Sample records for greater mekong subregion

  1. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker Energy HoldingEnergy Information Subregion

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin: alternative approaches to deal hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide

  3. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  4. Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Andreas

    Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise Rik is related with the low shelf gradient and a strong acceleration of the East Asian sea-level rise from 34 depositional systems change into estuaries and eventually drown when sea-level rise overtakes the sediment

  5. Greater West Texas State Employee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we change lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2013 Annual Report of Transportation-Odessa Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Local Campaign.ttuhsc.edu/relations/secc www.facebook.com/gwtsecc #12;2013 Top Greater West Texas State Agencies In Employee Participation 2013

  6. Distinguishing Between Greater and Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    .e. knee high), minimal cover at ground level, and an abundance of flowering plants that harbor insects, see Ecology and Management of the Greater Prairie-Chicken E-969 at nrem.okstate.edu/extension. Threats power devel- opment. GPCs can tolerate some minimal levels of fragmentation, but at higher levels

  7. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of underflow into the subregion. Both conceptual models extend approximately 25 miles to the southwest of the INEEL, a distance sufficient to include known concentrations of contaminant tracers. Several hypotheses have been developed concerning the effective thickness of the SRPA at the INEEL. The USGS model has defined the effective thickness from electrical resistivity and borehole data to be as much as 2,500 ft in the eastern part of the subregion and as much as 4,000 ft in the southwestern part. The WAG-10 model has developed two alternatives using aquifer-temperature and electrical resistivity data. The ''thick'' aquifer interpretation utilizes colder temperature data and includes a northtrending zone in which the thickness exceeds 1,300 ft and with a maximum thickness of 1,700 ft. The ''thin'' aquifer interpretation minimizes aquifer thickness, with thickness ranging from 328 to 1,300 ft. Facility-specific models generally have focused efforts on the upper 250 ft of saturation. Conceptual models have utilized a stratigraphic data set to define geohydrologic units within the INEEL subregion. This data set, compiled from geophysical logs and cores from boreholes, correlates the thick, complex stack of basalt flows across the subregion. Conceptual models generally concur that the upper geohydrologic unit consists of a section of highly fractured, multiple, thin basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. Beneath this unit is an areally extensive, thick, unfractured basalt flow that rises above the water table southwest of the INEEL. The bottom unit consists of a thick section of slightly- to moderately-altered basalt. A key objective of the DOE water-integration project at the INEEL is to coordinate development of a subregional conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport that is based on the best available understanding of geologic and hydrologic features. The first step in this process is to compile and summarize the current conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL that have been developed from extensive geohydrologic studies con

  8. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  9. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2011 Annual Report of Transportation Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Campaign Manager Nicole campaign information 2011 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (chair), Texas Tech University Health

  10. 2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign You will find, as you look,717 and West Central Texas SECC raised $131,797 for a combined total of $957,514! · 4,608 state employees gave a fan! www.facebook.com/pages/Greater-West-Texas-State- Employee-Charitable-Campaign/103542263037744

  11. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2012 Annual Report campaign information 2012 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (Chair), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center David Abercia, Texas Tech University Dianah Ascencio, Texas Department of Transportation

  12. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  13. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  14. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  15. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  16. Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview DARRYL E. JORY and EDWIN S. IVERSEN mariculture in the greater Caribbean area (Fig. 1). Sea- food is and has been a staple for Carib- bean people since pre-Columbian times. ABSIRACF-Marine mollusks suitable for mariculture in the Caribbean area have

  17. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  18. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  19. asymptomatic greater kudus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Cover Change (1975-2000) in the Greater Border Lakes Region Research Map NRS-3 United land cover classifications and change detection for a 13.8 million ha landscape...

  20. Captive propagation and brood behavior of greater prairie chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1994 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  1. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. [BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team`s ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  2. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  3. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  4. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  5. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  6. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  7. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  8. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  9. Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater Long

  10. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater

  11. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  12. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  13. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  14. Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings July 23, 2010 - 4:03pm Addthis Cindy Regnier,...

  15. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation...

  16. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  17. 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    1 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) Julio A-mail:polimita@hotmail.com Nico M. Franz Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico PO Box 9012, Mayagüez, PR 00681, U.S.A. E-mail:franz@uprm.edu Abstract. The bee fauna of the Greater Puerto Rico area was studied. A review

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  19. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  20. Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

  1. You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and engineering. Our'Texas Aggie football team is nationally acclaimed, and every game brings a festive atmosphere

  2. An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates Siobhán B. Cookea from Haiti, Insulacebus toussaintiana, is described here from the most complete Caribbean subfossil

  3. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  4. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  5. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  6. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    community, grouse, hazard function, mortality, preda- tion, wind turbine *Correspondence author. EEffects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development

  7. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  8. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  9. Asthenospheric upwelling, oceanic slab retreat, and exhumation of UHP mantle rocks: Insights from Greater Antilles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Greater Antilles in Hispaniola. We use numerical models of intra-oceanic subduction to explain exhumation Antilles in Hispaniola [Abbott et al., 2006; Abbott et al., 2005]. Field observations show that the garnet and Hispaniola islands [e.g., Lewis et al., 2006]. It was formed during subduction of the Proto-Caribbean oceanic

  10. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (production of electricity at the point of use) may reduce CO2 emissions relative to the most likely of electricity and CO2 emissions. The results showed that while greater energy efficiency is achieved: December 10, 1999 #12;iii ABSTRACT The Canadian government is evaluating options to reduce CO2 emissions

  11. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  12. Solid waste workers and livelihood strategies in Greater Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Claudel, E-mail: claudelnoel@gmail.co [University of the West Indies, Institute for Sustainable Development, Environmental Management Unit, 13 Gibraltar Camp Way, Mona Campus, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid waste management industry in Haiti is comprised of a formal and an informal sector. Many basic activities in the solid waste management sector are being carried out within the context of profound poverty, which exposes the failure of the socioeconomic and political system to provide sufficient job opportunities for the urban population. This paper examines the involvement of workers in the solid waste management industry in Greater Port-au-Prince and the implications for livelihood strategies. The findings revealed that the Greater Port-au-Prince solid waste management system is very inclusive with respect to age, while highly segregated with regard to gender. In terms of earning capacity, the results showed that workers hired by the State agencies were the most economically vulnerable group as more than 50% of them fell below the official nominal minimum wage. This paper calls for better salary scales and work compensation for the solid waste workers.

  13. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  14. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  15. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  16. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  17. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  18. Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste treatment technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, T W; Fischer, D K

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed to provide the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program with criteria and a methodology to select candidate treatment technologies for Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) destined for dedicated storage and ultimately disposal. The technology selection criteria are provided in a Lotus spreadsheet format to allow the methodology to evolve as the GTCC LLW Program evolves. It is recognized that the final disposal facility is not yet defined; thus, the waste acceptance criteria and other facility-specific features are subject to change. The spreadsheet format will allow for these changes a they occur. As additional treatment information becomes available, it can be factored into the analysis. The technology selection criteria were established from program goals, draft waste acceptance criteria for dedicated storage (including applicable regulations), and accepted remedial investigation methods utilized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Kepner-Tregoe decisionmaking techniques are used to compare and rank technologies against the criteria.

  19. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  20. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  1. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  2. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  3. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  4. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  5. Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Computers, such as Facebook (FB) is also a somewhat prickly topic in higher education as the stakeholders listed above attempt

  6. Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total inter-vessel pit area per ves-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total cavitation safety and transport efficiency. Fourteen species of diverse growth form (vine, ring- and diffuse species total). Two types of vulnerability-to-cavitation curves were found. Ring-porous trees and vines

  7. The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    PROBLEM The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While Massachusetts' seismic building codes are adapted from Cali- fornia to damage from earthquakes of small magnitude, particularly if the fundamen- tal frequency of the seismic

  8. Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

  9. Michael Langley GREATER MSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    prosper here. People prosper here. OUR REGION'S STORY #12;RAPID URBANIZATION & GROWING MIDDLE CLASS Mumbai and Insurance Reports (examples) · Met Council: NARC Study · MGI: Game Changers Data Analysis · Sectors (Mc · Nutrition · Water filtration · Water purification Food & Water Solutions #12;BUSINESS AND PEOPLE PROSPER

  10. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  11. Utility concepts applied to the socio-economic subregionization analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Joseph Ching-Huei

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and, can be grouped into a single factor. These factors usually are independent of one another and may readily be used. to represent all the essential information of the original set of varia- bles. The reduction of the number of variables can... the most important information contained in the original data. As pointed out by Hummel, factor analysis has 40 these distinguishing characteristics: 1 . Factor analysis can separate the interrela- tionship among the phenomena into functional patterns...

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study.

  13. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  14. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  15. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  16. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  17. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  18. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  19. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G. [Waste Management Group, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases.

  20. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 3, Sealed sources held by general licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume in a series of three volumes characterizing the population of sealed sources that may become greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). In this volume, those sources possessed by general licensees are discussed. General-licensed devices may contain sealed sources with significant amounts of radioactive material. However, the devices are designed to be safe to use without special knowledge of radiological safety practices. Devices containing Am-241 or Cm-244 sources are most likely to become GTCC LLW after concentration averaging. This study estimates that there are about 16,000 GTCC devices held by general licensees; 15,000 of these contain Am-241 sources and 1,000 contain Cm-244 sources. Additionally, this study estimates that there are 1,600 GTCC devices sold to general licensees each year. However, due to a lack of available information on general licensees in Agreement States, these estimates are uncertain. This uncertainty is quantified in the low and high case estimates given in this report, which span approximately an order of magnitude.

  1. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 1, Sealed sources held by specific licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sealed sources are small, relatively high-activity radioactive sources typically encapsulated in a metallic container. The activities can range from less than 1 mCi to over 1,000 Ci. They are used in a variety of industries and are commonly available. Many of the sources will be classified as Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) for the purpose of waste disposal. The US Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of this class of low-level radioactive waste. To better understand the scope of the GTCC LLW situation regarding sealed sources and to provide data to a model that projects future quantities of GTCC material, data from a comprehensive 1991 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) survey and a related 1992 survey of Agreement States were analyzed to estimate the number, volume, and activity of Potential GTCC sealed sources currently available from specific licensees. Potential GTCC sealed sources are sources that exceed the limits stated in 10 CFR 61 when isotope concentrations are averaged over the volume of the capsule. Based on the surveys, the estimated number of existing Potential GTCC sealed sources held by specific licensees is 89,000, with an unpackaged volume of 0.93 m{sup 3} and an activity of 2,300,000 Ci. However, current disposal practices allow concentration averaging over the disposal container, substantially reducing the number of sealed sources which will actually be classified as GTCC LLW.

  2. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  3. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  4. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  5. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  6. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  7. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  8. Floodplain River Foodwebs in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Chouly

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics in tropical rivers undergo significant seasonal shifts and emphasizes that river food webs are altered by dams and flow regulation. Seston and benthic algae were the most important production sources supporting fish biomass during the dry season...

  9. Energy and Environment Partnership Programme for Mekong Region | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:Emminol JumpEnergy SystemSystems Network

  10. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  11. Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars. Frothy bloat is the major nonpathogenic cause of death loss and depressed weight gains in stocker cattle grazing winter wheat

  12. What is the Eelgrass Stressor Response Project? The Eelgrass Stressor Response Project was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget Sound. It is closely connected to DNR's long term eelgrass monitoring program. Both projects are part of the Puget Sound Assessment and Monitoring Program (PSAMP), a multi-agency monitoring effort that is coordinated by the Puget Sound

  13. Brandon Heller A number of recent advances in the physical layer are enabling wireless communications devices to reach ever-greater speeds. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    -Division Multiplexing (OFDM) 3. Multi-Antenna Techniques 3.1 Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) 3.2 Multiple Input range, better bit rates, greater battery life, and increased reliability. Upcoming standards bit-error rates. Section 4 describes options for more reliably encoding data. Section five discusses

  14. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  15. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix I: Impact of concentration averaging low-level radioactive waste volume projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; O`Kelley, M.; Ely, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a quantitative framework for bounding unpackaged greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste types as a function of concentration averaging. The study defines the three concentration averaging scenarios that lead to base, high, and low volumetric projections; identifies those waste types that could be greater-than-Class C under the high volume, or worst case, concentration averaging scenario; and quantifies the impact of these scenarios on identified waste types relative to the base case scenario. The base volume scenario was assumed to reflect current requirements at the disposal sites as well as the regulatory views. The high volume scenario was assumed to reflect the most conservative criteria as incorporated in some compact host state requirements. The low volume scenario was assumed to reflect the 10 CFR Part 61 criteria as applicable to both shallow land burial facilities and to practices that could be employed to reduce the generation of Class C waste types.

  16. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  17. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  18. amatoxin northern california: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use of approximateuse, storm damage California, Subregion IV, Santa Cruz Cell Water Wave Refractionuse California, Subregion I, Subregion II, Subregion III, Subregion...

  19. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  20. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPAR?, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ? PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin attenuates arsenic-induced diabetes in mice. ? Encapsulated insulin acts effectively at nearly 10 fold lesser dose than insulin. ? Injection route is more effective than oral administration route. ? Nano-insulin can cross blood–brain barrier with added physiological implications. ? Nano-insulin acts mainly through regulation of mitochondrial signaling cascade.

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  2. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  3. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  4. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

  6. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  7. Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

  8. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  9. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPA / SPRA / USACE MarshallWeEarl

  11. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  12. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the module includes training on the Idaho site commitment to safety and safety programs, quality assurance and environmental protection and the right to a safe and healthful...

  13. Ecology and Greater Prairie-Chicken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    of Mortality and Competition _______________ 5 Wind Power Generation ___________________________ 5 Habitat

  14. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  15. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind FarmGratiotLakesWind

  16. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee RegionIndiana

  17. Modeling transport and deposition of the Mekong River sediment Zuo Xue a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    . In the following winter, strong ocean mixing, and coastal current lead to resuspension and southwestward dispersal

  18. Greater solubility usually = greater toxicity Chromium (Cr) Six oxidation states, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    (depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals Uranium ­ heaviest natural element - 17 isotopes · Natural form % = U-238 (99.27), U-235 (0.72), U-234 (0 in nuclear fuel ­ U-235 (readily fissionable) · Used in nuclear and conventional weapons · Uranium enrichment

  19. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia.

  20. Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same soils appear to more efficiently retain TN and some TOC at greater depths. Very low DOC in both soils indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in microbial or SOM pools. Greater mineral N in granite percent. There is not evidence of the impact of increased available C on TOC in granitic soils. Soil

  1. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle MATERIAL. © 2008 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers

  2. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the public and private sectors in providing a supply of high quality urban water? Best management practices in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operation

  3. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2012 - 3:10pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Second Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Since February 2010, the Variable Generation Subcommittee at...

  4. The health of manufacturing in the UK is assuming greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    , energy production and mineral extraction would place the total to nearer 25% of the economy manufac- turing processes, are in- volved. A wider definition, including, for example, con- struction

  5. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Antonio International Airport. The city's EECBG management team knew the new airport terminal offered a highly visible location to showcase renewable energy technologies and help...

  6. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Wise detections of known QSOs at redshifts greater than six

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blain, Andrew W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Assef, Roberto; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bridge, Carrie [California Institute of Technology, 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarrett, Tom [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Cutri, Roc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, Sara [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics MC 0435, 910 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L., E-mail: ab520@le.ac.uk [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present WISE All-Sky mid-infrared (IR) survey detections of 55% (17/31) of the known QSOs at z > 6 from a range of surveys: the SDSS, the CFHT-LS, FIRST, Spitzer, and UKIDSS. The WISE catalog thus provides a substantial increase in the quantity of IR data available for these sources: 17 are detected in the WISE W1 (3.4 ?m) band, 16 in W2 (4.6 ?m), 3 in W3 (12 ?m), and 0 in W4 (22 ?m). This is particularly important with Spitzer in its warm-mission phase and no faint follow-up capability at wavelengths longward of 5 ?m until the launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WISE thus provides a useful tool for understanding QSOs found in forthcoming large-area optical/IR sky surveys using PanSTARRS, SkyMapper, VISTA, DES, and LSST. The rest-UV properties of the WISE-detected and the WISE-non-detected samples differ: the detections have brighter i/z-band magnitudes and redder rest-UV colors. This suggests that a more aggressive hunt for very high redshift QSOs by combining WISE W1 and W2 data with red, observed optical colors could be effective at least for a subset of dusty candidate QSOs. Stacking the WISE images of the WISE-non-detected QSOs indicates that they are, on average, significantly fainter than the WISE-detected examples, and are thus not narrowly missing detection in the WISE catalog. The WISE catalog detection of three of our sample in the W3 band indicates that their mid-IR flux can be detected individually, although there is no stacked W3 detection of sources detected in W1 but not W3. Stacking analyses of WISE data for large active galactic nucleus samples will be a useful tool, and high-redshift QSOs of all types will be easy targets for JWST.

  8. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WASHINGTON - Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today...

  9. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 12:00am Addthis Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today...

  10. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification Plan: Residential Retrofits A Primer on EM&V, Data Collection, Tracking and Reporting of Efficiency Savings, and Supporting Available Tools for EECBG and SEP Grantees...

  11. Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska and Computational Investigations of Sandbar Dynamics ­ Paul Kinzel, U.S. Geological Survey ­ Colorado Water Science and Values in the Niobrara Basin: Does Water Flow to Money? ­ Steven Shultz, University of Nebraska-Omaha 2

  12. THE GREATER TORONTO AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODELLING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    . Miller Bahen-Tanenbaum Professor Department of Civil Engineering University of Toronto Joint Program Distribution 32 4.5.3 Mode Split 32 4.6 Modelling Socio-Economic Attributes 32 #12;4 TABLE OF CONTENTS, cont with a basic understanding of what the model does, the key assumptions upon which the model is built

  13. Title: Boundary File: GTA (Greater Toronto Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District, and Municipal Boundary ­ Lower Municipality of Durham, Regional Municipality of York Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum

  14. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of ENERGYAgrees withDepartment of

  15. affords greater survival: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Page 1 of 2 Affordable Care Act Health Care Reform Physics Websites Summary: Page 1 of 2 Affordable Care Act Health Care Reform...

  16. Dining Options Near the Greater Richmond Convention Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on traditional deli fare. Fish platters, build- your own sandwiches, "deli dogs", potato-and- duck pierogis and more. ** B BR L D 4-12 blocks from GRCC Rappahannock 320...

  17. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdf MoreRevisedProgram Breaks Down Barriers for

  18. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex(GC-72) |Reserve |Sadesh Sookraj,ImproveEnergy with

  19. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen andMeeting Date:FocusProgram

  20. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact UsDepartment ofNuclear Energy forDepartment of

  1. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartment ofSeptember 2013Service

  2. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber ofTexas-Louisiana-

  3. LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAMEnergyInvestigativeCogginLES' URENCO-USA

  4. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee

  5. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro

  6. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnology PerformanceDepartmentforEfficiency, Save Money |

  7. KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island, Florida: Energy

  8. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long Valley Caldera | Openequal

  9. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 500 ppm Sulfur

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights ï‚·2008DeutscheState470,6036,190

  10. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings forinitialThose

  11. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings forinitialThoseEfficiency,

  12. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union WorkSession Chair:Energy

  13. DOE prepared for Greater Sage-Grouse designation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOE

  14. Greater Carrollwood, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiverCarrollwood,

  15. Greater Northdale, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:

  16. Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:

  17. Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:EnergySun

  18. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department Third Report to theEfficiency, Save

  19. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroup ReportLow IncomeE-Government ActEight

  20. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellence |Science BowlSimulation Model

  1. Dr. Bill Brinkman: Working Towards Greater Energy Security | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher Fecko ChemicalJohnBenjamin L.

  2. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

  3. Severe depression is associated with increased microglial quinolinic acid in subregions of the anterior cingulate gyrus: Evidence for an immune-modulated glutamatergic neurotransmission?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Johann; Walter, Martin; Gos, Tomasz; Guillemin, Gilles J; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Mawrin, Christian; Brisch, Ralf; Bielau, Hendrik; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Louise; Bogerts, Bernhard; Myint, Aye-Mu

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    †, Tomasz Gos1,3, Gilles J Guillemin4, Hans-Gert Bernstein1, Zoltán Sarnyai5, Christian Mawrin6, Ralf Brisch1, Hendrik Bielau1, Louise Meyer zu Schwabedissen1, Bernhard Bogerts1 and Aye-Mu Myint1,7 Abstract Background: Immune dysfunction, including... ) has invited JS for a Visiting Scholarship. This work was supported in part by grants of the Stanley Medical Research Foundation to BB and JS (Grant No. 07R-1832), the Commission of European Communities 7th Framework Program Collaborative Project...

  4. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 12. Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegley, H.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puerto Rico/US Virgin Island atlas assimilates three collections of wind resource data: one for the region as a whole and one each for both the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. For the two subregions, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in both subregions are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  5. Cross-modal plasticity for tactile and auditory stimuli within the visual cortex of early blind human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Lindsay Burke

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    blind than sighted subjects) within subregions of somatosensory cortex is interesting, in this thesis,

  6. Towards greater personalisation of active labour market policy? Britain and Germany compared 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goerne, Rudolf Alexander

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This PhD study centres on analysing the changing employment service portfolios available to disadvantaged people out of work in Britain and Germany. Looking at the recent wave of comparative studies on ‘activation’ ...

  7. he need for efficient food production has never been greater. One in seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    is undernourished1 . Urbani- zation and biofuel production are reducing land availability, and climate change, lack fallen in one-quarter of countries. Meanwhile, developing nations and the growing world population'sfoodcomesfrom farms that raise both. Animals pull ploughs and carts, and their manure fertilizes crops, which supply

  8. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region(s): Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, Global This paper shows that a decline in car ownership in cities in developed nations can be attributed primarily to people living...

  9. Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  10. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Contracting companies supporting EM’s cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies.

  11. Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

  12. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999. “Cool Home Features Bring Peak Energy Savings. ”Home Energy 16:22–27. Sherman, M. , D. Wilson and D. Kiel.Residential Heating and Cooling Energy Use in Four Canadian

  13. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identity – one of sustainable living, group values, andliving – a sort of utopian agrarianism in which food is both environmentally sustainable and

  14. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington; Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho; the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the WIPP vicinity in New Mexico; the Nevada...

  15. lem of greater complexity than the overhaul of the global energy system. Energy touches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into place. Substantial govern- ment spending on research and development will be required, along of energy for the world in this century,and we will have to develop new technologies for its use if we.N.Secretary-GeneralKofiAnnanontheMil- lennium Development Goals. In April 2004, Timemagazinenamedhimoneofthe100most influential people

  16. Outreach NOW 6 Outreach NOW 7 Acrowd of more than 60 people from the greater Wash-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Science Foundation, other leading federal research agencies, and foreign embassies is helping Virginia.S. federal government. Charles Clancy, director, says, "Our goal is to lead the country in holistically "Joseph" Wang, the Grant A. Dove Profes- sor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director

  17. Greater Acceleration through Sparsity-Promoting GRAPPA Kernel Calibration Daniel S Weller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    , Boston, MA, United States, 4 Dept. of Image Analytics and Informatics, Siemens Corporate Research,2, where N is the total number of fits, is a tuning parameter, is the DWT sparsifying transform, F-1 resolution), requiring 8 minutes in a Siemens Trio 3 T scanner with a vendor-supplied 32-channel head array

  18. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was significantly eliminated in cells pretreated with a 1 mM dose of octanol, which inhibits gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, or in cells carrying a dominant negative connexin 43 vector. The data imply in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose

  19. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  20. Precision wood particle feedstocks with retained moisture contents of greater than 30% dry basis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  1. Weed evolution after crop gene introgression: greater survival and fecundity of hybrids in a new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    . raphanistrum · Raphanus sativus) in Michigan (MI), USA. Hybrid and wild populations had similar growth rates-wild hybrids, we established four wild (Raphanus raphanistrum) and four hybrid radish populations (R, Raphanus raphanistrum. Ecology Letters (2006) 9: 1198­1209 I N T R O DU C T I O N Weed populations can

  2. ENJOYING THE RAIN FOREST Nowhere in the world will your eyes observe a greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will see today are the same as those that dazzled the first Spanish explorers more than 500 years ago. You

  3. Mitogenomic sequences better resolve stock structure of southern Greater Caribbean green turtle rookeries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    confounds assessment of the scale of natal homing and population structure among regional rookeries. We, Venezuela; Galibi, Suriname; and Tortuguero, Costa Rica. Five single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were differentiation supports demographic indepen- dence of Aves Island and Suriname, emphasizing the need to recognize

  4. Charitable Practices of Muslim Americans in the Greater Kansas City Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Joseph

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    American civil rights and discourage Islamic philanthropy; "The passage of both USA Patriot Acts, the closing of several Muslim charities, and the curbing of civil liberties beginning with the Bush administration and continuing through the Obama...

  5. "Justification of Effort" in Animals 60 Animals Prefer Reinforcement that Follows Greater Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Robert

    , Emily Klein, Kelly DiGian, and Jérôme Alessandri without whose help mush of the research described

  6. Distribution, Abundance, and Status of the Greater Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    , in Canada CAMERON L. ALDRIDGE1,2 and R. MARK BRIGHAM Department of Biology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 Canada 1Corresponding Author's e-mail: aldridge@ualberta.ca 2Current Address: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9 Canada Aldridge, Cameron L., and R

  7. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    at Texas A&M University, Sam Houston State University Vertebrate Museum, the Natural Science Research Laboratory at Texas Tech University Museum, the natural history collections at Angelo State University, the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation...

  8. Growth and poverty in the urban fringe : decentralization, dispersion, and inequality in greater Buenos Aires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libertun de Duren, Nora R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents the case of growth in Buenos Aires since the late 1970s, when the decentralization of urban planning powers in the Province of Buenos Aires began, until 2001, when an economic crisis submerged -even ...

  9. World-Class Energy Assessments: Industrial Action Plans for Greater and More Durable Energy Cost Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes recommendations for improving the impact of industrial energy assessments. This initiative responds to the observation that less than half of recommended energy improvements are implemented as a result of traditional...

  10. Asymptotic Zero Energy States for SU(N greater or equal 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Hoppe

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas are presented concerning the question which of the harmonic wavefunctions constructed in [hep-th/9909191] may be annihilated by all supercharges.

  11. Atmospheric effects in astroparticle physics experiments and the challenge of ever greater precision in measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Louedec

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Astroparticle physics and cosmology allow us to scan the universe through multiple messengers. It is the combination of these probes that improves our understanding of the universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. Unlike other areas in science, research in astroparticle physics has a real originality in detection techniques, in infrastructure locations, and in the observed physical phenomenon that is not created directly by humans. It is these features that make the minimisation of statistical and systematic errors a perpetual challenge. In all these projects, the environment is turned into a detector medium or a target. The atmosphere is probably the environment component the most common in astroparticle physics and requires a continuous monitoring of its properties to minimise as much as possible the systematic uncertainties associated. This paper introduces the different atmospheric effects to take into account in astroparticle physics measurements and provides a non-exhaustive list of techniques and instruments to monitor the different elements composing the atmosphere. A discussion on the close link between astroparticle physics and Earth sciences ends this paper.

  12. Feb., 1958 CARBONFORRIATIONFROM CARBONMONOXIDE-HYDROGEN RIIXTURES 133 550". Thisispiesuniably connectedwith the greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : CARBON JIOSOSIDE-HYDROGES MIXTURES OVER IRON CAThLYSTS.'s2 I. PROPERTIES OF CARBON FORMED BYP. L. WALKER, University Park, Pennsylvania Raceived April 8, 1965 The properties of carbons formed from various carbon graphite is used as the moderator and carbon dioxide as the coolant. The extent of carbon transfer

  13. Contamination of the agricultural land due to industrial activities southern of greater Cairo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, E.A.; Ibrahim, Y.H.; Nasralla, M.M. (National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial processes in the investigated area include ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgical work, ceramics, fire bricks, cement industry, etc. Soil, weeds, vegetation and dust samples were collected and analysed for several heavy metals. High levels of Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, Mn and zinc found in the soil close to a lead, zinc smelter. In the heavy contaminated area concentrations of more than 500 ug/g Pb, 1200 ug/g zinc and 50 ug/g Ni and Cd were recorded in the surface soil at 1500 m from the smelter. The concentrations of the heavy metals in the contaminated area (3-5) km from the smelter reached more than 200 ug/g Pb and 25 ug/g Ni and Cd and 160 ug/g zinc. Higher levels of these toxic elements were found in the dust on the leaves of the examined vegetations. Furthermore, accumulated concentrations reached more than 100 ug/g Pb and 10 ug/g Cd in leaves of herbs and maize. Soil close to cement industry found enriched with heavy metals but it is much less pronounced. 10 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

  15. Snake rivers. The Council also believes the changes would provide greater flexibility to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The same month, the Bonneville Power Administration predicted it would lose more than $250 million spending poli- cies, the Bonneville Power Administra- tion could help relieve its financial crisis Commission's proposed Standard Market Design Rule for wholesale power markets was "seriously flawed

  16. Behavioral Ecology Vol. 13 No. 3: 375380 Female greater wax moths reduce sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auckland, University of

    , and Stuart Parsons School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK in the evolution of audition (Faure and Hoy, 2000) and will present the greatest challeng- es when conspecifics) with peak energy between 80 and 100 kHz, and they are emitted in ap- proximatley 0.5-s bursts

  17. A Guide to Wildlands Conservation in the Greater Sierra Nevada Bioregion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilling, Fraser; Girvetz, Evan; Erichsen, Chris; Johnson, Brenda; Nichols, Pete

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wilderness Coalition 2655 Portage Bay East, Suite 5 Davis,Wilderness Coalition 2655 Portage Bay East, Suite 5 Davis,

  18. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 percent. Habitat selection ratios showed a preference for ridge as well as grassland habitat and avoidance of bare ground and flatland habitats. The location data from west Texas was further analyzed to build a predictive logistic regression model...

  19. Title: Boundary File: GTHA (Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Natural Resources 2012 Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum / Map Projection: WGS84 / UTM (17) Resolution: N

  20. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-YearEffectEfficientGovernment

  1. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F,-SA-01:5-SA-01:DraftoftotoRecord of

  2. Recovery of carboxylic acids at pH greater than pK{sub a}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, L.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics of producing carboxylic acids by fermentation is often dominated, not by the fermentation cost, but by the cost of recovering and purifying the acids from dilute aqueous solutions. Experiments were performed to measure uptakes of lactic and succinic acids as functions of pH by basic polymeric sorbents; sorbent regeneration was also tested. Performance at pH > pK{sub a} and regenerability depend on sorbent basicity; apparent pK{sub a} and monomer pK{sub a} can be used to predict sorbent performance. Two basic amine extractants, Alamine 336 and Amberlite LA-2, in were also studied; they are able to sustain capacity to higher pH in diluents that stabilize the acid-amine complex through H bonding. Secondary amines perform better than tert-amines in diluents that solvate the additional proton. Competitive sulfate and phosphate, an interference in fermentation, are taken up by sorbents more strongly than by extractants. The third step in the proposed fermentation process, the cracking of the trimethylammonium (TMA) carboxylate, was also examined. Because lactic acid is more soluble and tends to self-esterify, simple thermal cracking does not remove all TMA; a more promising approach is to esterify the TMA lactate by reaction with an alcohol.

  3. Many voices, one wilderness : collaborative conservation in the greater Chicago region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Justin (Justin Timothy)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a growing recognition in the conservation community that landscape-scale networks of preserves and habitat corridors are needed to adequately protect native biodiversity. While most of the efforts to protect ...

  4. Anim. Behav., 1998, 55, 337350 Social calls coordinate foraging in greater spear-nosed bats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    as they attack prey (Barclay 1982; Balcombe & Fenton 1988). Although echo- location calls can serve other

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfter LeaseMeters Deep

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfter LeaseMeters200 Meters

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfterthan 200 Meters Deep

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfterthanReserves fromthan

  9. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon DOE-HDBK-1046-2008CommerceClean Energy |

  10. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAM DOEofScienceDepartmentEnergy

  11. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005Site-Level ExerciseMarch 14, 2014NovemberImpact

  12. Haiti-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open EnergyHackberry,gateway

  13. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |ProductionDepartmentDevelopment |to|

  14. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights ï‚·2008DeutscheState470,6036,190 5,932

  15. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonnaDraft3:C Low-Level Radioactive

  16. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency, and MoreEnergyof Energy DOEEnergy DOEDOE|

  17. Greater Sage-Grouse Populations and Energy Development in Wyoming | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:Energy

  18. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling inEffluentGovernment

  19. Dominican Republic-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling FarmCenter,Dolliver,Open Energy

  20. Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation sourceInvensysIslandJackson(EC-LEDS)

  1. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringout by electric and gas utilitiesEnergy

  2. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringout by electric and gas utilitiesEnergyPlan

  3. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Department of EnergyMobile

  4. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil &315_ArnibanPriorityof Energy Poneman || Department

  5. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftware and hardware orIndexes LLC Jump

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher FeckoDraft ResourceAdvice:ProjectC

  7. Draft Greater Than Class C EIS Public Hearings to Come to Pasco, WA and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher FeckoDraftDraft For-Profit

  8. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  9. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 3: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on the Release of Contaminants to the Subsurface Environment from Waste Source Terms at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This source-term summary document is intended to describe the current understanding of contaminant source terms and the conceptual model for potential source-term release to the environment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as presented in published INEEL reports. The document presents a generalized conceptual model of the sources of contamination and describes the general categories of source terms, primary waste forms, and factors that affect the release of contaminants from the waste form into the vadose zone and Snake River Plain Aquifer. Where the information has previously been published and is readily available, summaries of the inventory of contaminants are also included. Uncertainties that affect the estimation of the source term release are also discussed where they have been identified by the Source Term Technical Advisory Group. Areas in which additional information are needed (i.e., research needs) are also identified.

  10. Differential Responses of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (Pgrmc1) and the Classical Progesterone Receptor (Pgr) to 17?-Estradiol and Progesterone in Hippocampal Subregions that Support Synaptic Remodeling and Neurogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bali, Namrata; Arimoto, Jason M.; Iwata, Nahoko; Lin, Sharon W.; Zhao, Liqin; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : The Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Climacteric 8:3–12 11. Rapp SR, Espeland MA, Shumaker SA, Henderson VW, Brunner RL,Manson JE, GassML, StefanickML, Lane DS, Hays J, Johnson KC, Coker LH, Dailey M, Bowen D 2003 Effect of estrogen plus progestin...:2651–2662 13. BrintonRD,ThompsonRF, FoyMR,BaudryM,Wang J, FinchCE, Morgan TE, Pike CJ, Mack WJ, Stanczyk FZ, Nilsen J 2008 Pro- gesterone receptors: form and function in brain. Front Neuroendo- crinol 29:313–339 14. Thomas P 2008 Characteristics of membrane...

  11. Precedence of the Eye Region in Neural Processing of Faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issa, Elias

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed multiple subregions in monkey inferior temporal cortex (IT) that are selective for images of faces over other objects. The earliest of these subregions, the posterior ...

  12. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  13. Twentieth-Century Global-Mean Sea Level Rise: Is the Whole Greater than the Sum of the Parts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    and Atmospheric Research, Hobart, Australia c Department of Physical Geography, Utrecht University, Utrecht Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands f Department of Geography, Trent University for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands h Department

  14. Electrical Hazards The greater hazards related to electricity are electrical shock and fire. Electrical shock occurs when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    , the amount of current, the duration of exposure, and whether the skin is wet or dry. Water is a good for the level of hazard. Lab coats (knee-length) and proper footwear are required for work involving chemicals or moving machinery. · Leave behind protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, etc.) when leaving the work

  15. An examination of the impact of introducing greater contextual interference during practice on learning to golf putt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gyu-Young

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    participant practiced putting to three targets (4 ft, 8 ft, and 12 ft distance) for a total of 108 trials (36 trials to each target). On Day Two 30 trials of retention (10 trials to each target) and 10 transfer trials (10 ft distance) were performed...

  16. 1st World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography, Buxton, Greater Manchester 1417 April 1999. Eddy Current Tomography for Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo

    . 451 Eddy Current Tomography for Metal Solidification Imaging Minh H. Pham* , Yingbo Hua* , Neil B of molten metal inside a pipe by eddy currents. A complete mathematical model is developed which reveals functions in multiple layered media. Keywords: eddy current tomography, electromagnetic field, numerical

  17. EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, Katherine [City of Philadelphia] [City of Philadelphia

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

  18. An examination of the impact of introducing greater contextual interference during practice on learning to golf putt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gyu-Young

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    adjustments. Such adjustments were beneficial when participants had to respond to a novel target location during transfer. Wegman (1999) examined the effect of three practice methods (repetitions, random, and combined) on ball rolling, racket striking...

  19. COMPLETE TRACKING OF PROTON FLOW IN THYLAKOIDS THE UNIT CONDUCTANCE OF CFo IS GREATER THAN 10 fS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schönknecht, Gerald

    further 20% of CF1 and increased the proton permeability of membranes by 3 orders of magnitude. In control, B, y, .sand £· 3 subunits (a, band c) are found for bacterial F0 , while 4 subunits (IV, I and III low, some percent of a 213 #12;femto-Siemens (fS) [6,8]. than 100 protons/sand F0 · 900 protons

  20. Identification of Water Resources Planning Problems in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio and its Associated Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, J. K.; Shih, C. S.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agencies, river authorities and interest groups in water resources management have evolved into a complicated system in this area. Thus, it was realized that an overview embedded with the systems approach for the current water resources problems is needed...

  1. W E R E ' S THEMANAGEMENT IN COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT? Planning for Improved Care, Greater Use, and Growth of Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    LA GESTION EN LA ADMINISTRACIONDE LAS COLECCIONES? La necesidad urgente de documentar y proteger la de un sistema asociado de perfiles de colecciones; 2) establecimiento de un indice de salud de la mCtodo de medir la calidad de las colecciones; y 5) uso de 10s informes de impacto de colecciones

  2. The interest across our nation in the health and welfare of children has never been greater. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    to demonstrate that the approach proposed is likely to be effective. The more cutting-edge and creative funding is fierce. A key factor for success is whether an applicant has preliminary (pilot) data given our researchers that extra competitive edge needed to secure larger grants. The following examples

  3. Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Mallow, Anne M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

  4. Identification of Management and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, K.; Shih, C. S.

    including the inventory and planning control for both surface and ground Water Resource Management of the San Antonio area are presented. Emphasis has been placed upon the identification of the probabilistic nature of various decision-making parameters...

  5. Evaluation of carbon fluxes and trends (2000e2008) in the Greater Platte River Basin: A sustainability study for potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    world food shortages, livestock and food price increases, and negative environmental effects: A sustainability study for potential biofuel feedstock development, Biomass and Bioenergy (2012), http

  6. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen andMeeting Date:FocusProgramFocus

  7. Reasoning about Primes (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Oehlschlägel

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a couple of related theorems including Legendre's and Andrica's conjecture. Key to the proofs is an algorithm that delivers the exact upper bound on the greatest gap that can occur in a combinatorial game with the set of $P$ primes $\\le p$ in their doubled primorial interval $0..p\\#..2p\\#$ where we relax a constraint that the primes usually follow: if the bound $g(P)=2p-5$ for maximizing the gap length applies with more degrees of freedom, it also applies in the more constrained prime game as $g(P)\\le2p-5$, at least in the subregion $[1,{p'}^2]$ where no other primes have influence ($p'$ notates the next other prime). From here proving the mentioned theorems is straightforward, for example Legendre's interval $]n^2,(n+1)^2[$ is located completely inside the valid subregion and is greater than the greatest possible gap. Another consequence is that there must be a prime within $n\\pm (\\sqrt{n}-1)$ for all $n>1$. For small numbers the proofs are verified using the R statistical language.

  8. anambra state southeast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Southeast Asia Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: in this area is based on monthly data. None of the studies presents a comprehensive picture of the Mekong Delta...

  9. SPARTANADVENTURES SPARTAN PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Patagonia Dog Sledding in Northern Michigan Antarctica February Wolves of Yellowstone Cuba March Mekong, Cozumel, Belize City, Santo Tomas, Roatán, Costa Maya TREASURES OF PATAGONIA (VIA AUSTRALIA) January 11

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 2012 University of Washington Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Nation Building and Nature in the Mekong Delta david biggs "A much-needed perspective on human efforts over time to shape this amphibious land/waterscape. . . . Biggs is clearly a major talent, who has

  11. Bill Post is a Valley leader, involved with the ASU Foundation, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Arizona, The Greater Phoenix Leadership, The Institute of Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    , The Thunderbird School of Global Management, and Translational Genomics Research Institute. In 2007, he was Valley such as efforts to improve power plant emissions-to-algae-to-biofuel, high efficiency solar cells, and projects for the fifth consecutive year in the 2009 Dow Jones World Sustainability Index and the 2009 Dow Jones North

  12. 1st World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography, Buxton, Greater Manchester, April 14-17, 1999. Development of Iterative Algorithms for Industrial Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickalov, Valery

    , Novosibirsk 630090, Russia Pickalov@itam.nsc.ru *Institute of Introscopy, Tomsk 634028, Russia Abstract

  13. Timing of the deposition of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene coal-bearing deposits in the Greater Glendive area, Montana and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the aid of a grant from the National Geographic Society, a cooperative agreement with the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Late Cretaceous and Paleocene geologic and paleontologic field studies were undertaken in Makoshika, State Park and vicinity, Dawson County, Montana. This region was chosen as a study area because of its potential for yielding new fossil localities and extensive exposures both above and below the K/T boundary, as suggested by previous research by David W. Krause and Joseph H. Hartman. Related field studies were also undertaken in areas adjacent to the Cedar Creek Anticline in North Dakota. This work was part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of mammalian and molluscan faunas during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene and to relate observed patterns to floral and invertebrate changes in composition. This study focuses on the record of mammals and mollusks in the Makoshika stratigraphic section and places old and new observations into a paleomagnetic and palynomorph framework. Of particular interest is the appearance and diversification of archaic ungulate mammals. Simultaneous dinosaur extinction with ungulate radiation has been invoked in gradual, as opposed to catastrophic, models of faunal change at the K/T boundary. However, supposed Cretaceous localities bearing archaic ungulates and other mammals of {open_quotes}Paleocene aspect{close_quotes} may be the product of faunal reworking. Elsewhere in the Williston Basin (e.g., Garfield and McCone Counties, Montana), the molluscan record of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene strata indicates the extinction of all of the highly sculptured unionid bivalves just prior to the onset of coal swamps and subsequent coal formation.

  14. A .--The continental scaup population (Lesser [Aythya affinis] and Greater [A. marila] combined) has declined markedly since 1978. One hypothesis for the population decline states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    hipótesis comparando el peso corporal y las reservas de nutrientes (lípidos, proteínas y minerales) de A y 2000. Encontramos que el peso corporal promedio y las reservas de lípidos y minerales de las Louisiana; de modo similar, el peso corporal y las reservas de lípidos y minerales de los machos fueron 108

  15. Planning the Ranch for Greater Profit: A Study of Physical and Economic Factors Affecting Organization and Management of Ranches in the Edwards Plateau Grazing Area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Tate, J. N. (James Norman)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the numbers of cattle have been decreasing since 1923. The decline in numbers of all kinds of livestock in the area from 1917-1919 was apparently due to drought conditions during 1917 and 1918. This de- cline was only temporary-the trend continuing upward...; two-year heifers 1.04. vearling steers 96- two-year steer I .OB; three-year steer 1.14; ewes -15; rams .17; lambs .08. vearling e.wes .11; ykirling wethers .'I];' wethers .lfi; does .13; bucks .15; kids .05; yearling does .lo; chevons .ii...

  16. cast rates greater than about 0.4 per output port, since at that rate the multicast queues themselves become unstable.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    1998. [4] G. Birkhoff. Tres observaciones sobre el algebra lineal. Univ. Nac. Tu­ cumâ??an Rev. Ser. A5

  17. The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not. This gives GMMs a greater flexibility since the covariance matrices k of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Clustering Exercise 1 The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not want and hence the clusters may have any desired elliptical shapes. It can be shown that k-means in R. The function to apply k-means is kmeans. The function to apply the EM algorithm is the function

  18. The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not. This gives GMMs a greater flexibility since the covariance matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Clustering Exercise 1 Question 1 The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means be anything we want and hence the clusters may have any desired elliptical shapes. It can be shown that k-means

  19. 20 Gy Versus 44 Gy of Supplemental External Beam Radiotherapy With Palladium-103 for Patients With Greater Risk Disease: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology Inc, Mountain View, CA (United States); Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The necessity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a supplement to prostate brachytherapy remains unknown. We report brachytherapy outcomes for patients with higher risk features randomized to substantially different supplemental EBRT regimens. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and June 2004, 247 patients were randomized to 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy EBRT followed by a palladium-103 boost (115 Gy vs. 90 Gy). The eligibility criteria included clinically organ-confined disease with Gleason score 7-10 and/or pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 10-20 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. The median day 0 prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume was 125.7%; 80 men received androgen deprivation therapy (median, 4 months). Multiple parameters were evaluated for their effect on bPFS. Results: For the entire cohort, the cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival rates were 97.7%, 93.2%, and 80.8% at 8 years and 96.9%, 93.2%, and 75.4% at 10 years, respectively. The bPFS rate was 93.1% and 93.4% for the 20-Gy and 44-Gy arms, respectively (p = .994). However, no statistically significant differences were found in cause-specific survival or overall survival were identified. When stratified by PSA level of {<=}10 ng/mL vs. >10 ng/mL, Gleason score, or androgen deprivation therapy, no statistically significant differences in bPFS were discerned between the two EBRT regimens. On multivariate analysis, bPFS was most closely related to the preimplant PSA and clinical stage. For patients with biochemically controlled disease, the median PSA level was <0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: The results of the present trial strongly suggest that two markedly different supplemental EBRT regimens result in equivalent cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival. It is probable that the lack of benefit for a higher supplemental EBRT dose is the result of the high-quality brachytherapy dose distributions.

  20. Random variation in rectal position during radiotherapy for prostate cancer is two to three times greater than that predicted from prostate motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaife, J.; Harrison, K.; Romanchikova, M.; Parker, A.; Sutcliffe, M.; Bond, S.; Thomas, S.; Freeman, S.; Jena, R.; Bates, A.; Burnet, N.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of slices required to show the entire rectum on the MV scans (i.e. half the number of kV slices) are shown as circles. The interquartile ranges, of the actual numbers of slices showing rectum on the MV scans, are shown as bars (25% percentile as the lower... bar and 75% percentile as the upper bar). Full paper: Random rectal variation is higher than predicted during prostate RT BJR 3 of 12 birpublications.org/bjr Br J Radiol;87:20140343 In order to investigate any and all differences in median position...

  1. 24 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1988, 110, 24-30 greater than the lower limit set by the present experiments. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    , exhibits reactivity similar to that of the group 3 transition metal cations. Product distributions in GdH2+ is 120 f 5 kcal/mol. Gd(CH3)(H)+ is produced in the reaction with propane indicatingHlz,463-82-1;n- C6HI4,110-54-3; propane-2,2-d2,2875-95-8; 2-methylpropane-2-dI, 20717-74-2;n

  2. no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zong Z.

    Xin Cheng, Zong Z. Tian, and Hongchao Liu 125 For an actuated signalized intersection, pedestrian calls

  3. Greater accordance with the DASH dietary pattern is associated with lower diet-related greenhouse gas production but higher dietary costs in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsivais, Pablo; Scarborough, Peter; Lloyd, Tina; Mizdrak, Anja; Luben, Robert; Mulligan, Angela A.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Woodcock, James

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the DASH score. The FFQ data were processed by using the FFQ EPIC Tool for Analysis (17), software based on the earlier analysis system (16), to estimate average daily nutrient and energy intakes. Dietary data were deemed implausible when energy estimates... : climate, diet quality, food prices, prevention, public health INTRODUCTION Diets that are consistent with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)5 are associated with reduced cardiometabolic risk and better health outcomes. The design...

  4. Patterns of habitat use by fishes associated with Sargassum mats in the Gulf of Mexico, with an emphasis on the greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Robert Joseph David

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH SARGASSUM MATS IN THE NW GULF OF MEXICO. Introduction. Materials and Methods ? Sampling design. Data analysis, . Results. Environmental conditions. Mat characteristics . . Catch composition. . Size distribution. . . . Spatial and temporal patterns.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Introduction. . Materials and Methods. . . 34 35 Vl6 CHAPTER Field collections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Otolith procedures, . Data analysis. . Results. Environmental conditions . . Spatial and temporal distribution. . . . Size...

  5. Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) Biomass Production, Ensilability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) ­ Biomass Production, Ensilability and Feeding Value Thanh Tham, Uppsala Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 Cover: The development of water hyacinth along rivers and canals in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam (photo: H Thanh Thâm, 2010) #12;3 Water hyacinth

  6. Environ. Biosafety Res. 7 (2008) 7385 Available online at: c ISBR, EDP Sciences, 2008 www.ebr-journal.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    , and cultivated rice in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: implications for transgenic rice Michael B. COHEN1 AB T6G 0M4, Canada 3 Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA development in countries where wild and weedy relatives co-occur with the crop. To evaluate possible risks

  7. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 × 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

  8. Urban influence on diversity of avifauna in the Edwards Plateau of Texas: effect of property sizes on rural landscape structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Afanador, Edith

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    restoration. Finally, the Live Oak-Mesquite Savannah subregion showed the highest average ownership property size (7305 acres), and the highest values of patch richness and �²-diversity. Management in this ecoregion should focus on conservation of land...

  9. A Regional Approach to Market Monitoring in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barmack, Matthew; Kahn, Edward; Tierney, Susan; Goldman, Charles

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RTO SMUD SCED SCUC SSG-WI WAPA WECC Arizona Public Serviceaggregated form. For example, WECC publishes a daily reportfor three sub-regions of WECC, but the report does not

  10. The variety of insecticides available today is much greater than it was 20 years ago. It includes some made from bacteria, insect-killing fungi or viruses; products such as insecticidal soaps that kill by physical processes; and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of nerve impulses by affecting the potassium or sodium ion channel in nerve cells. Insect Growth Regulators interfere with the normal movement of potassium and sodium ions across nerve cell surfaces. This prevents that breaks it down is acetylcholinesterase. OP insecticides function by inhibiting the action of the enzyme

  11. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  12. IMPROVING ACCESS TO CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED POLISH POPULATION IN THE GREATER CHICAGO AREA-EXPERIENCE FROM THE POLISH AMERICAN ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK FACTOR MODIFICATION (POLAARIS) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Also, the lipid profiles indicated high triglycerides, low HDL and normal LDL levels. In fact, an institutional learning has been that being ?Polish? is a risk factor for coronary artery...

  13. Community Action Partnership of the Greater Dayton Area Â… Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, OAS-RA-11-18

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data CorporationPastCommunicatingSupport

  14. DOE/EIS-0375D: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (February 2011)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA - 0942 E N v m

  15. DOE/EIS-0375D: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375D)(February 2011)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA - 0942 E N v m Impact Statement

  16. Use-wear analysis of the Clovis biface collection from the Gault site in central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smallwood, Ashley Michelle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of North America. The site setting is on the easternmost boundary of the Oak-Mesquite-Juniper Park/Woods (Frye et al. 1984). Gault is situated in the physiographic subregion known as the Lampasses Cut Plain of the Edwards ____________ This thesis... follows the style and format of American Antiquity. 2 Plateau, which closely borders the Blackland Prairie to the east of the Balcones Escarpment (Amos and Gehlbach 1988). The subregion is characterized as an open- woodland of oaks, junipers...

  17. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  18. Flux Emergence in the Solar Active Region NOAA 11158: The Evolution of Net Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vemareddy, P; Karthikreddy, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation on the evolution of observed net vertical current using a time series of vector magnetograms of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 obtained from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We also discuss the relation of net current to the observed eruptive events. The AR evolved from $\\beta\\gamma$ to $\\beta\\gamma\\delta$ configuration over a period of 6 days. The AR had two sub-regions of activity with opposite chirality: one dominated by sunspot rotation producing a strong CME, the other showing large shear motions producing a strong flare. The net current in each polarity over the CME producing sub-region increased to a maximum and then decreased when the sunspots got separated. The time profile of net current in this sub-region followed the time profile of the rotation rate of the S-polarity sunspot of the same sub-region. The net current in the flaring sub-region showed a sudden increase at the time of the strong flare and remained unchanged till the end of the observation, while the ...

  19. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  20. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations (including internal inspection procedures that enforce compliance); lists of nuclear facilities; emergency response procedures and available resources; information related to the transportation of nuclear wastes (particularly via shipping); understanding and notification of accidental releases; and radionuclide release data from select coastal facilities. Incremental increases in the sensitivity of the information being shared could strengthen norms for Indian and Pakistani nuclear transparency. This paper suggests seven technology-based Indian and Pakistani nuclear transparency projects for consideration. Existing nuclear-related agreements provide an information-sharing framework within which the projects could occur. Eventually, as confidence increases and new agreements are negotiated, future projects could begin to deal with the accounting of fissile materials and nuclear weapons disposition and control.

  1. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates from an ensemble of CCM3 simulations are compared to those computed from observations of the TRMM satellite over a 44-month period. On regional and sub-regional scales, the comparison fares well over much of the Eastern Hemisphere south of 10...

  2. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States -- Climatic and Geologic and semiarid southwest- ern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology and Range subregions. Introduction The arid and semiarid southwestern United States is among the fastest

  3. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  4. the new mexico botanist Special Issue Number 3 October 2012 proceedings of the third

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    The Night Sky of Southwest New Mexico / Gary Emerson 62 Stream Restoration: The Health of the Planet L. Propst, Jerome A. Stefferud, and Keith B. Gido 65 Stream Restoration at Black Canyon Creek, Gila Benefit and the Effects on State and Private Lands in the Gila Sub-Region / Doug Boykin 60 Restoration

  5. REVIEW Open Access Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France (French Guiana), Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The subregion covers some 7,200,000 sq km (Figure 1) and is populated by about 30 million people. The provision in the Americas [3]. The three Guyanas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) have the highest annual parasite index

  6. The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/98/04/31/19 $2.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 141, Number 1, April 6, 1998 3149

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    - tent state. We have then assessed our conclusions in the context of assembled nuclear pores themselves localization of nucleoporins to subregions of the nuclear pore and its associated structures as they traverse the nuclear pore. Ligand blotting and solution binding studies of isolated proteins have attempted

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) has recently finished. That will be followed by presentations Group (NTTG). In this context, they are called "subregional" planning groups, where WECC is the "regionGrid and NTTG, and west-wide through WECC. The coordination efforts of transmission providers are required

  8. UNECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2011-2012 ___________________________________________________________ 1 1 Overview of forest products markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    product innovation and market growth, such as biorefining, biomass energy production, and development is made up of three subregions: Europe, North America and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). It stretches from Canada and the United States of America in the west through Europe to the Russian Federation

  9. Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations; published 16 March 2010. [1] Enhanced mesoscale eddy activity northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago by 5° longitude subregions revealed the dominant mesoscale periods ranging from 90 days near 18°N

  10. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine Abstract Within-range effects of climatic change on tree growth at the sub-regional scale remain poorly- growth responses to climate change, the role of drought becomes even more complex in shaping communities

  11. Russell, J. 1974. Floating nplants proposed off ____. 1969. Nuclear power-anadromous Stober, Q. J., and E. O. Salo. 1973. Ecological New Jersey. Nat!. Fisherman 55(6):6B-7B. fishes. Greater Portland Commer. 53(31) studies of the proposed Kiket Island nucl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishing Institute. 1972a. Costly fish kill. County PUD and Seattle City Light, 537 p. lumbia River of Dredging on Aquatic Organisms With Special Application to Areas Adjacent to the Northeastern Pacific Ocean ties in the rivers and harbors of the United States is the dredging and dis posing of approximately 380

  12. Merging hydraulics with biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorncraft, Garry; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research staff are now working with developers in Lao PDR and Australia to ensure design criteria is optimised at time of construction. Research is presently underway on a suite of Mekong and Murray-Darling species to identify critical tolerances of shear and pressure. Work in the USA is also being expanded to lamprey and white sturgeon in an effort to increase the understanding beyond salmon species. Researchers and developers are hopeful of constructing the first fish-friendly hydro plants within the next two years. Pending favourable outcomes, the expansion of this technology to other sites and river systems is the ultimate development outcome.

  13. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong Delta, Vietnam |

  14. Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong Delta, Vietnam

  15. Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong Delta, VietnamEnergy

  16. Devonshire Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong Delta,

  17. Dezentrale Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong Delta,Dezentrale

  18. Dharamshala Hydro Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe Mekong

  19. Dharmshala Hydro Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe MekongDharmshala Hydro

  20. Dhauladhar Hydro System Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe MekongDharmshala

  1. Dialight Lumidrives formerly Lumidrives Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDaytonDestilaria dethe MekongDharmshalaDialight

  2. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R. (1603 Solano NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110)

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  3. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chugh, Rashmi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Janet Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  4. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  5. Construction of N-body time-symmetric initial data sets in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr T. Chru?ciel; Justin Corvino; James Isenberg

    2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a collection of N asymptotically Euclidean ends with zero scalar curvature, we construct a Riemannian manifold with zero scalar curvature and one asymptotically Euclidean end, whose boundary has a neighborhood isometric to the disjoint union of a specified collection of sub-regions of the given ends. An application is the construction of time-symmetric solutions of the constraint equations which model N-body initial data.

  6. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeastern United States. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, H.W. Jr.; Marine, I.W.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology of the southeastern United States was studied to recommend areas that should be considered for field exploration in order to select a site for a radioactive waste repository. The region studied included the Piedmont Province, the Triassic Basins, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. This study was entirely a review of literature and existing knowledge from a geotechnical point of view and was performed by subcontractors whose individual reports are listed in the bibliography. No field work was involved. The entire study was geotechnical in nature, and no consideration was given to socioeconomic or demographic factors. These factors need to be addressed in a separate study. For all areas, field study is needed before any area is further considered. A total of 29 areas are recommended for further consideration in the Piedmont Province subregion: one area in Maryland, 8 areas in Virginia, 4 areas in North Carolina, 6 areas in South Carolina, and 10 areas in Georgia. Of the 14 exposed and 5 buried or hypothesized basins identified in the Triassic basin subregion, 6 are recommended for further study: one basin in Virginia, 3 basins in North Carolina, and 2 basins in South Carolina. Four potential candidate areas are identified within the Atlantic Coastal Plain subregion: one in Maryland, one in North Carolina, and 2 in Georgia.

  7. Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

  8. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  9. NREL Quantifies Value of CSP to the Grid (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In California study, greater penetration of renewable energy means greater value of CSP with thermal energy storage.

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows for greater water extraction, (about 5-7% more waterdryness [11]. Greater water extraction leads to decreased

  11. Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

  12. Development of active regions: flows, magnetic-field patterns and bordering effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getling, A V; Buchnev, A A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A qualitative analysis is given to the data on the full magnetic and velocity vector fields in a growing sunspot group, recorded nearly simultaneously with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. Observations of a young bipolar subregion developing within AR 11313 were carried out on 9-10 October 2011. Our aim was to form am idea about the consistency of the observed pattern with the well-known rising-tube model of the formation of bipolar acrive regions and sunspot groups. We find from our magnetograms that the distributions of the vertical [B_v] and the horizontal [B_h] component of the magnetic field over the area of the magnetic subregion are spatially well correlated; in contrast, the rise of a flux-tube loop would result in a qualitatively different pattern, with the maxima of the two magnetic-field components spatially separated: the vertical field would be the strongest where either spot emerges, while the maximum horizontal-field strengths would be reached in between them. A specific fea...

  13. Dual hidden landscapes in Anderson localization on discrete lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Leite Lyra; Svitlana Mayboroda; Marcel Filoche

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The localization subregions of stationary waves in continuous disordered media have been recently demonstrated to be governed by a hidden landscape that is the solution of a Dirichlet problem expressed with the wave operator. In this theory, the strength of Anderson localization confinement is determined by this landscape, and continuously decreases as the energy increases. However, this picture has to be changed in discrete lattices in which the eigenmodes close to the edge of the first Brillouin zone are as localized as the low energy ones. Here we show that in a 1D discrete lattice, the localization of low and high energy modes is governed by two different landscapes, the high energy landscape being the solution of a dual Dirichlet problem deduced from the low energy one using the symmetries of the Hamiltonian. We illustrate this feature using the one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site potentials as a prototype model. Moreover we show that, besides unveiling the subregions of Anderson localization, these dual landscapes also provide an accurate overal estimate of the localization length over the energy spectrum, especially in the weak disorder regime.

  14. Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

  15. Prevailing climatic trends and runoff response from Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalaya, upper Indus basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze trends in maximum, minimum and mean temperatures (Tx, Tn, and Tavg, respectively), diurnal temperature range (DTR) and precipitation from 18 stations (1250-4500 m asl) for their overlapping period of record (1995-2012), and separately, from six stations of their long term record (1961-2012). We apply Mann-Kendall test on serially independent time series to assess existence of a trend while true slope is estimated using Sen s slope method. Further, we statistically assess the spatial scale (field) significance of local climatic trends within ten identified sub-regions of UIB and analyze whether the spatially significant (field significant) climatic trends qualitatively agree with a trend in discharge out of corresponding sub-region. Over the recent period (1995-2012), we find a well agreed and mostly field significant cooling (warming) during monsoon season i.e. July-October (March-May and November), which is higher in magnitude relative to long term trends (1961-2012). We also find ... The observed...

  16. ON THE ANTI-CORRELATION BETWEEN SPECTRAL LINE BROADENING AND INTENSITY IN CORONAL STRUCTURES OBSERVED WITH EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H. [Deptartment of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advance in spectral resolution of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging (EIS) spectrometer on board Hinode has allowed for more detailed analysis of coronal spectral lines. Large line broadening and blueshifted velocities have been found in the periphery of active region (AR) cores and near the footpoints of coronal loops. This line broadening is yet to be understood. We study the correlation of intensity and line width for entire ARs and sub-regions selected to include coronal features. The results show that although a slight positive correlation can be found when considering whole images, many sub-regions have a negative correlation between intensity and line width. Sections of a coronal loop display some of the largest anti-correlations found for this study with the increased line broadening occurring directly adjacent to the footpoint section of the loop structure, not at the footpoint itself. The broadened lines may be due to a second Doppler-shifted component that is separate from the main emitting feature such as a coronal loop, but related in their excitation. The small size of these features forces the considerations of investigator and instrumental effects. Preliminary analyses are shown that indicate the possibility of a point-spread function that is not azimuthally symmetric and may affect velocity and line profile measurements.

  17. Social capital's dark side: knowledge, reciprocity, and the liability of relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Jamie D.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    members with greater influence over decision making are more able to achieve their goals than less well-connected members. In addition to providing greater power over individual decisions, higher levels of social capital are also accompanied by greater...

  18. Deregulation and environmental differentiation in the electric utility industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, M; Russo, M V; Montes-Sancho, M J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between investments in coal generation and investments inthe greater the level of coal generation, the more difficultlower the level of coal generation, the greater the increase

  19. Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater Thanversion, “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater2012. “Modeling Future Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,”

  20. Causes and Control of Wood Decay,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preservative Treatments.................................................... 17 Oil-type Preservatives in the pro- duction process, greater air and water pollution or environmental protection costs, and greater

  1. Resultant magnetic fields due to both windings and heavy current leads in large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Renyuan; Li Yan; Lin Feng; Tian Lijian [Shenyang Polytechnic Univ. (China)] [Shenyang Polytechnic Univ. (China)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy current field due to both windings and heavy current leads (HCL) in large power transformers is analyzed by using the improved T-{Omega} method, in which the T and {Omega} can be solved separately in different subregions. Thus, the storage capacity and CPU time can be saved to a great extent. In addition, the local overheating on the tank wall near the magnetic shield gap is calculated and analyzed, and the improving measures are proposed. On the basis of these work, a composite shield is analyzed and optimized. The numerical results show that the eddy current losses have been reduced and the local overheating has been removed by using this composite shield.

  2. The Hidden Landscape of Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filoche, Marcel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave localization occurs in all types of vibrating systems, in acoustics, mechanics, optics, or quantum physics. It arises either in systems of irregular geometry (weak localization) or in disordered systems (Anderson localization). We present here a general theory that explains how the system geometry and the wave operator interplay to give rise to a "landscape" that splits the system into weakly coupled subregions, and how these regions shape the spatial distribution of the vibrational eigenmodes. This theory holds in any dimension, for any domain shape, and for all operators deriving from an energy form. It encompasses both weak and Anderson localizations in the same mathematical frame and shows, in particular, that Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape.

  3. The Hidden Landscape of Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcel Filoche; Svitlana Mayboroda

    2011-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave localization occurs in all types of vibrating systems, in acoustics, mechanics, optics, or quantum physics. It arises either in systems of irregular geometry (weak localization) or in disordered systems (Anderson localization). We present here a general theory that explains how the system geometry and the wave operator interplay to give rise to a "landscape" that splits the system into weakly coupled subregions, and how these regions shape the spatial distribution of the vibrational eigenmodes. This theory holds in any dimension, for any domain shape, and for all operators deriving from an energy form. It encompasses both weak and Anderson localizations in the same mathematical frame and shows, in particular, that Anderson localization can be understood as a special case of weak localization in a very rough landscape.

  4. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  5. Controls on deposition of the Pratt seam, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenfluh, G.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of regional, subregional and local variations in the Pratt seam of northern Alabama has generated a geological model which depicts the internal and external geometry of the coal seams and adjoining rocks of the Pratt group and suggests the controlling factors for deposistion of thick and thin coal. In addition to primary structural controls of peat accumulation, differential compaction of peat and other detrital sediments was an important factor governing the topographic setting within the fault blocks. Within a minable coal body, seam thickness is relatively constant (aside from local variations), but when the margins of the body are approached, the number of benches and partings will increase shortly before the seam splits into a number of unminable thin seams. This zone of transition which marks the boundary of the coal body is narrow (on the order of 500 to 1000 feet); consequently efforts in estimating minable tonnages should be directed toward defining this line more precisely.

  6. US Renewable Futures in the GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.; Karas, Joseph F.; Nathan, Mayda

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the GCAM integrated assessment model with detailed a representation of renewables, the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sectoral detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long-distance transmission. We find that renewable generation levels grow over the century in all scenarios. As expected, renewable generation increases with lower renewable technology costs, more stringent climate policy, and if alternative low-carbon technology are not available. The availability of long distance transmission lowers policy costs and changes the renewable generation mix.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  8. Entanglement entropy on the fuzzy sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karczmarek, Joanna L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain entanglement entropy on the noncommutative (fuzzy) two-sphere. To define a subregion with a well defined boundary in this geometry, we use the symbol map between elements of the noncommutative algebra and functions on the sphere. We find that entanglement entropy is not proportional to the length of the region's boundary. Rather, in agreement with holographic predictions, it is extensive for regions whose area is a small (but fixed) fraction of the total area of the sphere. This is true even in the limit of small noncommutativity. We also find that entanglement entropy grows linearly with N, where N is the size of the irreducible representation of SU(2) used to define the fuzzy sphere.

  9. WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A. [IRFU/SAp CEA/DSM, Laboratoire AIM CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bontemps, S. [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Federrath, C. [MoCA, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ward-Thompson, D. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, UCLAN, Preston, Lancashire PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J. [IAPS-INAF, Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bressert, E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping (Australia); Di Francesco, J. [NRCC, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, University of Victoria (Canada); Griffin, M. [University School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

  10. Fish mercury distribution in Massachusetts, USA lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.S.; West, C.R.; Pancorbo, O.; Hulme, K.; Cooperman, A.; DeCesare, G.; Isaac, R.; Screpetis, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment, water, and three species of fish from 24 of Massachusetts' (relatively) least-impacted water bodies were sampled to determine the patterns of variation in edible tissue mercury concentrations and the relationships of these patterns to characteristics of the water, sediment, and water bodies (lake, wetland, and watershed areas). Sampling was apportioned among three different ecological subregions and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Average muscle mercury concentrations were 0.15 mg/kg wet weight in the bottom-feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus); 0.31 mg/kg in the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens); and 0.39 mg/kg in the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Statistically significant differences in fish mercury concentrations between ecological subregions in Massachusetts, USA, existed only in yellow perch. The productivity level of the lakes (as deduced from Carlson's Trophic Status Index) was not a strong predictor of tissue mercury concentrations in any species. pH was a highly (inversely) correlated environmental variable with yellow perch and brown bullhead tissue mercury. Largemouth bass tissue mercury concentrations were most highly correlated with the weight of the fish (+), lake size (+), and source area sizes (+). Properties of individual lakes appear more important for determining fish tissue mercury concentrations than do small-scale ecoregional differences. Species that show major mercury variation with size or trophic level may not be good choices for use in evaluating the importance of environmental variables.

  11. Energy balance in peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Silling, Stewart Andrew

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peridynamic model of solid mechanics treats internal forces within a continuum through interactions across finite distances. These forces are determined through a constitutive model that, in the case of an elastic material, permits the strain energy density at a point to depend on the collective deformation of all the material within some finite distance of it. The forces between points are evaluated from the Frechet derivative of this strain energy density with respect to the deformation map. The resulting equation of motion is an integro-differential equation written in terms of these interparticle forces, rather than the traditional stress tensor field. Recent work on peridynamics has elucidated the energy balance in the presence of these long-range forces. We have derived the appropriate analogue of stress power, called absorbed power, that leads to a satisfactory definition of internal energy. This internal energy is additive, allowing us to meaningfully define an internal energy density field in the body. An expression for the local first law of thermodynamics within peridynamics combines this mechanical component, the absorbed power, with heat transport. The global statement of the energy balance over a subregion can be expressed in a form in which the mechanical and thermal terms contain only interactions between the interior of the subregion and the exterior, in a form anticipated by Noll in 1955. The local form of this first law within peridynamics, coupled with the second law as expressed in the Clausius-Duhem inequality, is amenable to the Coleman-Noll procedure for deriving restrictions on the constitutive model for thermomechanical response. Using an idea suggested by Fried in the context of systems of discrete particles, this procedure leads to a dissipation inequality for peridynamics that has a surprising form. It also leads to a thermodynamically consistent way to treat damage within the theory, shedding light on how damage, including the nucleation and advance of cracks, should be incorporated into a constitutive model.

  12. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 301-429, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clemens, D. P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Krco, Marko, E-mail: nchapman@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  13. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  14. Effects of Regulated Water Flows on Regen-eration of Fremont Cottonwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -long dam and reservoir system designed to provide water and hydroelectric power to the greater Phoenix

  15. Aligning Incentives With Program Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents techniques used by Michigan Saves to increase participation and provide greater incentives.

  16. Evolutionary Ecology, 1990, 4, 290-297 Density-dependent natural selection does not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    by differences in efficiencyof food use. The minimum food required for successful pupation is actually greater

  17. Design for Product-Embedded Disassembly with Maximum Profit Shingo Takeuchi and Kazuhiro Saitou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    ) directive on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) will require manufacturers to recycle greater

  18. Multifunctional composites : healing, heating and electromagnetic integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaisted, Thomas Anthony John

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laser machining, which may introduce a greater heat affected zone than traditional milling and drilling.

  19. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertical kiln technology are considered. In particular, these trends towards greater efficiency in cement

  20. THE USEFULNESS OF USELESS BY ABRAHAM FLEXNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for themselves greater satis- factions than are otherwise obtainable. In this paper I shall concern myself

  1. OptIC project: An intercomparison of optimization techniques for parameter estimation in terrestrial biogeochemical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    and earth system models, especially for long-term (multian- nual and greater) simulations. Data assimilation

  2. Benchmarking Best Practices of Demand Responsive Transit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged; Palmer, Kurt; Abdelmaguid, Tamer

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transit District Greater Attleboro - Taunton RegionalHartford Hamden Bridgeport Attleboro Portland Milford Albany

  3. Agron. Sustain. Dev. 27 (2007) 112 1 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of native prairie species offer biomass feedstocks that may yield greater net energy gains than monoculture

  4. Achieving Energy Efficiency Through Real-Time Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the careful implementation of simple behavior change measures, opportunities exist to achieve strategic gains, including greater operational efficiencies, energy cost savings, greater tenant health and ensuing productivity and an improved brand value through sustainability messaging and achievement.

  5. Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10...

  6. Indirect Learning: How Emerging- Market Firms Grow in Developed Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sourindra; Prabhu, Jaideep C.; Chandy, Rajesh K.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -market competitors such as Nokia- Siemens Networks (operating in China). Drawing on these arguments, we hypothesize the following: H2a: Emerging-market firms that have greater exposure to developed-market competitors in their domestic market exhibit greater...

  7. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A freezing point below 100C Stable at temperatures greater than 800C Low corrosion of stainless steel and high-nickel content alloys A heat capacity greater than 2...

  8. At several localities around the world, thrust belts have developed on both sides of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    of the Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico), whereas a south-verging thrust belt called; Fig. 2). The Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico) of the northeastern Caribbean

  9. Data:D3c7fe8e-aa83-4df5-801d-864cadc82b19 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    greater than 30 KWs as defined in the determination of billing demand section of this tariff. 2. Average monthly energy consumption is equal to greater than 3,000KW based on the...

  10. Data:1e969327-8244-4db7-9c77-1fb5b2244bed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    greater than 30 KWs as defined in the determination of billing demand section of this tariff. 2. Average monthly energy consumption is equal to greater than 3,000KW based on the...

  11. E ective Query Size Estimation Using Neural Networks Hongjun Lu Rudy Setiono 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setiono, Rudy

    ;ectively compare di#11;erent query execution plans to select the optimal one. Along with the evolution of DBMS technology, accurate size estimation of query results assumes greater and greater importance

  12. Synthesis, Characterization and Anion Binding Properties of Boron-based Lewis Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hai Yan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    fluorination chemistry. Interestingly, the telluronium systems show a greater fluoride anion affinity than their sulfonium analogs. This increase is assigned to the greater spatial and energetic accessibility of the sigma* orbital on the tellurium atom which...

  13. What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Scott C.

    Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

  14. Fact #877: June 15, 2015 Which States Have More Battery Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    states with a greater share of BEVs in red and states with a greater share of PHEVs in blue. Those states where the BEVs and PHEVs are near 5050 are a neutral color. Georgia had...

  15. Just A Little Bit More Joop van de Pol1, Nigel P. Smart1, and Yuval Yarom2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recover secret keys of the secp256k1 curve, used in the Bitcoin protocol, with a probability greater than

  16. Transportation Biofuels in the USA Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a greater focus on specific biofuel production technologies.differences for certain biofuel feedstocks as well as policy24 Biofuel

  17. Transportation Biofuels in the US A Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a greater focus on specific biofuel production technologies.differences for certain biofuel feedstocks as well as policy24 Biofuel

  18. Problem Solving and Psychological Traps* Jennifer Priestley and William Hakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priestley, Jennifer Lewis

    of Kazakhstan greater than 20 million? B. What is the population of Kazakhstan? If you are like most people

  19. Do PV Systems Increase Residential Selling Prices If So, How Can Practitioners Estimate This Increase?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar in new homes may therefore require higher state and federal incentive levels and/or greater customer

  20. Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar in new homes may therefore require higher state and federal incentive levels and/or greater customer

  1. Nanoscale optoentropic transduction mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Benjamin David

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applied 5 Hz, -3V voltage oscillation at room temperature. (observed oscillations, although under high voltages greater

  2. Complete pattern of ocular dominance columns in human primary visual cortex.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Daniel L; Sincich, Lawrence C; Horton, Jonathan C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibit greater heterogeneity. dle of the cortex devoid oflarger V1 correlates with a dle of ocular dominance columns.

  3. NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technologies (ICT) to transform the generation, transmission, distribution and consumption of electricity to provide greater automation, increase reliability, improve...

  4. The role of feedback in speech motor learning : insights from healthy speakers and applications to the treatment of apraxia of speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austermann-Hula, Shannon Noelle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    responses, enhances retention because it requires greater engagement in movement planning processes, which more closely approximates the increased processing demands

  5. President Announces New Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    semiconductors can operate at higher temperatures and have greater durability and reliability at higher voltages and frequencies, ultimately achieving unprecedented...

  6. Conference program and abstracts. International Biogeography Society 6th Biennial Meeting – 9-13 January 2013, Miami, Florida, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greater Antilles, Cuba-Hispaniola- Puerto Rico. Keywords:of Puerto Rico, Mona, and Hispaniola. Phylogenetic and

  7. vitasaw.sjh - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greater Cleveland Nurses Association, Cleveland, Ohio. 1986 Invited participant, Advancing Methods for Family Research in Nursing: Helping Health Care to ...

  8. 407 Design and operation of HVAC systems THE IMPACT OF VENTILATION ON AIR QUALITY IN INDOOR ICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Demokritou; Qingyan Chen; Chunxin Yang; John Spengler

    risk to both athletes and spectators. A field survey in ten ice rink arenas in the Greater Boston and

  9. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process technology is far greater in chemical and petrochemicalprocesses such as hydrotreating and hydrocrack.ing, and for petrochemical

  10. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    microalgae that fuel food webs and a shelter for inver- tebrates and fishes that reach substantially greater

  11. The Use of Graphics Calculator in a Matriculation Statistics Classroom: A Malaysian Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics calculator for five weeks showed significantly greater improvement on their mathematics achievement than students in the control

  12. A joint U.S.-China demonstration energy efficient office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Mary Beth; Huang, Yu JoeWatson, Rob; Shi, Han; Judkoff, Ron; She rman, Micah

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and IAQ comfort increases significantly with properly designed and maintained floor distribution, leading to greater energy effectiveness and enhanced productivity.

  13. Practice Exam --to prepare for Second Midterm Exam Name: ___________________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    density of the Universe was greater than the critical density, and there was no anti-gravity from "dark

  14. A Comparison of Demand Side Management Data Assessment Procedures for Small and Medium-Sized Manufacturing Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matheidas, M. T.; Heffington, W. M.

    ). Systematic errors are introduced when the operating time length consistently is greater or less than that of the plant....

  15. Present-day climate forcing and response from black carbon in snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanner, Mark G; Zender, Charles S; Randerson, James T; Rasch, Philip J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is emitted in greater quantity from biomass burning and low-in significant quantity from biomass burning, leading

  16. E-mail: Today's Date: As required by law, our office adheres to written policies and procedures to protect the privacy of information about you that we create, receive or maintain. Your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... II II II Persistent cough greater than a 3 week duration........................................................................................................................................................... II II II Cough that produces blood

  17. REGISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2013-2014 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG\\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    by a generalized rash lasting three (3) or more days, a fever of 101° Fahrenheit or greater, a cough

  18. University of California, San Diego Tuberculosis Screening Admission Requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    the student have signs/symptoms of active TB disease? (Cough greater than 3 weeks, chest pain, unexplained

  19. 80 BOSTONIA Summer 2014 As a student in the School of Law in the 1980s, Michael A. Gollin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and Matthew Horowitz (LAW'14). Among the agencies where PIP grantees have worked are Greater Boston Legal

  20. Multi-Building Microgrids for a Distributed Energy Future in Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment can provide the system with greater reliability.Reliability of power supply Reduction of investments in plants and equipment

  1. A Low-Power Mobile Sensing Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requires greater energy- awareness and workload adaptivity.are severely energy-constrained. We show how awareness of

  2. All-optical logic gates based on vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauss, Veronica Andrea

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    self-heating. Consequently, ROF, and therefore, modulation bandwidth, can be greater for optical modulation than for electrical

  3. Magnetic Exchange Coupling and Single-Molecule Magnetism in Uranium Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Jeffrey Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    greater than 99% U-238 (depleted uranium), which has no neturanium, since this actinide element offers minimal radioactivity (in depleted

  4. Investigation of the Role of Trap States in Solar Cell Reliability using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezryadina, Anna Sergeyevna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar cell lead to a higher fill factor, therefore resulting in greater efficiency value, and bringing the cell's output power

  5. Records of the evolution of the Himalayan orogen from in situ ThPb ion microprobe dating of monazite: Eastern Nepal and western Garhwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    Ma inclusions are preserved within garnets of the Greater Himalayan Crystallines. The presence of 45:2

  6. Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Greater Sage associated with wind energy development on greater sage-grouse populations. We hypothesized that greater sage-grouse nest, brood, and adult survival would decrease with increasing proximity to wind energy infrastructure

  7. JONATHAN LOSOS Evolutionary ecology of Anolis lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    of Tyson Research Center 2000-2003 and 2004-2005 Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin on the Greater Antilles. Ecomorphs arose independently on each major island group in the Greater Antilles. Monday independently on each major island group in the Greater Antilles. ....In other words, species doing the same

  8. SUBJECT: Increase in Equipment Capitalization Threshold to $5,000 As of July 1, 2011 the Florida Board of Governors approved BOG Regulation 9.001, 9.002, 9.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    resources greater than $250 all have been capitalized. As of July 1, 2011 the threshold is increased from personal property items with a cost of greater $5,000 and library resources with a cost greater than $250SUBJECT: Increase in Equipment Capitalization Threshold to $5,000 As of July 1, 2011 the Florida

  9. Forages and Pastures: Grazing and Forage Management M118 Summer annuals for fall grazing in the high elevation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) S on 100% NE+ (NE100; n = 2). Cow serum K, Cu, NEFA, and prolactin (PRL) concentrations at breeding, and serum Na and PRL concentrations at the end of breeding were greater (P were greater (P PRL concentrations at breeding were greater (P

  10. PARAID: The Gear-Shifting Power-Aware RAID Charles Weddle, Mathew Oldham, Jin Qian, An-I Andy Wang, Florida State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andy

    energy consumption translates into increased heat dissipation, greater cooling requirements, reduced operating costs. Greater energy consumption leads to more heat dissipation, which in turn leads to greater computational density, and higher operating costs. For a typical data center, storage alone accounts for 27

  11. 3DFEMWATER: A three-dimensional finite element model of water flow through saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3DFEMWATER model is designed to treat heterogeneous and anisotropic media consisting of as many geologic formations as desired, consider both distributed and point sources/sinks that are spatially and temporally dependent, accept the prescribed initial conditions or obtain them by simulating a steady state version of the system under consideration, deal with a transient head distributed over the Dirichlet boundary, handle time-dependent fluxes due to pressure gradient varying along the Neumann boundary, treat time-dependent total fluxes distributed over the Cauchy boundary, automatically determine variable boundary conditions of evaporation, infiltration, or seepage on the soil-air interface, include the off-diagonal hydraulic conductivity components in the modified Richards equation for dealing with cases when the coordinate system does not coincide with the principal directions of the hydraulic conductivity tensor, give three options for estimating the nonlinear matrix, include two options (successive subregion block iterations and successive point interactions) for solving the linearized matrix equations, automatically reset time step size when boundary conditions or source/sinks change abruptly, and check the mass balance computation over the entire region for every time step. The model is verified with analytical solutions or other numerical models for three examples.

  12. An Extinction Map and Color Magnitude Diagram for the Globular Cluster NGC 3201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; Mario Mateo

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential $E_{V-I}$ variations of up to $\\sim 0.2$ mag on a scale of arcminutes across NGC 3201 are presented in the form of an extinction map. This map, created by calculating average $E_{V-I}$ values for stars in small subregions of the field with respect to a fiducial region, greatly improves the appearance of the CMD of the cluster. We describe how we implemented this technique in detail with our data for NGC 3201. A comparison between our map and that of the same region extracted from the COBE/DIRBE reddening maps published by Schlegel, Finkbeiner, & Davis (1998) (SFD) displays larger-scale similarities between the two maps as well as smaller-scale features which show up in our map but not in the SFD map. Several methods of determining an $E_{V-I}$ zeropoint to add to our differential extinction map are presented. Isochrone fitting proved to be the most successful one, but it produces an average $E_{V-I}$ for the cluster which is smaller than previously published values by $\\sim 1.5\\sigma$. Finally, our results seem to support the statement by Arce & Goodman (1999) that the SFD maps overestimate the reddening in regions of high extinction.

  13. Reservoir description and future development plans for the Unam/Mfem Fields, OML 67, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kofron, B.M.; Jenkinson, J.T.; Maxwell, G.S. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technology Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Unam/Mfem fields, which are currently produced from three platforms, are, located 25 km offshore (southeastern Nigeria) in water depths of 60 feet to 100 feet. Over 100 MMBO have been produced to date from both unconformity bounded and fault trap reservoirs in the Upper and Middle Biafra Sands. These structural and stratigraphic geometries define at least eleven different reservoirs that are not interconnected. STOIIP for all eleven reservoirs is estimated to exceed 900 MMBO based on a recently completed reservoir characterization study. A two year reservoir description study followed the acquisition of a 1991 3-D seismic survey and resulted in the drilling of six successful wells and two sidetracks. A 3-D model of reservoir geometries and fluid flow properties was generated by integrating geologic, geophysical, and reservoir engineering data. These diverse data sets were interpreted using a combination of workstations, software packages, and displays that included Landmark, IREX, wireline log and seismic correlation charts. A detailed stratigraphic zonation scheme with 28 zones was defined and correlated field wide and subregionally to build the reservoir framework. Twenty seismic horizons were created. More than 300 critical compute, generated grids were then used to calculate STOIIP volumes. This study led to the identification of new pay zones along with a much better understanding of the spatial distribution of all pays within the fields. A revised exploitation strategy has subsequently been proposed which calls for 5 new platforms and the drilling of 21 additional wells over the next few years.

  14. Variation of mercury in fish from Massachusetts lakes based on ecoregion and lake trophic status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.; West, C.R. [Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection, Boston, MA (United States). Office of Research and Standards] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-four of the state`s least-impacted waterbodies were sampled for sediment, water, physical characteristics and 3 species of fish to determine the extent of, and patterns of variation in, mercury contamination. Sampling effort was apportioned among three different ecological subregions of the state, as defined by EPA, and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Mean fish mercury was 0.14 ppm wet weight in samples of 168 of the bottom feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) (range = 0.01--0.79 ppm); 0.3 ppm in 199 of the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens) (range = 0.01--0.75 ppm); and 0.4 ppm in samples of 152 of the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) (range = 0.05--1.1 ppm). Multivariate statistics are employed to determine how mercury concentrations in fish correlate with sediment chemistry, water chemistry, fish trophic status, fish size and age, lake and watershed size, the presence and extent of wetlands in the watershed, and physical characteristics of the lake. The survey design complements ongoing efforts begun in 1983 to test fish in a variety of waters, from which emanated fish advisories for impacted rivers and lakes. The study defines a baseline for fish contamination in Massachusetts lakes and ponds that serves as a template for public health decisions regarding fish consumption.

  15. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  16. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of human chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Speer, M.C.; Vayanis, E.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de; Soares, M.B.; Fischer, S.G.; Warburton, D. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Gilliam, C.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY (United States)); Tantravahi, U. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have characterized 21 polymorphic (CA), microsatellites for the development of a genetic map of chromosome 13. Fifteen markers were isolated from a flow- sorted chromosome 13 library, four CA repeats were derived from NotI-containing cosmid clones, and two polymorphic markers were described previously (J. L. Weber, A. E. Kwitek, and P. E. May, 1990, Nucleic Acids Res. IS: 4638; L. Warnich, 1. Groenwald, L. Laubscher, and A. E. Retief, 1991, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 49(Suppl.): 372 (Abstract)). Regional localization for all of the markers was performed by amplification of DNA from five somatic cell hybrids containing different deletions of chromosome 13. Genetic markers were shown to be distributed throughout 6 of the 11 resolvable chromosomal subregions. Using data from nine families provided by the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH), a framework map of 12 of these 21 markers was developed. Six of the 12 markers form three pairs, with each two members of a pair being tightly linked, such that nine systems of markers can be distinguished. The average heterozygosity of these 12 markers is 0.75. The total length of the sex-averaged map is 65.4 cM (Kosambi), with an average distance of 8.2 cM between systems of markers (eight intervals). Seven remaining markers were placed provisionally into the framework map. 41 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. THE NORTH AMERICAN AND PELICAN NEBULAE. II. MIPS OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Padgett, D. L. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guieu, S. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cole, D. M. [Raytheon, Pasadena, CA (United States); Strom, S. E.; Wolff, S. C., E-mail: luisa.rebull@jpl.nasa.gov [NOAO, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of {approx}7 deg{sup 2} of the North American and Pelican Nebulae region at 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m with the Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We incorporate the MIPS observations with earlier Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations, as well as archival near-infrared (IR) and optical data. We use the MIPS data to identify 1286 young stellar object (YSO) candidates. IRAC data alone can identify 806 more YSO candidates, for a total of 2076 YSO candidates. Prior to the Spitzer observations, there were only {approx}200 YSOs known in this region. Three subregions within the complex are highlighted as clusters: the Gulf of Mexico, the Pelican, and the Pelican's Hat. The Gulf of Mexico cluster is subject to the highest extinction (A{sub V} at least {approx}30) and has the widest range of infrared colors of the three clusters, including the largest excesses and by far the most point-source detections at 70 {mu}m. Just 3% of the cluster members were previously identified; we have redefined this cluster as about 10-100 times larger (in projected area) than was previously realized.

  18. Respondent-driven sampling bias induced by clustering and community structure in social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis Enrique Correa; Lambiotte, Renaud; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling hidden populations is particularly challenging using standard sampling methods mainly because of the lack of a sampling frame. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is an alternative methodology that exploits the social contacts between peers to reach and weight individuals in these hard-to-reach populations. It is a snowball sampling procedure where the weight of the respondents is adjusted for the likelihood of being sampled due to differences in the number of contacts. In RDS, the structure of the social contacts thus defines the sampling process and affects its coverage, for instance by constraining the sampling within a sub-region of the network. In this paper we study the bias induced by network structures such as social triangles, community structure, and heterogeneities in the number of contacts, in the recruitment trees and in the RDS estimator. We simulate different scenarios of network structures and response-rates to study the potential biases one may expect in real settings. We find that the ...

  19. National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

  20. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  1. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K. [California State University, Fresno; Yeasmin, Dilruba [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  2. A paucity of bulk entangling surfaces: AdS wormholes with de Sitter interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Fischetti; Donald Marolf; Aron Wall

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study and construct spacetimes, dubbed planar AdS-dS-wormholes, satisfying the null energy condition and having two asymptotically AdS boundaries connected through a (non-traversable) inflating wormhole. As for other wormholes, it is natural to expect dual descriptions in terms of two disconnected CFTs in appropriate entangled states. But for our cases certain expected bulk entangling surfaces used by the Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) prescription to compute CFT entropy do not exist. In particular, no real codimension-2 extremal surface can run from one end of the wormhole to the other. According to HRT, the mutual information between any two finite-sized subregions (one in each CFT) must then vanish at leading order in large $N$ -- though the leading-order mutual information per unit area between the two CFTs taken as wholes may be nonzero. Some planar AdS-dS-wormholes also fail to have plane-symmetric surfaces that would compute the total entropy of either CFT. We suggest this to remain true of less-symmetric surfaces so that the HRT entropy is ill-defined and some modified prescription is required. It may be possible to simply extend HRT or the closely-related maximin construction by a limiting procedure, though complex extremal surfaces could also play an important role.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF INELASTIC NEUTRINO REACTIONS WITH LIGHT NUCLEI ON THE STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). The time evolution of shock waves is calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions, and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations. In addition, the effects of ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons is addressed in the simulations. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as {approx}10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles are heated near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and the density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei evolve differently in the non-linear phase of SASI than do models that lack heating by light nuclei. This result is because matter in the gain region has a varying density and temperature and therefore sub-regions appear that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. Although the light nuclei are never dominant heating sources and they work favorably for shock revival in some cases and unfavorably in other cases, they are non-negligible and warrant further investigation.

  4. The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

  5. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  6. Thermal structure of hot non-flaring corona from Hinode/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petralia, A; Testa, P; Del Zanna, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies a very hot plasma component has been diagnosed in solar active regions through the images in three different narrow-band channels of SDO/AIA. This diagnostic from EUV imaging data has also been supported by the matching morphology of the emission in the hot Ca XVII line, as observed with Hinode/EIS. This evidence is debated because of unknown distribution of the emission measure along the line of sight. Here we investigate in detail the thermal distribution of one of such regions using EUV spectroscopic data. In an active region observed with SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT, we select a subregion with a very hot plasma component and another cooler one for comparison. The average spectrum is extracted for both, and 14 intense lines are selected for analysis, that probe the 5.5 = 6.3, the distribution of the hot region shows a well-defined peak at log T = 6.6 and gradually decreasing trends on both sides, thus supporting the very hot nature of the hot component diagnosed with imagers. The other ...

  7. Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Stephen A

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

  8. Sample Exam 2 Phys 121 Number 6 Spring 2013 1. Identical 2.0-C charges are located on the vertices of a square with sides that are 2.0 m in length. Determine the electric potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janow, Rich

    conductor is A) B) R C) R D) 3R E) 9R 16. Light bulb A is rated at 60 W and light bulb B is rated at 100 W. Both are designed to operate at 110 V. Which statement is correct? A) The 60 W bulb has a greater resistance and greater current than the 100 W bulb. B) The 60 W bulb has a greater resistance and smaller

  9. State of Washington Joint Aquatic Resource Permit Application (JARPA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sandra

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    all of the required permits, there is a greater likelihoodinform applicants on which permits they need, resulting inreduce the need for permit revisions that are currently

  10. Ultracapacitors and Batteries in Hybrid Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Zolot, M.; Sprik, S.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an ultracapacitor in conjunction with a battery in a hybrid vehicle combines the power performance of the former with the greater energy storage capability of the latter.

  11. Plasmon-induced enhancement of intra-ensemble FRET in quantum dots on wrinkled thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, C. G. L; Inman, R. H; Rich, B.; Gopinathan, A.; Khine, M.; Ghosh, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaic devices, which will lower self-absorption and increase device efficiency.photovoltaic modules [4] to allow greater broadband solar absorption for increased efficiency.

  12. Obama Administration Awards More than $54 Million for State Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    priority to high accident rate intersections. This funding will significantly reduce energy consumption and improve safety through greater visibility. Funding will also be...

  13. Slides from the Earth Quake Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    Measure of the ENERGY released in the earthquake, based on vibration caused by seismic waves; Logarithmic scale ? M = 6 is ten times greater vibration, and ...

  14. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greater FTE and cost allocation to the transactional processes, inconsistent automation self- service and longer days to fill open positions. - Effectiveness scores are 1...

  15. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factor and its installed capacity must be greater than theand 2006, the total installed capacity increased by 570%.Japan Germany USA Installed capacity (GW) Year Source: IEA

  16. Data:Babe856b-ea7a-49ef-b709-a8c39c96076b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (75 gallons or greater capacity) Sector: Residential Description: Rates are subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment Tracking Factor, determined quarterly, to reflect changes in the...

  17. First-Ever Network Member Gathering Held at 2015 Better Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, D.C., to engage in dialogue focused on sharing proven approaches for greater energy efficiency in buildings. This year was the first to incorporate the residential...

  18. China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    greater shifts in coal generation technology (i.e. ,use of supercritical coal generation) and higher renewableCCS) technology to coal generation under the CIS pathway of

  19. Document:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in microns) is always greater than or equal to the resolution. Modern accelerator BPM systems have resolutions ap- proaching 5 to 10 microns and accuracies better than 150...

  20. FINAL Submitted to NREL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a series of upgrades: (1) installing supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems in all substations which provide greater information for system operators, (2)...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Pillon Climate Change and the Need for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    + Investments that Enhance Resiliency, Economic Efficiency, and the Environment Net zero energy buildings have greater self sufficiency Wind energy is a lower cost...

  2. DOE to Provide up to $14 Million to Develop Advanced Batteries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the President proposed his Twenty in Ten plan, targeting a twenty percent reduction in gasoline usage by 2017 through greater use of alternative fuels and increased vehicle...

  3. Microsoft Word - SD243-1_Clean_20140429

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    state of records management, within a specific area or organization, and provide a roadmap of improvement andor greater efficiencies for the future. The National Archives and...

  4. Doing the Time Warp: Queer Temporalities and Musical Theater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Sarah Taylor

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this duo’s first flop Allegro (1947) as a greater aestheticfluid cinematic staging, Allegro’s innovative attempts "tobeen spent trying to “fix” Allegro through storytelling with

  5. Soot science | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greater insight into the role of soot in cloud formation, and cleaner aviation engines through more accurate soot models. The Science Soot is produced from incomplete...

  6. Fact #852 December 22, 2014 Turbocharged Engines Account for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    greater fuel economy, models are increasingly being offered with smaller displacement engines that consume less fuel. In order to meet performance expectations, turbocharging is...

  7. Data:Fcd6d1ad-a904-4a0b-94a6-e8c4396e132b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Utility Company) Effective date: 20130201 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Water Heater Service (75 gallons or greater capacity) Sector: Residential Description:...

  8. Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barradale, Merrill Jones

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performanceon U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performancenot returned). Higher wind supply costs; Greater reliance on

  9. National Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama calls on Americans to work together to achieve greater U.S. energy security and build a more robust economy.

  10. Data:95ff90db-93d5-4889-b78f-41d6a03f9cb7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    name: Meeker Coop Light & Power Assn Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Peak Alert: 350 KVA or Greater- Non Control Sector: Commercial Description: Source...

  11. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #42

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As of 11/15/05, nine gas processing plants in Louisiana, with capacities equal to or greater than 100 million cubic feet per day, are not active.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Greater Portland Council of Governments at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  13. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 20,000 MW of renewable resources to be developed will greater utilization of renewable  resources and meeting the of renewable resources. ..16 Table 8.

  14. Account Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an Account Specialist responsible for executing Long Term (LT) surplus sales greater than 18 months, including energy, capacity, reserves...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Promotion and Infrastructure Development Any regional transportation planning organization containing a county with a population greater than one million must collaborate with...

  16. EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    occurs at night and times during the day where PV generation is greater than EV charging load Technical Accomplishments and Progress - Peak Shaving Algorithms 17 * The most...

  17. Federal Railroad Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mandated the study. Federal Railroad Administration DOT Reorganization DOT is in the process of looking at reorganizing the Department to try to achieve even greater...

  18. acacia leucocephala bark: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sylvestris . Radial and axial . Carbon Boyer, Edmond 133 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone Biology and Medicine...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: solar power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test loop directly supports the SunShot goals by providing development for thermal energy storage costs 15kWhth and by allowing greater collection efficiencies and...

  20. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay; Zhuo, Jiaying; Zha, Junli; Reddy, Srinivasa; Olp, Jonathan; Pai, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV iron compounds induced greater intracellular ROS generation,IV iron preparations on intracellular reactive oxygen species generationIV iron preparations on intracellular immune cell ROS generation

  1. Reviews: From the End of Energy and Unlocking Energy Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    help move toward greater energy security and reduced carbonthat would guarantee energy security, and calls for muchof Energy: The Unmaking of America’s Environment, Security

  2. Policy message Trends in the global agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    may have severe consequences: in- creased poverty, greater social dis- parities and segregation, fuel- wood, and other products. ­ Communication: Mobile phones make it possible to find out market

  3. E L S E V I E R J . E n r i n n . R a f u u r t t r i r . t .V o l . 1 7 .N o . 2 . p p . 1 2 7 1 , 1 1 .1 9 9 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    'eapons) and 2atAm, all being significantll' greater than Chernobl'l t37Cs. The verticalpro/iles o/'t37Cs

  4. Evolution, ecology and distribution of bats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    diversity · Energy stability ­ more solar energy allows for more diversity · Greater specialization gigas Australia #12;Megaderma lyra (Family: Megadermatidae) India #12;Old World Rhinolophidae

  5. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    greater in chemical and petrochemical applications than inMonomers Olefin Petrochemicals Bimetallic reformingsales and values; for the Petrochemical Industry (Table B) X

  6. Alternative Energy Development Incentive (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible projects include the construction of electricity generation facilities of 2 megawatts or greater that utilize hydroelectric, solar, biomass, geothermal, wind, or waste heat from an indus...

  7. Alternative Energy Development Incentive (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible projects include the construction of electricity generation facilities of 2 megawatts or greater that utilize hydroelectric, solar, biomass, geothermal, wind, or waste heat from an indus...

  8. Data:F8126233-c178-4705-98cb-1b03f1360a4b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  9. Data:6bd927cc-eaf0-4061-b52d-b05926a7a872 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  10. Data:053540f9-6bab-4e9e-9fc4-1827bceb7cd2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  11. Data:95e41e6f-0caf-4e74-bff9-714e68dec7cb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  12. Data:95ccccaa-1be3-43ee-a239-8015513ab448 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  13. Data:8ad31a67-1818-436a-94d0-87f93d2271e4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  14. Data:600ef8d4-7a2d-4e77-aa8d-45124bd5e804 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20000101 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial-for Energy greater than 2500 kWh-Distributed generation Rider Sector: Commercial Description: Customers requesting...

  15. Data:B5d8053a-eb8b-4a4d-acca-3a3ac8d9ad02 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  16. Data:5a0ad747-8db3-4b0b-b705-fa38acf391e9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  17. Data:20ca22af-871f-44fe-9416-14e28a4b07ae | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  18. Data:28d59351-f16b-4707-bbb7-d7ad1dd3342a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  19. Data:68959f43-f77f-4792-9094-34fab5f50b07 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  20. Data:Aa1ada0c-ecbc-424e-90d6-76a85c64d44b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  1. Data:Badff9c8-b392-400c-8fcc-16f3378c67a8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  2. Data:C17caada-b5b9-4367-b179-bbd821e9468e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Systems (Greater than 20 kW) Billing Solar Renewable Energy Distributed Generation Billing Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffs...

  3. Data:11facda7-42ca-4851-b210-a53323d3933b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20140401 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Single-Phase Over 200 Amps Sector: Commercial Description: *For non-residential buildings drawing greater than 200 Amps 100...

  4. NMAC 17.9.569 Interconnection of Generating Facilities with a...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NMAC 17.9.569 Interconnection of Generating Facilities with a Rated Capacity Greater than 10 MWLegal...

  5. President Obama Announces New Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    bandgap semiconductors can operate at higher temperatures and have greater durability and reliability at higher voltages and frequencies - ultimately achieving unprecedented...

  6. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by a dioxane water extraction, while Trajano et al.water, limited condensation reactions for both substrates, as evidenced by greater lignin extraction

  7. Data:2310b373-609d-43a7-a227-bbf2435c1b73 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  8. Data:Ed777808-d0b0-404a-845b-1d383e58c2a3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  9. Data:110628cb-8bca-42d2-82ed-7b6f1b08f6f8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  10. Data:9f0b0bc8-7e09-4369-adb5-a5a23758df04 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  11. Data:657a387e-3f66-4337-bf86-1983088978fd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  12. Data:D87f8a17-d879-4204-b57e-1c15a265a13b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KCP&L Greater...

  13. Adv. Space Res. Vol. 10. No. 1. (1)113--(1)119, 1990. 0273--1177/90 $0.00 + .50 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. Copyright 1989 COSPAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune. NH 3, H20 and H2S are all removed by condensation at pressures greater than

  14. A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with CCS promises a greater CO 2 reduc- tion potential thanpotential coal-based hydrogen transportation system in Ohio with CO 2 capture and storage (CCS).

  15. A COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED AND BACKGROUND SUBSIDENCE RATES IN TEXAS-LOUISIANA GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, L.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carry greater tidal and wind forces. Increased wave fetchareas from strong wind and tidal forces. Plant production inloss of the bouyant force of groundwater, wind erosion, and

  16. Data:F8001f40-3db9-42c4-b666-0da3a93c535d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    voltages. Consumers receiving service under this schedule will provide all transformers and take service at 300 KVA or greater. Northern Lights, Inc. will meter accounts...

  17. Data:50bda05d-aad7-4341-8671-3618b3cc6b86 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    voltages. Consumers receiving service under this schedule will provide all transformers and take service at 300 KVA or greater. Northern Lights, Inc. will meter accounts...

  18. Memorandum of Understanding between DOD and DOI on Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Defense develop renewable energy in the interests of greater installation energy security and reduced installation energy costs and to help meet the Department of the...

  19. EIS-0375: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOEEIS-0375, Environmental Protection Agency, Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level...

  20. Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate, Phase II: 26 September 2007 - 25 September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedeman, S.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Solar's CIGS manufacturing cost has decreased by increased automation, higher materials utilization, and greater capacity with higher rates in all tools.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advancing Alternative Fuel Markets Adoption and Growth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  2. affecting energy capacity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organization of Santiago affects its capacity to design and apply urban energy initiatives MIT - DSpace Summary: The need for greater levels of energy efficiency has never...

  3. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    studies Goal: * Demonstrate the feasibility of significant thermal storage for dish Stirling systems to leverage their existing high performance to greater capacity * Demonstrate...

  4. The Biogeography of Globally Threatened Seabirds and Island Conservation Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatz, Dena R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofand North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofGreater Antilles (Hispaniola) Lesser Antilles Galapagos

  5. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  6. New Energy Efficiency Standards for External Power Supplies to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on President Obama's State of the Union address, which called for reducing carbon pollution and helping communities move to greater energy efficiency, the Energy Department...

  7. Healthy time, home production, and labor supply: The effect of health shocks on time use in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jenny Xin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the labor force, or early retirement, then social insuranceis often linked to early retirement for more elderly workinghealth can lead to early retirement and greater demand for

  8. Obama Administration Announces Availability of $3.9 Billion to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is soliciting applications for 3.9 billion in grants to support efforts to modernize the electric grid, allowing for greater integration of renewable energy sources while...

  9. Data:1844e12d-12a3-4722-a554-be3c170bffaa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 20080701 End date if known: Rate name: Tariff A1: Single Phase Residential, Greater Than 200 Amps and Less Than 400 Amps Sector:...

  10. Data:6df5cc4e-9b21-4464-809b-ff986065de63 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 20080701 End date if known: Rate name: Tariff A2: Single Phase Residential, Greater Than 400 Amps Sector: Residential Description:...

  11. Employment Discrimination against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallory, Christy; Herman, Jody L.; Badgett, M.V. Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pdf/StateofTransCAFINAL.pdf. Tulsa CommunityFoundation, Tulsa Reaches Out (TRO) Project, andService Council of Greater Tulsa, Tulsa’s Gay Community: A

  12. Update on mobile applications in dermatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shivani; Eluri, Madhu; Boyers, Lindsay N; Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FDA regulation of mobile health technologies. N Engl J Med.providers. As technology advances, mobile applications maytechnology continues to advance and physicians have greater access to mobile-

  13. Quantifying the impact of extranasal testing of body sites for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization at the time of hospital or intensive care unit admission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinnell, JA; Huang, SS; Eells, SJ; Cui, E; Miller, LG

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at any site less than 6%. High MRSA prevalence: Thoseinvestigations with MRSA colonization at any site greaterNasal Testing Body Sites for MRSA Colonization at the Time

  14. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the shipments of two companies, BP Solar and Mitsubishiaddition, funding to solar companies increased dramaticallyand expansions of solar companies. Greater debt financing is

  15. Binary Space Partitions for Fat Rectangles Pankaj K. Agarwal Edward F. Grovey T. M. Muraliz Jeffrey Scott Vitterx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    in S have aspect ratios greater than , we can construct a BSP of size npm2O( plog n ) for S in npm2O( plog n

  16. USAMP/NonDestructive Evaluation Steering Committee (Task Team...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Nondestructive Evaluation * NDE for light-weighting Development in the North American Automotive Industry * NDE for manufacturing * Emerging challenges Hurdles to greater...

  17. UMND2 : SenseClusters Applied to the Sense Induction Task of SENSEVAL-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Ted

    a Pointwise Mu- tual Information (PMI) score greater than five. If the value of PMI is near 1.0, this means

  18. ammonium sulfate fertilizer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manures had NPK contents greater than common solid organic fertilizers such as cattle manure used in Zimbabwe. Simbarashe Govere; Benard Madziwa; Precious Mahlatini 393...

  19. Behaviour Change at Work: empowering energy efficiency in the workplace through user-centred design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockton, Dan; Cain, Rebecca; Harrison, David; Giudice, Sebastiano; Nicholson, Luke; Jennings, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    up 18% of the UK's carbon footprint. A combination of18% of the country's carbon footprint (Technology Strategyhas a greater carbon footprint. 3 See www.carbonculture.net

  20. accelerator beam instrumentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atomic radius than C - Greater solubility than to trapped C atoms) Quench - Heat to Austenite (face centered higher C solubility) - Add Carbon - Cool Pulfrey,...