploratory survey investigating the status of quality management practices in the logistics function in the Greek industry. This is the first paper to provide information regarding quality management performance in the growing and challenging area of logistics in the Greek industry. The survey instrument contains information about the forces that encourage or discourage managers to implement quality initiatives in the logistics function, the quality methods and techniques that are currently in use, their overall satisfaction with the current level of quality management in logistics and their perceptions regarding the critical success factors for effective quality management in logistics. The findings of this survey are compared with related findings from similar surveys in other countries in order to generalise upon the results and draw meaningful conclusions. The logistics quality performance status generated by this exploratory study could be used by logistics managers as a benchmark tool or roadmap for future quality improvements.

Katerina Gotzamani; Fotis Vouzas; Pantelis Longinidis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of the long-term environmental performance of Greek lignite-fired power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract At national, regional and global level, there is no doubt that the electric generation from fossil fuel-fired power plants is one of the greatest causes of air pollution and climate change. However, fossil fuels contribute more than 70% in the planet electricity generation during the last 30 years. In Greece, lignite is the only proved significant indigenous fossil fuel source, currently representing about 50% of the national electricity generation (a situation which is not expected to change dramatically in the near future). As a result, owed to the use of local lignite reserves (poor quality lignite), the Greek Lignite Thermal Power Stations (LTPSs) are responsible for the production of significant airborne emissions and particle releases (e.g. CO2, SO2, NOX, PM). At the same time, Greece, on top of the Kyoto Protocol, has accepted specific obligations and incorporated into its national legislation several air quality Directives concerning the reduction of various harmful gases and particle releases attributed to fossil fuel combustion. Thus, wide scrutiny of concentration time series of all these airborne emissions constitutes an important indicator of the current technology used, considering at the same time that any violation noted should be the object of serious national concern. Under this argument, the current work presents and evaluates the long-term environmental performance of the Greek lignite-based electricity generation system as far as CO2, NOX, SO2 and PM are concerned up to the year 2011. According to the results obtained, one may rank the operating \\{LTPSs\\} according to their environmental performance giving to the Greek society the necessary tools to determine their utilisation factor on top of the techno-economic criteria used up to now.

J.K. Kaldellis; M. Kapsali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A resource that may guide and support your efforts as a chapter advisor. Greek Life in the Division of Student Affairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A resource that may guide and support your efforts as a chapter advisor. Greek Life in the Division of Student Affairs John W. Elrod Commons Advisor manual W&L Greek Life #12;Advisor Expectations 1. Serves as an advisor to the chapter officers regarding: a. University policy concerning fraternities/sororities b

Marsh, David

29

"The Greek community will strive for excellence in scholarship, service, leadership, involvement, diversity, building community, and brotherhood/sisterhood."  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, involvement, diversity, building community, and brotherhood/sisterhood." Being sustainable or "going green professionals to develop customized green workplans. 2) Sustainable Practices - · Work as a collective 1255 students) are leading the sustainability effort on campus with their Green Greeks vision and plan

Linhardt, Robert J.

30

An in service training course, (INSET) on ICT pedagogy in classroom instruction for the Greek primary school teachers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To meet the increasing demand for change in the incorporation of ICT in education the Greek Ministry of Education and the Institute of Educational Policy of Greece, launched a nationwide project of in-service training (INSET) of teachers of the second ... Keywords: Communities of practice, Distributed community, ICT pedagogy, INSET, Primary education, Training

Nikolaos Amanatidis

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A comparative analysis of Greek universities' presence on the World Wide Web using an analytical MCDM methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greek universities are currently in a transition state, as a new bill has been voted by the parliament trying to focus on lasting problems tormenting Greek higher level education; the implementation of the new law creating a strong reaction from part of the academic community. What is more, globalisation has increased competition and academia is now called upon to operate in an international environment facing other well established and prestigious institutions. It is in this context that Web 2 technologies widely available today offer a framework that allow academic institutions to increase their extraversion and reach a wider public; wikis, forums and e-learning platforms to name a few of these technologies. This paper attempts to offer a convincing answer to the ability of the Greek universities, operating in an unfavourable environment with many obstacles, to exploit what Web 2 has to offer; to also assess their readiness to integrate the new technologies and face the competition directly. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used for a comparative analysis of the online presence of Greek universities, and the results can prove to be a helpful tool for website creators and academia administration in order to improve their services.

Vassilis Kostoglou; Jason Papathanasiou; Odysseas Moschidis; Paraskevi Ladopoulou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Zeno, Achilles and the turtle Not very far from Crotona (now in Italy, but back then it was a Greek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeno, Achilles and the turtle Not very far from Crotona (now in Italy, but back then it was a Greek of "infinite divisibility" of time and space. The paradox most often quoted concerns Achilles and a turtle: Achilles, the swiftest runner in Greece, can never catch a turtle that has been given a head start. For

De Carli, Laura

33

Pigment identification in a Greek icon by optical microscopy and infrared microspectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optical microscopy, cross-section and fragment Micro-FTIR spectroscopic techniques along with microchemical tests were used for the identification of pigments in two different samples of an icon. Representing the Last Judgement, and painted by the Greek master Ioannis from the village of Kapesovo in the year 1771, the kneeling desk icon under investigation is a noteworthy contribution to the study of materials in post-Byzantine visual arts. The main components found in the ground layer of both samples were gypsum, beeswax and a proteinaceous material. Cinnabar, Prussian blue and cerussite were identified on the paint layers. The binding medium on the paint layers was weddelite. The materials used in the painting and ground layers were characterized in order to clarify the painting technique. Proteinaceous materials have been identified as binders for the pigments, indicating a tempera painting technique.

Dimitra Kovala-Demertzi; Leuteris Papathanasis; Rocco Mazzeo; Mavroudis A. Demertzis; Evagelia A. Varella; Silvia Prati

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Material Aspects of Icons. A Review on Physicochemical Studies of Greek Icons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tradition of icon painting is alive in the orthodox world up to the present day, since icons are not just objects of art expression but are chiefly sacred objects involved in worship. ... Characterization of binding media in the icons of post-Byzantine period would also enable researchers to investigate the validity of common assumptions about the influences of the Venetian style on Greek icon painting techniques from the 16th to the early 19th century, which up to now have been based mostly on information in artists handbooks. ... In addition to the overlay of soot, several superposed overpaintings as a result of interventions retouching the surface of icons have been undertaken in the past not by conservators but by iconographers, not with the intention of conservation of the artistic value of the icon but for the restoration of its iconographic and aesthetic integrity in order to continue to serve its function as liturgical object. ...

Sophia Sotiropoulou; Sister Daniilia

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

This article was downloaded by:[Hebrew University] [Hebrew University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or distribution in any form to anyone correctly predicted subtle effects in the dynamics of the solar system, in the celebrated Hulse ­ Taylor

McGaugh, Stacy

36

Dosimetry quality audit of high energy photon beams in greek radiotherapy centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background and purpose Dosimetry quality audits and intercomparisons in radiotherapy centers is a useful tool in order to enhance the confidence for an accurate therapy and to explore and dissolve discrepancies in dose delivery. This is the first national comprehensive study that has been carried out in Greece. During 2002 2006 the Greek Atomic Energy Commission performed a dosimetry quality audit of high energy external photon beams in all (23) Greek radiotherapy centers, where 31 linacs and 13 Co-60 teletherapy units were assessed in terms of their mechanical performance characteristics and relative and absolute dosimetry. Materials and Methods The quality audit in dosimetry of external photon beams took place by means of on-site visits, where certain parameters of the photon beams were measured, calculated and assessed according to a specific protocol and the IAEA TRS 398 dosimetry code of practice. In each radiotherapy unit (Linac or Co-60), certain functional parameters were measured and the results were compared to tolerance values and limits. Doses in water under reference and non reference conditions were measured and compared to the stated values. Also, the treatment planning systems (TPS) were evaluated with respect to irradiation time calculations. Results The results of the mechanical tests, dosimetry measurements and TPS evaluation have been presented in this work and discussed in detail. This study showed that Co-60 units had worse performance mechanical characteristics than linacs. 28% of all irradiation units (23% of linacs and 42% of Co-60 units) exceeded the acceptance limit at least in one mechanical parameter. Dosimetry accuracy was much worse in Co60 units than in linacs. 61% of the Co60 units exhibited deviations outside 3% and 31% outside 5%. The relevant percentages for the linacs were 24% and 7% respectively. The results were grouped for each hospital and the sources of errors (functional and human) have been investigated and discussed in details. Conclusion This quality audit proved to be a useful tool for the improvement of quality in radiotherapy. It succeeded to disseminate the IAEA TRS-398 protocol in nearly all radiotherapy centers achieving homogenization and consistency of dosimetry within the country. Also, it detected discrepancies in dosimetry and provided guidance and recommendations to eliminate sources of errors. Finally, it proved that quality assurance programs, periodic quality control tests, maintenance and service play an important role for achieving accuracy and safe operation in radiotherapy.

Constantine J. Hourdakis; A. Boziari

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery 3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

38

Propensity to export and effects on cluster development: a comparative study of the Cyprus and Greek solar thermal clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Access to sophisticated demand is critical for cluster upgrading in developing countries. Despite this, the role of exports in cluster development has not been adequately researched. This study tries to answer two questions; what are the factors that increase the propensity of a cluster to successfully engage in exports and how exports affect cluster upgrading. In order to isolate the effect of exports, two clusters are studied, the Cyprus and the Greek solar thermal clusters. Despite the fact that these two clusters emerged in similar environments, today they present some distinct differences which could be explained by the different levels of success in exporting. Our findings suggest that the export vision shared among cluster participants, and the collaboration to achieve the vision are of critical importance in penetrating sophisticated export markets. This study highlights the positive influence of exports on cluster development and provides managers and policy makers with an indication of which factors contribute to successful exporting.

Andreas Petrou; Christos Maxoulis; Harris Haralambous

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

40

Wide scale penetration of renewable electricity in the Greek energy system in view of the European decarbonization targets for 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The key policy analyzed in this paper, is the achievement of a significant decarbonization of the Greek Energy System by the year 2050 through the decarbonization of the two sectors presently responsible for the highest levels of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) emissions, namely power and transport. The objective is to reduce GHG emissions by 2050, through the maximization of renewable energy sources (RES) penetration in electricity, with a simultaneous intensive electrification of the transport sector and the electrical interconnection of non-connected islands. An important parameter considered in the present work is that expansion planning of power systems under environmental constraints leads to a rather complex techno-economic analysis involving large scale penetration of Renewable Energy Sources. The penetration level of variable renewable electricity is subject to a number of restrictions implied by the need for (a) storage capacity to decrease the energy curtailment which can occur when the customer load is low and RES electricity generation is high (b) fast reserve capacity to deal with variations of variable RES or combined heat and power (CHP) electricity generation (c) transmission system expansion related to the penetration of areas with high RES potential. New methodologies are developed and a number of novel scenarios are formulated in conformity with the European energy strategy towards 2050.

K. Tigas; G. Giannakidis; J. Mantzaris; D. Lalas; N. Sakellaridis; C. Nakos; Y. Vougiouklakis; M. Theofilidi; E. Pyrgioti; A.T. Alexandridis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Seismic Hazard and Public Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Seismic Safety Organization (ISSO) has been formed to promote public safety by being prepared for the largest potential events which can happen at any time, rather than for certain probable events which have been exceeded in several recent earthquakes with disastrous consequences. The position of ISSO is available now in English, Italian, Russian, Hebrew, Spanish, and Hindi at http://www.issoquake.org. That position has been misrepresented elsewhere and this short note is to counter such inaccurate viewpoints.

Mualchin, Lalliana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Statistical Approach Towards The Recognition of Hindi Language Words  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in several other countries like Nepal, Mauritius, Singapore, Fiji, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad, UAE, etc. can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Speeding up the Raster Scanning Methods used in theX-Ray Fluorescence Imaging of the Ancient Greek Text of Archimedes  

SciTech Connect

Progress has been made at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) toward deciphering the remaining 10-20% of ancient Greek text contained in the Archimedes palimpsest. The text is known to contain valuable works by the mathematician, including the ''Method of Mechanical Theorems, the Equilibrium of Planes, On Floating Bodies'', and several diagrams as well. The only surviving copy of the text was recycled into a prayer book in the Middle Ages. The ink used to write on the goat skin parchment is partly composed of iron, which is visible by x-ray radiation. To image the palimpsest pages, the parchment is framed and placed in a stage that moves according to the raster method. When an x-ray beam strikes the parchment, the iron in the ink is detected by a germanium detector. The resulting signal is converted to a gray-scale image on the imaging program, Rasplot. It is extremely important that each line of data is perfectly aligned with the line that came before it because the image is scanned in two directions. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the best parameters for producing well-aligned images and to reduce the scanning time. Imaging half a page of parchment during previous beam time for this project was achieved in thirty hours. Equations were produced to evaluate count time, shutter time, and the number of pixels in this experiment. On Beamline 6-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), actual scanning time was reduced by one fourth. The remaining pages were successfully imaged and sent to ancient Greek experts for translation.

Turner, Manisha; /Norfolk State U.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), Professor of Greek and a Naval Architect: A New Light on the 16th-century Manuscript Misure di vascelli etc. diproto dellArsenale di Venetia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century in Venetian naval architecture. Early in the 16th century, the maritime power of Venice was seriously threatened by the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman II in the East and by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in the West. In order to regain its naval... power in the Mediterranean, the Republic of Venice strongly encouraged Venetian shipwrights to submit new designs for war galleys. The undisputed founder and champion of this naval program was not a skilled shipwright but a young professor of Greek...

Campana, Lilia 1975-

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cop$c Language Guy Halawi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are they? · Copts are an Egyp$an Chris$an group · Largest Chris$an group' is adapta$on of the Greek word "" (Egyp$an) #12;Copts - Popula$on · Total popula of the Egyp$an Arabic · Cop$c word in other languages: Hebrew) - crocodile

Dershowitz, Nachum

46

English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

makes the important point that the Indian vernaculars werea turning point in Dayals narrationthat it took Indiansother south Indianlanguage publishers. The point was not to

Sadana, Rashmi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

English to Hindi Translation Protocols for an Enterprise Crowd Srinivasan Iyengar, Shirish Karande, Sachin Lodha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not satisfactory. However, statistics point towards a promise of crowd sourcing for Indian Languages: (Ross et. al several candidates. Introduction Current quality of machine translation for Indian languages, Indian IT enterprises employ large number of educated computer savvy Indians (see Table 1) and are well

Shenoy, Prashant

48

English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 He will also have Amartya Sens The Argumentative In- dianface of modern India, Amartya Sen is working on something.also English, as secular Sen, Amartya, 3 Seth, Vikram, 63,

Sadana, Rashmi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Perspectives on quantity-sensitivity and decomposed scalar constraints: A view from Hindi stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 6.2 WSP VS . P K P ROM . . . . . . . . . .P K P ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .that the constraint, P K P ROM , often the driving force in

Buchanan, Kendra Nicole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The All-Greek Circle of Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and use them to our advantage. The mainstream ideas will not always work and must be infused with outside

Escher, Christine

51

Greek-English Dictionary of Mathematical Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. abrupt change: ap tomh metabol . abrupt distribution: ap tomh katanom . abscess: ap sthma. abscissa. absolute change: ap luth metabol . absolute constant: ap luth stajer . absolute continuity: ap luth sun. absolute temperature: ap luth jermokras a. absolute tensor: ap lutoc tanust c. absolute units: ap lutec mon

Georgiou, Georgios

52

Terra Terror: An Interdisciplinary Study of Earthquakes in Ancient Near Eastern Texts and the Hebrew Bible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brushwood roof, coated in plaster began to collapse into the14 tons of mortar and plaster, 14 tons for the ceiling andimpermeable rock needed no plaster while those with cracked

Roberts, Ryan Nathaniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM: FOR THE WORLD THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 2005/2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COSTA RICA KAZAKHSTAN CAMEROON SURINAME ECUADOR CYPRUS BURKINA FASO #12;A NOBEL FOR JERUSALEM PROFESSOR

Anat, Maril,

54

Approximate Revenue Maximization with Multiple Items SERGIU HART, Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Noam Nisan, School of Computer Science and Engi- neering, and Center for the Study of Rationality and Subject Descriptors: J.4. [Computer Applications]: Economics General Terms: Economics, Theory Additional.1846. The work of Sergiu Hart is partially supported by a European Research Council Advanced Investigator grant

Fiat, Amos

55

Greek Monday Note September 26, 2011 Week 1 | Fall 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: October 4, 2011 Time: 11 am Where: West Willamette Seminar Room in Valley Library Student Affairs Speed. When: October 7, 2011 Time: 1 ­ 2:30 pm Where: East & West Willamette Seminar Room in Valley Library into the workforce. When: October 12, 2011 Time: 3 ­ 4 pm Where: West Willamette Seminar Room in Valley Library CSSA

Escher, Christine

56

Greek Monday Note February 21, 2011 Week 8 | Winter 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learn about ancient landscapes and cultures that highlight the complexity of issues such as ecotourism

Escher, Christine

57

Follow-up study of indoor radon in Greek buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......brick). The main heating sources are oil products, natural gas and electricity. However, due to the economical situation...number 9 in Figure-1) which includes Athens, the capital of Greece. Attica is the most populated region of Greece......

A. Clouvas; S. Xanthos; M. Kolovou; C. Potiriadis; G. Takoudis; J. Guilhot

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A MATHEMATICA NOTEBOOK ABOUT ANCIENT GREEK MUSIC AND MATHEMATICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' music could bewitch animals and trees, and even rescue Eurydice from Hades. The lyre was Apollos' emblem

Spagnolo, Filippo

59

ORPHEUS: A Virtual Learning Environment of Ancient Greek Music  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

return. The guard dog Cerberus fell asleep listening to his music, while Hades was moved by it and let

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

60

Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Overview Tsvi Piran Racah Institute for Physics Abstract. Magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Strong thirty years, after the discovery of Gamma-Ray bursts (GRBs) we have now a reasonable GRB model

Jensen, Grant J.

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61

Subscriber access provided by HEBREW UNIV The Journal of Physical Chemistry B is published by the American Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Andelman, Daniel Harries, and Rudi Podgornik J. Phys. Chem. B, 2009, 113 (17), 6001-6011· DOI: 10.1021/jp, Tel AViV UniVersity, Ramat AViV, Tel AViV 69978, Israel Daniel Harries Institute of Chemistry of Theoretical Physics, J. Stefan Institute, and Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Uni

Harries, Daniel

62

Proton Pathways in Green Fluorescence Protein Department of Physical Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R) and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), which convert light or chemical (2H21 O2/2H2O) energy, respectively pumps. This provides a superb example for the microscopic construction of proton pathways within; Lossau et al., 1996). This is evident from the two absorption peaks, at 395 nm for the neutral form (ROH

Agmon, Noam

63

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading , The Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading Amir Sagy1 , The Institute;Abstract The dynamics of rapid fracture in heterogeneous grainy media are studied in a series of laboratory experiments in which artificial rock slab is fractured under conditions of uniaxial tension. By performing

Fineberg, Jay

64

Pluralizing Nationalism: Narrative, Politics and the Figure of the Revolutionary in the Hindi Novel from the 1930s to the 1950s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

London: Curzon Press. Camus, Albert. [1946] 1993. Thethe French writer Albert Camus near contemporaneous 1942of the progressive, dreamily Camus, Albert. The Stranger,

Govind, Nikhil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

66

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

67

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

68

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

69

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

70

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

71

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

72

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

73

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

74

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

75

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

76

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

77

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

78

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

79

Onomatopoeia and Phono-Iconicity in Hebrew "The domain of onomatopoeia is much vaster than it seems to have been believed'  

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of listening; and second, certain natural noises have more common features with one speech sound than with some unique: yet both display OP, proving that it is a deep, far-reaching and lively device of linguistic

80

Hydrogen transport in nickel ,,111... Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen transport in nickel ,,111... Roi Baer Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Received 13 November 1996; revised manuscript received 21 January 1997 The intricate dynamics of hydrogen of subsurface with surface hydrogen on the nickel host. The analysis is based on the embedded diatomics

Zeiri, Yehuda

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

[Aristotle attributed this teaching to Thales of Miletus, the first known Greek philosopher, scientist, and mathematician.  

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on ordering these publications appears on page 2. Bureau of Reclamation National Park Service U.S. Army Corps-term field research sites in New Hampshire, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Nebraska since the late 1970s of Engineers USDA Forest Service U.S. Geological Survey #12;A G I E n v i r o n m e n t a l A w a r e n e

Hardy, Darel

82

Greek Foreign Policy in the Shadow of the Debt Crisis: Continuity and New Directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the same time in Cyprus, the so-called Lot 12 named ... estimated to hold seven trillion cubic feet of natural gas, worth as much as 70 billion euros...2011). Subsequent estimates brought the size of the fin...

Aristotle Tziampiris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

July 28, 1990, Galveston Bay, Texas--The Greek Tank Vessel, Shinoussa, collided  

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was extensive. Oil impacted shorelines, birds, emergent marsh, and aquatic resources. The removal finned fish was banned from Galveston Bay and a ban on shellfish and shrimp removal remained in effect for more than, and additional marsh terraces were built on 121 acres of shallow, open-water bottom. A 57-acre site

84

Competition and price asymmetries in the Greek oil sector: an empirical analysis on gasoline market  

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This article attempts to investigate the issue of asymmetries in the transmission of shocks to input prices and exchange rate onto the wholesale and retail price of gasoline respectively. For this purpose, we ...

Michael L. Polemis

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analyses of Greek Research Reactor with mixed HEU-LEU Be reflected core  

SciTech Connect

The fuel-cycle analyses presented in this paper provide specific steps to be taken in the transition from a 36-element water-reflected HEU core to a 33-element LEU equilibrium core with a Be reflector on two faces. The first step will be to install the Be reflector and remove the highest burnup HEU fuel. The smaller Be-reflected core will be refueled with LEU fuel. All analyses were performed using a planar 5-group REBUS3 model benchmarked to VIM Monte Carlo. In addition to fuel cycle results, the control rod worth, reactivity response to increased fuel and water temperature and decreased water density were compared for the transition core and the reference HEU core.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, K. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Greek energy and protein feeding standards for growing and fattening cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adapted by the two Schools of Agriculture at the Universities of Thessaloniki and Athens, as well it was not easily understandable by the farmers. In the same way, he avoided the use of the unit of fat deposition from the calculated net energy (NE) requirement for maintenance and growth and the partial efficiency

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Hull Remains from the Pabu Burnu Shipwreck and Early Transition in Archaic Greek Shipbuilding  

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................................................ 19 II THE HULL REMAINS...................................................................... 21 Fragment Catalogue ....................................................................... 23 UM1..................................................................................... 29 Workings............................................................................ 31 UM2............................................................................................... 39 General Description...

Polzer, Mark Edward

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Screening for preadolescent and adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis of the spine in a Greek ROM population  

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Previous school screenings in Greece showed a prevalence of Id. Scoliosis similar to other countries in Europe, America and Asia averaging 1, 5-3% for curves ?10. A complete absence of ROM children with scoliosi...

Panagiotis Smyrnis; A Alexopoylos; Nick Sekouris; E Katsourakis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Elements of Greek tragedy in three Eugene O'Neill plays  

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Z f@5e P~~ ~3. etre eg ~ Ibex@ ea ~ ~ ~~eo ~ ~ ~"~ ~!'~ ~y~ mern]g C~~ime~ M, g ~r'S'e (CXyh~ehm); Grin~ k:Xg ~ (Qv~)~ ~ ~M~~ Ma ~~ (M&8C~)~ ~~ CX5%~$ QE C4G @CK9Bo 4am, ea G~kle~ 6eecWbea X4 9, e ~ (~em M Ve play& 3, $ Q~ O~~y Q4QC@6 90 GQ3. 4y...JKB~ 2. gag) y pg "g 0 ~ ~~ ~ CeeE~ ~ Sam eZ m ~~~ ~ey ~ gQVQ, Co XQ QQ~ ~~ ~@~ G~~~ o . LQQ QX) ~~GAS &t@VQ Q MVQ~~ 49 8~~ Q~~v e became eZ tkeM tcmV. y ~~~~a~ Re ee . k~. 9&Ne~ ~~?m3. y ~ ~Key f. ". 13. ~ @~mix ~ep' 40 MA@P MLV8 ~ C ~&6 ~ %4~4Ck...

Koinm, Albert Julius

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Assessing performance in Greek bauxite mining by means of frontier estimation methodologies  

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......analyses of the 1978 Chinese economic reforms. Socioecon. Plann...Productivity change in U.S. coal mining. RFF Discussion Paper...ECONOMY, GENERAL DIRECTORATE FOR ECONOMIC POLICY, DIRECTORATE FOR MACROECONOMIC...Productivity trends in the coal mining industry in Canada......

I. E. Tsolas

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regionalism and Greek architecture : the architecture of Dimitris and Suzana Antonakakis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regionalism grew out of the discourse that identified locally developed cultural entities and their referrent expressions as an object of inquiry whose aim was a more effective way of addressing the issues of development ...

Metallinou, Vasilia Angelos

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Birth of the Mob: Representations of Crowds in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature  

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social significance. Hadess slave explains to Xanthias thatwhich are the majority in Hades (or, who are a ??????,hearing the ruckus inside Hadess palace, Xanthias had asked

Schwab, Justin Jon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Encyclopdia Universalis, 2006 Version prliminaire Origine des langues et du langage  

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sanscrit et l'hindi, les langues iraniennes (persan, kurde, ossète, etc.), les langues romanes (le latin et

Boyer, Edmond

96

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody fragments specific Sample Search...  

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of single chain antibody fragments ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody fragments stabs Sample Search...  

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of single chain antibody fragments ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-interferon antibody fragment Sample...  

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of single chain antibody fragments ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody affinity Sample Search Results  

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chemist 53 drug discovery ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

100

REPORT OF THE PANAMA WTE CONFERENCE Panama City , 11th June 2011 co-organized by the Greek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

worldwide like in New York, Miami, Shanghai, etc. #12;2 Concerning SYNERGIA: The Waste to Energy Research, a successful Waste To Energy Conference was held in Panama City (Republic of Panama) with wide participation entitled "Waste to Energy Solution for Municipal Solid Waste worldwide and potential for Waste to Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

thePowerof SUNY Specializing in the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Arabic-speaking and ancient Greek  

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-speaking world, and Egyp- tian dialect, the prevalent form of Arabic in daily use in Egypt, but also a dialect

Suzuki, Masatsugu

102

Evaluation of an on-line ash analysis system for low-grade and inhomogeneous Greek lignite  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using commercial on-line analysis systems for monitoring the ash content of low-grade lignites was investigated by carrying out numerous bench- and pilot-scale trials in the mines of Public Power Corporation SA, Greece. Pilot-scale trials were based on a dual-energy {gamma}-ray transmission analyzer, which was installed on the conveyor belt that transports lignite from the pit to the bunker of Kardia mine, Ptolemais. According to the obtained results, the accuracy of the on-line measurements was not adequate and did not allow lignite quality monitoring in real time. The deterioration of the on-line measurements' accuracy, compared to previous applications in other mining sites, was related to the intense variation of the lignite ash content and ash composition, which distorted the calibration of the analyzer. The latter is based on certain assumptions regarding the average atomic number of the organic and mineral matter contained in the lignite. Further experimental work is needed to investigate solutions for successful implementation of this method to low-grade lignites that exhibit large variation in ash content and composition. 17 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Konstantinos V. Kavouridis; Francis F. Pavloudakis [Public Power Corporation SA, Athens (Greece). General Division of Mines

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

1. Design Review: Proposed construction or improvements on any properties within the Greek Housing Area shall receive prior approval  

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. Material should be selected for ease of long-term maintenance. 15. Landscape: Each lot should be fully storage use shall be constructed on the lot without prior approval of the Architectural Design Review Disposal: Trash, garbage or other waste shall not be kept except in sanitary containers. 13. Exterior

Almor, Amit

104

Calculation and modelling to the brown coal drying fluidized bed specialized for Greek lignite of west Macedonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brown coal is considered to be a competitive primary energy source for power generation in parts of Central and Eastern Europe due to the economically recoverable reserves of this fuel in these regions. Specifically for Greece lignites is the main fuel ... Keywords: brown coal, electric energy, energy source, fluidized bed, lignites

John Karmalis; Nikolaos Asimopoulos; Dimitrios Zissopoulos; Natsos Kouvatsis

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of an On-Line Ash Analysis System for Low-Grade and Inhomogeneous Greek Lignite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of using commercial on-line analysis systems for monitoring the ash content of low-grade lignites was investigated by carrying out numerous bench- and pilot-scale trials in the mines of Public Power Corporation SA, Greece. ... The remaining lignite reserves that are suitable for electricity generation are 3.2 billion tonnes (as of 12/31/2005). ...

Konstantinos V. Kavouridis; Francis F. Pavloudakis

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha -hydroxyisobutyrate ree Sample Search...  

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Pi Greek Woman of the Year Ann... Marie Frappier - Rho Gamma Greek Man of the Year Jordan Fischette - Alpha Tau Omega Greek Professor... of the Year Carl Braunlich Philanthropy...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha cap alpha Sample Search Results  

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Pi Greek Woman of the Year Ann... Marie Frappier - Rho Gamma Greek Man of the Year Jordan Fischette - Alpha Tau Omega Greek Professor... of the Year Carl Braunlich Philanthropy...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha muzka ostajotsja Sample Search Results  

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Pi Greek Woman of the Year Ann... Marie Frappier - Rho Gamma Greek Man of the Year Jordan Fischette - Alpha Tau Omega Greek Professor... of the Year Carl Braunlich Philanthropy...

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - access ad hoc Sample Search Results  

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ad hoc Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: access ad hoc Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Bengali, Hindi and Telugu to English Ad-hoc...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - antistasin-like serine protease Sample...  

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Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 24 METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Analysis of binding properties and specificity Summary:...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody fab fragment Sample Search Results  

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Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 2 GENOVIS AB, Box 790, SE-220 07 LUND, SWEDEN Phone +46 46...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - assays specifically detecting Sample Search...  

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Northern blot procedures The Quant-iT ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

113

Research Highlight  

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Effects of Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Khain, A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Area of Research:...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticuerpos igg igm Sample Search Results  

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antibody fragment recognizing IgG of ... Source: Lebendiker, Mario - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Collection: Biotechnology ;...

115

A Semantic Account of Quasi-Lexemes in Modern English - Processing Semiotic Units of Greek or Latin Origin into Lexical Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing quasi-lexemes with theories of compounding enables me to analyze their specificity and limitations. Quasi-lexemes have a semantic content like complete lexemes do, but are constrained by their morphological ...

Souillé -Rigaut, Chris

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A History of Medicine. vol. 2, Early Greek, Hindu, and Persian Medicine. Henry E. Sigerist. Oxford University Press, New York, 1961. 352 pp. Illus. $11  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...New York, 1961. 50 pp. Demineralization by Electrodialysis. J. R. Wilson, Ed. Butterworths, Washington...1961. 992 pp. Illus. $22.50. Industrial Water Treatment Practice. P. Hamer, J. Jackson and E. F. Thurston...

Everett Mendelsohn

1961-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

What is a ship? The Policy of the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage: the effect of the Greek Supreme Court judgment in the Slops case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The international compensation regime for oil pollution damage established by the CLC 1992 and the 1992 Fund Convention covers damages caused by discharge of oil from a ship. The definition of a ship under the...

Zuzanna Peplowska

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

From Abyssomicin to Zaragozic Acid: Chemical Synthesis and Drug  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the centuries many nations and nationalities--from the Greeks, Romans, Persians, Egyp- tians, Italians

Snyder, Scott A.

119

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2008 16:00 -16:30 Opening Ceremony Hall A, Herods Forum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON CORALS REEFS: BLEACHING AND SKELETON LOSS 19:15 M. Horowitz, Hebrew:30 Parallel Session A-3: microRNA - from plants to humans in development, health and disease Hall D, Dan. Mandelboim, Hebrew University - Hadassah Medical School VIRAL AND HUMAN microRNAs USE SHARED TARGET SEQUENCES

Shamir, Ron

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha gamma sur Sample Search Results  

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Johnson Alpha Delta Pi Summary: Marie Frappier - Rho Gamma Greek Man of the Year Jordan Fischette - Alpha Tau Omega Greek Professor... : Sigma Gamma Rho 3.13 PHC: Alpha Xi...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The automaton theater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hero of Alexandria was a Greek geometrician, engineer, and inventor who lived in Alexandria probably during the first century A.D. He wrote in Greek a number of theoretical treatises revealing a thorough knowledge of ...

Xagoraris, Zafirios

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Poetics of the Ordinary: The American Places of Charles W. Moore [Research and Debate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

camp of Greek islands or Mexico that Moore distinguished from a spe- ci?cally American twentieth-century

Sabatino, Michelangelo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

IntroduCtIon: QuantIfyIng soCIal develoPment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

civilization are most often traced back to the ancient Greeks and romans, although other advocates identify pre

Landweber, Laura

124

press.princeton.edu Ancient World  

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.princeton.edu 1 New Rethinking the Other in Antiquity Erich S. Gruen "Did ancient Greeks regard Persians and egyp

Landweber, Laura

125

COSC 490 Network Security Annie Lu 1 Authentication Applications  

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Security Annie Lu 5 KERBEROS In Greek mythology, a many headed dog, the guardian of the entrance of Hades

Lu, Enyue "Annie"

126

2007 Raj JainCSE571SWashington University in St. Louis Kerberos V4Kerberos V4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerberus), known in Greek mythology as being the monstrous three-headed guard dog of Hades ! Designed

Jain, Raj

127

BIOLOGY OF UNDERWATER CAVES by Tom IlifJe, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the subterranean River Styx which from Greek mythology circles through Hades or the underworld. Thus, stygobites

Iliffe, Thomas M.

128

2009 Raj JainCSE571SWashington University in St. Louis Kerberos V4Kerberos V4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerberus), known in Greek mythology as being the monstrous three-headed guard dog of Hades ! Designed

Jain, Raj

129

doi:10.1016/S0092-8240(03)00007-7 Bulletin of Mathematical Biology (2003) 65, 375396  

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Gan, 52900, Israel E-mail: ylouzoun@princeton.edu SORIN SOLOMON Racah Institute for Physics, Hebrew methodology based on a combination between Monte-Carlo simulation and ele- ments from partial differential

130

Jules Verne on the Web Jules Verne in Israel  

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Jules Verne on the Web Jules Verne in Israel Dr. Zvi Har'El Department of Mathematics The Technion: Hebrew translations Centennial activities Jules Verne on the Web: The first year E-Texts, Potpourri

Har?El, Zvi

131

Annual Report From the President 5  

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HebrewUniversityisa pluralistic institution,wherescienceandknowledgearedeveloped for the benefit of humankind, in an atmosphere are at a turning point, poised at the juncture between the end of a very difficult decade for higher education

Anat, Maril,

132

2007 Connecticut Separation Science Council Csaba Horvth Medal to be Presented to Professor Eli Grushka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Professor Eli Grushka ot the Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel will be the recipient of the 2007 Connecticut Separation Science Councils Seventh Csaba...

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sol-gel process set for commercialization  

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Sol-gel process set for commercialization ... Research on embedding chemical compounds in porous glass, carried out in Israel at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has reached the point of commercialization. ...

JAMES KRIEGER

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Structure and Interactions of the Proline-rich Domain Received for publication,October 22, 2007, and in revised form, April 30, 2008 Published, JBC Papers in Press,April 30, 2008, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M708717200  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expression and Purification Facilities, The Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, The Hebrew for Biomolecular Research, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands ASPP2 is a pro

Lebendiker, Mario

135

BCH222 -Greek Key Barrels C.I. Branden and J. Tooze (1999) Introduction to Protein Structure, Second Edition, pp. 77-78 & 335-336 (look at the color  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the back of the beta barrel. Residues 110-136 (View3) are a long alpha helix (how many turns.kin contains one domain from the -amylase enzyme of PDB file 1E43. Remind yourself of the basic geometrical

Richardson, David

136

Plaster Casts at Berkeley. Collections of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology & Department of Classics at UC Berkeley. An Exhibition of Rare Plaster Casts of Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. 2nd edition 2005, pp. vi + 76 + ii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Britain: An Oxford Story of Plaster Casts from the Antique (sculptor Lysistratos took plaster impressions not only fromPlaster Casts at Berkeley COLLECTIONS OF THE HEARST MUSEUM

Miller, Stephen G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

History of Hydropower | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

History of Hydropower History of Hydropower Humans have been harnessing water to perform work for thousands of years. The Greeks used water wheels for grinding wheat into flour...

138

Kansas City Kansas Community College Transfer Program to University of Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College Algebra 3 MATH 104 Precalculus Math 5 MATH 108 Pre-Calculus Mathematics 5 MATH 115 Calculus 3 MATH Archaeology 3 CLSX 148 Greek and Roman

139

HRskins LAbortItories Sbltus Report on Speh Rnerrrc:h 1992, SR-109/110, 129-140  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Thus, in Old Persian, there is a sign for t?e syllable cia, and in Greek alphabetic writing, a SIgn

140

The cigarette transit road to the Islamic Republic of Iran and Iraq: Illicit tobacco trade in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. 303610452-524. Parker J. Iraq depending more on importedtrough the Silopi Pass into Iraq probably transport over aother goods imported into Iraq. . . . Cigarettes from Greek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

1987 GEM UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO  

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. And whether they attended a GDI Week tug-of-war or a Greek exchange, there was always SOMETHING TO WRITE HOME

O'Laughlin, Jay

142

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

world economy experienced shocks that included turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa, a Greek debt crisis with financial impacts spreading to other Eurozone countries, and...

143

98 Int. J. Electronic Democracy, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2008 Copyright 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

made by a Greek political party to this direction, for the design and development of a unified. A unified framework for political parties to support e-democracy practices: the case of a Greek party C@csd.auth.gr #12;A unified framework for political parties to support e-democracy practices 99 Abstract: E

Bouras, Christos

144

After twenty-six years at the Institute for Advanced Study, Glen Bowersock, a preeminent authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particularly on the history of Roman Greece and Asia Minor, and of pre-Islamic Arabia. More than a dozen books on Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern history, retired in July as a Professor in the School of Historical on Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern history and culture, as well as the classical tradition in modern

145

College of Arts and Sciences CLA Classics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ancient Romans and modern film-makers. CLA 131 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FROM GREEK AND LATIN. (3) LatinandGreekroots,prefixes,andsuffixesasfoundinmedicalterminology.Primarilyforpre-medical,pre-dental,pre-nursingandpre- veterinarystudents,butotherswillbeadmittedforhelpinvocabularybuilding. CLA 135 GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY. (3) The TO THE DEATH OF CONSTANTINE. (3) CoverstheconquestsofAlexandertheGreat,andthemainfeaturesoftheHellenisticWorld,theRomanRepublicandtheRoman

MacAdam, Keith

146

ANCIENT HISTORY & CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 2008-2010 DEGREE PLAN (expires 08/2016)  

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hours Selected from Architecture, Classics, Fine Arts, Philosophy, or list of approved alternatives C IN RESIDENCE) 6 hours pre-Modern history chosen from topics in AHC 310 and 330: _________ _________ 9 hours-division Greek and/or Latin: _________ _________ 9 hours of upper-division Greek and/or Roman history, chosen

Texas at Austin, University of

147

DSpace@Cambridge: implementing long-term digital preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Rosetta Stone, a granite stone slab containing the same Ptolemaic 3http://www.rfc-editor.org/ Figure 1: The Rosetta Stone decree in greek, Egyptian demotic script and Egyp- tian hieroglyphics. Although the greek translation of the text expresses concepts...

De Mulder, Tom

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Lucretian swerve: The biological basis of human behavior and the criminal justice system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...swerves could have been the Greek gods, of whom there was no shortage...Greek literature, where the gods had a daily impact on the lives...stochastic property of atomic particles. The second point is that some...offer the viewpoint that God does not play dice). Finally...

Anthony R. Cashmore

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Byzantine Icons The Art and Science of Depiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Byzantine Icons · 4.209 The Art and Science of Depiction · Fredo Durand, Julie Dorsey · Spring 2001 · Konstantinos Tsakonas, tsakonas@mit.edu #12;Definitions Icon(): a Greek word that means image; an artistic a spiritual representation of a sacred person or event Iconography(): a Greek word that means to write an icon

Durand, Frédo

150

Michalis Faloutsos Curriculum Vitae University of California,Riverside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.cs.ucr.edu/michalis Personal Information Nationality : Greek, Canadian Languages : English and Greek (fluent), French (good in the Department of Electrical and Computer En- gineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece; GPA : 9;discusses the findings of our paper. The Wired magazine is a popular computer magazine with a broad audience

Faloutsos, Michalis

151

University of Idaho Moscow, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to gain the GDI berth in the championship game, w hile A TO defeated SAE to represent the Greeks. FINAL STANDINGS BYGROUPS: GDI J. Lindle)l 2. TMA-J 3. Gault 4. Upham S. McConnell Greek J. Alpha Tau Omega 2

O'Laughlin, Jay

152

Adsorption of H2O, CO2 and Xe on Soft Surfaces Ori Stein and Micha Asscher*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry and the Farkas Center for Light-Induced Processes, The Hebrew UniVersity of Jerusalem, Israel studies from multilayer coverage grating of Xe on ODT-SAM have demonstrated that sublimation of the chemistry of these small molecules with biologically relevant surfaces such as membranes. In addition

Asscher, Micha

153

Pegasos: Primal Estimated sub-GrAdient SOlver for SVM Shai Shalev-Shwartz SHAIS@CS.HUJI.AC.IL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@GOOGLE.COM Google inc., Mountain View, USA and The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel Nathan Srebro NATI@UCHICAGO.EDU Toyota Technological Institute, Chicago, USA Abstract We describe and analyze a simple and effec- tive be adapted to em- ploy non-linear kernels while working solely on the primal objective function. We

Srebro, Nathan

154

J. Phys. I France 5 (1995) 1087-1107 AUGUST 1995, PAGE 1087 Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diversity Moshe Levy, Haim Levy(*) and Sorin Solomon llacah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University an alternative methodology for economic study trie microscopic simulation (MS) approach. We employ the MS methodology to study a basic model of the stock market formulated at trie microscopic level trie level

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

155

Driven, autoresonant three-oscillator interactions O. Yaakobi,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800, Israel 2 Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel of a double phase-locked autoresonant state in the system, as the driving oscillation passes linear resonance-oscillator excitations are independent of the sign of the driving frequency chirp rate. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.76

Friedland, Lazar

156

Control of Kirchhoff vortices by a resonant strain L. Friedland*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the frequency of oscillations of the strain rate. In real applica- tions, this result must pass stability testControl of Kirchhoff vortices by a resonant strain L. Friedland* Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew, but oscillating strain rate with chirped oscillation frequency, allows adiabatic control of the axis ratio a

Friedland, Lazar

157

Spatial control of a classical electron state in a Rydberg atom by adiabatic synchronization E. Grosfeld and L. Friedland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Grosfeld and L. Friedland Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 field amplitude to exceed a threshold. The threshold scales as A3/4 , where A is the sweep rate , measuring the probability of ionization of beams of highly excited hydrogen atoms passing through a micro

Friedland, Lazar

158

Stage-Specific Regulation of Solanum lycopersicum Leaf Maturation by Class 1 KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Israel c Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem...genotypes. False discovery rate was used to identify differentially...nm for excitation, a long-pass 560-nm filter for chlorophyll...543 nm for excitation, band-pass 560- to 615-nm filter for...

Eilon Shani; Yogev Burko; Lilach Ben-Yaakov; Yael Berger; Ziva Amsellem; Alexander Goldshmidt; Eran Sharon; Naomi Ori

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

Synthesis with Clairvoyance Orna Kupferman1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis with Clairvoyance Orna Kupferman1 , Dorsa Sadigh2 , and Sanjit A. Seshia2 1 Hebrew to all environments. Algorithms for solving the synthesis problem reduce it to the solution of a game to be realizable. In this paper, we consider the role of clairvoyance in synthesis, in which the system can "look

Seshia, Sanjit A.

160

Ronald H. W. Hoppe Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ronald H. W. Hoppe Department of Mathematics University of Houston Conferences, Workshops, Seminars and Optimization, Universit¨at Hei- delberg, Heidelberg, Germany July 21-25, 2008 · Department of Mathematics- plications, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, January 12-17, 2008 · Department of Mathematics, University

Glowinski, Roland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Implementing a Caching Service for Distributed CORBA Objects ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 , Roy Friedman 2 , and Roman Vitenberg 2 1 The Hebrew University, Institute of Computer Science architecture is highly configurable with regard to a broad spectrum of application parameters. The main consistency, security, and persistence requirements, our architecture is highly configurable with regard

Friedman, Roy

162

An Overview of Recent Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hopkins U Los Alamos NL Lawrence Livermore NL Lodestar MIT Nova Photonics, Inc. New York U Old Dominion U U Hiroshima U Hyogo U Kyoto U Kyushu U Kyushu Tokai U NIFS Niigata U U Tokyo JAEA Hebrew U Ioffe, Garching ASCR, Czech Rep U Quebec Supported by #12;Bell / NIFS seminar / 080916 2 "Spherical Torus" Extends

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

163

On the Structure of Armstrong Relations for Functional Dependencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Structure of Armstrong Relations for Functional Dependencies CATRIEL BEERI The Hebrew Abstract. An Armstrong relation for a set of functionaldependencies (FDs) is a relation that satisfies each) of Armstrong relatsons are investigated. Upper and lower bounds on the size of minimal-sized Armstrong

Fagin, Ron

164

Light-Weight Leases for Storage-Centric Coordination Gregory Chockler , Dahlia Malkhi y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@cs.huji.ac.il. #12; 1 Introduction Motivation. In recent years, advances in hardware technology have made possible Force Aerospace Research-OSR contract #F49620-00-1-0097, and MURI AFOSR contract #SA2796PO 1-0000243658. 2 School of Computer Science and Engineering, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Email: dalia

Chockler, Gregory "Grisha"

165

The Chemistry of Trimethylamine on Ru(001) and O/Ru(001) B. F. Hallac and M. Asscher*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Physical Chemistry and the Farkas Center for Light Induced Processes, The Hebrew UniVersity of Jerusalem of trimethylamine (TMA) has been studied over clean and oxygen-covered Ru(001) under UHV conditions, as a model dissociates upon surface heating, with hydrogen as the only evolving molecule following temperature

Asscher, Micha

166

A Key Role for Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element Binding Protein in Hypoxia-Mediated Activation of the Angiogenesis Factor CCN1 (CYR61) in Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Metastasis, and the Cellular Microenvironment A Key Role for Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element...Belgian Friends of the Hebrew University (A. Honigman). The costs of publication of...solely to indicate this fact. Hypoxia is a prominent feature of solid tumors known to...

Ronit Meyuhas; Eli Pikarsky; Einat Tavor; Avihu Klar; Rinat Abramovitch; Jacob Hochman; Tal Goshen Lago; and Alik Honigman

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Student Guide 2013 2 About This Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Hebrew language ones, are accredited by the Israeli Council of Higher Education, and are open about their arrival on campus and getting settled at the Technion. The information is presented their period at the Technion an enjoyable one. The Technion ­ Israel Institute of Technology, which has

Adler, Joan

168

Richard Bland College Transfer Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-HE Health & Physical Education-HPE Health Sciences-HLSC Hebrew-HEBR Higher Education-HIED History-HIST Histotechnology-HTEC Honors-HNRS Human Services-HMSV Humanities-HUM Information Technology-IT Instructional Design (http://uc.odu.edu/advising/cs/2010_2011.shtml) for more specific degree requirements and applicability

169

Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. Ab Initio Classical Trajectory Calculations of the Substitution-Electron Transfer Branching Ratio in CH2O-+ CH3Cl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the SN2-SN1 spectrum and the -elimination E2-E1 spectrum,3-5 with their borderline regions, which possess of Computational Chemistry, Hebrew UniVersity, Jerusalem 91904, Israel ReceiVed: July 16, 2004 The reaction of a formaldehyde radical anion with methyl chloride is an example of a reaction in which a single transition state

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

170

Cerebral perfusion and oxygenation are impaired by folate deficiency in rat: absolute measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cerebral perfusion and oxygenation are impaired by folate deficiency in rat: absolute measurements University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; 3 Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel

Fantini, Sergio

171

Chemistry  

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Chemistry A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew...

172

The origin of the structural depression above Gulf coast salt domes with particular reference to Clay Creek dome, Washington County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oT ~ttee THd ORIGTN OF Tiki STRUCTURAL S&iR "'SION ABOV' ULF COAST SALT KRISS UITH PARTI'ULAR ~~JCS TO ' LAY CRgdK DGIQ JA' HI:. ' TON COK;TY~ TWAS Alfred Norman licDowsll A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... Application of kodel Theory to uepression problem 13 Salt mis 'cele Models 14 Hodel Fault Patterns . 16 Aegio. ial Setting of Slay Greek oalt Dome. . . ~ Structural Interpretation of Faulting on Glar Greek Tertiary Growth History of 'la; Greek Some...

McDowell, Alfred Norman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of his remarks he referred to the animated discussion which took place recently in the newspapers as to whether Greek should be a compulsory subject in university examinations -which is ... the subjects of other communications.

1905-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

User:Calpak | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 Calpak A.E. is the first Greek company since 1976 that deals in solar water heaters and solar panels. Calpak had an unrivalled commercial success in the late 70s, at a time when...

175

Economies of Archaic Sicily: The Archeological Evidence from the Northeastern Euboian Settlements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greek remains all along San Mauro hill. 540 As at Naxos, ana Naxos, Monte San Mauro e Camarina, CronCatania 16 (1977)1952: la necropolis della Valle S. Mauro; le fortificazioni

Rygorsky, Joel Morris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Feedbacks, Timescales, and Seeing Red  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to automatically maintain the distance between the bed and runner stones, have been employed in wind- and water mills since the seventeenth century (e.g., Maxwell 1867), and float valves were used by the Greeks

Roe, Gerard

177

Political Risk and Stock Market Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article examines empirically the relationship between political instability and stock market development in a small capital market (the Greek capital market). We measure socio-political instability by con...

Costas Siriopoulos; Dimitrios Asteriou

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Scepticism and the Study of History  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the two centuries prior to the publication of David Humes History of England, the attitude of the sceptical thinkers regarding the study of history had changed greatly. The ancient Greek sceptics and the ...

Richard H. Popkin

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

"The Vapheio Gems: A Reconsideration of the Find-Spots"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In answer to a controversy about the actual number of sealstones found in the Vapheio Tholos, this short article examines the original excavation report (in Greek) and concludes that 28 (or 29) seals came from the cist (LH ...

Younger, John G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Adaptive reuse and revitalization of water heritage in Nicosia, Cyprus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bi-communal sewerage system developed for the divided capital of Nicosia, Cyprus has been lauded as a rare example of cooperation between the Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities. The story of how the project ...

Lau, Marisa (Marisa May-Lan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

UGA Majors Checklist The University of Georgia has over 140 majors! To review your interest in these majors, begin by completing the checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied Biotechnology * Engineering, Biological Health Promotion Arabic * Engineering, Biochemical History Engineering, Computer Systems Housing * Art/Art History * Engineering, Electrical and Electronics Human Animal Science * Economics Greek * Anthropology * Engineering, Agricultural Health & Physical Education

Arnold, Jonathan

182

Updated August 2012 Allen County Community College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 MAT 105 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 MATH 104 PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS 3 MAT 120 PRE-CALCULUS 3 MATH LITERATURE 3 CLSX 148 GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY 3 CO

183

greece and italy An Artistic and Literary Odyssey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: the Bronze Age Aegean kingdoms, Archaic and Classical Greece, pre-Roman Etruria, the early Roman Empire Italian; others, drawing. In the winter ("Renaissance") we focus on the Roman appropriation of Greek art

184

Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin Explore it!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and go upstairs to the first floor. 7. PLASTER CASTINGS OF THE WINCKELMANN INSTITUTE Some plaster plaster casting collection of original ancient Greek and Roman sculptures. After the extensions had been

Freytag, Johann-Christoph

185

Museum of Art and Archaeology 7pm, Room 106, Pickard Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orpheus ["Orfeu negro"] (1959) Directed by Marcel Camus Starring Breno Mello and Marpessa Dawn Winner of the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film, Camus' film brings the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus

Taylor, Jerry

186

What will count as mathematics in 2100? Keith Devlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the enormous power that the calculus gave to humankind. Here the old Greek tradition of formal proof came back into ascendancy, as a large part of present- day pure mathematics was developed. By the end of the 19th century

Devlin, Keith

187

Sex dierences in the emotional brain Tor D. WagerCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williams & Wilkins. INTRODUCTION Since the times of the Greek philosophers, and probably before, humankind evolved to process emotional stimuli. How- ever, measurements of brain function measure the end products

Ochsner, Kevin

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - ad libitum lunch Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

167 Marshall Street 472-4876 GreekAmerican Lunch... Dinner Alto Cinco 526 Westcott Street 422-6399 MexicanVegan LunchDinner appeThaizing 727 S. Crouse Avenue......

189

The 2005 Chios Ancient Shipwreck Survey: New Methods for Underwater Archaeology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005 a Greek and American interdisciplinary team investigated two shipwrecks off the coast of Chios dating to the 4th-century b.c. and the 2nd/1st century. The project pioneered archaeological methods of precision ...

Foley, Brendan

190

Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...orientation of the ancient Greeks that the gods will inevitably punish those who transgress...conservation and contamination: invisible particles as a plausible mechanism. Dev. Psychol...preschool child's conception of invisible particles in the context of dissolving. Dev. Psychol...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Osmogenetics: Aristotle to Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explain life better than theology (referring to god, from the ancient Greek theos god; logos talk). Among these, Talete (624-547...potential of a substance, including pressure, particle charge, gravity, and other physical factors...

Albino Maggio; Jian-Kang Zhu; Paul M. Hasegawa; Ray A. Bressan

192

The Importance of Geological Features in Designing Open-Pit Lignite Exploitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greece covers today 50 per cent of its electric power generation by burning low grade lignite extracted from open pits. Greece or more correctly the Greek Public ... year 1990. To achieve it, new open pits will b...

J. Tanakakis

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Icon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Originally, the Greek word eikon...stood for an image, carrying some meaning as in typical portraits of sacred persons within the Orthodox Church. An operational definition of icon was given by Peirce [1] as anyt...

Stefano Levialdi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Biowarfare as a biopolitical icon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heraclitus, the ancient Greek philosopher, wrote The bow (bis) is called life (bos), but its work is death... (Fr. 49 a). I have discussed some icons of the endless game between life and... ...

Emilio Mordini

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Die Tagebcher Giorgos Sepheris: Ein Beitrag Zur Europischen diaristik  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diaries 19251960 of the Greek poet George Sepheris present an interesting study object as to the modalities of subjectivity and their expression in an autobiographical context. The limits of intimity, the...

Ioanna Mylonaki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Individual monitoring for internal exposure in Europe and the integration of dosimetric data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Ministry of Health Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRA...Yes, 2001 CSN (Nuclear Safety Council...by the Spanish Regulatory Body: Guia de...Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear: Requisitos tecnico...Greek Atomic Energy Commision HU Yes Ministry......

M. A. Lopez Ponte; C. M. Castellani; L. Currivan; R. Falk; P. Olko; C. Wernli

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A well in search of an owner : using novel assertions to assess Miriam's disproportionate elaboration among women in the Midrashim of late antiquity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. King. 1997. Pp. 179-209. Bovon, Franois. Mary Magdalenethese scholars, Franois Bovon, points out that all of theforms of the [Greek] name (Bovon 77-78). In his analysis of

Sherman, Miriam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Flowers to head new European Science Foundation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Reverdin, a Greek scholar and Chairman of the Swiss Fond National and Dr P. Riis, a Danish physician. Secretary-General of the ESF will be Dr F. Schrieider, ...

Brian Flowers

1974-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

202 Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 1982, 27, 202-205 the film thickness were compared with experimental data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greek Letters = viscosity v = kinematic viscosity 6 = dimensionlessaxial coordinate p = density and Spray Systems",Tokyo, 1978; p 145. Mlyasaka. Y. Trans. Soc. Mech. Eng. Jpn. 1974, 40, 797, 806. Nikolaev

Torquato, Salvatore

200

Single-Molecule Enzymology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of the atom, the fundamental particle of chemistry, was understood by some of the 4th century BC Greeks, who philosophized that all matter is reducible to indivisible particles. Experiments done 20...

N. J. Dovichi; R. Polakowski; A. Skelley; D. B. Craig

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Garrett Fugate Oral History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oral history interview with Garrett Fugate conducted by Jeremy Adkison in 2010. In this interview, University of Kansas student Garrett Fugate discusses his childhood experiences as a member of the Greek Orthodox community, and his eventual decision...

Fugate, Garrett; Adkison, Jeremy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Of Wonder and Waking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the goddess be seen. Persephone was the wife of Hades.Hades, in Greek, has a multiple signification: therelation to Persephone, Hades/death is not just her lover,

Axel, Brian Keith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Observations on the growth of Tetrahymena pyriformis strain W in a medium-intensity, static magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

struggled to describe, understand, and apply the seemingly "magical" powers of the magnet. In the fifth century A. D. , the Greek physician, Aetius, attributed to it the medicinal power to cure gout and epilepsy (Mottelay, p. 26, 1922), while according... struggled to describe, understand, and apply the seemingly "magical" powers of the magnet. In the fifth century A. D. , the Greek physician, Aetius, attributed to it the medicinal power to cure gout and epilepsy (Mottelay, p. 26, 1922), while according...

Laird, Robert Joel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tribological characterization of coatings and nanofluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: osteoarthritis, gout, Fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, etc and can lead to loss 14 of joint function 59 . Arthritis comes from Greek words ?arthro? meaning ?joint? and ?itis? meaning ?inflammation? therefore arthritis means ?inflammation...: osteoarthritis, gout, Fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, etc and can lead to loss 14 of joint function 59 . Arthritis comes from Greek words ?arthro? meaning ?joint? and ?itis? meaning ?inflammation? therefore arthritis means ?inflammation...

Baxi, Juhi Bhaskar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Women @ Energy: Julia Laskin | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Julia Laskin Julia Laskin Women @ Energy: Julia Laskin April 1, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis Dr. Julia Laskin's career has taken her from Leningrad, USSR, to Washington State via Israel. She earned her master's degree from Leningrad Polytechnical Institute, her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and worked at the University of Delaware on the East Coast until coming to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington State. Dr. Julia Laskin's career has taken her from Leningrad, USSR, to Washington State via Israel. She earned her master's degree from Leningrad Polytechnical Institute, her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and worked at the University of Delaware on the East Coast until coming to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington State.

206

Building a Bridge to Heart Transplantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He who saves one life, saves the world entire. Hebrew proverb, quoted in Thomas Keneally, Schindler's List End-stage heart failure, characterized by marked symptoms at rest or with minimal activity despite optimal therapy, is designated as stage D heart failure. Frequent, recurring... Dr. Dale G. Renlund explains the temporary use of mechanical circulatory support before transplantation. This technology increases our ability to help some patients.

Renlund D.G.

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Motorway Safety in Europe and Greece: A Comparative Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motorways offer a high level of road safety as compared to other road types. In most EU member states, motorways represent a percentage of all primary and secondary roads varying between 1% and 12% (EU15). In Greece this figure has been significantly lower until 2004 and since then it has been sharply increased. Road safety levels have been also improved as a consequence of that. The paper provides a comparative analysis of motorway safety among Greece and the EU and furthermore among Greek motorways. To achieve this, it makes use of certain safety indicators such as fatality and accident rates. In addition, for the Greek motorways, it makes use of additional data which are available from the motorway operators data bases including incidents and their causes. Association of accidents to drivers behavior is sought where possible. Finally, a more in depth investigation takes place concerning accidents in the Greek motorways, mainly in the ATTICA TOLLWAY and in EGNATIA ODOS.

Dimitrios Papaioannou; Alexandros Kokkalis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Teaching natural philosophy and mathematics at Oxford and Cambridge 1500-1570  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the subject; Pole was a noted theologian who used the Greek fathers; and Cecils personal library contained many Greek works. 21 Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Later Reformation in England 1547 - 1603 (London, 1990). p. 67. 22 It is clear that even Pole took... of natural philosophy. This is a trade off between instances where an individual bought the collected works without much interest in the section on natural philosophy, and those who were interested in the Physica and De anima to the exclusion of all...

Hannam, James

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zachariah, Michael R. (Michael R. Zachariah) - Departments of Chemistry & Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota Zakarian, Armen (Armen Zakarian) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Zare, Richard N. (Richard N. Zare) - Department of Chemistry, Stanford University Zargarian, Davit (Davit Zargarian) - Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal Zeiri, Yehuda (Yehuda Zeiri) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Zewail, Ahmed (Ahmed Zewail) - Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology Zhang, John Z.H. (John Z.H. Zhang) - Department of Chemistry, New York University Zhang, Qi (Qi Zhang) - Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York, Albany,

210

Memento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rifle at other living creatures. However, Miranda's awareness of birth, death, and life is illuminated after her brother has shot and cut open a pregnant rabbit. Miranda holds the not-yet-born babies in her hand; and as Porter writes, "Having seen...). In addition to these recent disruptions in her life, Norma Jean is troubled by the memory of her baby's death and by her mother' s insistence that Norma Jean and Leroy attempt to recapture their relationship by visiting the battle ground of Shiloh-a Hebrew...

Clements, Cheryl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Humanistic Psychology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE history of Western psychology from Greek times onwards can be regarded as a series of attempts to study the ... machinery of his bodily organs, who was responsible for his conduct and behaviour. The psychology of Hobbes brought forth the protests of Cudworth and the Platonists. Coleridge in "Bio ...

L. S. HEARNSHAW

1958-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Dialectic Architecture for Computational Autonomy Mark Witkowski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent and Interactive Systems Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial from the ancient Greek µ, meaning self-regulation by having self-laws. Formal models of Deontics to interact and cooperate with peers. Furthermore, an agent does not need to act as a servant, but might elect

Witkowski, Mark

213

Astronomy in Ancient Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE traditional view that the knowledge of astronomy of the Greece of classical times had been derived from Egypt, a view to ... 90, 410; Nov. 3, 1939), pointed out that while Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy are usually quoted as equivalent foundations of Greek, and, therefore, medieval and modern ...

1939-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

ABSENCE OF GEOMETRIC MODELS IN MEDIEVAL CHINESE ASTRONOMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSENCE OF GEOMETRIC MODELS IN MEDIEVAL CHINESE ASTRONOMY JAYANT SHAH Abstract. In 718 A.D., Ch) on astronomy was entirely based on the Indian astronomy of the 7th century which in turn was based on the geometric astronomy of the Greeks. A few years later, the emperor asked I-hsing (Yixing in pinyin

Shah, Jayant M.

215

Astronomy and Ethics Mark A. Bullock 2/22/05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy and Ethics Mark A. Bullock 2/22/05 Astronomy, from the Greek astron, star, plus nomos, and thus as a challenge to ethics, so subsequent developments in astronomy deprived humans of an order" (Critique of Practical Reason, 288); but the achievements of modern astronomy have left the moral law within

Bullock, Mark A.

216

THREE NOTIONS OF NUMBER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......To the mathematician versed in foundational studies, this project may in fact appear ill conceived or at least badly named...the Greek (form, shape, what is seen); having taken the liberty of introducing it we may also allow it to serve for both singular......

Charles F. Weiher

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Editor: BOB STIVERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a fool· ball game ... Fall has fell and Mr. LUdy H all rears his gruesome head in the form of physics books that might as well be written in Greek. Our freshmen become students as well as cogs m the wheel

O'Laughlin, Jay

218

Meteoritic Clues Point Chromium Toward Earth's Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Box 35052, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Chromium, named for the Greek...isotopic forms on Earth and in the solar system, researchers can gain...suggesting that the early solar nebula had at least two components...suggests that, in the early solar nebula (A), chromium isotopes...

William F. McDonough

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Book reviews  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...magnetic bars and compasses, eventually landing a lucrative deal with the Admiralty...Tackley, Oxon OX5 3AG, UK Halley's comet is known to almost everyone, but few...ranging from Greek mathematics to Caesar's landing in Britain, from geomagnetism to gunnery...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Constitution of Christian Communal Boundaries and Spheres in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Constitution of Christian Communal Boundaries and Spheres in Jordan Géraldine Chatelard districts (Ajlun, Salt, and Karak) east of the Jordan River in villages and towns. There were few Christians of the province of Syria, the Greek Orthodox church, to which all Christians East of the Jordan river were

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Throughout history fish have been the object of much fas-cination by people throughout the world, not least due to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreword Throughout history fish have been the object of much fas- cination by people throughout in Greece, which is a maritime country par excellence. The close relationship of the Greek people to fish of the science of ichthyology. Nowadays, the knowledge about fish has both universal and local or national

Pauly, Daniel

222

For more information or to speak with an Admissions Advisor, please contact us  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCOUNTING 1 BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT 1 ENERGY MANAGEMENT 1 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION 1 FINANCE 1 GREEK AND ROMAN STUDIES 1 HISTORY 1 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 1 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1 PSYCHOLOGY 2 RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1 RELIGIOUS STUDIES AND APPLIED ETHICS 1 RUSSIAN 1 SCIENCE

Habib, Ayman

223

Crete: Endowed by Nature, Privileged by Geography, Threatened by Tourism?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crete: Endowed by Nature, Privileged by Geography, Threatened by Tourism? Helen Briassoulis in the Mediterranean and the largest Greek island, is a highly heterogeneous region which has experiencedrapid tourism development since the mid- to late 1960s when the growth in international tourism and broader socioeco- nomic

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

224

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety and death resulting from each fire. #12;Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards) -- HVAC fan motor burned up -- Alpha Chi Omega -- 3/13/10 $1,500 (Greek) -- Futon mattress caught fire

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

225

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety and death resulting from each fire. #12;Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards) -- Grease Fire -- Beaty Towers -- 9/10/10 $100 (Greek) -- HVAC fan motor burned up -- Alpha Chi Omega -- 3

Slatton, Clint

226

Name: Intended quarter of entry: Academic Planning Worksheet for Philosophy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Name: Intended quarter of entry: Academic Planning Worksheet for Philosophy This worksheet-Year College Courses: Introductory courses in symbolic logic, social philosophy, major problems of philosophy, and history of philosophy. Courses to develop writing skills, as well as language courses, especially Greek

Queitsch, Christine

227

CURRICULUM VITAE SERGIOS THEODORIDIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRICULUM VITAE SERGIOS THEODORIDIS February 2014. #12;Sergios Theodoridis Curriculum Vitae 1;Sergios Theodoridis Curriculum Vitae 2 EU and partly by the Greek Government, for training in Information technologies in the curriculum, Dept. of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Athens, 2004

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

228

Parameter Estimation of Dynamic Air-conditioning Component Models Using Limited Sensor Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???? Percentage opening of the EEV ?? Compressor volume ?? Error function ?1, ?2, ?3 Valve parameters ?0 Initial compression of the valve spring ?? Displacement of expansion valve head Greek symbols ?0 , ?1 Intermediate valve parameters....4 Simulink Response Optimization Toolbox ............................. 35 xi CHAPTER Page...

Hariharan, Natarajkumar

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ancient Philosophy (80250) Instructor: Robert Cavalier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the student a thorough understanding of Ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the later selected parts of the course. Course Outline Part I The Pre-Socratics Historical Context The Ionian;Philosopher-King The Republic Part IV Aristotle Metaphysics Nicomachean Ethics Part V Hellenistic and Roman

Spirtes, Peter

230

Composition (6 hours) ENG 11011 College Writing I * 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Pre-calculus I * 3 12012 Calculus with Pre-calculus II * 3 14001 Basic Mathematical Concepts I 4 14002 in Arts & Sciences CLAS G 21404 The Greek Achievement * 3 G 21405 The Roman Achievement * 3 ENG 21054 for courses listed below. ANTH 18630 Human Evolution * 3 L 18631 Issues in Human Evolution * Pre

Khan, Javed I.

231

1 2 April 2002science scope M U L T I C U L T U R A L  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in our classrooms. An important part of our efforts has been directed at identifying elements of the pre. History tends to define primitive as those societies which were pre- numerate. However, many societies the Babylonians, Egyptians, Chinese, Greeks, Romans, and Mexicans developed their own measurement systems based

Talanquer, Vicente A.

232

No. of words 3296 No. of illustrations: 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The principles of crop rotation have been described in our prehistory by Greek and Roman agronomists (4). As long positive effects on the succeeding crop yield. However, the Romans did not understand the mechanisms behind of cropping systems, i.e. smaller fields and mixtures of crop species (intercropping) was much more common Pre

233

Kansas City Kansas Community College Transfer Program to University of Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Petroleum Engineering (Subplans of Environmental, Biomedical, Petroleum, Pre-Med) Number to call at KU College Algebra 3 MATH 104 Precalculus Math 5 MATH 108 Pre-Calculus Mathematics 5 MATH 115 Calculus 3 MATH Archaeology 3 CLSX 148 Greek and Roman Mythology 3 ENGL 135 World Mythology 3 REL 171 Religion in American

234

A.Pl1I? G'T.D UNIVERSITY AiiOlSlllAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements detailed below, the student must take one of the following courses which cover pre-1800 literature 1): 3 hours Ancient Greek & Roman Mythology Literary Criticism and Theory" The Bible As Literature or (3) __ REL 2414 or (3) __ REL 2424 2 English 3104 and 3804 are pre-requisites for this class. 3

Virginia Tech

235

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Applicants must submit a supplemental application for review by faculty. www.ccs.ucsb.edu PRE-PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION · Pre-Law Program: www.duels.ucsb.edu/law · Pre-Health Program: www and Literature, Greek and Roman Culture lu Communication, B.A. n Comparative Literature, B.A.: emphases

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

236

Enlargement and the EU Periphery: The Impact of Changing Market Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the positive impact on relative market access of Greek regions. We thank Carsten Sch¨urmann, Roman R the changes in relative market access are likely to affect peripheral regions of pre-enlargement member states"). However, this mechanism is not deterministic. For example, a sufficiently strong pre

Boyer, Edmond

237

Neosho County Community College TRANSFER PROGRAM TO THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the School of Pharmacy when they will have completed the 68 credit hours of required pre-pharmacy courses or third semester in the pre- pharmacy curriculum to review their academic record and prepare Intro to Archaeology 3 CLSX 148 Greek and Roman Mythology 3 ENGL 215 Intro to Mythology 3 ENGL 209 Intro

238

TETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, starting with the Greek and Roman cultures3'4.The cumulative deposition from anthropogenicsourcesin preTETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric lead contamination detected in Swedish lake sediments for pre-industrial atmospherictrace-metalcontaminationt''it is commonlyassumed that air pollution

Short, Daniel

239

Allen County Community College Transfer Program to University of Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Petroleum Engineering (Subplans of Environmental, Biomedical, Petroleum, Pre-Med) Number to call at KU MATHEMATICS 3 MAT 120 PRE-CALCULUS 3 MATH 115 CALCULUS I 3 MAT 123 CALCULUS W/ ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I 5 MATH 121 LITERATURE 3 COL 211 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE 3 CLSX 148 GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY 3 COL 250 INTRODUCTION

240

Questions of protohistoric territorial heritage through the settlement systems during the Iron Age: a case study of the eastern Languedoc (France)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, if the situation of the pre-Roman peoples described by the authors of the Greek or Latin language during and after reality or erase some aspects of pre- Roman territorial dynamics. For this reason, we must also apply sources (Christol and Goudineau 1987-1988), it was occupied by the pre-Roman people of Volques Arécomiques

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PressRelease|TheFitzwilliamMuseum 1 August 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the period as John Ruskin, William Morris, George Bernard Shaw and the Pre-Raphaelite circle. Cockerell to a Nightingale, works by the Pre-Raphaelite circle (including Dante Gabriel Rossetti's unfinished Joan of Arc objects are displayed alongside Ancient Roman and Greek antiquities, extracts from the Ancient Egyptian

Zeki, Semir

242

Archaeological Prospection Archaeol. Prospect. 9, 229242 (2002)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may pre-date the building of the aqueduct in the first century BC, when Butrint became a Roman colonyScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/arp.202 Structural Layout of the Suburbs of Roman Butrint, encompasses 3000 years of Mediterranean history from the Hellenistic Greeks to the Venetians. In Roman times

243

University Core Curriculum Courses, 2004-2005, Listed Alphabetically Core Area Course Name and Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3084 Greek Arts and Architecture (Pre: ART 2385) ( also in Area 6 ) 6 ART 3184 Roman Art and Architecture (3 cr.) (Pre: ART 2385) (in Area 2 also) 2 ART 3184 Roman Art and Architecture (Pre: ART 2385 System II (Pre: AAEC 1005) 3 AAEC 1014 Survey of American Economic History (cross-listed with HIST 1014

Buehrer, R. Michael

244

203Literature in Translation LITERATURE IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Classics 201) (3)-- Classical Mythology An introduction to the study of Greek and Roman mythology in Translation 218 (3)-- Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation A survey of Chinese literature from historical and cultural contexts from pre-modern to modern times

Dresden, Gregory

245

SICILY & THE AMALFI COAST FROM $3195 | OCTOBER 3 12, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seemingly untouched by time. Discover sun-bleached Greek temples, Roman ruins and ancient theaters amidst and drives is all provided. Detailed travel and destination information to assist in planning Pre-trip gift~TAORMINA MARE Educational focus: History of Sicilian Art and Architecture. Excursion: Taormina. Explore

246

Amalfi/Positano Monte CarloMarseille  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next program manager · Comprehensive pre-departure information · Air- and cruise-related government of Ephesus, a veritable museum of Greek and Roman history with impeccably preserved relics from its ancient--the largest island in the Mediterranean--abounds with natural and architectural beauty. AMALFI/POSITANO, ITALY

Spence, Harlan Ernest

247

Literature in transLation (Lit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mythology An introduction to the study of Greek and Roman mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources for each lecture is illustrated with slides of works of art and architecture from the period. Selections in translation 218 (3)-- Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in translation Asurvey of Chinese literature from

Dresden, Gregory

248

RESOLUTION OF THE FACULTY SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction has resulted in two Gold- certified buildings, 8 certified buildings, and the development of a 32-building LEED-EB portfolio for energy efficiency in renovations. · The Florida Institute for Sustainable of Greeks Going Green, and a student government elected on a sustainability platform; and WHEREAS, Florida

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

249

Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of domiciliation, number of vessels). In addition, a specific country effect is identified for Greek shipEA 4272 Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre Cariou* Francois-Charles Wolff,version1-17May2011 #12;Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre CARIOU Corresponding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

A Brief History of the Freedom of Expressions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for zero. · Decimal numerals. · Calculation easier. Brahmagupta #12;Solving quadratics (820) Muhammad ibnA Brief History of the Freedom of Expressions Matt Might http://matt.might.net/ #12;Sapir) #12;Limits on the Greeks · No notation for zero. · No variables for unknowns. · No symbols

Might, Matt

251

NEW ACQUISITIONS LIST FEBRUARY 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.K5 P47 2006 Pert, Alan Red cactus: the life of Anna Kingsford BF 1999 .C67413 1992 Coelho, Paulo Greeks DJK 76.4 .F47 1988 Fermor, Patrick Leigh Between the woods and the water: on foot to Constantinople from the Hook of Holland: the middle Danube to the Iron Gates DK 215 .B38 Bayley, C.C. (Charles

252

SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& FRATERNITY SORORITY LIFE COMMUNITY STANDARDS & GREEK JUDICIAL BOARD HANDBOOK 2013 OFFICE Judicial Board Handbook 2 I. COMMUNITY STANDARDS Fraternity & Sorority Life is one of the most rewarding Councils have standards of conduct for all chapters and their members. It is the responsibilty of every

Hone, James

253

Approved Undergraduate Minors* Offered by Department and Program within School or College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Program Minor Program Minor Program College of Humanities & Fine Arts Food Science Afro-American Studies Mathematics Classics Microbiology Classical Civilization Physics Greek Psychological and Brain Sciences Latin Psychology English Science History The Stockbridge School of Agriculture History of Art and Architecture

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

254

In search of a physical theory of time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...applicable to indivisible particles in both spatial and temporal...designate elementary particles of time in parallel to...Which end is nearer to God, beauty and hope or...realm of theology if God is the ultimate Hidden...Greeks to be elementary particles of the world. With the...

K J Hs

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Why is hard to patent an invention? , W. Bein 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intellectual property law occurred around 500 BC, in Sybaris (a Greek colony) and protected the rights for the intellectual and financial investment, and a stimulus to innovate. As a monopoly, the patent has legal power secret protection has unlimited lifetime. I. INTRODUCTION The forms of intellectual property of interest

Bein, Wolfgang

256

-structures: An#-parallel -structures comprise the 2nd largest group of proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one calcium ion per loop. #12;Beta-propeller A beta-propeller architecture is characterized by 4 to 8 is formed by residues from the loop residues and from the strands. 1.Up and down longer loop. They occur a lot in an8-parallel -structures #12;The Greek key mo8

Cavanagh, John

257

Byzantine Icons The Art and Science of Depiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Byzantine Icons · 4.209 The Art and Science of Depiction · Fredo Durand, Julie Dorsey · Spring 2001 · Konstantinos Tsakonas, tsakonas@mit.edu Definitions Icon(): a Greek word that meansimage to write an icon. Project Focus Art&Science of Depiction Software Engineering Byzantine Icons Software

Durand, Frédo

258

Byzantine Icons The Art and Science of Depiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Byzantine Icons · 4.209 The Art and Science of Depiction · Fredo Durand, Julie Dorsey · Spring 2001 · Konstantinos Tsakonas, tsakonas@mit.edu Definitions Icon(): a Greek word that means image to write an icon. #12;2 Project Focus Art&Science of Depiction Software Engineering Byzantine Icons

Durand, Frédo

259

Iconic gestures in face-to-face TV interviews Maria Koutsombogera1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iconic gestures in face-to-face TV interviews Maria Koutsombogera1,2 and Harris Papageorgiou1 1,xaris}@ilsp.gr Abstract. This paper presents a study of iconic gestures as attested in a corpus of Greek face significance of the iconic gestures. We attempt to classify the iconic gestures attested according

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

260

ERASMUS Placement Offer Form EMPLOYER INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study Field 1. Agriculture, forestry and fishery (broad programmes) 2. Life science (others) / Plant diseases Oral and Written Language Skills Greek (level: ) X English (level: B2) French (level: ) German Description General Programmes Basic/broad, general programmes Basic/broad, general programmes Literacy

Herrmann, Samuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Progress in Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... HISTORIES of physics and magnetism have much in common, beginning with the discovery of the lode-stone by the ... , beginning with the discovery of the lode-stone by the Greeks. Modern texts on magnetism tend to overlook the work of past philosophers and it is very refreshing to find ...

C. A. BATES

1965-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

A journal of discovery and innovation from the University of Ottawa Summer 2013 Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the "capacity to perform work." But most of us tend to think of energy--derived from the Greek energeia, meaning's getting the seven billion of us out of bed in the morning, lighting our ever-expanding cities, helping our bodies heal, or powering our countless cars, computers, tablets and televisions. Energy shapes us

Petriu, Emil M.

263

Computerized Tomography and its Applications: a Guided Tour \\Lambda J.B.T.M. Roerdink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Radon transform and related transforms, inversion formulas, uniqueness, ill­posedness and stability: Computerized tomography, Radon transform, inversion formulas, recon­ struction algorithms, ill­posed problems projections', i.e. the recovery of a function from its line or (hyper)plane integrals (from the Greek ø ' o

Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

264

2 July 1976, Volume 193, Number 4247 Reactions of Oriented Molec  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fascinating effects are those whic SCIE NCE lecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions such as Cl2 July 1976, Volume 193, Number 4247 Reactions of Oriented Molec Molecules can be oriented in molecular beam their reactions show some unexpected steric ef Philip R. E The Greek philosopher Democritus

Brooks, Philip R.

265

A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 at the cathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tafel plots. We show that it is possible to determine the overpotential of an electrode also from its thermal signature. Nomenclature Greek Letters Transfer factor V Tafel over-potential Difference between two states Latin Letters a V Tafel constant b V Tafel slope J A cm-2 Current density jo A cm-2

Kjelstrup, Signe

266

A Fast and Simple Method for the Measurement of Total Antioxidant Potential and a Fingerprint of Antioxidants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......previously, with the increase of potential, more peaks...ordered according to the increase in value of the TAP...in varietal Greek red wines. Food Science and Technology...potential of Chilean wines. Nutrition Research...been applied for the quality assessment of honeys......

Pawel M. Wantusiak; Pawel Piszcz; Bronislaw K. Gld

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

80130 Syllabus: Introduction to Ethics Robert Cavalier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and abortion. Course Outline Part I History of Ethics Preface: The Life of Socrates Section 1: Greek Moral Philosophy Section 5: Recent Moral Philosophy Part II Concepts and Problems of Ethics Preface: Meta of Euthanasia Multimedia Module: A Right to Die? Section 2: The Topic of Abortion Multimedia Module: The Issue

Spirtes, Peter

268

A review of "Lords of Wine & Oile: Community & Conviviality in the Poetry of Robert Herrick" edited by Ruth Connolly and Tom Cain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and contemporary socio-literary circles. Ghostly classical allusion in Her- rick?s poetics is the focus of the next two chapters by Stella Achilleos and Syrithe Pugh, respectively. Achilleos concentrates on the poet?s close literary a#27; nity with the Greek...

Collins, Siobhn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

270

Questions and Answers - Where does the word atom come from and who first  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why does rubbing plastic and wooltogether create electricity? Why does rubbing plastic and wool<br>together create electricity? Previous Question (Why does rubbing plastic and wool together create electricity?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Are Democritus' theories of atoms still relevant today?) Are Democritus' theories ofatoms still relevant today? Where does the word atom come from and who first used this word? Around 2,500 years ago this Greek dude name Democritus was sitting around just thinking. He was thinking about cutting stuff up and came up with the idea that there must be a point where you could no longer cut something any smaller. He named the atom after the Greek word atomos, which means 'that which can't be split.' The cool part is that he was right. Well, 90% right. We can split atoms, but if you split an atom it becomes something else. An

271

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

272

Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 1. Atom  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. The notion of atoms dates back to Greek philosophers who sought a natural mechanical explanation of the Universe, as opposed to a divine one. The existence what we call chemical atoms, the constituents of all we see around us, wasn't proved until a hundred years ago, but almost simultaneously it was realised these weren't the indivisible constituents the Greeks envisaged. Much of the story of physics since then has been the ever-deeper probing of matter until, at the end of the 20th century, a complete list of fundamental ingredients had been identified, apart from one, the much discussed Higgs particle. In this programme, Ben finds out why this last particle is so pivotal, not just to atomic theory, but to our very existence - and how hopeful the scientists are of proving its existence.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

B. Fegley, Jr. Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF OBSERVATIONS 487 1.19.1.1 Pre-twentieth Century 487 1.19.1.2 The Twentieth Century to the Present Day 488 1.19.1.1 Pre-twentieth Century Venus is Earth's nearest planetary neighbor, and has fascinated mankind since, Aphrodite to the Greeks, Tai'pei to the Chinese, and Venus to the Romans (Hunt and Moore, 1982). Venus has

Fegley Jr., Bruce

274

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Silicate Production and Availability for Mineral Carbonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2, 3) Through mineral carbonation, the weathering of silicate minerals on land and the precipitation of carbonates in oceans is a natural negative feedback mechanism that stabilizes the Earths climate over geological time scales. ... The existence of Greek specifications of RCA, the European ones will come much later, will help Olympic Games 2004 to be as "green" as possible. ... The minerals calcite, feldspar, lime and periclase are present in ashes derived from Polish coal and/or woodchips. ...

P. Renforth; C.-L. Washbourne; J. Taylder; D. A. C. Manning

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

High-accuracy P-p-T measurements of pure gas and natural gas like mixtures using a compact magnetic suspension densimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control SNG3 Synthetic natural gas mixture SNG5 Synthetic natural gas mixture SSR Solid State Relay T Tee fitting Ta Tantalum Ti Titanium TLP Tension Leg Platform V Valve ZP Zero Point Greek letters ? Temperature....98 Figure VI.3. Percentage deviation of measured carbon dioxide densities from NIST -12 measured in 2006.99 Figure VI.4. Percentage deviation of measured nitrogen densities from NIST -12 measured in 2006...

Ejaz, Saquib

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

USHE TRANSFER ARTICULATION GUIDE BYU-IDAHO U of U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRICE ANAL 3 N AGBUS 435 AGRICULTURE COMMODITY MKTG 3 N AGBUS 440 AGRIBUSINESS FINANCE 3 N AGBUS 450 GPS APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE 1 N AGTEC 220 PREVENT MAINT & MACH MGMT 3 N AGTEC 230 AG ELECTRIC 2 N E ART 301 ART OF THE ANC N EAST & EGYPT 3 E ART 302 GREEK/ROMAN AR 3 E ART 303 MEDIEVAL ART 3 E ART

van den Berg, Jur

278

Kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field is considered. Analytic solutions are obtained for the force, friction coefficient, and diffusion coefficient in the model of a two-level atom without limitations imposed on the intensity of light fields. This effect is observed in the domain of global minima and maxima of the optical potential (i.e., at points where the relative phase of two standing waves is Greek-Phi-Symbol = 0, {pi}/2.

Prudnikov, O. N., E-mail: llf@laser.nsc.ru [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Taichenachev, A. V. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tumaikin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Yudin, V. I. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

A review of "The Arts of 17th-Century Science: Representations of the Natural World in European and North American Culture." by Claire Jowitt and Diane Watt, eds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ?introduction of the term nymphomania does 140 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS not indicate the discovery of a new disease, rather it reflects changes in the perception of female genitalia?and helps to make visible a significant part of their history? (177..., but also in the poetry of John Milton. Thus, Gilbert does not separate science from art or from religion, but, instead, shows her readers how scientists like Harvey drew from Judeo- Christian imagery and Greek mythology to describe scientific pro...

Karol K. Weaver

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

6 - Drachmageddon: Exit from Euroland and Bankruptcy? Or Bankruptcy Within Euroland?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chiefs of state, economists, and financial analysts have foreseen that either of two options will happen: Greece quits Euroland, reintroduces the drachma, probably defaults, prunes its balance sheets and, in an unlikely but not impossible move, rejoins Euroland. Or, it defaults within Euroland, obliging the other member states to ring-fence its economy to avoid contagion (Though contagion may also come from Spain and Italy, neither of them being in an economic situation much better than Greece.) Nobody can calculate the cost of the default option. Part of the cost of going back to the drachma will be the forced conversion of bank deposits, and strict capital controls. The latter are required to prevent massive capital flight at two critical times: just prior a new drachma is introduced and immediately afterward. Moreover, forced conversion will present several problems. While Greek government debt might be redenominated with few legal hiccups, private sector debt owed to non-Greek financial institutions would remain liable in euros, dollars, pounds, or whatever the currency of the original obligation. With the new drachma depreciating in the currency markets, the Greek private sector would experience rolling defaults. The chosen option of massive EU/ECB/IMF loans to Greece has not been easy or effective. Its sponsors disagreed among themselves, as well as with the Greek government and the general public. Privatizations have been overestimated in terms of the income they could bring, and often handicapped by Euroland itself because of their political reasons. And the myth of a benevolent troika proved to be just that: a myth.

Dimitris N. Chorafas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ash Quality of a Beneficiated Lignite from Ptolemais Basin, Northern Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Quality of a Beneficiated Lignite from Ptolemais Basin, Northern Greece ... Knowing that oil and gas reserves are diminishing very fast, the beneficiation of coals is of most importance, since this energy source is widely distributed around the world. ... The present research was carried in collaboration with Public Power Corporation of Greece, which simultaneously conducted pilot plant tests for beneficiating Greek lignites, using the TRI-FLO technique. ...

D. Vamvuka; E. Mistakidou; S. Drakonaki; A. Foscolos; K. Kavouridis

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

283

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

M N O P Q R S M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Lan, Ruiting (Ruiting Lan) - School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales Lang, Matthew (Matthew Lang) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University Langmead, Christopher James (Christopher James Langmead) - Ray and Stephanie Lane Center for Computational Biology & School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University Laurenzi, Ian J. (Ian J. Laurenzi) - Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University Laux, Thomas (Thomas Laux) - Institut für Biologie III, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg Lebendiker, Mario (Mario Lebendiker) - Wolfson Centre for Applied Structural Biology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Lee, Doheon (Doheon Lee) - Department of Bio and Brain Engineering,

284

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry,

285

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry, University of Maine Anderson, James B. (James B. Anderson) - Department of Chemistry,

286

Bread  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bread Bread Nature Bulletin No. 175-A January 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BREAD Housewives who bake their own bread buy a cake of compressed yeast, crumble it in a half-cup of warm water, mix it with a little flour and a pinch of sugar, and put the cup in a warm place. Presently, little bubbles begin to form and burst. The mixture swells and foams and rises. It is fermenting. Fermentation -- the name is derived from a Latin word meaning "to boil" -- has been known and used in making bread, beer and wine since early times. Yeast, or leaven, was used in the days of the Hebrew patriarchs. A portion of the uncooked dough was left from each baking and allowed to sour. This dough "starter", mixed with fresh dough, caused the whole to ferment, gas to form, and the bread raised or "leavened".

287

Argonne Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA Gas-filled Fragment Analyzer-AGFA Argonne National Laboratory B.B. Back, R.V.F. Janssens, W.F. Henning, T.L. Khoo, J.A. Nolen, D.H. Potterveld, G. Savard, D. Seweryniak Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel M. Paul University of Massachusetts Lowell P. Chowdhury, C.J. Lister University of Maryland W.B. Walters University of Edinburgh P.J. Woods Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory K. Gregorich Oregon State University W. Loveland Date: February 11, 2013 Abstract As the premier stable-beam user facility in the USA, ATLAS is currently being upgraded to provide high intensity (>1 pμA) stable beams. The combination of new high- efficiency detectors and intense beams will move ATLAS to the forefront as a world

288

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ha, Taekjip (Taekjip Ha) - Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Haas, Yehuda (Yehuda Haas) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Hagadorn, John R. (John R. Hagadorn) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder Hahn, David W. (David W. Hahn) - Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida Haller, Gary L. (Gary L. Haller) - Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon (Sharon Hammes-Schiffer) - Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Han, Jeong Woo (Jeong Woo Han) - Laboratory for Electrochemical Interfaces, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

289

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Baer, Roi (Roi Baer) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Baik, Mu-Hyun (Mu-Hyun Baik) - School of Informatics & Department of Chemistry, Indiana University Baker, David (David Baker) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Baltisberger, Jay H. (Jay H. Baltisberger) - Department of Chemistry, Berea College Bang, Duhee (Duhee Bang) - Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University Bao, Xinhe (Xinhe Bao) - State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Barash, Danny (Danny Barash) - Department of Computer Science, Ben Gurion University Barbas III, Carlos F. (Carlos F. Barbas III) - Departments of

290

Celebrating Einstein A Series of Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Series of Articles A Series of Articles "Albert Einstein is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating and influential figures of the modern era. As a preeminent physicist, he radically transformed our understanding of the universe." - Edited excerpt from Albert Einstein, Albert Einstein Archives, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem In this series about Albert Einstein’s body of work, his discoveries are related to today’s research, technology, and common knowledge. Series themes include "How did Einstein know that?" and "How did Einstein figure that out?" and they focus either on conveying a major concept or on the reasoning that led to it. These articles will also cover Einstein’s major 1905 writings and address his general theory of relativity. In consideration of 2005 being designated as the World Year of Physics, the release of these articles is especially appropriate.

291

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Fajans, Joel (Joel Fajans) - Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley Fiore, Catherine L. (Catherine L. Fiore) - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Fisch, Nathaniel J.(Nathaniel J.Fisch).- Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory & Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University Fisher, Vladimir (Vladimir Fisher) - Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science Fitzpatrick, Richard (Richard Fitzpatrick) - Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin Friedland, Lazar (Lazar Friedland) - Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Froyland, Gary (Gary Froyland) - School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New South Wales

292

Lignite industry in Greece within a world context: Mining, energy supply and environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today coal covers 38% of global production and roughly 30% of the EU-25 power output. In 2005 domestic lignite with a share of 60.5% in power generation and accounting about 30% of primary energy consumption is currently the most important indigenous fuel of Greece. Greece, mining 70Mt annually, is the second lignite producer in the EU and fourth in the world. Approximately 97% of the lignite used to supply the existing lignite-fired power plants of Greece is mined by Public Power Corporation S.A. (PPC). Lignite as the base load fuel gives a competitive strength in PPC's and Greece's fuel mix. Due to lignite consumer prices in Greece are significantly below those in other comparable markets in EU-15. Extraction of lignite has a very long tradition. Significant achievements and large experience which has been gained during many years of mining operations place Greek lignite-mining industry in the leading position in Europe. The paper presents current state of Greek lignite industry, including operating mines, volume of production and other important production indicators as well as improvements in labor productivity and good results in industrial safety. The future of coal and specifically of Greek lignite will be crucially determined by environmentally compatible, i.e. low-CO2 generation of electricity. Investment in modernization and renewal of the power plant fleet are the key to securing electricity supply and progress in preventing climate change.

Konstantinos Kavouridis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Using internet GIS technology for early warning, response and controlling the quality of the public health sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent EU and Greek Government legislation highlights the need for the modernisation of the public health management system and the improvement of the overall health of EU citizens. In addition, the effusion of epidemics even in developed countries makes the need for the enhancement of public health services imperative. In order to best confront the above-described challenges, the National Technical University of Athens, in cooperation with the Greek Ministry of Health and Welfare and the European Commission (EC), designed and developed an integrated public health information network, named GEPIMI (Integrated Geographical System for EPIdemiological and other Medical Information), in the framework of a three-year pilot project. This pilot project, funded by Greek Ministry of Health and Welfare and the EC supported the Programme INTERREG II to establish an advanced and integrated web-based information system that can process and move information in real time, allowing public health authorities to monitor events at hundreds or thousands of public health facilities at once. The system is established among hospitals, primary healthcare authorities and health agents in Greece, Bulgaria, Albania, Fyrom, and Turkey. The project aims at demonstrating the best practices, prospects, applications and high potential of Telematics Healthcare Networks in Europe, with a view to promoting cooperation and interconnection between European communities in the field of Telematics Healthcare Applications. The GEPIMI System, implemented via an innovative web based system, constitutes a replication of a highly effective mechanism. It incorporates state-of-the-art technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (G.I.S.), web based databases, GPS, and Smart Card Technology and supports a variety of health-related web applications including early warning and response of epidemics, remote management of medical records, seamless healthcare coverage, comprehensive statistical analysis of data, decision-making procedures, inter-communication between international scientific fora and other.

Dimitrios Ptochos; Dimitrios Panopoulos; Kostas Metaxiotis; Dimitrios Askounis; John Psarras

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A linguistic TOPSIS model to evaluate the sustainability of renewable energy options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Sources (RES) could be used to reduce carbon emissions, decrease dependence on fossil fuels and meet energy policy objectives towards Sustainable Development (SD). However, appraising the RES options' contribution to SD is a complex task, considering the different aspects of SD and the uncertainty of related information. The paper's objective is to extend the numerical multicriteria method TOPSIS for processing linguistic data in the form of 2-tuples, so as to show how energy policy objectives towards SD and RES are assessed using linguistic variables. Moreover, the application of the proposed method to the Greek energy market is presented.

Haris Doukas; Charikleia Karakosta; John Psarras

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Olympic Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...graduates (1858). Other authors drew competing lessons from the Olympic legacy. One warned that excessive athletic training diverted energy from mental development, leaving adolescents "listless and stupid": "It was especially remarked by the Greeks that no one who in boyhood won the prize at the Olympic... Over the years, the Journal has considered the Olympic competitions from the perspectives of eugenics, mental versus physical development, the health risks associated with athletics or mass gatherings, and the ethics of using performance-enhancing drugs, among others.

Jones D.S.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

"Technical Observations on the Sculptures from the Temple of Zeus at Olympia"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and 1996. 7. See, e.g., the spirited discussion in JdI 6: Furtwngler 1891; Sauer 1891a, 1891b; Treu 1891a, 1891b, 1891c. john g. younger and paul rehak44 Phases of Temple Construction The process of building a Greek temple is well known mainly from ob...dining in the sanctuary of demeter and kore 1 Volume 78 2009 Hesperia Th e J o u r na l of t h e A m e r i c a n S c ho ol of Classical Studies at Athens This article is The American School of Classical Studies at Athens...

Younger, John G.; Rehak, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Invitus, Regina: Aeneas Cast as the Unwilling and Unfit Hero  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dismissively of her, he closes with a touching simile that laments his love that has been lost: nec meum respectet, ut ante, amorem qui illius culpa cecidit velut prati ultima flos, praetereunte postquam tactus aratro est. (21-24) Let her not look...-drinking, elegant, and worldly image and lifestyle he preferred.48 This association with Dionysus served him well in the early days of the triumvirate, and he was well received in the East. Plutarch shows us that upon arrival at Ephesus, the Greeks welcomed him...

Geer, Rachel Leah

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

An investigation of minimum distance landing over a barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moment coefficient X axis force coefficient X axis force coefficient Control force coefficient t~ ~ (d /dt) Aircraft efficiency factor C. G. position, / c Stick fixed neutral poi. nt Nondirnensi. onal moment of inertia Units slug-ft sec Lt m... s, Tail length Aircraft mass Wing area Horizontal tail area L/u slugs ft2 ft sec vl 0 vh Perturbation velocity Initial ve]ocity u/un llorizontal tail vo]ume coefficient ft/sec ft/sec Greek Letters ae/an Angle of attack Control...

Filburn, Ralph Bernard, III

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Review of Aegean Prehistory VII: Neopalatial, Final Palatial, and Postpalatial Crete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Kommos III L.V. Watrous, Kommos III: The Late Bronze Age Pottery (Princeton 1992). Palaces R. Hagg and N. Marinatos eds., The Func- tion of the Minoan Palaces (Stockholm 1987). PGC H.-G. Buchholz and V. Karageorghis, Pre- historic Greece and Cyprus... Enneoros: Archaeo- astronomical Light on the Priestly Role of the King in Crete," in P. Hellstr6m and B. Alroth eds., Religion and Power in the Ancient Greek World (Uppsala 1996) 27-39; G. Henriksson and M. Blomberg, "Evidence for Minoan Astronomical Ob...

Rehak, Paul; Younger, John G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Athenian Corner, a Greek restaurant owned by the Panagiotopoulos family, has been a familiar sight in the historic district of downtown Lowell, Massachusetts, since 1974. Energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Panagiotopoulos family reduce operating costs and make their restaurant more successful. The Athenian Corner completed a building energy assessment through BetterBuildings Lowell that projected 30% energy savings if the recommended upgrades were installed. After securing $47,500 through a BetterBuildings Lowell grant and $27,500 in a loan from the local lending consortium, the restaurant installed a new boiler, air conditioning and heating system, lighting fixtures, and an efficient refrigerator storage cabinet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Dictionary of petroleum exploration, drilling, and production  

SciTech Connect

This book contains more than 20,000 definitions of oil exploration, drilling, and production terms, making this dictionary mandatory for both the experienced industry professional and the nontechnical person. Completing this comprehensive reference are more than 500 detailed illustrations. Appendices include a rotary rig diagram, a cable tool drilling rig, a beam pumping unit, giant oil fields of the world, giant oil, and gas fields of the United States and Canada, a geological time chart, geological map symbols, conversion factors, the Greek alphabet atomic weights and numbers, charts of the geological features of the United States and Canada, plus much, much more.

Hyne, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Visiting hours: the second-person address in critical theory and creative practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, shedding new light on Greek and Celtic myths and myth structures. Kitch borrows ~ 1 ~ 1 r f T~h ~ od ~ d Th A Ld, 4 i the germ of his narrative, he uses the tale of Angus the Young (retold in the appendix) as the basis for Adrian's illness. Third... ~ r ty 1t 1f I ~ bit d 11 y" (W~tl 87). One possible response to this dilemma is typified by Berth's funhouse builder, who, in effect sayer "If I'm stuck here, you--the reader ? -may as well be lost too. " In the last forty years there has been a...

Peterson, Scott David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Automatic history matching of dual porosity system with wellbore storage and skin constant rate case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vector notation Greek svmbols Interporosity flow shape factor, ft Viscosity, cp Porosity, fraction , ~mP 4 ~ ~ Oimensionless transfer coefficient kf (m~)f Oimensionless storativity ratio (mcf) $ me) Itl n Unit normal vector 66 REFERENCES 1... to the system of equations, the equations become d pod dS d'o 2 v'w- "of ? Sf['"'I' ? A 0 (A23) and Dm Dm( o 0) ( where 73 (, m'f jf ('m'fjf f (m'f) (A25) kf From the initial condition PD(rD, 0) = 0 PDF ( 0, 0) - 0 (rD. 0) = 0 Rearranging equation...

Olarewaju, Joseph Shola

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Liquid biofuels in GreeceCurrent status in production and research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the state of liquid biofuels in Greece and presents the current situation in production and research. The first part presents the production potential in terms of cultivated crops along with the industrial activity on biofuels and their distribution in the country. In the second part the research activities are discussed. It is shown that the Greek biofuel potential is significant although some problems in the allocation of the fuel resulted in severe constraints to efficiency. Research on the optimization of biodiesel properties and on the development of 2nd generation biofuels as well on the assessment of their impacts on engine performance and emissions is remarkable and promising.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A review of "War, Domination, and the Monarchy of France: Claude de Seyssel and the Language of Politics in the Renaissance" by Rebecca Ard Boone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the independent duchy of Savoy?s traditional, military aristocracy, Seyssel was educated in Italy and taught law at the University of Turin before entering the French king?s service. In the course of his career, Seyssel translated ancient Greek and Roman... presents a reinterpretation of the Monarchie de France in light of Seyssel?s own work on behalf of the French war effort in Italy. She argues that Seyssel drew on classical history as a means to articulate concrete solutions to the challenges of France...

Cohen, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'he Ph0Greek alphabet, that makerl 'I'he Cmega Ean' look odd too l I p:cefer:ced 'Planet of Judgement', but I've known better fan... operation is sclwduled for Dec. 7th. ','Io'll be thinking "bout you Beth, hurry up and get well - we need you! Beth's address 'Nill be Russell ViaI'd, Bedford Gen\\Jral Hospital (South Wing), Kempston,Bedford. l.L.& P. Janet. 2 By the tij~:0 ~/ou read...

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Installation of PV systems in GreeceReliability improvement in the transmission and distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) power systems are becoming one of the most developing investment areas in the field of Renewable Energy Sources (RES). A statement of the status quo of PV power systems in Greece, and their contribution towards the improvement of power system reliability, is the scope of the present paper. Siting and installation of PV power systems is performed according to a recent Greek law, along with environmental and geographical constraints. Meteorological data are computed, formulated and imported to appropriate software in order to simulate the PV units and generate their power output. Data for unserved loads, resulting from load shedding during peak hours, are compared to the above estimated power production. Assuming that a proportion of the eventually unsupplied power could be provided by the accessed power generation of the PV units, the reliability of both transmission and distribution system is improved. The impact on the transmission system is shown by an improvement of LOLP and LOEP indices, whereas peak shaving for the Interconnected Greek Transmission System (IGTS) is also illustrated. For the distribution system the impact is quantified using the distribution system reliability indices SAIDI, SAIFI, and CAIDI. Finally, the resulting improvement is also expressed in financial terms.

Aggelos S. Bouhouras; Antonios G. Marinopoulos; Dimitris P. Labridis; Petros S. Dokopoulos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Maximum wind energy contribution in autonomous electrical grids based on thermal power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greek islands cover their continuously increasing electricity demand on the basis of small autonomous thermal power stations. This electrification solution is related with increased operational cost and power insufficiency, especially during summer. On the other hand, the stochastic behaviour of the wind and the important fluctuations of daily and seasonal electricity load in almost all Greek islands pose a substantial penetration limit for the exploitation of the high wind potential of the area. In this context, the present study is concentrated on developing an integrated methodology which can estimate the maximum wind energy contribution to the existing autonomous electrical grids, using the appropriate stochastic analysis. For this purpose one takes into account the electrical demand probability density profile of every island under investigation as well as the operational characteristics of the corresponding thermal power stations. Special attention is paid in order to protect the existing internal combustion engines from unsafe operation below their technical minima as well as to preserve the local system active power reserve and the corresponding dynamic stability. In order to increase the reliability of the results obtained, one may use extensive information for several years. Finally, the proposed study is integrated with an appropriate parametrical analysis, investigating the impact of the main parameters variation on the expected maximum wind energy contribution.

J.K. Kaldellis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

New non-stick expoxy-silicone water-based coatings part 1: Physical and surface properties  

SciTech Connect

In search for tomorrow`s technology for water-based coating, Decora Manufacturing and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have initiated an intensive research program for designing, developing and manufacturing new coatings based on cross-linked, room temperature-cured silicone-expoxy resins. The new water-borne coatings have most exciting characteristics such as: non-stick properties, effective release, high lubricity, corrosion protection and abrasion resistance. The coatings are environmentally-friendly and easy to use. These coatings are ideal for marine, agricultural, industrial and maintenance applications. This paper brings quantitative measurements related to the dispersion technology (particle size, stability, shelf-life), to the non-stick properties (deicing, low surface energy, easy-release and non-stick), lubricity, adhesion to substrates, viscosity, dynamic and static friction coefficients and environmental impact (low VOC, non-toxicity, low-leaching). The coating was tested in various industrial coating systems and was found to exhibit excellent non-stick and release properties. Special attention was given to Zebra Mussels, Quagga Mussels and other bacterial and algeal bioforms. The coating proved to be efficient as foul-release coating with very low biofouling adhesion. The low adhesion applied to many other substances in which foul-release means easy-clean and low-wear.

Garti, N. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Smith, J. [Decora Manufacturing, Fort Edward, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

It's Elemental - The Element Astatine  

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Polonium Polonium Previous Element (Polonium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radon) Radon The Element Astatine [Click for Isotope Data] 85 At Astatine 210 Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight: 210 Melting Point: 575 K (302°C or 576°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: about 7 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen Radioactive What's in a name? From the Greek word for unstable, astatos. Say what? Astatine is pronounced as AS-teh-teen or as AS-teh-ten. History and Uses: Astatine was produced by Dale R. Carson, K.R. MacKenzie and Emilio Segrè by bombarding an isotope of bismuth, bismuth-209, with alpha particles that had been accelerated in a device called a cyclotron. This created

311

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

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Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

312

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Enlarge image The Trojan Goat incorporates recycled materials, including copper cladding reclaimed from a roof, wood panels reclaimed from shipping pallets, and paving stones reclaimed from the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. (Credit: Chris Gunn/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: University of Virginia What: Trojan Goat Where: Private residence Crozet, VA 22932 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2002 University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts Like the Trojan horse that launched the Greeks to victory, the Trojan Goat earned the University of Virginia second place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2002. Since then, the house has gone on to inspire

313

The Universe Adventure - Magnitude, Luminosity and Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apparent Magnitude Apparent Magnitude Some astronomical objects and their magnitudes. Some astronomical objects and their apparent magnitudes from Earth. Before telescopes, people looked at the sky and classified the objects they saw by their brightness. Hipparchus, a Greek mathematician, classified over 850 cosmic objects into six categories of brightness. Scientists later adopted the word magnitude, keeping and extending the scale developed by Hipparchus. The brightest stars were called first magnitude stars, the next brightest being second magnitude stars, etc. Today, we measure the brightness of an object using this same scale, but with much more precision and using a much larger scale. The scale is formatted so that the lower the magnitude the brighter the object, which means a star with a magnitude of

314

X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links: Related Links: May 2005 Headlines TIP Article Press Release Walters Art Museum SSRL Home Page SLAC Home Page Stanford Home Page Tuesday, 31 May 2005 X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text (contact: Uwe Bergmann, bergmann@slac.stanford.edu) Archimedes Figure Image provided by Will Noel, The Walters Art Museum An early transcription of Archimedes' mathematical theories has been brought to light through the probing of high-intensity x-rays at SSRL's BL6-2. The text contains part of the Method of Mechanical Theorems, one of Archimedes' most important works, which was probably copied out by a scribe in the tenth century. The parchment on which it was written was later scraped down and reused as pages in a twelfth century prayer book, producing a document known as a palimpsest (which comes from the Greek,

315

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 It takes 8,900 kilowatt hours to provide electricity to one U.S. house for a year. With the energy saved annually through Infrastructure on Demand, LANL can power 216 homes. | Photo Courtesy of LANL Los Alamos' New Virtualized Data Center Saves Energy and Cash Data centers are responsible for nearly 2% of U.S. electricity consumption -- a price tag of $4.5 billion. Learn how Los Alamos is helping to reduce that price tag. March 4, 2011 An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Bonneville Power Administration celebrates big windy milestone and

316

HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA HelioSphera formerly Next Solar SA Jump to: navigation, search Name HelioSphera (formerly Next Solar SA) Place Athens, Greece Zip 11523 Product Greek thin-film silicon PV module manufacturer with a 60MW plant in Tripolis. Coordinates 37.97615°, 23.736415° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.97615,"lon":23.736415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Definition: Geothermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Geothermal energy Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth ( Geo (Earth) + thermal (heat) )[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Thermal energy is the energy that determines the temperature of matter. The geothermal energy of the Earth's crust originates from the original formation of the planet (20%) and from radioactive decay of minerals (80%). The geothermal gradient, which is the difference in temperature between the core of the planet and its surface, drives a continuous conduction of thermal energy in the form of heat from the core to the surface. The adjective geothermal originates from the Greek roots γη (ge), meaning earth, and θερμος (thermos), meaning hot. At the

318

MST: Organizations: Precision Meso Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precision Meso Manufacturing Precision Meso Manufacturing Many engineers and product realization teams at Sandia National Laboratories are currently engaged in efforts to create revolutionary national security products that feature unprecedented functionality in ever-smaller, more portable configurations. In the course of development, the Sandia technology community has realized the need for manufacturing capabilities that expand upon what traditional microfabrication provides. The term “meso,” derived from the Greek mesos, meaning “intermediate” or “in the middle,” describes operations on a length scale that typically ranges from hundreds of micrometers to one centimeter. Meso Manufacturing involves a suite of innovative fabrication and metrology tools that compliment each other to make these products a reality. The Meso

319

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

320

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theta Theta Name: Laramy Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: GA Country: USA Date: N/A Question: I read your response to why we use the letter x in Algebra, but my question is why we use the Greek letter Theta in Trigonometry to represent an angle? Replies: Laramy It is just a convention. Nothing really dictates that folks use theta to represent angles in trigonometry. But when a lot of folks use the same letter the same way it increases understanding about what is being talked about. It is like, "Why does a red traffic light mean stop and a green light mean go? Why is it not the other way around?" This has become an international convention so people can drive in other countries without having to learn new rules all of the time. Sincere regards,

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321

Heliodynami Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heliodynami Ltd Heliodynami Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Heliodynami Ltd Place Athens, Greece Zip 176 72 Product Greek project developer. Coordinates 37.97615°, 23.736415° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.97615,"lon":23.736415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

323

It's Elemental - The Element Phosphorus  

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Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur The Element Phosphorus [Click for Isotope Data] 15 P Phosphorus 30.973762 Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight: 30.973762 Melting Point: 317.30 K (44.15°C or 111.47°F) Boiling Point: 553.65 K (280.5°C or 536.9°F) Density: 1.82 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for light bearing, phosphoros. Say what? Phosphorus is pronounced as FOS-fer-es. History and Uses: In what is perhaps the most disgusting method of discovering an element, phosphorus was first isolated in 1669 by Hennig Brand, a German physician and alchemist, by boiling, filtering and otherwise processing as many as 60

324

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

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Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

325

A Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Representing A Geothermal Field Subject To Site-Specific Information Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Bme Solution Of The Stochastic Three-Dimensional Laplace Equation Representing A Geothermal Field Subject To Site-Specific Information Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This work develops a model of the geothermal field in the Nea Kessani region (Greece) by means of the Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method, which describes the temperature variations across space in the underground geological formations. The geothermal field is formed by a thermal reservoir consisting of arcosic sandstones. The temperature distribution vs depth was first investigated by the Greek Institute of

326

RHIC | Why Does Quark Matter Matter?  

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Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? Why Does Quark Matter 'Matter'? The history of modern technological development can be viewed as a series of investigations, with ever increasing resolution, into the microscopic structure of matter. Since the days of the early Greek philosophers, science has been on a continual quest to find the smallest piece - the most fundamental building block - forming the substance of the universe. STAR researchers During that journey, many beautiful and exotic properties of the subatomic world have been discovered: particles with wave-like properties the ultimate position of which can never be known; "particles" of light that deliver a fixed amount of energy when they strike the atoms of a material's surface; particles in some types of electrical conductors that

327

Why sequence Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus?  

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Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? Pisolithus tinctorius and Pisolithus microcarpus? The term Pisolithus is derived from Greek, where piso means pea-shaped and lithos means stone. The fungal species under this category get their name from the pea-shaped spore capsules that break down to disperse spores, and thrive in temperate regions as well as in less-than-ideal conditions such as high levels of heavy metals, highly acidic soils and drought. They form associations with a wide range of woody plants, including trees, which act as carbon sinks and could be feedstocks for cellulosic biofuels. Interactions with mycorrhizal fungi help trees access scarce nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphate. By sequencing the genomes of fungi related to others previously sequenced by the DOE JGI, researchers hope to better understand the symbiosis

328

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! November 15, 2010 - 5:01pm Addthis Scott Minos Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Believe it or not, this Friday, November 19 is World Toilet Day, an annual event hosted by the World Toilet Organization since 2001 to raise awareness for proper sanitation world-wide. From outhouses to water closets, humans devising creative ways to relieve themselves of nature's call can be traced back at least as far as 3,000 B.C., when Scottish settlements featured stone huts equipped with drains extending from recesses in their walls. Later, around 1,700 B.C., the Greeks built definite latrines featuring large, earthenware pans connected

329

It's Elemental - The Element Neon  

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Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium The Element Neon [Click for Isotope Data] 10 Ne Neon 20.1797 Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight: 20.1797 Melting Point: 24.56 K (-248.59°C or -415.46°F) Boiling Point: 27.07 K (-246.08°C or -410.94°F) Density: 0.0008999 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 18 Group Name: Noble Gas What's in a name? From the Greek word for new, neos. Say what? Neon is pronounced as NEE-on. History and Uses: Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist, shortly after their discovery of the element krypton in 1898. Like krypton, neon was discovered through the

330

Glossary Term - Ceres  

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Catalyst Catalyst Previous Term (Catalyst) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Cloud Chamber) Cloud Chamber Ceres Ceres is an asteroid located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Discovered on January 1, 1801 by Giuseppi Piazzi, Ceres was the first asteroid ever discovered. With a diameter of 1025 kilometers (637 miles), Ceres is also the largest known asteroid. Ceres is also the Roman name for the Greek goddess Demeter, the elder sister of Zeus and daughter of Cronus and Rhea. Demeter was the goddess of grain and helped the crops grow. One day her daughter, Persephone, was abducted by Hades. While Demeter searched for her missing daughter, no crops grew and people starved. Persephone was eventually found, but Hades refused to let her leave the underworld. As a compromise, Persephone is

331

It's Elemental - The Element Molybdenum  

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Niobium Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium The Element Molybdenum [Click for Isotope Data] 42 Mo Molybdenum 95.96 Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight: 95.96 Melting Point: 2896 K (2623°C or 4753°F) Boiling Point: 4912 K (4639°C or 8382°F) Density: 10.2 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for lead, molybdos. Say what? Molybdenum is pronounced as meh-LIB-deh-nem. History and Uses: Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Welhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, in 1778 in a mineral known as molybdenite (MoS2) which had been confused as a lead compound. Molybdenum was isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Today,

332

Definition: Stereo Satellite Imagery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Stereo Satellite Imagery Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stereo Satellite Imagery Stereo Satellite Imagery is a form of Stereoscopy or 3D imaging. Two pictures are a take of the subject from two slightly different angles to produce the illusion of depth. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Stereoscopy (also called stereoscopics or 3D imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision. The word stereoscopy derives from the Greek "στερεός" (stereos), "firm, solid" + "σκοπέω" (skopeō), "to look", "to see". Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images

333

Secretary Bodman Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector Secretary Bodman Celebrates the Opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector November 18, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Pipeline ushers first link between gas suppliers of Central Asia and European consumers KIPI CROSSING, GREECE - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today celebrated the opening of the Turkey-Greece Inter-Connector (TGI) pipeline, ushering the first link between the gas suppliers of Central Asia and the consumers of Europe. This pipeline will expand the region's oil and gas infrastructure and increase the diversity of energy sources and suppliers. During the TGI's groundbreaking ceremony, Secretary Bodman congratulated Turkish and Greek leaders for their commitment to opening up the European

334

Definition: Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids intersected by a well. These petrophysical data are fundamental to developing the understanding of a geothermal reservoir.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Petrophysics (from the Greek πέτρα, petra, "rock" and φύσις, physis, "nature") is the study of physical and chemical rock properties and their interactions with fluids. A major application of petrophysics is in studying reservoirs for the hydrocarbon industry. Petrophysicists are employed to help reservoir engineers and geoscientists understand the rock properties of the reservoir, particularly how pores in

335

Glossary Term - Uranus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Tritium Previous Term (Tritium) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Van de Graaff Generator) Van de Graaff Generator Uranus Uranus as seen by the Voyager II spacecraft. Uranus is the seventh planet from the sun and takes 84 years to orbit the sun once. Uranus is about 4 times larger than the Earth and is about 14.5 times as massive. Uranus was discovered on March 13, 1781 by William Herschel. In greek mythology, Uranus was Father Sky. Planetary Data Distance from Sun Length of Day Length of Year Radius Mass 19.191 AU 17.2 hours 84.01 years 25,559 km 8.68*1025 kg Known Satellites Name Distance from Uranus Rotational Period Orbital Period Radius Cordelia 49,770 km -unknown- 0.335034 days 21 km Ophelia 53,790 km -unknown- 0.376400 days 23 km Bianca 59,170 km -unknown- 0.434579 days 27 km

336

It's Elemental - The Element Technetium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molybdenum Molybdenum Previous Element (Molybdenum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Ruthenium) Ruthenium The Element Technetium [Click for Isotope Data] 43 Tc Technetium 98 Atomic Number: 43 Atomic Weight: 98 Melting Point: 2430 K (2157°C or 3915°F) Boiling Point: 4538 K (4265°C or 7709°F) Density: 11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none Radioactive and Artificially Produced What's in a name? From the Greek word for artificial, technetos. Say what? Technetium is pronounced as tek-NEE-she-em. History and Uses: Technetium was the first artificially produced element. It was isolated by Carlo Perrier and Emilio Segrè in 1937. Technetium was created by bombarding molybdenum atoms with deuterons that had been accelerated by a

337

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Basics Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

338

It's Elemental - The Element Cobalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Previous Element (Iron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nickel) Nickel The Element Cobalt [Click for Isotope Data] 27 Co Cobalt 58.933195 Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight: 58.933195 Melting Point: 1768 K (1495°C or 2723°F) Boiling Point: 3200 K (2927°C or 5301°F) Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word for goblin or evil spirit, kobald and the Greek word for mine, cobalos. Say what? Cobalt is pronounced as KO-bolt. History and Uses: Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt, a Swedish chemist, in 1739. Brandt was attempting to prove that the ability of certain minerals to color glass blue was due to an unknown element and not to bismuth, as was commonly

339

Eco Sun Hellas Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Sun Hellas Ltd Place Thessaloniki, Greece Zip 54248 Product Greek PV system installer for industrial and residential use; works with RWE SCHOTT. Coordinates 40.63955°, 22.937075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.63955,"lon":22.937075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Microsoft Word - Armenian Cookbook.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presents an presents an Armenian Cooking Demonstration Thursday, January 24, 2013 Chez Leon 10:30 a.m - 1 p.m. Pauline Berberian, organizer and recipe source, assisted by Susan Kayser, Rose Moore and Mady Newfield 1 Appetizers and Salads Jajik (Cucumber salad) Ingredients: 4 cups cucumbers, finely chopped 3 cups Madzoon (yogurt, Greek style) 3 teaspoons mint leaves (fresh if possible), chopped 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon sugar 1 clove garlic, mashed Mix all ingredients and chill. Serves 9. Babaganosh (Eggplant dip) Ingredients: 2 eggplants 2 tablespoons Taheen (tahini - i.e. sesame seed paste) 1 teaspoon cumin Juice of 1 fresh lemon 1 garlic clove, mashed 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments at the Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT MINERvA MiniBooNE MINOS NOvA LBNE Cosmic Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments ArgoNeuT ArgoNeut detector at Proton Assembly Building Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT The Argon Neutrino Teststand or ArgoNeuT detector, nicknamed for Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, is a liquid argon neutrino detector at Fermilab. Argon is a noble, non-toxic element that in its gaseous form constitutes about 1 percent of air. It exists as a colorless liquid only in the narrow temperature range of minus 186 to minus 189 degrees Celsius. Neutrinos passing through a large volume of argon can interact with an argon atom, producing secondary particles such as muons and protons, which then ionize other argon atoms. An electric field within the detector causes

342

It's Elemental - The Element Bromine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Previous Element (Selenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Krypton) Krypton The Element Bromine [Click for Isotope Data] 35 Br Bromine 79.904 Atomic Number: 35 Atomic Weight: 79.904 Melting Point: 265.95 K (-7.2°C or 19.0°F) Boiling Point: 331.95 K (58.8°C or 137.8°F) Density: 3.11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for stench, bromos. Say what? Bromine is pronounced as BRO-meen. History and Uses: The only nonmetallic element that is a liquid at normal room temperatures, bromine was produced by Carl Löwig, a young chemistry student, the summer before starting his freshman year at Heidelberg. When he showed his

343

It's Elemental - The Element Barium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cesium Cesium Previous Element (Cesium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lanthanum) Lanthanum The Element Barium [Click for Isotope Data] 56 Ba Barium 137.327 Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight: 137.327 Melting Point: 1000 K (727°C or 1341°F) Boiling Point: 2170 K (1897°C or 3447°F) Density: 3.62 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? From the Greek word for heavy, barys. Say what? Barium is pronounced as BAR-ee-em. History and Uses: Barium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist, in 1808 through the electrolysis of molten baryta (BaO). Barium is never found free in nature since it reacts with oxygen in the air, forming barium oxide

344

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

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Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

345

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toxicity Profiles Toxicity Profiles These profiles were prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM many years ago. Although the toxicity values presented in the formal and condensed toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, the toxicity values are subject to change. Also note that some of the special characters, such as Greek letters and math symbols, in the original document format may not have translated well to html. Select a Profile Analyte CAS Number Formal Version Condensed Version Acenaphthene 83329 Formal Summary Acetone 67641 Formal Summary Aluminum 7429905 Formal Summary Anthracene 120127 Formal Summary Antimony (metallic) 7440360 Formal Summary Aroclor-1254 11097691 Formal Summary Aroclor-1260 11096825 Formal Summary Arsenic 7440382

346

Definition: Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques The objective of electromagnetic (EM) techniques is to image the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface through the measurement of naturally- or artificially-generated electromagnetic fields.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental interactions in nature, the other three being the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and gravitation. This force is described by electromagnetic fields, and has innumerable physical instances including the interaction of electrically charged particles and the interaction of uncharged magnetic force fields with electrical conductors. The word electromagnetism is a compound form of two Greek terms, ἢλεκτρον, ēlektron, "amber", and μαγνήτης, magnētēs, "magnet". The science

347

Small Hydropower Systems: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse (EREC) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you're considering building a small you're considering building a small hydropower system on water flowing through your property, you have a long tradition from which to draw your inspi- ration. Two thousand years ago, the Greeks learned to harness the power of running water to turn the massive wheels that rotated the shafts of their wheat flour grinders. And in the hydropower heyday of the 18th century, thousands of towns and cities worldwide were located around small hydropower sites. Today, small hydropower projects offer emissions-free power solutions for many remote communities throughout the world-such as those in Nepal, India, China, and Peru-as well as for highly industrialized countries, like the United States. This fact sheet will help you determine whether a small hydropower system will

348

Environmental cost-effectiveness of bio diesel production in Greece: Current policies and alternative scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following European Directive 2003/30/EC, the Greek Government adapted legislation that introduces and regulates the bio diesel market. The implemented quota scheme allocates the country's annual, predetermined, tax exempt production of bio diesel to industries based on their ability to meet several criteria. A number of bio diesel supply chain stakeholders have criticized this policy for being efficiency-robbing and vague. This paper uses 2007 data from energy crop farms and three bio diesel-producing companies in order to assess these criticisms. We study the economic and environmental aspects of the currently adopted policy and compare them to three alternative scenarios. We conclude that such criticisms have a merit and that policy makers need to reconsider their alternative options regarding the promotion of bio diesel in transport. Permission of sales directly to local consumers and promotion of forward integration by farmers are efficiency enhancing and environment-friendly means of promoting the use of bio diesel in transport.

Constantine Iliopoulos; Stelios Rozakis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

TEI Piraeus students' knowledge on the beneficial applications of nuclear physics: Nuclear energy, radioactivity - consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent nuclear accident in Japan revealed the confusion and the inadequate knowledge of the citizens about the issues of nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences In this work we present the first results of an ongoing study which aims to evaluate the knowledge and the views of Greek undergraduate students on the above issues. A web based survey was conducted and 131 students from TEI Piraeus answered a multiple choice questionnaire with questions of general interest on nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences. The survey showed that students, like the general population, have a series of faulty views on general interest nuclear issues. Furthermore, the first results indicate that our educational system is not so effective as source of information on these issues in comparison to the media and internet

Pilakouta, Mirofora

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Water recovery from dew  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recovery of clean water from dew has remained a longstanding challenge in many places all around the world. It is currently believed that the ancient Greeks succeeded in recovering atmospheric water vapour on a scale large enough to supply water to the city of Theodosia (presently Feodosia, Crimea, Ukraine). Several attempts were made in the early 20th century to build artificial dew-catching constructions which were subsequently abandoned because of their low yield. The idea of dew collection is revised in the fight of recent investigations of the basic physical phenomena involved in the formation of dew. A model for calculating condensation rates on real dew condensers is proposed. Some suggestions for the ideal condenser are formulated.

V.S. Nikolayev; D. Beysens; A. Gioda; I. Milimouka; E. Katiushin; J.-P. Morel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

RC structures strengthened by metal shear panels: experimental and numerical analysis  

SciTech Connect

Metal shear panels (MSPs) may be effectively used as a lateral load resisting system for framed structures. In the present paper, such a technique is applied for the seismic protection of existing RC buildings, by setting up a specific design procedure, which has been developed on the basis of preliminary full-scale experimental tests. The obtained results allowed the development of both simplified and advanced numerical models of both the upgraded structure and the applied shear panels. Also, the proposed design methodology, which is framed in the performance base design philosophy, has been implemented for the structural upgrading of a real Greek existing multi-storey RC building. The results of the numerical analysis confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed technique, also emphasising the efficiency of the implemented design methodology.

De Matteis, G. [Dept. of Design, Rehabilitation and Control of Architectural Structures, University of Chieti-Pescara 'G. D'Annunzio', V.le Pindaro, 42-65127 Pescara (Italy); Formisano, A.; Mazzolani, F. M. [Dept. of Structural Engineering University of Naples 'Federico II', P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effective deployment of photovoltaics in the Mediterranean countries: Balancing policy risk and return  

SciTech Connect

Although the Mediterranean region is blessed with abundant solar resources, photovoltaic energy currently represents a very small share of power production. In Germany however, a much less sunny country, the photovoltaic (PV) industry is booming. This country has become a front runner in the adoption of PV because of effective policy incentives. Based on a cross-case study analysis of the German, Spanish and Greek PV markets, this paper investigates factors determining the effectiveness of PV policies. Our analysis shows that, above a certain level of return, risk-related factors (such as policy instability and administrative hurdles) play a more important role in influencing investment decisions than return-related factors (such as the level of a feed-in tariff). (author)

Luethi, S. [IWOe-HSG, Institute for Economy and the Environment, University of St. Gallen, Tigerbergstr. 2, CH-9000 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Riparian areas in urban settings: two case studies from Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Riparian areas are significant ecosystems due to the numerous and substantial services they provide. These ecosystem services can range from wildlife habitat, water quality improvement, flood mitigation and recreational opportunities. Human developments, including cities and towns are frequently established in the riparian areas and degrade their functionality. Maintaining healthy riparian areas in urban settings that sustain their connectivity with the natural riparian areas should be of a great priority. Fragmented riparian areas lose many of the aforementioned ecosystem services. At the same time healthy riparian areas are aesthetically pleasing, creating a feeling of escape for the inhabitants, while also increasing the real estate value of the adjacent structures. In this study examples of healthy and degraded urban riparian areas from two Greek cities are presented. Overall, the proper restoration and sustainable management of these areas can improve the quality of life in urban settings and maintain the services they provide.

Valasia Iakovoglou; George N. Zaimes; Dimitrios Gounaridis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Contribution of the Cyclic Poets to the Aeneid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the KU Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Submitted to the Department of Latin and Greek of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts Master T h e s i s L a... t i n W i l l i a m s , M a r t h a P. 19S C o n t r i b u t i o n s of the cyc l i c p o e t s t o the Aeneid. The Contribution of the C y c l i c Poets to the Affneid. """^ { g ^ % Macrobius, Sat. IV, 17, speaking of the i n v e n t i 6 i r...

Williams, Martha Philippa

1898-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Neutron scattering techniques as a tool for nondestructive testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron scattering techniques such as neutron diffraction, Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) and Neutron Reflectivity (NREF) are very powerful tools for the nondestructive study of materials. The corresponding experimental facilities at a Greek research reactor and demonstrative experiments of their employment in the nondestructive testing of materials are presented. Neutron diffraction was applied in the study of irradiation effects on SiCf /SiC composites in view of their application to future fusion reactors. SiC materials are important in the aerospace industry and their oxidation at high temperatures was investigated by NREF. Finally, a SANS study of the precipitation of the aerospace Al-8.9at%Li alloy is presented.

G. Apostolopoulos; K. Mergia; A.G. Youtsos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Renewable power needs smart storage solutions  

SciTech Connect

Ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus claimed that the only thing constant in life is change, a truth we must accept and even celebrate. Another truth we face today is a growing demand for more energy to help us power the kind and pace of change weve become accustomed to, while minimizing environmental consequences. Renewable energy--two words that often find themselves woven into environmentally conscious dialogue. And according to Dave Lucero, director of alternative energy storage at EaglePicher Technologies LLC, the Tri-Cities should be thinking about two more: energy storage. Lucero recently addressed the Tri-Cities Research District about tackling the persistent challenge of maximizing renewable energy, which is inherently variable due to changing weather patterns. Capturing that energy and making it available for later use is vital.

Madison, Alison L.

2010-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Experimental Determination of the Efficiency and Emissions of a Residential Microcogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fueled by Diesel and Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of the diesel fuel properties were obtained from fuel certification tests conducted by the Alberta Research Council and established by the American Society for Testing and Materials, and the remainder are reported general properties. ... Clucas, D. M.Development of a Stirling engine battery charger based on a low cost wobble mechanism, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, 1993. ... investigation is conducted to evaluate the effects of using blends of ethanol with conventional diesel fuel, with 5% and 10% (by vol.) ethanol, on the performance and exhaust emissions of a fully instrumented, six-cylinder, turbocharged and after-cooled, heavy duty, direct injection (DI), Mercedes-Benz engine, installed at the authors' lab., which is used to power the mini-bus diesel engines of the Athens Urban Transport Organization sub-fleet with a view to using bio-ethanol produced from Greek feedstock. ...

Nicolas Farra; Tommy Tzanetakis; Murray J. Thomson

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

A co-operative environment for local government: an InternetIntranet approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a Web-based, database oriented CSCW system to support information dispersal between different Local Government authorities (Region, Prefecture and Municipalities) and the citizens. The system is implemented around the `shared workspace' notion, a group of directories and files controlled by the users of the workspace. Intranet and Extranet technologies are exploited to enable asynchronous and synchronous co-operation, manipulation of information from heterogeneous sources, security and easy administration, providing in parallel advanced communication facilities. We propose an innovative approach for the development of shared workspaces over WWW, based on state-of-the-art software platforms, integrating WWW and database technologies. The whole system was developed under a project funded by the Greek General Secretariat of Research and Technology and aims in the efficient distribution and management of information between and within different types of local authorities (Municipalities, Prefectures).

Christos Bouras; Panagiotis Destounis; John Garofalakis; Vassilis Triantafillou; Giannis Tzimas; Panagiotis Zarafidis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Road Transport Elasticity: How Fuel Price Changes can Affect Traffic Demand on a Toll Motorway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The crisis beginning in late 2008 in Greece, and still in progress, led the Greek Government to undertake a particularly harsh program under the joint auspices of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Union and the European Central Bank, aimed at restoring the primary budget surplus. The implementation of such a financial program has dramatically increased fuel taxes - about 82% for unleaded and 31% for diesel also producing a serious impact on road traffic demand. Starting from the above framework, this paper describes the main outcomes of a study aimed at identifying, assessing and forecasting the effects of fuel prices and tax changes on traffic flows along a 365km toll motorway corridor project connecting Athens to Tsakona, in the South-West of the Peloponnese.

Antonio Musso; Cristiana Piccioni; Michele Tozzi; Gilles Godard; Alexandre Lapeyre; Kostas Papandreou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Water resources management in Crete and in the Aegean Islands, with emphasis on the utilization of non-conventional water sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Greek regions of Crete and of the Aegean Islands are of the southernmost river basin districts (RBDs) of the European Union. They both have limited water resources, and water demand often surpasses water availability. The geographical fractionation, particularly for the region of the Aegean Islands, is a major constrain for the implementation of an integrated water management plan. This article aims at presenting the current status of water resources in the above regions, and the existing water management plans. The article summarizes the pressures on the water resources of the above geographical regions, and investigates the possibility for utilization of nonconventional water resources, like desalinated seawater, reclaimed wastewater and brackish water. One of the conclusions among others is that the development of novel processes on water resources management should be one of the primary aims of any integrated water management plan.

Petros Gikas; Andreas N. Angelakis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "greek hebrew hindi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

It's Elemental - The Element Titanium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scandium Scandium Previous Element (Scandium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Vanadium) Vanadium The Element Titanium [Click for Isotope Data] 22 Ti Titanium 47.867 Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight: 47.867 Melting Point: 1941 K (1668°C or 3034°F) Boiling Point: 3560 K (3287°C or 5949°F) Density: 4.5 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word Titans, the mythological "first sons of the Earth." Say what? Titanium is pronounced as tie-TAY-nee-em. History and Uses: Titanium was discovered in 1791 by the Reverend William Gregor, an English pastor. Pure titanium was first produced by Matthew A. Hunter, an American metallurgist, in 1910. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the

362

It's Elemental - The Element Osmium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhenium Rhenium Previous Element (Rhenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iridium) Iridium The Element Osmium [Click for Isotope Data] 76 Os Osmium 190.23 Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight: 190.23 Melting Point: 3306 K (3033°C or 5491°F) Boiling Point: 5285 K (5012°C or 9054°F) Density: 22.57 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for a smell, osme. Say what? Osmium is pronounced as OZ-mee-em. History and Uses: Osmium and iridium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Osmium and iridium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

363

It's Elemental - The Element Antimony  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tin Tin Previous Element (Tin) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tellurium) Tellurium The Element Antimony [Click for Isotope Data] 51 Sb Antimony 121.760 Atomic Number: 51 Atomic Weight: 121.760 Melting Point: 903.78 K (630.63°C or 1167.13°F) Boiling Point: 1860 K (1587°C or 2889°F) Density: 6.685 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words anti and monos, which together mean "not alone." Antimony's chemical symbol comes from its historic name, Stibium. Say what? Antimony is pronounced as AN-the-MOH-nee. History and Uses: Antimony has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores stibnite (Sb2S3) and

364

Definition: Electrical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Methods Electrical Methods Electrical methods aim to map the electrical resistivity structure of the subsurface. Electrical resistivity (inverse of electrical conductivity) is a measure of the ability for electrical current to flow and depends on parameters such as rock type, porosity and permeability, fluid type and saturation, and temperature. The SI unit of measure for resistivity is the ohm meter. [1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electrical resistivity (also known as resistivity, specific electrical resistance, or volume resistivity) quantifies how strongly a given material opposes the flow of electric current. A low resistivity indicates a material that readily allows the movement of electric charge. Resistivity is commonly represented by the Greek letter ρ. The SI unit of

365

Manhattan Project: The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn, Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute, Berlin THE DISCOVERY OF FISSION Berlin, Germany (1938-1939) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The English word "atom" derives from the Greek word "atomon" ("ατομον"), which means "that which cannot be divided." In 1938, the scientific community proved the Greek philosophers wrong by dividing the atom. Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. Fission, the basis of the atomic bomb, was discovered in Nazi Germany less than a year before the beginning of the Second World War. It was December 1938 when the radiochemists Otto Hahn (above, with Lise Meitner) and Fritz Strassmann, while bombarding elements with neutrons in their Berlin laboratory, made their unexpected discovery. They found that while the nuclei of most elements changed somewhat during neutron bombardment, uranium nuclei changed greatly and broke into two roughly equal pieces. They split and became not the new transuranic elements that some thought Enrico Fermi had discovered but radioactive barium isotopes (barium has the atomic number 56) and other fragments of the uranium itself. The substances Fermi had created in his experiments, that is, did more than resemble lighter elements -- they were lighter elements. The products of the Hahn-Strassmann experiment weighed less than that of the original uranium nucleus, and herein lay the primary significance of their findings. It folIowed from Albert Einstein's E=mc2 equation that the loss of mass resulting from the splitting process must have been converted into energy in the form of kinetic energy that could in turn be converted into heat.

366

A methodological framework for assessing the employment effects associated with energy efficiency interventions in buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The global trend toward a low carbon, sustainable economy is widely acknowledged to create a large number of jobs across many sectors of the economy. The deployment of renewable and energy efficiency projects represent a large share of the so called green jobs and help retain current levels of employment especially in countries facing the socio-economic threat of increasing unemployment rates. These effects should be taken into account during the process of energy planning, but due to difficulties in their quantification this is not always feasible. This paper utilizes the inputoutput analysis and the adjusted earnings gain approach for assessing the employment effects associated with the implementation of energy saving interventions in the building sector, with a view to produce results that can be easily incorporated into costbenefit analyses. The proposed framework, which comprises four basic steps, namely identification of all the potential changes in employment due to energy efficiency interventions, quantification of these employment effects in physical terms, calculation of the net present value of the estimated employment effects and monetization, has been implemented for three energy efficiency interventions widely implemented in Greek buildings. The results of the analysis clearly show that the exploitation of energy saving technologies in the Greek building stock generates significant employment benefits, ranging between 0.11 and 0.23 million per 1 million of investment in the base case scenario and reaching the 1024% of the energy costs savings attributed to the implementation of these interventions throughout their entire lifetime.

S. Mirasgedis; C. Tourkolias; E. Pavlakis; D. Diakoulaki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

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Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

368

It's Elemental - The Element Chlorine  

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Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon The Element Chlorine [Click for Isotope Data] 17 Cl Chlorine 35.453 Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight: 35.453 Melting Point: 171.65 K (-101.5°C or -150.7°F) Boiling Point: 239.11 K (-34.04°C or -29.27°F) Density: 0.003214 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for greenish yellow, chloros. Say what? Chlorine is pronounced as KLOR-een or as KLOR-in. History and Uses: Since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. Chlorine was first produced by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) with

369

Calendars  

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Calendars Calendars Nature Bulletin No. 447-A March 4, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CALENDARS This is a Leap Year with 366 days instead of the usual 365, and 29 days in February. Julius Caesar was responsible for that. The Roman calendar was patterned after those of the ancient Greeks and Egyptians which, in turn, had been modeled on that of the early Sumerians in Babylonia. The Sumerians had 12 lunar months in a year but every so often, to make up for the difference between that year and the year of the natural seasons, their astronomer-priests inserted an extra month. The Roman year was too short. It had had only 365 days for so many centuries that their calendar was badly out of step with the seasons and something had to be done about it. The summer months were coming in spring. Caesar's astronomers told him the reason: instead of being exactly 365 days long, a year was 365 and one-quarter days in length. Julius then solved the problem -- so he thought -- by establishing a leap year of 366 days every fourth year. He put the extra day in February because that was the last month on the old Roman calendar. Their new year started on the first day of March.

370

Owls  

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Owls Owls Nature Bulletin No. 267-A April 29, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OWLS The owls, of all our native birds, are least understood. Most kinds remain hidden, motionless and silent during the day and hunt only at night or in the dim twilight of morning and evening. Only a few, like our common Short-eared Owl and those big owls of the far north -- the Snowy Owl, the Great Gray Owl and the Hawk Owl -- habitually hunt in daytime. Because an owl' s feathers are peculiarly soft and fluffy, it flies as silently as a passing shadow, swoops upon its prey unheard, and its Indian name was "hush-wing". Since ancient times there have been many superstitions and legends about these birds. They have been regarded as the companions of sorcerers, witches, ghosts, hobgoblins and Satan himself. Their weird nocturnal hootings, gobblings and screams were and are believed to predict death, illness or disaster. Even today, in our southern states, the plaintive quavering cry of the Little Screech Owl -- which they call the "Shivering" Owl -- will cause some people to get out of bed and turn over their left shoe; others to throw a nail or other iron object into the fire. To the Greeks and Romans, the owl was a symbol of wisdom and was the companion of their goddess of wisdom.

371

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

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Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

372

A Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging an Arsenic-Loving  

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Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern For many people, arsenic is synonymous with poison, so it is perhaps a surprise that some plants, such as the fern Pteris vittata (Figure 1) seem to quite deliberately accumulate large amounts of it. What is more, the plant converts it to the most toxic inorganic form known. How does it do this? First some background; while there is some evidence that arsenic is required for health [1], this is debatable. On the other hand, the poisonous nature of arsenic compounds was understood by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and it has been used throughout history as a homicidal and suicidal agent. It is found in two environmentally common oxy acids; arsenous acid (H3AsO3), and arsenic acid (H3AsO4), whose salts are known as arsenites and arsenates, respectively. Of these, the trivalent arsenic species are the most toxic. The infamous agent of murder is arsenic trioxide (white arsenic or As2O3), which is simply the (reputedly tasteless) anhydride of arsenous acid.

373

Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants  

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Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic luster, but show bright colors which range from red, violet or blue, depending upon the size of the nanoparticles (2,3). Colloidal gold has traditionally been used to color materials such as glass (e.g. gold ruby glass and cranberry glass) and enamels (e.g. famille rose enamels) since the 16th century. The earliest report of a colloidal gold preparation may be in the Bible. The book of Exodus reports that Moses destroyed the golden calf in a manner that may have resulted in an aqueous (water-based) gold colloid, which he then forced the Israelites to drink. In modern times gold colloids are imbibed for a variety of ailments (despite little or no evidence of any health-related benefits), but the most important applications may be in the field of nano-technology (see 1, and refs therein).

374

Asters  

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Asters Asters Nature Bulletin No. 431-A October 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ASTERS One of the charms of our American autumn is the profusion of asters that decorate the landscape from late August until the killing frosts of October or November. Some kinds, last wildflowers of the dying year, are still blooming when even the goldenrods are gone. Some are white; a few are pinkish; others range in color from pale blue to purple. They are very hardy but people who gather armloads of asters are disappointed to find that they close up and lose their beauty almost as soon as picked. The asters belong to that largest of all plant families, the Composites, which includes such common flowers as goldenrods, daisies, sunflowers, thistles and dandelions. The name aster, from the Latin and Greek word meaning "star", was given them because the flower head has a showy ring of rays or florets -- similar to those of a daisy, sunflower and chicory -- around a yellow center that turns reddish or purplish brown with age. Almost all are perennials. Each tiny seed has a short tuft of fuzz by which it is carried away in the wind.

375

Teratogens  

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Teratogens Teratogens Name: leff Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What is a teratogen? Replies: A teratogen is a chemical that causes a fetus to develop incorrectly, there are many examples of these. Perhaps one of the most common is alcohol. When a pregnant woman drinks excessively the baby is born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome which includes a combination of physical and mental problems. psych Teratogen means, in Greek, "monster forming". Teratogens are chemicals that cause abnormalities in embryos. Alcohol certainly is one. Perhaps the most famous is thalidomide, a drug originally designed to combat morning sickness is pregnant women. It caused the long bones in the arms or legs to be absent, resulting in babies with severely stunted arms or legs. Rarely, a microorganism such as a bacterium can be teratogenic. One is Toxoplasma, which causes toxoplasmosis. It is carried by rabbits and cats and can be common in your yard, which is why doctors often advise pregnant women to wear latex gloves when gardening

376

Dates  

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Dates Dates Nature Bulletin No. 511-A December 15, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DATES When the wise men from the east, guided by a mysterious new star, traveled to Jerusalem and thence to Bethlehem where they worshipped the infant Jesus and presented Him with gifts, you can be sure that, in addition to gold and frankincense and myrrh, they carried dates as food to sustain them on their long journey. The Date Palm had been cultivated along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers since the time of the Sumerians, 3000 years before the birth of Christ. This tree, like the coconut palm, is unknown today in its wild state but is believed to have originated in Ethiopia. In early times it was abundant in Palestine and the scientific name, Phoenix, given to the date palm by the Greeks, may be due to the fact that they first saw it in Phoenicia. The "tree of life, " variously referred to in the Bible, was probably this palm.

377

Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine  

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In June?August 2006 an expedition with the aim to look for low?radioactive archaeological lead at the bottom of the Black Sea near the Crimean peninsula (Ukraine) was organised by a Korean?Ukrainian collaboration. The first samples with ?0.2 tons of total mass were found at a depth of 28 m among the relics of an ancient Greek ship. Their age has been dated to the first century B.C. This lead was used as ballast in the keel of the ship. The element composition of the samples was measured by means of X?ray fluorescence and ICP?MS analyses. The first preliminary limits on the 210 Pb contamination of the samples are less than a few hundreds mBq/kg. The measurements were performed using gamma spectroscopy with HPGe?detectors and alpha spectroscopy with commercial ??detectors. Measurements of 40K Th/U in the lead samples were undertaken in Kiev and in the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS Italy). If it was found to be radio?clean this lead could be used as high efficiency shield for ultra low?level detectors and as raw material for growing radio?pure scintillation crystals such as PbMoO4 or PbWO4 for the search for rare processes.

F. A. Danevich; S. K. Kim; H. J. Kim; A. B. Kostezh; V. V. Kobychev; B. N. Kropivyansky; M. Laubenstein; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; A. S. Nikolaiko; S. Nisi; D. V. Poda; V. I. Tretyak; S. A. Voronov

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to zero waste. Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a zero waste solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U)

Hadjichristos, John [Defkalion GT SA, 1140 Homer Street, Suite 250, Vancouver BC V682X6 (Canada)] [Defkalion GT SA, 1140 Homer Street, Suite 250, Vancouver BC V682X6 (Canada); Gluck, Peter [Retired from INCDTIM Cluj-Napoca in 1999 (Romania)] [Retired from INCDTIM Cluj-Napoca in 1999 (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

The medieval metal industry was the cradle of modern large-scale atmospheric lead pollution in northern Europe  

SciTech Connect

There is great concern for contamination of sensitive ecosystems in high latitudes by long-range transport of heavy metals and other pollutants derived from industrial areas in lower latitudes. Atmospheric pollution of heavy metals has a very long history, and since metals accumulate in the environment, understanding of present-day pollution conditions requires knowledge of past atmospheric deposition. The authors use analyses of lead concentrations and stable lead isotopes ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios) of annually laminated sediments from four lakes in northern Sweden to provide a decadal record of atmospheric lead pollution for the last 3000 years. There is a clear signal in the sediments of airborne pollution from Greek and Roman cultures 2000 years ago, followed by a period of clean conditions 400--900 A.D. From 900 A.D. there was a conspicuous, permanent increase in atmospheric lead pollution fallout, The sediments reveal peaks in atmospheric lead pollution at 1200 and 1530 A.D. comparable to present-day levels. These peaks match the history of metal production in Europe. This study indicates that the contemporary atmospheric pollution climate in northern Europe was established in Medieval time, rather than in the industrial period. Atmospheric lead pollution deposition did not, when seen in a historical perspective, increase as much as usually assumed with the Industrial Revolution.

Braennvall, M.L.; Bindler, R.; Renberg, I.; Emteryd, O.; Bartnicki, J.; Billstroem, K.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Chapter 20: Graphite  

SciTech Connect

Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Simulations of economical and technical feasibility of battery and flywheel hybrid energy storage systems in autonomous projects  

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This paper deals with the feasibility of a Renewable Energy Sources (RES)-based stand-alone system for electricity supply based on a Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) located on the Greek Island of Naxos. The innovative use of flywheels in parallel connection with electrochemical batteries, as an integrated storage device in the same power plant, was selected to be simulated as it is a necessary buffer covering the load of a typical house. The optimal configuration for the electromechanical connection between the electrochemical batteries and flywheels is also considered in this study. Operational characteristics of the new storage systems were estimated and used in the simulations, while the financial aspects of the projects finalized using hand-made calculations and the HOMER software was used only for the energy calculations. It was found that an off-grid project using advanced and totally green technologies is possible and comparable to more conventional RES-based systems, in terms of energy and economical feasibility. Finally, it can be concluded that systems with low price flywheels are equivalent to those with electrochemical batteries.

George N. Prodromidis; Frank A. Coutelieris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism  

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Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Using spectroscopic information for magnetometry and magnetic microscopy obviously requires detailed theoretical understanding of spectral shape and magnitude of dichroism signals. A research team at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 has now shown unambiguously that, contrary to common belief, spectral shape and magnitude of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) are not only determined by the relative orientation of magnetic moments and x-ray polarization, but their orientation relative to the crystallographic axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when freely suspended these objects pointed north-south. Throughout the past, we have used this phenomenon-magnetism-for navigation and more recently for power production and digital information storage, all while trying to explore and understand its origins. In 1986 researchers at a facility similar to the ALS observed for the first time that the absorption of x rays depends not only on the composition of a material-that is, if it contains iron, nickel, or other elements-but also on its magnetism. The effect is unique in that it allows us to distinguish which atomic species magnetism originates from and provides information about their local atomic environment-for example, whether a magnetic species is surrounded by 4 or 6 oxygen atoms. A research team at the ALS has now shown that the relationship between magnetic order and absorption of x rays is even more complex and exciting than has been assumed for the past 20 years, leading to a reassessment of previous results.

384

Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism  

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Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism Print Using spectroscopic information for magnetometry and magnetic microscopy obviously requires detailed theoretical understanding of spectral shape and magnitude of dichroism signals. A research team at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 has now shown unambiguously that, contrary to common belief, spectral shape and magnitude of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) are not only determined by the relative orientation of magnetic moments and x-ray polarization, but their orientation relative to the crystallographic axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare stones with the power to attract iron. Moreover, when freely suspended these objects pointed north-south. Throughout the past, we have used this phenomenon-magnetism-for navigation and more recently for power production and digital information storage, all while trying to explore and understand its origins. In 1986 researchers at a facility similar to the ALS observed for the first time that the absorption of x rays depends not only on the composition of a material-that is, if it contains iron, nickel, or other elements-but also on its magnetism. The effect is unique in that it allows us to distinguish which atomic species magnetism originates from and provides information about their local atomic environment-for example, whether a magnetic species is surrounded by 4 or 6 oxygen atoms. A research team at the ALS has now shown that the relationship between magnetic order and absorption of x rays is even more complex and exciting than has been assumed for the past 20 years, leading to a reassessment of previous results.

385

Virtue vs utility: Alternative foundations for computer ethics  

SciTech Connect

Ethical decisions within the field of computers and information systems are made at two levels by two distinctly different groups of people. At the level of general principles, ethical issues are debated by academics and industry representatives in an attempt to decide what is proper behavior on issues such as hacking, privacy, and copying software. At another level, that of particular situations, individuals make ethical decisions regarding what is good and proper for them in their particular situation. They may use the general rules provided by the experts or they may decide that these rules do not apply in their particular situation. Currently, the literature on computer ethics provides some opinions regarding the general rules, and some guidance for developing further general rules. What is missing is guidance for individuals making ethical decisions in particular situations. For the past two hundred years, ethics has been dominated by conduct based ethical theories such as utilitarianism which attempt to describe how people must be behave in order to be moral individuals. Recently, weaknesses in conduct based approaches such as utilitarianism have led moral philosophers to reexamine character based ethical theories such as virtue ethics which dates back to the Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle. This paper will compare utilitarianism and virtue ethics with respect to the foundations they provide for computer ethics. It will be argued that the very nature of computer ethics and the need to provide guidance to individuals making particular moral decisions points to the ethics of virtue as a superior philosophical foundation for computer ethics. The paper will conclude with the implications of this position for researchers, teachers and writers within the field of computer ethics.

Artz, J.M. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Compensatory Feeding Following a Predator Removal Program : Detection and Mechanisms, 1982-1996 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

Predator removal is one of the oldest management tools in existence, with evidence that ancient Greeks used a bounty reward for wolves over 3,000 years ago (Anonymous 1964). Efforts to control predators on fish have been documented in scientific journals for at least 60 years (Eschmeyer 1937; Lagler 1939; Foerster and Ricker 1941; Smith and Swingle 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959), and has likely been attempted for much longer. Complete eradication of a target species from a body of water has rarely been the objective of predator removal programs, which instead have attempted to eliminate predators from specific areas, to reduce the density or standing stock of predators, or to kill the largest individuals in the population (Meronek et al. 1996). In evaluating management programs that remove only part of a predator population, the compensatory response(s) of the remaining predators must be considered. Some potential compensatory responses by remaining individuals include increased reproductive output, increased growth rate, or increased consumption of certain prey species (Jude et al. 1987). If compensation by predators that remain in the system following a removal effort occurs, it may reduce the effectiveness of the predator control program. Northern pike-minnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis (formerly called northern squawfish) consume juvenile salmon in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. Northern pikeminnow have been estimated to consume about 11% of all juvenile salmon that migrate through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River (Rieman et al. 1991). Modeling studies suggested that removal of 20% of the northern pikeminnow population in John Day Reservoir would result in a 50% decrease in predation-related mortality of juvenile salmon migrating through this reach (Beamesderfer et al. 1991). Since the early 1940's, other programs have been implemented to remove northern pikeminnow, with hopes of improving the survival of juvenile salmon (Ricker 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959).

Petersen, James H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

Evans, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A New Tomography Beamline at a Wiggler Port at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) Storage Ring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new tomography beamline has been built and commissioned at the 7 T wiggler of the CAMD storage ring. This beamline is equipped with two monochromators that can be used interchangeably for X?ray absorption spectroscopy or high resolution X?ray tomography at best 23 ?m pixel size. The high?flux double multilayer?mirror monochromator (W?B4C multilayers) can be used in the energy range from 6 to 35 keV with a resolution (?E/E ) between 0.010.03. The second is a channel?cut Si(311)?crystal monochromator with a range of 15 to 36 keV and resolution of ca. 10?4 this is not yet tested. Tomography has the potential for high?throughput materials analysis; however there are some significant obstacles to be overcome in the areas of data acquisition reconstruction visualization and analysis. Data acquisition is facilitated by the multilayer monochromator as this provides high photon flux thus reducing measurement time. At the beamline Matlab routines provide simple x y z fly?throughs of the sample. Off?beamline processing with Amira can yield more sophisticated inspection of the sample. Standard data acquisition based on fixed angle increments is not optimal however new patterns based on Greek golden ratio angle increments offer faster convergence to a high signal?to?noise?ratio image. The image reconstruction has traditionally been done by back?projection reconstruction. In this presentation we will show first results from samples studied at the new beamline.

Kyungmin Ham; Heath A. Barnett; Leslie G. Butler; Clinton S. Willson; Kevin J. Morris; Roland C. Tittsworth; John D. Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek  

SciTech Connect

Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burris, J.A. [C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Water, law, science  

SciTech Connect

In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Harvesting Implementing Embedded Piezoelectric Generators The Potential for the Attiki Odos Traffic Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this research is to analyze and present the benefits of the exploitation of a piezoelectric generator (PEG) energy harvesting system as well as to study and identify its usage in Attiki Odos Highway traffic grid for energy generation and storage purposes. The research is focused initially on the study of the available technology and evaluation of the produced energy, if this technology is used at specific sites on Greek roads. For this purpose, based on experiments and taking into account the scientific experience of foreign countries where this technology has been tested, final propositions will be made on how and where to exploit this new technology. For the purposes of the study, strategically selected urban areas are used, where steadily heavy traffic load is present. Taking into account statistical data concerning the mobility of vehicles (vehicle per hour rates) in various urban areas in Attiki Odos Highway, and the scientific experience of foreign countries in similar PEG applications, calculations in order to estimate the electric energy that could be produced if piezoelectric generators were embedded in the asphalt are performed using the simulation tool of IPEGTM. Major factors in this process are: The length of the road used for the implementation of this technology The number of vehicles per hour passing from the specific under study area The kWh of electric energy that can be produced by implementing the piezoelectric generators energy harvesting systems of the specific under study area Calculations and an assessment of the potential electric energy generated in these urban areas will also be presented in this research providing very useful results for an early implementation of this technology.

A. Kokkinopoulos; G. Vokas; P. Papageorgas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chapter 12 - Geothermal Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses where the earth's thermal energy is sufficiently concentrated for economic use, the various types of geothermal systems, the production and utilization of the resource, and the environmental benefits and costs of geothermal production. Earth scientists quantify the energy and temperature in the earth in terms of heat flow and temperature gradient. The heat of the earth is derived from two components: the heat generated by the formation of the earth, and heat generated by radioactive decay of elements in the upper parts of the earth. The word geothermal comes from the combination of the Greek words go, meaning earth, and thrm, meaning heat. Geothermal resources are concentrations of the earth's heat, or geothermal energy, that can be extracted and used economically now or in the reasonable future. The earth contains an immense amount of heat but the heat generally is too diffuse or deep for economic use. Hence, the search for geothermal resources focuses on those areas of the earth's crust where geological processes have raised temperatures near enough to the surface that the heat contained can be utilized. Currently, only concentrations of heat associated with water in permeable rocks can be exploited economically. These systems are known as hydrothermal geothermal systems. All commercial geothermal production is currently restricted to geothermal systems that are sufficiently hot for the use and that contain a reservoir with sufficient available water and productivity for economic development. Geothermal energy is one of the cleaner forms of energy now available in commercial quantities. Use of geothermal energy avoids the problems of acid rain and greatly reduces greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air pollution.

Joel L. Renner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community  

SciTech Connect

John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

Holden N. E.; Holden,N.E.; Coplen,T.B.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

396

Quel avenir pour le sport?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rsum Le progrs technologique reprsente un moteur de dveloppement mais, dans cette mesure mme, il se lie laction dissolvante exerce par la technologie sur le noyau thicopolitique du sport. Si le monde sportif ne se dote pas, dans un temps qui devient court, de moyens de protection autour dun thme, celui des enjeux de transformation dans les rapports entre science, homme, sport et technologies, nous pourrons peut-tre assister la fin du sport de comptition, du moins tel que nous le connaissons. De quoi demain sera-t-il fait? La mutation technologique que reprsente le passage aux nanosciences et nanotechnologies saccompagnera dun phnomne de transversalit appel mtaconvergence, prcipitant un bouleversement de la condition humaine, qui amne diverses organisations scientifiques voquer lenjeu dun homme en transition, dun transhumanisme en quelque sorte. Lubris dsignait chez les Grecs anciens tout ce qui dpasse la mesure, mais encore faut-il tre en situation de dire o se situe la limite. Jusquo pouvons-nous aller trop loin? Le dfi est celui de lubris technologique. Technological progress stands as a force for improvement, but simultaneously it can also be seen as an element that is wearing away the ethical and political core of sport. If, before a deadline that is looming ever closer, the world of sport fails to take steps to protect itself in one particular respect, that of considering what is at stake in terms of the changing relationships between science, mankind, sport and technology, then we may be seeing the end of competitive sport, at least as we know it. What will tomorrow be made of? The technological change that is coming with the move towards nanosciences and nanotechnology will bring with it a transversal phenomenon known as metaconvergence resulting in a revolution in the human condition that has led some scientific organisations to raise the prospect of a human being in transition, a kind of transhumanism. Hubris was the word used by the ancient Greeks for that which went too far, but one needs to be in a position to say where the limits lie. How far can we go before it becomes too far? The challenge is that of technological hubris.

J. Wauthier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

B Flavour Tagging with Artificial Neural Networks for the CDF II Experiment  

SciTech Connect

One of the central questions arising from human curiosity has always been what matter is ultimately made of, with the idea of some kind of elementary building-block dating back to the ancient greek philosophers. Scientific activities of multiple generations have contributed to the current best knowledge about this question, the Standard Model of particle physics. According to it, the world around us is composed of a small number of stable elementary particles: Electrons and two different kinds of quarks, called up and down quarks. Quarks are never observed as free particles, but only as bound states of a quark-antiquark pair (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons), summarized as hadrons. Protons and Neutrons, the constituents forming the nuclei of all chemical elements, are baryons made of up and down quarks. The electron and the electron neutrino - a nearly massless particle without electric charge - belong to a group called leptons. These two quarks and two leptons represent the first generation of elementary particles. There are two other generations of particles, which seem to have similar properties as the first generation except for higher masses, so there are six quarks and six leptons altogether. They were around in large amounts shortly after the beginning of the universe, but today they are only produced in high energetic particle collisions. Properties of particles are described by quantum numbers, for example charge or spin. For every type of particle, a corresponding antiparticle exists with the sign of all charges swapped, but similar properties otherwise. The Standard Model is a very successful theory, describing the properties of all known particles and the interactions between them. Many of its aspects have been tested in various experiments at very high precision. Although none of these experimental tests has shown a significant deviation from the corresponding Standard Model prediction, the theory can not be complete yet: Cosmological aspects like gravity, dark matter and dark energy are not described, and open questions remain in the sector of neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations. Also no answer has been given to the question of matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the contemporary universe. Assuming that the Big Bang created equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there must be effects where nature treats matter and antimatter somehow different. This can happen through a mechanism called CP violation, which has been observed within the Standard Model, but not in the necessary order of magnitude. For all these reasons, the search for New Physics - theories beyond the Standard Model - is one of the main objectives of modern particle physics. In this global effort, flavour physics is the field of transitions between the different types of quarks, called quark flavours, wherein the examination of B meson oscillations and the search for CP violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays set the stage for the work presented in this thesis.

Schmidt, Andreas; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The play of light in crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

And God said: 'Let there be light', and there was light. Genesis 1 3 When trapped in a crystal, light interacts with electrons, phonons (crystal lattice vibrations) and defects, generating many effects which are important not only for pure physics, by broadening our comprehension of nature, but also for practical applications. These include: photo-galvanic effects; discrete light scattering on lattice vibrations; laser radiation, first observed in ruby crystals; nonlinear effects resulting in generation of harmonics, so that under incidence of an intense coherent light beam onto a crystal it emits (or reflects) light of different wavelengths; transformation of the electron avalanche in semiconductors and semiconductor microstructures into the flow of coherent 'laser' light; and the capability of polarized light to magnetize electrons and nuclei in a crystal. This is far from being a complete list of the remarkable optical effects that scientists have observed and studied in crystals. Countless scientific papers and monographs have been devoted to these investigations, with quite a number of them leading to the award of Nobel Prizes. Here I'm going to speak very briefly, simplifying the problem as best I can, about a remarkable optical phenomenon in crystals: the generation by light of a quasiparticle called an 'exciton'. Why is it a 'quasiparticle', i.e. 'as if' a particle, and not a true particle? Because it exists in a crystal and not in vacuum and moves in a periodically changing field created by the atoms (ions) of the crystal lattice. In this respect, an electron in a crystal is also a quasiparticle. The idea of the exciton dawned upon Yakov Ilyich Frenkel, the well-known physicist of the Physico-Technical Institute (PhysTech), in 1931. Omitting the details that would require knowledge not only of quantum physics, but also of the history of its development, I'll say only that the Frenkel exciton is the excited state of the crystal, which is created, for instance, by light and which, arising in one of the crystal cells, spreads over the whole crystal, because the cells differ absolutely in no way from one another. Physicists call such a situation translation symmetry. Without going into the mechanism of the energy transfer from cell to cell, note only that the whole crystal, like a gigantic molecule, assumes in the excited exciton state. The word 'exciton' was coined by Frenkel himself, who had formed it from old Greek exito, meaning 'I excite'. Yakov Ilyich liked to give names to newly-discovered particles, and it was he who invented the name 'phonon' for the vibrational quantum of the crystal lattice. Few physicists know that the godfather of this term, forever established in physics, was Frenkel. When Frenkel reported his study on the exciton at PhysTech, one of his young colleagues couldn't help joking: 'Yasha, why didn't you name this particle in Russian---vozbudon'? (From the Russian vozbudit, meaning 'to excite'.) In contrast to the electron, which can also be excited by light in a crystal, the exciton is electrically neutral. Moving in the crystal it transfers energy, but not a charge. A neutral exciton is very much like an atom. But this 'atom' is generated by light within a crystal. The model of such a quasi-atom is particularly obvious in semiconductor crystals, where it can be conceived as an electron and a positively charged hole bound by Coulomb interaction. It is very much like the Dirac electron--positron pair, whose existence ensues from the well-known Dirac equation taking into account relativistic invariance---the same equation that has revealed to mankind the existence of antimatter. I think that it was under the influence of Dirac's ideas that the Englishman Mott and the American Wannier suggested an exciton model analogous to the positronium atom (an electron and a positron bound to each other by Coulomb interaction). It should be noted that both Mott and Wannier worked at Bristol University where Dirac had worked. Usually, the Wannier--Mott exciton is called hydrogen-like, bearing in mind its s

Boris Petrovitch Zakharchenya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z