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  1. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  2. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Great Plains Central Facility The Southern Great Plains (SGP) site was the first field measurement site established by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program in 1992. Today, it is considered the largest and most extensive climate research field site in the world. Scientists are using the measurements obtained from the SGP to improve the understanding and representation of clouds and aerosols, as well as their interactions, in climate and earth system models. More

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-10 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Southern Great Plains Site Meets Scientific Needs The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is unique in its dedication to long-term, continuous measurement of

  4. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-05 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Launches Newly-Designed Website The recent designation of the ARM Program's infrastructure as a national user facility was an opportunity

  5. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  6. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Site Reaches Safety Milestone On April 11, 2005, our dedicated SGP site employees celebrated the safety milestone of five years without a

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Science Team Meets in Albuquerque Some 300 ARM scientists and ACRF infrastructure staff members attended the 16th ARM Science Team meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on March 27-31, 2006. In

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Dynamic Rain Gauge Calibration System A new calibration system recently implemented at the SGP site will verify the operation of the ARM Climate Research

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 ANL/EVS/NL-08-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in West Africa in 2006, Dr. Salla

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aug./Sept. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. New Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter Installed at SGP Accomplishing the ARM Program's objective of improving the treatment of clouds in climate

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ACRF Instrument Team Meets at SGP The ARM Program has had unprecedented success in operating a large array of sophisticated

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 ANL/ER/NL-04-12 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Winter Storms Winter has set its sights on us, just in time to make the holidays bright. Remembering the joy winter brought us when we were children

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-12 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Diffuse Irradiance Study Works to Set Measurement Standard The ACRF sites have many instruments that measure and collect data on atmospheric conditions,

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-02 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Begins First Field Deployment The new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is in place at its first field research site in scenic Point

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Radar Improved with New Reflector A new corner reflector (too small to be seen in Figure 1) on the W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR)

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-01 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Water Vapor Data Support Severe Weather Forecasting in Oklahoma and Kansas The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) participates in the

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-01 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ARM Archive Sets Record for User Accounts The ARM Archive stores and distributes the large quantities of data generated by routine

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Cloud Radar Is Deployed at SGP The W-band ARM cloud radar (WACR), under development since 2004, has been deployed at the SGP central facility. A dual-polarization radar operating at

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare visual data with the non-visual data retrieved by

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. CLASIC Concludes with a Splash The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) drew to a close on June 30, 2007, at the ARM

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-06 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Atmospheric Compensation Experiment Completed at SGP The Atmospheric Compensation Experiment field campaign, held at the SGP June 6-12, 2005, focused

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-06 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. New Micropulse Lidars Improve Measurements of Cloud Properties To understand how clouds and sunlight affect Earth's climate, the ARM Program studies these

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-06 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. CLASIC and CHAPS Campaigns The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) and the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Holds 15 t h Annual Science Team Meeting The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program held its 15 th Annual Science Team Meeting on March

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-03 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's a - Helicopter? Last week, scientists from across the country met in Ponca City, Oklahoma, to

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 ANL/EVS/NL-08-03 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting The Sheraton Norfolk Waterside Hotel on the banks of the Elizabeth River in Norfolk, Virginia, hosted

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-05 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment Scheduled for September In a new field campaign using the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), researchers will

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-05 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Cold Air Funnel Sighted at SGP Central Facility In early May, SGP central facility personnel observed a cold air funnel near the site (Figure 1). The term cold

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-11 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Local Students Tour SGP Facility A group of 30 seventh graders from the Deer Creek-Lamont school district received a warm welcome at the SGP site on November

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-11 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Winter Outlook As the winter weather season approached, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released its

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct./Nov. 2005 ANL/EVS/NL-05-10 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Site Access Roads Improved The "road" to improving the SGP site access roads was long and bumpy, but both visitors and employees are now enjoying trouble-free trips to

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-10 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Repair Capability Saves Resources and Keeps Data Flowing The ACRF SGP site recently established a repair capability for its wind sensor equipment that is

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Warming and Methane Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as "greenhouse gases." These

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  18. Southern Great Plains

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southern Great Plains Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The S outhern G reat P lains r egion, c omprising K ansas, O klahoma, and T exas, c ontains o il a nd g as i nfrastructure c ritical t o t he nation's e nergy s upply, i ncluding n umerous o ffshore p latforms, onshore o il a nd g as w ells, o il r efineries, n atural g as p rocessing plants, p ipelines, a nd s hipping t erminals. M any o f t hese a

  19. Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  20. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Change.org Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Fallon Sanford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean ...

  2. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  3. ITC Great Plains, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ITC Great Plains, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Great Plains, LLC Place: Kansas Phone Number: Topeka (785) 783-2226 or Dodge City (620) 371-6534 or (785) 783-2226...

  4. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  5. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Downwind, LLC Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Crystal Yarbrough

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on ...

  8. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  9. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma | Department of Energy from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Block Plains & Eastern Clean Line Arkansas and Oklahoma 06-08-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from

  10. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111...

  11. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  12. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomPublicationsSouthern Great Plains Newsletter Archive Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive 2011 March PDF - 2.7MB 2010 September PDF - 1.6MB 2009 January PDF - 472KB February PDF - 472KB 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 January PDF - 7.4MB

  13. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of ...

  14. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Chantel |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy from Chantel Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Chantel Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Chantel 06-09-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Garrett Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Rutherford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Campbell

  15. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hughes | Department of Energy from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Marshall Hughes 07-10-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Patti McCutchen

  16. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) | Department of Energy Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) PDF icon Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line

  17. Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric transmission

  18. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric

  19. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Dr. Contreras ...

  20. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line ... through the Southwestern Power Administration ... NEPA Website, and through other channels of communication. ...

  1. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation (Program Document) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Program Document: Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety

  2. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  3. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  4. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 ...

  5. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  6. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  7. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application In addition to conducting a NEPA review of the proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line project, DOE will also conduct due diligence on non-NEPA factors such as the project's technical and financial feasibility and whether the project is in the public interest. DOE will conduct a thorough review that includes making all required statutory

  8. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SGP) Site () | Data Explorer Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To

  10. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region.

  11. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Dr. Contreras 6-10-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

  12. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Ms. Callahan Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Ms. Callahan 07-13-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Cynthia Blansett (COE) Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Simon Mahan (SWEA)

  13. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ozarks | Department of Energy Save The Ozarks Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The Ozarks Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment by Save the Ozarks 07-13-15.pdf More Documents & Publications Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains and Eastern

  14. NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement EXECUTION VERSION PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT among THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE HOLDINGS LLC, ARKANSAS CLEAN LINE LLC, PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE OKLAHOMA LLC and certain of their Affiliates (as set forth herein) dated as of March 25, 2016 NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement Table of Contents Article I Defined Terms and Definitions

  15. EIS-0390: Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for Western Area Power Administration's proposal to participate with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. (Tri-State), to construct the proposed Eastern Plains Transmission Project (Project). Western’s participation with Tri-State would be in exchange for capacity rights on the transmission lines.

  16. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux ...

  17. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy development within Western’s Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region (Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota) and upon the Service’s landscape-level grassland and wetland easements. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  18. EIS-0486: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed project would include an overhead ± 600 kilovolt (kV) high voltage direct current (HVDC) electric transmission system and associated facilities with the capacity to deliver approximately 3,500 megawatts (MW) primarily from renewable energy generation facilities in the Oklahoma Panhandle region to load-serving entities in the Mid-South and Southeast via an interconnection with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  19. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field Authors: Torn, Margaret [1] + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1246027 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Specialized Mix Research Org:

  20. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  1. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Data Explorer Search Results AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was

  2. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical towers, measurements at the US-ARc

  3. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont (Dataset) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field Authors: Torn, Margaret [1] + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1246027 Resource Type: Dataset Data

  4. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was burned

  5. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical

  6. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 PDF icon Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the

  7. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  8. Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains G. Feingold and W. L. Eberhard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Vernon and M. Previdi Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract We have demonstrated first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The response of non-precipitating, ice-free clouds to

  9. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Implementation Transmission Planning Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 PLAINS & ... August 2003 Blackout DOE Grid Tech Team Energy Assurance ...

  10. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  11. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line- Part 2 Application: Comments Received on the Updated Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2014, DOE requested additional information from Clean Line Energy Partners, LLC to supplement and update its original Plains and Eastern Clean Line application. The updated Part 2 application and other documentation were available for a public comment period that closed on July 13, 2015. Comments were posted as they were received.

  12. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  13. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  14. Instrumentation for Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 accept the instrument but operates it in a degraded mode until the problems are fixed, or does not operate the instrument. Similar procedures are followed for other types of equipment and some aspects of the site data system. Central Facility Table 1 shows the progress to date on implementation of instruments, facilities, and general aspects of the site data system

  15. Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains L. Bianco, D. Cimini, and F. Marzano Center of Excellence CETEMPS University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy L. Bianco and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado R. Ware Radiometrics Co. and University Consortium for Atmospheric Research

  16. GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van Hove, S. Y. Ha, and C. Rocken GPS Science and Technology Program University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an improved capability to measure and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. Applications for this type of data include their use

  17. Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Clayton and V. Brackett Science Applications International Corporation National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Tooman and J. E. M. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratories Livermore,

  18. DOE/SC-ARM-14-021 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation Revised: May 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

  19. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT DOE/EIS-0486 MARCH 2016 3 1 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1021.331) require completion of a mitigation action plan (MAP) following each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and its associated Record of Decision (ROD) to address mitigation commitments expressed in the ROD. The DOE Notice

  20. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81- April 28, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2014, DOE requested additional information from Clean Line Energy Partners, LLC to supplement and update its original Plains and Eastern Clean Line application. The updated Part 2 application and other documentation are now available for a 45-day public comment period.

  2. OE Issues Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 21, 2012, DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) issued a Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project on behalf of the Department and Southwestern Power Administration

  3. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  4. Subtask 7.3 - The Socioeconomic Impact of Climate Shifts in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Tera Buckley; Troy Simonsen

    2007-12-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated the water demand response/vulnerability to climate change factors of regional economic sectors in the northern Great Plains. Regardless of the cause of climatic trends currently observed, the research focused on practical evaluation of climate change impact, using water availability as a primary factor controlling long-term regional economic sustainability. Project results suggest that the Upper Missouri, Red River, and Upper Mississippi Watersheds exhibit analogous response to climate change, i.e., extended drought influences water availability in the entire region. The modified trend suggests that the next period for which the Red River Basin can expect a high probability of below normal precipitation will occur before 2050. Agriculture is the most sensitive economic sector in the region; however, analyses confirmed relative adaptability to changing conditions. The price of agricultural commodities is not a good indicator of the economic impact of climate change because production and price do not correlate and are subject to frequent and irregular government intervention. Project results confirm that high water demand in the primary economic sectors makes the regional economy extremely vulnerable to climatic extremes, with a similar response over the entire region. Without conservation-based water management policies, long-term periods of drought will limit socioeconomic development in the region and may threaten even the sustainability of current conditions.

  5. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  6. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  7. A 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains M. M. Khaiyer, A. D. Rapp, D. R. Doelling, and M. L. Nordeen Analytical Service and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, W. L. Smith, Jr., and L. Nguyen Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction While the various instruments maintained at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

  8. Vision Statement for Research and Educationall Outreach for tl1e ARM CART Southern Great Plains Locale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Vision Statement for Research and Educationall Outreach for tl1e ARM CART Southern Great Plains Locale P. J. lamb Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies K. C. Crawford Oklahoma Climatological Survey F. V. Brock School of Meteorology R. M. Rabin National Severe Storms Laboratory University of Oklahoma/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration "Weather Center" Norman, OK 73019 .National Weather Service Forecast Office (NWSFO) Dennis H. McCarthy, Director As

  9. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grasses (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.

  10. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern hemisphere, and elsewhere. Finally these data can be integrated into a history of climate change and predictive climate models. This is not a small undertaking. The goals of researchers and the methods used vary considerably. The primary task of this project was literature research to (1) evaluate existing methodologies used in geologic climate change studies and evidence for short-term cycles produced by these methodologies and (2) evaluate late Holocene climate patterns and their interpretations.

  11. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  12. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore » (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  13. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  14. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  15. Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

    2013-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

  16. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These results contradicted the logic and evidence of global warming. If Earth is getting hotter, how can incoming sunlight be decreasing? Ohmura was shocked by the results, and ...

  17. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the RWP can measure wind speeds and temperatures up to 10 miles directly above its location. To measure wind speeds and directions, Dr. May uses the Doppler principle. When...

  18. Northern Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Northern G reat P lains Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The N orthern G reat P lains i s h ...

  19. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With the rapid changes in the arctic environment, the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research. Since 1997, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has gathered climate data at its NSA site in Barrow, the northernmost city in the United States located on the edge of the Arctic Ocean. The ARM Facility established multiple climate research sites on the North Slope to provide data about Arctic clouds and

  20. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site accurately. Other extended facilities are located over wheat, pasture, rangeland, alfalfa, and native prairie. Okmulgee State Park contains 535 acres housing 100 campsites,...

  1. Coal. [Great Plains Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The status of various research projects related to coal is considered: gasification (approximately 30 processes) and in-situ gasification. Methanol production, retrofitting internal combustion engines to stratified charge engines, methanation (Conoco), direct reduction of iron ores, water resources, etc. Approximately 200 specific projects related to coal are considered with respect to present status. (LTN)

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designed to measure the mixing ratio of CO2 from space. The mixing ratio is the proportion of dry air that is composed of CO2. Researchers will fly an aircraft over the SGP...

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy. Scientists to Validate Satellite-Based Ozone Measurements Aura, the third and final satellite in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP site, located a third-party provider for the gear and purchased a small supply. ... sensors * Sun trackers * Uninterruptible power supplies * Computer monitors, drives * ...

  5. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uses laser technology to measure vertical profiles of atmospheric properties. The system will be out of service from late June until mid August. New signal acquisition and...

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12, 2007. Munchkin has been with us since 1993. He has been a fine and loyal friend, guardian, and companion on long shifts and a part of the ARM family. He personally greeted...

  7. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    installed together at the SGP central facility (ARM photo). October 2004 3 Okmulgee Turkey Vultures Thwarted . . . Finally After years of trying to keep messy turkey vultures...

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Both measurements are essential in understanding cloud-climate interactions, and current measurement techniques are not as accurate as desired. (Thin clouds have low water content...

  9. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of DOE's funding for ACRF is to provide educational resources to anyone interested in learning more about climate sciences, weather, research techniques, or instrumentation. ACRF...

  10. Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollister, Emily B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ansley, R J; Boutton, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

  11. Notice of Availability of Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Public Hearings: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 242- Dec. 17, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (DOE/EIS–0486; Draft EIS) for a 90-day public comment period. DOE also announces 15 public hearings to receive comments on the Draft EIS. In addition, DOE invites comments on the National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 process and any potential adverse impacts to historic properties from the proposed Project.

  12. Multi-EM27/SUN Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) Comparison at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9 Multi-EM27/SUN Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) Comparison at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report H Parker J Hedelius April 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  13. Multi-EM27/SUN Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) Comparison at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Multi-EM27/SUN Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) Comparison at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report H Parker J Hedelius April 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

  14. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  15. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The southern termination of the Howe segment of the Lemhi fault was placed between Howe lines H1 and H2, 2.2 km south of the fault’s southernmost surface expression. In the adjacent basin, south-dipping normal faults at the northern end of Howe line 81-3 and two southwest-dipping normal faults at the northeastern end of Howe line 82-2 that can be correlated with Howe segment. South of the surface expression, two southwest-dipping normal faults on Howe line H1 can be correlated with the Howe segment. Further into the ESRP, Howe lines H2, H3, and S4 show continuous flat lying reflectors and indicate no fault offset. The southern termination of the Arco segment of the Lost River fault was placed between Arco lines S2 and A3, a distance of 4.6 km south of the fault’s southernmost surface expression. Within the basin, west-dipping normal faults interpreted on Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2 can be correlated with the Arco segment. Further south within the Arco volcanic rift zone (VRZ), three seismic lines (Arco lines A2, S2, and A3) permit two interpretations. The west- and south-dipping normal faults on Arco lines A2 and S2 could be associated with slip along the Arco segment. These normal faults have an opposite dip to an east-dipping fault on Arco line A3. The observed small-offsets (< 85 m) along the oppositely dipping normal faults can be interpreted as a graben structure that resulted from dike intrusion within the Arco VRZ. Arco line A4 further south within the Arco VRZ shows flat lyin

  16. The Low-Level Jet over the Southern Great Plains Determined from Observations and Reanalyses and Its Impact on Moisture Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Huang, Maoyi

    2015-09-01

    This study utilizes five commonly used reanalysis products, including the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 (NCEP2), ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA)-Interim, Japanese 25-year Reanalysis (JRA-25), Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) to evaluate features of the Southern Great Plains Low Level Jet (LLJ) above the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. Two sets of radiosonde data are utilized: the six-week Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), and a ten-year period spanning 2001-2010. All five reanalysis are compared to MC3E data, while only the NARR and MERRA are compared to the ten-year data. Each reanalysis is able to represent most aspects of the composite LLJ profile, although there is a tendency for each reanalysis to overestimate the wind speed between the nose of the LLJ and 700 mb. There are large discrepancies in the number of LLJ observed and derived from the reanalysis, particularly for strong LLJs that leads to an underestimate of the water vapor transport associated with LLJs. When the ten-year period is considered, the NARR overestimates and MERRA underestimates the total moisture transport, but both underestimate the transport associated with strong LLJs by factors of 2.0 and 2.7 for the NARR and MERR, respectively. During MC3E there were differences in the patterns of moisture convergence and divergence, with the MERRA having an area of moisture divergence over Oklahoma, while the NARR has moisture convergence. The patterns of moisture convergence and divergence are more consistent during the ten-year period.

  17. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional gene expression under warming with or without clipping in order to adapt the changed out environment. More detail analysis is underway.

  18. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quickly screen for siting issues at a high level. The model resolution is suitable for state or multi-county siting but users are cautioned against using these models for micrositing. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently released voluntary land-based wind energy guidelines for assessing impacts of a wind facility to wildlife using a tiered approach. The tiered approach uses an iterative approach for assessing impacts to wildlife in levels of increasing detail from landscape-level screening to site-specific field studies. Our models presented in this paper would be applicable to be used as tools to conduct screening at the tier 1 level and would not be appropriate to complete smaller scale tier 2 and tier 3 level studies. For smaller scale screening ancillary field studies should be conducted at the site-specific level to validate collision predictions.

  19. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  20. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  1. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  2. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  3. Plains and Eastern Clean Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Vinson & Elkins - Attorney Represented clients in merger and acquisition, project development and private equity investment transactions, including transactions in the wind ...

  4. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infill drilling program at this time. Pruet is integrating the reservoir characterization, 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation results of the project into their field-scale reservoir management strategy for the Womack Hill Field to improve field operations.

  5. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infill drilling program at this time. Pruet is integrating the reservoir characterization, 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation results of the project into their field-scale reservoir management strategy for the Womack Hill Field to improve field operations.

  6. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  7. Geothermal Energy Market Study on the Atlantic Coastal Plain: Technical Feasibility of use of Eastern Geothermal Energy in Vacuum Distillation of Ethanol Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-04-01

    The DOE is studying availability, economics, and uses of geothermal energy. These studies are being conducted to assure maximum cost-effective use of geothermal resources. The DOE is also aiding development of a viable ethanol fuel industry. One important point of the ethanol program is to encourage use of non-fossil fuels, such as geothermal energy, as process heat to manufacture ethanol. Geothermal waters available in the eastern US tend to be lower in temperature (180 F or less) than those available in the western states (above 250 F). Technically feasible use of eastern geothermal energy for ethanol process heat requires use of technology that lowers ethanol process temperature requirements. Vacuum (subatmospheric) distillation is one such technology. This study, then, addresses technical feasibility of use of geothermal energy to provide process heat to ethanol distillation units operated at vacuum pressures. They conducted this study by performing energy balances on conventional and vacuum ethanol processes of ten million gallons per year size. Energy and temperature requirements for these processes were obtained from the literature or were estimated (for process units or technologies not covered in available literature). Data on available temperature and energy of eastern geothermal resources was obtained from the literature. These data were compared to ethanol process requirements, assuming a 150 F geothermal resource temperature. Conventional ethanol processes require temperatures of 221 F for mash cooking to 240 F for stripping. Fermentation, conducted at 90 F, is exothermic and requires no process heat. All temperature requirements except those for fermentation exceed assumed geothermal temperatures of 150 F. They assumed a 130 millimeter distillation pressure for the vacuum process. It requires temperatures of 221 F for mash cooking and 140 F for distillation. Data indicate lower energy requirements for the vacuum ethanol process (30 million BTUs per hour) than for the conventional process (36 million BTUs per hour). Lower energy requirements result from improved process energy recovery. Data examined in this study indicate feasible use of eastern geothermal heated waters (150 F) to provide process heat for vacuum (130 mm Hg) ethanol distillation units. Data indicate additional heat sources are needed to raise geothermal temperatures to the 200 F level required by mash cooking. Data also indicate potential savings in overall process energy use through use of vacuum distillation technology. Further study is needed to confirm conclusions reached during this study. Additional work includes obtaining energy use data from vacuum ethanol distillation units currently operating in the 130 millimeter pressure range; economic analysis of different vacuum pressures to select an optimum; and operation of a pilot geothermally heated vacuum column to produce confirmatory process data.

  8. Stromatolites, ooid dunes, hardgrounds, and crusted mud beds, all products of marine cementation and microbial mats in subtidal oceanic mixing zone on eastern margin of Great Bahama Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Kendall, C.S.C.G.; Steinen, R.P.

    1989-03-01

    The interisland channels along the eastern margin of the Great Bahamas Bank contain lithified structures that owe their origin to recent marine cementation. This cementation appears to be commonly associated with a complex microbial community of plants and microorganisms living within a bank-margin oceanographic mixing zone. In this region, reversing tidal and wind-driven currents flow up to 3 knots (150 cm/sec) three hours out of each six-hour tidal period. Here, marine-cement crusted, carbonate mud beds are found interbedded within migrating ooid sand bars and dunes and are associated with growing, lithified stromatolites up to 2 m in height. These laminated mud beds are found with thicknesses of up to 1 m in subtidal depths of 4 to 8 m (12 to 25 ft). The muds appear to be homogeneous, but closer examination by SEM and under a microscope reveals they are composed of pelletoid aggregates of needle-shaped aragonite crystals with diameters of up to 50 ..mu... The size of these soft pellets is similar to the smaller grains of ooid sands that are abundant in the area. This size similarity could explain why both the mud beds are found in similar high-energy hydraulic regimes as the ooid sands, but does not suggest how or why the aggregates of pure aragonite needles form. A high production of ooid sand within this bank margin environment permits the formation of natural levees along the margins of tidal channels. The back sides of these levees are being lithified by marine cements to form hardgrounds. Skeletal and ooid sand dunes stabilized by Thallasia in channel bottoms also are becoming lithified. Grapestones form at the distributaries of flood tidal deltas of ooid sand. All of these features have a common attribute: they are continually in contact with the turbulent mixing-zone waters.

  9. ARM - Lesson Plans: Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  10. Great Plains Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and implement policies, technologies and practices in the areas of energy security and bio-based materials. Coordinates: 44.979035, -93.264929 Show Map Loading map......

  11. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  12. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: DeMott, PJ 1 ; Suski, KJ 1 ; Hill, TCJ 1 ; Levin, EJT 1 + Show Author Affiliations Colorado State University Publication Date: 2015-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1232637 ...

  13. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2015 KP-AP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott October 1, 2015 KP-AP-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott October 1, 2015 KP-AP-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott More schedules Annual

  14. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir ...

  15. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of underflow into the subregion. Both conceptual models extend approximately 25 miles to the southwest of the INEEL, a distance sufficient to include known concentrations of contaminant tracers. Several hypotheses have been developed concerning the effective thickness of the SRPA at the INEEL. The USGS model has defined the effective thickness from electrical resistivity and borehole data to be as much as 2,500 ft in the eastern part of the subregion and as much as 4,000 ft in the southwestern part. The WAG-10 model has developed two alternatives using aquifer-temperature and electrical resistivity data. The ''thick'' aquifer interpretation utilizes colder temperature data and includes a northtrending zone in which the thickness exceeds 1,300 ft and with a maximum thickness of 1,700 ft. The ''thin'' aquifer interpretation minimizes aquifer thickness, with thickness ranging from 328 to 1,300 ft. Facility-specific models generally have focused efforts on the upper 250 ft of saturation. Conceptual models have utilized a stratigraphic data set to define geohydrologic units within the INEEL subregion. This data set, compiled from geophysical logs and cores from boreholes, correlates the thick, complex stack of basalt flows across the subregion. Conceptual models generally concur that the upper geohydrologic unit consists of a section of highly fractured, multiple, thin basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. Beneath this unit is an areally extensive, thick, unfractured basalt flow that rises above the water table southwest of the INEEL. The bottom unit consists of a thick section of slightly- to moderately-altered basalt. A key objective of the DOE water-integration project at the INEEL is to coordinate development of a subregional conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport that is based on the best available understanding of geologic and hydrologic features. The first step in this process is to compile and summarize the current conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL that have been developed from extensive geohydrologic studies conducted during the last 50 years.

  16. Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains Site Field Campaign Report (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Program Document: Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report The purpose of this study was to measure the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) fractions of PM2.5 particulate matter at the U.S. Department

  17. Plain Language Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Plain Language Training The Department has an active and popular Plain Language Training Program. Between April 2013 and March 2014, there were six Plain ...

  18. Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Plain Writing Implementation Plan July 13, 2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013) Plain ...

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  20. EIS-0072: Great Plains Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the impacts of a project to construct a 125 million cubic feet per day coal gasification facility located in Mercer County, North Dakota. The Office of Fossil Energy adopted three environmental impact evaluation documents prepared by other Federal agencies to develop this EIS.

  1. Regional Community Wind Conferences, Great Plains Windustry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Lisa [Windustry

    2013-02-28

    Windustry organized and produced five regional Community Wind Across America (CWAA) conferences in 2010 and 2011 and held two CWAA webinars in 2011 and 2012. The five conferences were offered in regions throughout the United States: Denver, Colorado ? October 2010 St. Paul, Minnesota ? November 2010 State College, Pennsylvania ? February 2011 Ludington, Michigan (co-located with the Michigan Energy Fair) June 2011 Albany, New York October 2011

  2. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

  3. Eastern Pine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    + Reflect Natural Elements * Light Penetration + Diffusion * IntegratedBuilt-in Furniture * Open Concept Design * Healthy + Durable Materials Eastern Pine 25 MATERIAL CRITERIA ...

  4. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  5. Plain Language Training Classes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Classes Plain Language Training Classes February 18, 2016 7:30AM to 10:30AM MST Plain Language Training Classes When you write, do you write what you want ...

  6. NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... or owning new electric power transmission facilities and ... with the Clean Line Entities in the design, ... The project will seek 150 - 200 foot wide easements in which ...

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The updated Part 2 application and other documentation are now available for a 45-day public comment period. The public comment period began on April 28, 2015, the date the Notice ...

  8. 1222 6.b Plains and Eastern Project Cost.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Line Segment - OK 427 853 Line Segment - AR 277 553 Line Segment - TN 16 33 HVDC CONVERTERS Oklahoma Converter Station 300 Arkansas Converter Station 100 Tennessee Converter ...

  9. Notice of Availability of Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Major facilities associated with the proposed Project include converter stations in Oklahoma and Tennessee; an approximately 720-mile high voltage direct current (HVDC) ...

  10. Clean Line Plains and Eastern FRN.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  11. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thorsen 051115 Comment from Mr. Melton 051315 Comment from Ms. Smith 051315 Comment ... Coyer 060815 Comment from Pat Costner 060815 Comment from Mr. & Mrs. Smith 060815 ...

  12. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSIO...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... or aquatic insects which may provide forage, adverse effects to aquatic resources will be minimized through strict adherence to the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). ...

  13. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Act NERC North American Electric Reliability Corporation ... for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section ... Due to its lower losses and more efficient use of right ...

  14. EIS-0486: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project. The proposed project would include an overhead 600 kilovolt (kV) high voltage direct current (HVDC) electric transmission system and associated facilities with the...

  15. Microsoft Word - Clean Line Plains & Eastern Benefits 7January2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results summarizing key benefits to Tennessee and Arkansas. From our detailed nodal production cost simulation of the power system, we estimate benefits to Tennessee and Arkansas ...

  16. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and...

  17. Plain Language Compliance Report (2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  18. PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  19. Plain Language Compliance Report (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  20. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aquifer THE INL & THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER underneath the Idaho National Laboratory is one of the most productive groundwater resources in the U.S. Each year about 2 million acre-feet of water is drawn from the aquifer. Approximately 95 percent of the water withdrawn from the aquifer is used for irrigation, 3 per- cent for domestic water, and 2 percent for industrial purposes. The aquifer is the primary water source for more than 280,000 people in

  1. Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  2. High Plains Tech Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner High Plains Tech Center Energy Purchaser High Plains Tech Center Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.40645133, -99.4282195 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  3. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains Site (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature,

  4. High Plains Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    owned subsidiary of Seaboard Foods, is a renewable energy company focused on producing alternative fuels from the Seaboard Foods integrated system. References: High Plains...

  5. Western Plains Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Western Plains Energy LLC Place: Oakley, Kansas Zip: 67748 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates: 40.714855, -111.298899 Show Map...

  6. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Marble Drop Learning objective: for students to analyze a problem, and test and refine solutions. This will demonstrate a key skill needed in engineering and scientific...

  7. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  8. White Plains, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in White Plains, New York 3 Registered Financial Organizations in White Plains, New York 4 References US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in White Plains, New York Power Authority...

  9. Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  10. High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Solar Power Plant Facility High Plains Ranch Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Sun Power Location Carizzo Plain, California Coordinates 35.1913858,...

  11. City of West Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of West Plains Place: Missouri Phone Number: 417-256-7176 Website: westplains.nethallelectricde Twitter:...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations Related Campaigns ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night...

  13. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  14. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50 instruments over 25 locations covering over 35,000 square miles (90,000 square kilometers) and can be viewed as a real "laboratory without walls." The heart of the SGP is the...

  15. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, ...

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. ANG coal gasification project management control system report. [Great Plains project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Much time, money and effort has been spent in the forefront of this project for project controls. The work breakdown structure for the systems has been custom designed. The systems, both manual and computerized, have been well scrutinized and chosen by ANG to represent the most cost effective and efficient way of controlling a project the magnitude of $1.5 billion. These systems have been developed in a manner so that information can be gathered as detailed or as summarized as necessary, and in the most timely and expeditious ways.

  18. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plot was burned on 20050308. The second plot, US-ARc, was left unburned as the ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Dataset File ...

  19. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  20. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  1. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain;...

  2. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  3. UPDATE TO PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE PROPOSAL FOR NEW OR UPGRADED...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Houston, T 6341 1001 McKin Houston, T 3453 1400 1974 Comm Tallahassee ADDRESS 43 rd St. ... Ext. 3911 1974 Commonwealth Lane Tallahassee, FL 32303 Jason Zoller E & E ...

  4. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space

  5. New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight December 16, 2015 - 10:04am Addthis New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight Timothy J. Welch Hydropower Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office What You Need to Know About Section 242 Funding The Energy Department began accepting applications today from hydropower owners and operators that produced hydroelectric power in 2014 from new equipment added to an existing dam or conduit since 2005. Applications for

  6. Eastern Power Customer Services Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Eastern Power Services organization (PSE) of Northwest Requirements Marketing, Power Services, and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Northwest (NW) Requirements...

  7. Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River...

  8. Des Plaines, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Des Plaines, Illinois Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) NARI National...

  9. Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Snake River...

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIAs 1987 ANWR assessment. Recognizing the value of this study, ...

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  12. Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  13. Green Plains Renewable Energy Inc GPRE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Inc GPRE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Plains Renewable Energy Inc (GPRE) Place: Omaha, Nebraska Zip: 68114 Product: Nebraska-based publicly traded...

  14. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations 2015.06.01, Turner, SGP Comments? ... Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract The Plains Elevated ...

  16. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Eastern Renewable Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study This study answers questions about technical issues related to a 20%-30% wind energy scenario in the Eastern Interconnection. ...

  17. ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY - ENERGY ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DOEEIS-0463) 3. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (DOEEIS-0486) 4. Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic EIS (DOEEIS-0459) 5. Presidential Permit Application, Great...

  18. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  19. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  20. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike‐slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east‐west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north‐ to northeast‐striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local‐scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  1. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  2. Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) was initiated by a coalition of regional Planning Authorities. These Planning Authorities are entities listed on the NERC compliance registry as Planning Authorities and represent the entire Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC was founded to be a broad-based,

  3. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  4. Plain Energy GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plain Energy GmbH Place: Munchen, Germany Zip: D-81675 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Germany-based renewable energy investment...

  5. Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Requirements » Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web The Plain Writing Act requires federal documents to be clear, concise, and well-organized. All publications and websites created by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) need to be written in plain language. Read Guidance on the Plain Writing Act of 2010 from the Office of Management and Budget. What is Plain Language? A website is written in plain language if it's written so

  6. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  7. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  8. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  9. Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is ...

  10. Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Name: Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern...

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  12. Evaluation of a 5-Year Cloud and Radiative Property Dataset Derived from GOES-8 Data over the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41248 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils Petroleum Development Laboratory Institute of Northern Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5880 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December 2008 Office of Fossil Energy Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaskan

  13. DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships.

  14. Eastern Woodlands Training and Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center and the Seminole Tribe of Florida is pleased to announce the 2016 Eastern Woodlands ONAP Training and Regional Meeting designed to address tribal housing needs identified throughout the Eastern Woodlands region.

  15. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study process, scenarios, tools, and goals.

  16. History of transcontinental railroads and coal mining on the Northern Plains to 1920

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryans, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    This history examines the symbiotic relationship between three transcontinental railroads-the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern-and coal mining in Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming through 1920. Throughout their dual existence, American railroads and the coal industry enjoyed a mutually beneficial association. On the Northern Plains, however, this partnership assumed new dimensions. There, the coal and rails exerted unique influences upon one another. The location of deposits determined many of the transcontinentals' early decisions, especially route selection. The native fuel also was used to promote settlement on railroad lands. Two of the roads, the Union Pacific and Northern Pacific, held land grants containing valuable deposits. The Great Northern, having no such subsidy, acquired coal lands in northern Montana. On these properties, the three railroads pioneered the region's commercial coal mining industry. Eventually, each formed subsidiaries to direct their coal operations. While much of their production supplied steam locomotives, some was sold to the public. Furthermore, the policies of the Northern Pacific and Great Northern especially enabled their coal to stimulate non-railroad enterprises. In addition, all three provided the transportation which made exploitation by others economically feasible.

  17. Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Great Lakes Energy Coop Name: Great Lakes Energy Coop Address: PO Box 70 Place: Boyne City, MI Zip: 49712 Service Territory: Michigan Phone Number: 1-800-678-0411 Website:...

  18. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  19. EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act Author...

  20. ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (AS-PECAN) Field

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Campaign Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (AS-PECAN) Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (AS-PECAN) Field Campaign Report The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field campaign was a large multi-agency/multi-institutional experiment that targeted nighttime convection events in the central plains of the United States in order to better

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University Joined the Challenge: August 2015 Headquarters: Cheney, WA Charging Locations: N/A Domestic Employees: 1,989 In 2007 Eastern Washington University accepted the challenge to reduce campus emissions by becoming signatory to the American Colleges and University President's Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). Installing

  2. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This one-page, two-sided fact sheet provides an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation and Integration Study process.

  3. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  4. Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Place: Madison, Wisconsin Zip: 53704 Sector: Services Product: Biodiesel research, consulting, management distribution and services company. Coordinates:...

  5. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreatPoint Energy Address: 222 Third Street Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02142 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  6. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon simmonshydrogeochemicalpeer2...

  7. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Bakersfield, California Product: Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA...

  8. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  9. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  10. Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean,...

  11. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year...

  12. PP-32 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmissionf facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-32 Eastern Maine Electric ...

  13. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepared by: EnerNex Corporation January 2010 EASTERN WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION STUDY: Executive Summary and Project Overview 2 3 EASTERN WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION ...

  14. Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand The Plain Writing Act of 2010 requires federal agencies to write "clear Government communication that the public can understand and use." President Obama also emphasized the importance of establishing "a system of transparency, public participation, and collaboration" in his January 21, 2009, Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government. We here

  15. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development

  16. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  17. Core Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  18. Slim Holes At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Slim Holes At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  19. Field Mapping At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake...

  20. Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake...

  1. Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River...

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern is teaming up with the New England Electric Auto Association and the Town of Windham to participate in National Drive Electric Week, a celebration to raise awareness of the ...

  3. Eastern Maine Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maine Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eastern Maine Electric Coop Place: Maine Phone Number: (207) 454-7555 Dial Ext. 0 Website: emec.com Facebook: https:...

  4. Large-scale stabilized dunes on the High Plains of Colorado: Understanding the landscape response to Holocene climates with the aid of images from space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, S.L. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Goetz, A.F.H.; Yuhas, R.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Principal-component analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images from eastern Colorado reveals stabilized dune fields that are composed of single and compound parabolic dunes, some longer than 10 km. These dunes have been reactivated at least four times in the past 10,000 yr, at ca. 9500 to 5500 yr B.P., 5500 to {gt}4800 yr B.P., 4800 to {gt}1000 yr B.P., and {lt}1000 yr B.P., during droughts that probably exceeded the dry conditions during the 1930s. Dune orientations indicate that these landforms were molded by winds from the northwest, which now dominate during the winter and spring with the passage of Pacific air masses. This study underscores the sensitivity of the landscape of the High Plains to drought conditions, which may become more prevalent because of the anticipated effects of greenhouse warming.

  5. Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 23, 2011 Contact: David Whiteley d.a.whiteley@att.net 314-753-6200 Eastern Interconnection Grid Planning Authorities to Study Set of Stakeholder-Identified Electric System Futures The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by

  6. HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses CARLSBAD, N.M., March 25, 2003 - To help the region's small businesses attract federal and state work, Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) will offer a Small Business Fair on May 2 in Carlsbad to introduce the U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA) HUBZone concept and other socioeconomic programs. WTS is the prime contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A HUBZone

  7. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative | Department of Energy Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the

  8. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  9. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The Great Lakes Wind Collaborative is a multi-sector coalition of wind energy stakeholders working to facilitate the sustainable development of wind power in the binational Great ...

  10. Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm Facility Great Lakes Science Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind...

  11. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Initial Results (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.; Townsend, A.; Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Clark, K.; King, J.

    2013-10-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study, which aims to answer critical questions about the future of the Eastern Interconnection under high levels of solar and wind generation penetration.

  12. Composite refraction-reflection stack sections: Tracing faults in the Atlantic coastal plain sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, D.E.; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    Seismic data from the Atlantic Coastal Plain are reprocessed and composite refraction-reflection stack sections produced to investigate basement faults that penetrate upward into Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments in South Carolina. Reprocessing recovered reflections from within the deep crust to the Moho as well as from within thin veneer (300) of the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. One of the major objectives of this paper is to discuss the use of shallow refracted arrivals to construct a composite refraction- reflection stack that allows better imaging of the subsurface at shallow depths.

  13. Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). PDF icon Eastern Interconnection Planning

  14. Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is an historic endeavor initially funded by an award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to a provision of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal is to create an unprecedented collaborative among the states in the Eastern Interconnection. Comprised of

  15. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised) Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised) EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection. PDF icon 47078.pdf More Documents & Publications Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview Proceedings of the March 25-26, 2009 Conference

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Connecticut State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University Joined the Challenge: September 2015 Headquarters: Willimantic, CT Charging Location: Willimantic, CT Domestic Employees: 980 As part of the University's commitment to Sustainability, Eastern Connecticut State University installed its first Level 2 charging station in December 2014, creating

  17. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The fact that offshore activity is not solely restricted to migratory species, such as the silver-haired bat, hoary bat, and eastern red bat, is in itself an important finding. ...

  18. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  19. Groundwater Discharge along a Channelized Coastal Plain Stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaSage, Danita M; Sexton, Joshua L; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Fryar, Alan E; Greb, Stephen F

    2015-10-01

    In the Coastal Plain of the southeastern USA, streams have commonly been artificially channelized for flood control and agricultural drainage. However, groundwater discharge along such streams has received relatively little attention. Using a combination of stream- and spring-flow measurements, spring temperature measurements, temperature profiling along the stream-bed, and geologic mapping, we delineated zones of diffuse and focused discharge along Little Bayou Creek, a channelized, first-order perennial stream in western Kentucky. Seasonal variability in groundwater discharge mimics hydraulic-head fluctuations in a nearby monitoring well and spring-discharge fluctuations elsewhere in the region, and is likely to reflect seasonal variability in recharge. Diffuse discharge occurs where the stream is incised into the semi-confined regional gravel aquifer, which is comprised of the Mounds Gravel. Focused discharge occurs upstream where the channel appears to have intersected preferential pathways within the confining unit. Seasonal fluctuations in discharge from individual springs are repressed where piping results in bank collapse. Thereby, focused discharge can contribute to the morphological evolution of the stream channel.

  20. Depositional environments, sequence stratigraphy, and trap configuration of lower Wolfcampian clastics along eastern edge of Midland basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, N.R.; Reuter, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    The Lower Permian (lower Wolfcampian) along the eastern edge of the Midland basin, west Texas, is characterized by ramp-type shelf margins. During eustatic lowstand, nearshore sedimentation shifted drastically to the west into a basinal setting below the Pennsylvanian (Canyon) shelf margin. Core descriptions demonstrate that lowstand systems tract (LST) and transgressive systems tract (TST) siliciclastics were deposited in deltaic and coastal-plain environments. Prodelta, delta-front, and stream-mouth bar facies are associated with the LST. Coastal-plain and distributary channels are preserved in the TST. The sequence stratigraphic framework indicates type 1 sequence boundaries at 287 Ma, 282 Ma, and 280 Ma in the lower Wolfcampian clastics. This lower Wolfcampian package of sedimentary rocks overlies the Pennsylvanian and is capped by the 279-Ma middle Wolfcampian unconformity. All three sequence boundaries and associated systems tract deposits exhibit a prograding stacking pattern within the sequence stratigraphic framework. Basinally restricted prograding LST deltaic rocks are overlain by backstepping TST deltaics and highstand systems tract (HST) outer marine shales. Production in lower Wolfcampian clastic fields is associated with fine-grained quartzarenites up to 45 ft thick which were deposited in stream-mouth bars. Delta-front and prodelta low-permeability shales encase the reservoir facies, forming lateral permeability barriers. HST outer marine shales deposited over the stream-mouth-bar sandstones act as a top seal, creating a stratigraphic trap and providing source for the high-BTU gas and oil produced from these basinally restricted LST deltaics.

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS.

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral

  4. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National

  5. Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis – Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John W.; Glen, Jonathan M.; Liberty, Lee M.; Dobson, Patrick; Gasperikova, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province (SRP) overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle; it represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America. Our goals for this Phase 1 study are to: (1) adapt the methodology of Play Fairway Analysis for geothermal exploration to create a formal basis for its application to geothermal systems, (2) assemble relevant data for the SRP from publicly available and private sources, and (3) build a geothermal play fairway model for the SRP and identify the most promising plays, using software tools that are standard in the petroleum industry. The success of play fairway analysis in geothermal exploration depends critically on defining a systematic methodology that is grounded in theory (as developed within the petroleum industry over the last two decades) and within the geologic and hydrologic framework of real geothermal systems. Our preliminary assessment of the data suggests that important undiscovered geothermal resources may be located in several areas of the SRP, including the western SRP (associated with buried lineaments defined by gravity or magnetic anomalies, and capped by extensive deposits of lacustrine sediment), at lineament intersections in the central SRP (along the Banbury-Hagerman trend NW of Twin Falls, and along the northern margin of the Mt Bennett Hills-Camas Prairie area), and along the margins of the eastern SRP. Additional high temperature resources are likely associated with rhyolite domes and crypto-domes in the eastern SRP, but are masked by shallow groundwater flow leading to low upper crustal heat flow values. These blind resources may be exploitable with existing deep drilling technology. Groundwater modeling planned for later phases of the PFA project will address whether temperatures at viable producing depths are sufficient to support electricity production.

  6. Testing and Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the ARM Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility Victor R. Morris and Charles N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operational Testing * Installed in October 2005 at SGP Guest Instrument Facility * Failed after 3 weeks due to moisture intrusion * Modified by manufacturer to minimize internal condensation * Reinstalled in August 2006 * Evaluated reliability of system and characteristics of data * Cloud images compare favorably with those from TSI * Cloud fraction data underestimate TSI values, especially when sky is overcast Operational Testing * Installed in October 2005 at SGP Guest Instrument Facility *

  7. Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Gas

  8. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin...

  9. JW Great Lakes Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44114-4420 Sector: Wind energy Product: Ohio based subsidiary of Juwi...

  10. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  11. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  12. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Coyle; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the ????rst time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

  13. Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in climate models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ in climate models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ in climate models During boreal summer, convective activity over the eastern Pacific (EPAC) inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) exhibits vigorous intraseasonal variability (ISV). Previous observational studies identified two

  14. Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interconnections, 2009-2012 (January 2014) | Department of Energy Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern Interconnections, 2009-2012 (January 2014) Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern Interconnections, 2009-2012 (January 2014) The "Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern Interconnections, 2009-2012" document, available below, is a compilation of publicly-available data on transmission constraints and

  15. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  16. Eastern Iowa Light & Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Light & Power Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eastern Iowa Light & Power Coop Place: Iowa Phone Number: (563) 732-2211 Website: easterniowa.com Facebook: https:...

  17. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  18. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2008 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

  19. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

  20. Project Reports for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  1. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other ...

  2. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, B.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, the development of wind datasets, the transmission analysis, and the results of wind integration analysis for four scenarios.

  3. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.'' This topical report was submitted jointly by the Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) and the Electric Power Research ...

  4. Environmental Regulation Impacts on Eastern Interconnection Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu; Young II, Marcus Aaron

    2013-07-01

    In the United States, recent environmental regulations will likely result in the removal of nearly 30 GW of oil and coal-fired generation from the power grid, mostly in the Eastern Interconnection (EI). The effects of this transition on voltage stability and transmission line flows have previously not been studied from a system-wide perspective. This report discusses the results of power flow studies designed to simulate the evolution of the EI over the next few years as traditional generation sources are replaced with environmentally friendlier ones such as natural gas and wind.

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area of 1.5 million acres. The ANWR Coastal Plain Area includes the 1002 Area, State of Alaska lands to the 3-mile limit from the coast line, and approximately 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands.

  6. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  7. Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd (GCNETS) Place: China Product: China-based...

  8. North Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.756272, -73.170087 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  9. Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.7212097, -73.1576139 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  10. Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1538473, -96.8020228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  11. Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wall Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China Zip: 730000 Sector: Hydro Product:...

  12. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstrationn Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  13. The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Insitute for Energy Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44106 Website: energy.case.edu...

  14. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  15. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  16. Advanced Unit Commitment Strategies in the United States Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meibom, P.; Larsen, H. V.; Barth, R.; Brand, H.; Tuohy, A.; Ela, E.

    2011-08-01

    This project sought to evaluate the impacts of high wind penetrations on the U.S. Eastern Interconnection and analyze how different unit commitment strategies may affect these impacts.

  17. North Carolina Eastern M P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Carolina Eastern M P A Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 252-482-4444 Website: www.ncpublicpower.comaboutus Outage Hotline:...

  18. ,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Underground Natural Gas Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...282016 11:29:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage" ... Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","AGA Eastern Consuming Region ...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tracks Eastern Area...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MemorandumChecklist; Jones to File; Elimination Recommendation for LASL Tracts BB, SS, JJ in Eastern Area 3; Lot 67 in Barrinca Mesa; September 22, 1987 NM.10-3 - Memorandum;...

  20. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

  1. Title Geology of the Great Basin. Copyright Issue Entire Book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fiero, B. 101084 Document Date 1186 Document Type Book ERC Index number 05.09.128 Box Number 1672-1 Recipients Unversity of Nevada Reno Press ADI " Geology of the Great...

  2. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Power Battery Co., Ltd Place: China Product: Guangzhou - based maker of Li-Ion, Li-Polymer, LiFePO4, NiCd, and NiMH...

  3. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 4-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change....

  4. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Great Falls is a census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia.1 Registered Energy...

  5. Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the...

  6. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of ...

  7. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  8. COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 23, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales, Big Data Dr. Christopher Clark Cornell University ...

  9. Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Gefei; Hadley, Stanton W; Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores () | Data Explorer Data Explorer Search Results Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility obtained data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and

  11. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy PREPARED BY: EnerNex Corporation REVISED FEBRUARY 2011 EASTERN WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION STUDY PIX #16204 2 3 EASTERN WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION STUDY Revised February 2011 Prepared for NREL by: EnerNex Corporation Knoxville, Tennessee NREL Technical Monitor: David Corbus Prepared under Subcontract No. AAM-8-88513-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-47078 National Renewable

  12. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1: methodology. Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity

  13. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report Aided by its consultant, the US Geologic Survey (USGS), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed ''Seismic Hazard Methodology for

  14. Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United States:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect central and Eastern United States: Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United States: Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report The NRC staff concludes that SOG/EPRI Seismic Hazard Methodology, as documented in the topical report and associated submittals, is an acceptable methodology for use in calculating seismic

  15. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Successful Exploration Strategies | Department of Energy Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies Keeping Nevada in Hot Water presentation by James Faulds of University of Nevada, Reno at the 2013 Annual Peer Review meeting in Colorado. PDF icon nevada_hotwater_peerreview2013.pdf More Documents

  16. Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of Offshore Wind Projects | Department of Energy and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects March 30, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of President Obama's all of the above approach to energy, the Obama Administration today joined with the governors of Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Pennsylvania to

  17. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting

  18. Coal underlying Federal lands in the Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex W. Karlsen; John R. SanFilipo; Peter D. Warwick

    2002-09-01

    About 6% of the total coa resource was selected for assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain region of the NCRA project underlies federally proclaimed management areas. Of the approximately 11 billion short tons of coal in this category, approximately 37 percent are estimated to be federally owned. Much of the coal in these categories may not be available for mining, and much of it is probably not economically recoverable. The dispersed nature of Federal holdings, the complicated nature of surface and mineral estate ownership, and the existence of various legal and technological restrictions may remove a significant portion of this coal resource from consideration for development. Continuing work by USGS scientists suggests that potentially viable energy resources of coal-bed methane are present within both Federal and non-Federal areas of the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain coal-bearing region. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  19. ARM-support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (AS-PECAN) Field Campaign Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (A -PECAN) Field Campaign Report DD Turner B Geerts April 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  20. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information

  2. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer at test area north, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Bowers, B.

    1995-06-01

    A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to depths of at least 500 feet penetrate 10 basalt-flow groups and 5 to 10 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 940,000 to 1.4 million years. Each basalt-flow group consists of one or more basalt flows from a brief, single or compound eruption. All basalt flows of each group erupted from the same vent, and have similar ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium contents, and natural-gamma emissions. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated for hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years during periods of volcanic quiescence. Basalt and sediment are elevated by hundreds of feet with respect to rocks of equivalent age south and cast of the area, a relation that is attributed to past uplift at TAN. Basalt and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 200 feet below land surface. Rocks below this depth are saturated and make up the Snake River Plain aquifer. The effective base of the aquifer is at a depth of 885 feet below land surface. Detailed stratigraphic relations for the lowermost part of the aquifer in the depth interval from 500 to 885 feet were not determined because of insufficient data. The stratigraphy of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in the upper 500 feet of the unsaturated zone and aquifer was determined from natural-gamma logs, lithologic logs, and well cores. Basalt cores were evaluated for potassium-argon ages, paleomagnetic properties, petrographic characteristics, and chemical composition. Stratigraphic control was provided by differences in ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium content, and natural-gamma emissions of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds.

  3. Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Mike Marino 2011.03.29 Mike-Marino Contrast. It's not just a setting on the TV - it's also a critical part of how doctors practice medicine today. Looking inside the body to see

  4. Fermilab | Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer | Great Ideas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Submitted More Often (GISMO) GISMO Great Ideas Submitted More Often Tell us about your GISMO! GISMO stands for Great Ideas Submitted More Often. GISMO is designed to start a conversation between you and the OPTT team early in the creation process so that we can help you identify what ideas should be disclosed and help guide you through the process for those ideas that should be protected. How does GISMO work? It starts with a GISMO form, which asks you to describe your idea for a new

  5. Letter from Deputy Secretary Poneman to Clean Line Energy Regarding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Line: Comment from Ms. Schroeder Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Zuniga Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Cain...

  6. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  7. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are: a review of a greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered home, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution for solar greenhouses, and the future of solar greenhouses.

  8. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are a review of greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered house, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution from solar greenhouses, and the future for solar greenhouses.

  9. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  10. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  11. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  12. PPPL: Great story, Bright Future | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL: Great story, Bright Future By Kitta MacPherson May 12, 2011 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Stewart Prager Perspective on: The future of fusion Name: Stewart Prager Title: Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Administrative focus:Prager, a well-known plasma physicist and fusion scientist with a distinguished career and a record of discovery at the University

  13. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  14. PP-20-1 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20-1 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc PP-20-1 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc Presidential permit authorizing Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate and maintain electric transmision facilities at the U.S-Canadian border. PDF icon PP-20-1 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc More Documents & Publications PP-18 Glacier Electric Cooperative, Inc PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 PP-230-3

  15. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Solar Dataset (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory produced solar power production data for the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS) including "real time" 5-minute interval data, "four hour ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data, and "day-ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data for the year 2006. This presentation provides a brief overview of the three solar power datasets.

  16. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N.

    1996-12-31

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  17. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. )

    1996-01-01

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to...

  19. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  20. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas ...

  1. Federal interagency ecosystem management initiative: Great Lakes ecosystem case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordle, S.

    1995-12-01

    In August 1994 a team of representatives from six Federal agencies conducted a case study of ecosystem management practices in the Great Lakes. Its report was based on interviews carried out in Chicago, Illinois, and Ann Arbor, Michigan; on phone interviews; and on written materials provided by Federal and State officials as well as representatives of Tribal organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry, and the International Joint Commission. The report describes mainly what the participants told or provided to the survey team, with a few explicit conclusions and recommendations from the team. The issues covered by the survey included Legal, Institutional, Science and Information, Budget, and Public Participation.

  2. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  3. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederic Kuzel

    2009-09-01

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRP™s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  4. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  5. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  6. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuels Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky

  9. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 89 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy,

  10. Geothermal Data via the Virginia Tech and DMME Portal to the National Geothermal Data System for the Eastern and Southeastern United States from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The former title for this record was "Geothermal Data for the Eastern and Southeastern U.S. from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Tech." The content originally referenced is still available. It includes geothermal maps of seven southeastern states with accompanying data tables. The seven states are: New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Caroline, and Georgia. Data types include geothermal data, seismic data, and magnetic and gravity data. Typical geothermal data may include tables of temperature versus depth data, plots of temperature/gradient versus depth, tables of thermal conductivity data, and tables of gamma log data. Other resources available from the RGL provide information about hot springs in the southeastern U.S., temperatures for Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments, and deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks in the eastern and southeastern U.S. Recently, this website and its collection of geothermal data has been renamed and reorganized as a portal into the National Geothermal Data System, a move that makes far more data both available and integrated.

  11. Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

    1999-02-01

    The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

  12. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  13. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  14. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  15. Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Justin, Charles

    2009-04-01

    Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

  16. File:EIA-Eastern-OR-WA-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pdf) Description Eastern Oregon and Washington By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  17. An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model Lawrence Salomone Pinnacle Specialty Group, Inc. DOE NPH Meeting October 21-22, 2014 PDF icon An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model More Documents & Publications A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East

  18. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EnerNex Corporation; The Midwest ISO; Ventyx

    2011-02-01

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  19. Quaternary structure of the southern Po Plain (Italy): Eustatic and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabegoli E.; Onorevoli, G. )

    1990-05-01

    The Quaternary telescoped growth pattern of the Southern Po Plain developed during the last 250,000 yr through the superimposition of six fining-upward continental sequences, which can be correlated with terraced deposits. The boundary surfaces of every cycle (base and top of gravels and/or sands), the overall thickness, the thickness of basal coarse sediments, and the related trends and deviations have been computer-gridded and contoured. Comparison between the maps of the whole Quaternary sequence and the structural map of Pliocene isobaths suggests that the sequence evolution has been controlled by the combined action of glacio-eustatic fluctuations and strong tectonics. Lowstands controlled the regional pattern of the basal surfaces, and highstands coincide with the time of accretions of the sequences. Tectonics influenced the local subsidence, and consequently, the paleogeographic setting, following a rather regular cyclic trend. Four tectonic events alternated with four pauses; each period was 20,000-50,000 years long. Thrust kinematics proceeded cyclically from the inner to outer thrust faults, giving rise to isolated grouped and joined and grouped but free tectonic elements.

  20. Quantifying the role of degasification subsidence in wetland loss -- Mississippi delta plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Johnson, D.O.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Isaacson, H.R.; Penland, S.; Connor, P.F.

    1991-03-01

    Modem and ancient delta plains in Louisiana that border the northern Gulf of Mexico are undergoing unprecedented rates of land loss. Subsidence due to compaction and loss of pore water is believed to be one of the primary land loss factors, whereas subsidence due to gas emission is generally believed to play a significant role only in the upper one or two meters of a wetland. Evidence to the contrary is presented here that suggests that degasification subsidence is a more important mechanism contributing to land loss than previously thought. In addition, potential degasification subsidence can be quantified if the depression from normal compressional and shear wave velocities is known. Velocity reductions of 30 to 75% from compressional wave velocity in water and extending to depths of tens of meters have been observed in a saltwater marsh in Louisiana. An order of magnitude reduction in velocity has been observed previously in gas-rich sediments on the adjacent continental shelf, where biogenic gas is observed to depths of 1 km or more. The ratio of normal to depressed compressional wave velocities is used to calculate potential degasification subsidence.

  1. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, Joshua L.

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  2. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February ...

  3. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  4. Ground-water solutes and eolian processes: An example from the High Plains of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Eolian dunes associated with saline-lake basins are important geologic features in arid and semiarid areas. The authors propose that eolian processes may also be important in controlling solute concentration and composition of ground water in these environments. A study of Double Lakes on the Southern High Plains of Texas suggests that approximately 200 megagrams of chloride enters this topographically closed basin from the surrounding water table aquifer, direct precipitation and surface runoff. Solute-transport simulation suggest that approximately 70 of the 200 megagrams of the chloride annually leaves the basin by diffusion and ground-water advection through a 30 meter-thick shale underlying the lake. The remaining 130 megagrams is hypothesized to be removed by eolian processes. Closed water-table contours around the lake and a hydrologic analysis suggest that it is improbable that solutes will reach the surrounding water-table aquifer by ground-water transport from this lake system. The conceptual eolian-transport model is further supported by observed chloride profiles in the unsaturated zone. When analyzed with estimates of recharge fluxes, these profiles suggest that approximately 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride are removed from the basin annually by eolian process and redeposited downwind of the lake. Eolian input to the ground water is consistent with the observed plume shape as well as with the solute and isotopic composition of ground water in the water-table aquifer downwind of the lake basin.

  5. Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

  6. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  7. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 7,862 17,834 34,190 160,946 247,849 262,039 269,285 244,910 208,853 134,234 47,094 16,471 1995 13,614 4,932 36,048 85,712 223,991 260,731 242,718 212,493 214,385 160,007 37,788 12,190 1996 12,276 39,022 32,753 130,232 233,717 285,798 303,416 270,223

  8. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 4,737,921 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,509 1995 4,730,109 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 1996 4,593,948

  9. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 530,741 349,007 159,102 30,353 9,093 4,218 8,493 5,462 6,537 22,750 119,120 256,340 1995 419,951 414,116 196,271 76,470 8,845 14,449 13,084 9,496 3,715 25,875 247,765 398,851 1996 435,980 333,314 236,872 66,149 12,958 4,261 2,804 5,141 5,152 24,515 213,277 269,811

  10. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 905,018 584,386 467,210 599,207 831,273 1,086,355 1,342,894 1,578,648 1,775,994 1,885,465 1,819,517 1,589,500 1995 1,206,116 814,626 663,885 674,424 850,290 1,085,760 1,300,439 1,487,188 1,690,456 1,811,013 1,608,177 1,232,901 1996 812,303 520,053 341,177 397,770 612,572 890,243

  11. Eastern Seaboard Electric Grid Fragility Maps Supporting Persistent Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Kimberly A; Weigand, Gilbert G; Fernandez, Steven J

    2012-11-01

    Persistently available power transmission can be disrupted by weather causing power outages with economic and social consequences. This research investigated the effects on the national power grid from a specific weather event, Hurricane Irene, that caused approximately 5.7 million customer power outages along the Eastern Seaboard in August of 2011. The objective was to describe the geographic differences in the grid s vulnerability to these events. Individual factors, such as wind speed or precipitation, were correlated with the number of outages to determine the greatest mechanism of power failure in hopes of strengthening the future power grid. The resulting fragility maps not only depicted 18 counties that were less robust than the design-standard robustness model and three counties that were more robust, but also drew new damage contours with correlated wind speeds and county features.

  12. Microbial desulfurization of Eastern oil shale: Bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maka, A.; Akin, C.; Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    The removal of sulfur from Eastern oil shale (40 microns particle size) slurries in bioreactors by mixed microbial cultures was examined. A mixed culture that is able to remove the organic sulfur from model sulfur compounds presenting coal as well as a mixed culture isolated from oil shale enrichments were evaluated. The cultures were grown in aerobic fed-batch bioreactors where the oil shale served as the source of all nutrients except organic carbon. Glucose was added as an auxiliary carbon source. Microbial growth was monitored by plate counts, the pH was checked periodically, and oil shale samples were analyzed for sulfur content. Results show a 24% reduction in the sulfur content of the oil shale after 14 days. The settling characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined in the presence of the microbes. Also, the mixing characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  14. Proposals in for Czech firms; cooperation likely with eastern Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-02-10

    Two Western groups - Shell and a consortium made up of Agip, Conoco, and Total - have offered to buy the refining operations of Chemopetrol Litvinov and Kaucuk Kralupy, both in the Czech republic. Meanwhile, Amoco, Neste, and PCD are looking at the possibility of acquiring some of the plastics plants at Litvinov. Amoco is interested in the polypropylene operations, Neste in polyethylene, and PCD in both. The two Czech firms are included in the second wave of privatization, which will begin in midyear. So far, there have been no offers for the 80,000-m.t./year polystyrene and 60,000-m.t./year styrene butadiene rubber operations belonging to Kralupy, although Atochem representatives recently visited the plants. Litvinov is carrying out revamping operations at its core unit, a 12-year-old, 450,000-m.t./year ethylene plant. The plant, currently running at 400,000 m.t./year, supplies downstream plants, Neratovice, and sells on the export markets. An existing ethylene pipeline between Litvinov and Bohlen in eastern Germany, which used to supply an average 100,000 m.t./year of ethylene to Bohen in exchange for naphtha, is virtually unused. One proposal involves reactivating this exchange to secure ethylene feedstock for plants in eastern Germany. According to some sources, a preliminary decision has been made to shut down the 100,000-m.t./year ethylene plant at Leuna and possibly to expand the Bohlen cracker by 100,000 m.t./year, to 400,000 m.t./year by the late 1990s.

  15. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. ); Schultz, C.W. ); Parekh, B.K. ); Misra, M. ); Bonner, W.P. )

    1992-11-01

    The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

  16. CX-013529: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program-Eastern Division-Rate Order No. WAPA-170 CX(s) Applied: B4.3Date: 03/10/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

  17. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  18. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are made up of at least 178 basalt-flow groups, 103 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 4 rhyolite domes. Stratigraphic units identified in 333 wells in this 890-mile{sup 2} area include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. Stratigraphic units were identified and correlated using the data from numerous outcrops and 26 continuous cores and 328 natural-gamma logs available in December 1993. Basalt flows make up about 85% of the volume of deposits underlying the area.

  19. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Hammer and Hand, Pumpkin Ridge Passive House, North Plains, OR

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hammer and Hand Pumpkin Ridge Passive House North Plains, OR DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  20. EO 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes (2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 47: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes (2010) EO 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes (2010) This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability of ocean and coastal economies, preserve our maritime heritage, support sustainable uses and access, provide for adaptive

  1. Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  2. Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center - Final Report, June 2008 | Department of Energy Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical Center - Final Report, June 2008 Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical Center - Final Report, June 2008 This 2008 report describes the Eastern Maine Medical Center's installation of a Centaur 50 gas turbine and performance data for one year from December 2006 to November 2007. The turbine has a nameplate rating of 4,570 kW and can

  3. Website Provides Data for Key Oil Play in North Dakota, Eastern Montana |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Website Provides Data for Key Oil Play in North Dakota, Eastern Montana Website Provides Data for Key Oil Play in North Dakota, Eastern Montana July 19, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new web-based geographic information system designed to improve oil production in North Dakota and eastern Montana has been launched with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Bakken Decision Support System (BDSS) assembles data for the Bakken and Three Forks Formations

  4. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  5. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  6. Petroleum geology of principal sedimentary basins in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The principal petroliferous basins in eastern China are the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins of Mesozoic age, and the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins of Cenozoic age. These basins contain mostly continental fluvial and lacustrine detrital sediments. Four different geologic ages are responsible for the oil and gas in this region: (1) Mesozoic in the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins; (2) Tertiary in the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins; (3) Permian-Carboniferous in the southern North China basin and the northwestern Ordos basin; and (4) Sinian in the southern Sichuan basin. The most prolific oil and gas sources are the Mesozoic of the Songliao basin and the Tertiary of the North China basin. Although the major source rocks in these basins are lacustrine mudstone and shale, their tectonic settings and the resultant temperature gradients differ. For example, in the Songliao, North China, and associated basins, trapping conditions commonly are associated with block faulting of an extensional tectonic regime; the extensional tectonics in turn contribute to a high geothermal gradient (40/sup 0/-60/sup 0/C/km), which results in early maturation and migration for relatively shallow deposits. However, the Ordos and Sichuan basins formed under compressional conditions and are cooler. Hence, maturation and migration occurred late, relative to reservoir deposition and burial, the result being a poorer quality reservoir.

  7. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  8. The 2007 Eastern US Spring Freeze: Increased Cold Damage in a Warming World

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The 2007 Eastern US Spring Freeze: Increased Cold Damage in a Warming World Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The 2007 Eastern US Spring Freeze: Increased Cold Damage in a Warming World Plant ecologists have long been concerned with a seemingly paradoxical scenario in the relationship between plant growth and climate change: warming may actually increase the risk of plant frost damage. The underlying hypothesis is that mild winters and warm, early

  9. Great Lakes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics July 22, 2011 - 5:32pm Addthis Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory A team of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and New Mexico State University researchers have developed a new approach to growing graphene

  10. Background Report on Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A

    2011-05-01

    Each month, approximately 45,000 people die from violence, hunger, disease, and other effects of displacement as a result of war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The country is often said to be plagued by a 'resource curse.' During each period in history since its discovery by the West, the DRC has possessed the resources the world craves and the world has sought these without regard for the consequences to the Congolese people. The catastrophic consequences of Congo's history of natural resource exploitation are the direct and indirect death of millions of Congolese people. The current war in Congo is multi-causal in nature but explanations are often reduced to describing it as an ethic conflict based on objective grievance. Objective grievance such as inequality, ethnic tensions, land disputes, and lack of democracy do exist, but they are neither necessary nor sufficient to explain the cause of the violent conflict, and more importantly, they fall short in explaining why this conflict has continued for years. The reality is the conflict is an economic war in which the trade of conflict minerals, gold and the 3Ts (tin, tantalum, tungsten), is directly linked to the financial sustainability of the groups fighting each other in eastern DRC. Objective grievance is a by-product of the conflict, used to create a false but plausible moral justification to continue violence. This paper examines the history of conflict in the DRC and the socio-economic variables contributing to the current war fought over conflict minerals.

  11. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  12. FIA-14-0066- In the Matter of Great Lakes Wind Truth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 7,  2014, OHA issued a decision granting an Appeal filed by Great Lakes Wind Truth (the Appellant) of a determination that the DOE’s Golden Field Office issued to it regarding the...

  13. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389-A ... Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  14. Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installation? Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 7 November, 2014 - 12:13 As prices...

  15. 1,"Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1144.5 2,"Antelope...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",189.5 9,"Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Wind","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 10,"Langdon Wind LLC","Wind","FPL Energy Langdon Wind LLC",159

  16. Y-12 and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ? a grand partnershi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    having hiked every one of the 900 miles of trails in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. When he first arrived at Y-12, I gave him a trail map of the Smokies. A few years...

  17. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters | Department of Energy Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information

  18. Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great May 10, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white shirts) to complete five residential solar PV system installations on the Bishop Paiute Reservation in March 2016. Photo from Gary Bacock, Bishop Paiute Tribe. Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white

  19. Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels December 5, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis Idaho National Laboratory describes R&D efforts to transform raw biomass into quality feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, power and bioproducts. Aaron Crowell Senior Technical Research Analyst What does this project do? Develops and utilizes domestically produced biofuels to make our military and the nation more secure. From

  20. Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring Two Nerds . . . One Love . . . and A Great Golden Ring August 17, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis Two scientists got engaged in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. | Video from The Daily Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) The work of the Energy Department has led to many scientific and technological breakthroughs. Today, we're highlighting a different

  1. There's a Great Future in Plastic Solar Cells | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) There's a Great Future in Plastic Solar Cells Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 04.01.12 There's a Great Future in

  2. Session: Avian migration and implications for wind power development in the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mabey, Sarah; Cooper, Brian

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session was arranged to convey what is known about avian migration, particularly in the eastern US. The first presentation ''Migration Ecology: Issues of Scale and Behavior'' by Sarah Mabey frames the issue of migratory bird interactions with wind energy facilities from an ecological perspective: when, where, and why are migrant bird species vulnerable to wind turbine collision. The second presentation ''Radar Studies of Nocturnal Migration at Wind Sites in the Eastern US'' by Brian Cooper reported on radar studies conducted at wind sites in the eastern US, including Mount Storm, Clipper Wind, and others.

  3. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  4. Potential of Hot-Dry-Rock Geothermal Energy in the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    This is subtitled, ''A report to the United States Congress under Section 2502 of Public Law 102-486 (The Energy Policy Act of 1992)''. It documents a workshop held by the U.S.G.S. (in Philadelphia, January 1993) as required by EPACT 1992. The workshop concluded that under present (1993) economic and technological constraints, mining heat for power electrical power generation is not feasible in the eastern United States. The main issues are the costs of drilling very deep wells and the general applicability of hydrofracturing technology to compressional stress field typical of the eastern U.S. (DJE-2005)

  5. ,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2014" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  6. ,"Eastern Consuming Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Eastern Consuming Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Eastern Consuming Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2014" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  7. Great circle solution to polarization-based quantum communication (QC) in optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Hughes, Richard John

    2016-03-15

    Birefringence in optical fibers is compensated by applying polarization modulation at a receiver. Polarization modulation is applied so that a transmitted optical signal has states of polarization (SOPs) that are equally spaced on the Poincare sphere. Fiber birefringence encountered in propagation between a transmitter and a receiver rotates the great circle on the Poincare sphere that represents the polarization bases used for modulation. By adjusting received polarizations, polarization components of the received optical signal can be directed to corresponding detectors for decoding, regardless of the magnitude and orientation of the fiber birefringence. A transmitter can be configured to transmit in conjugate polarization bases whose SOPs can be represented as equidistant points on a great circle so that the received SOPs are mapped to equidistant points on a great circle and routed to corresponding detectors.

  8. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Citation ... Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) In this study ...

  9. Y-12 completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Park | National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National Park Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 9:43am Tom Richey of the Y-12 National Security Complex, left, and his son Austin put a bench in place at the Elkmont Campground amphitheater as project leader Al Roberson and Scott Underwood, both of Y-12, look on. The groups recent refurbishment of the amphitheater carries on a 20-year tradition of supporting the Great Smoky Mountains

  10. New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to

  11. EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines | Department of Energy Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February 26, 2015 - 11:47am Addthis Multi-mode RCCI (Reactivity-Controlled Compression Ignition), a promising advanced combustion process, has the potential to improve fuel economy of passenger cars by at least 15%, according to a recent

  12. WiTec at Sandia: Pushing a Great Tool Further. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect WiTec at Sandia: Pushing a Great Tool Further. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: WiTec at Sandia: Pushing a Great Tool Further. Abstract not provided. Authors: Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin Publication Date: 2012-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1116404 Report Number(s): SAND2012-8071C 480446 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WiTec Research&Development Meeting held September 24-27, 2012 in Ulm, Germany.; Related Information:

  13. A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

  14. Advanced Unit Commitment Strategies for the U.S. Eastern Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Meibom, P.; Barth, R.; Tuohy, A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper outlines a study undertaken for the U.S. Eastern Interconnection in which different advanced unit commitment strategies were simulated for three different years to evaluate the benefits that may occur from using these strategies as an operational tool.

  15. AmeriFlux CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margolis, Hank A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce. Site Description - 49.69247° N / 74.34204° W, elevation of 387 mm, 90 - 100 yr old Black Spruce, Jack Pine, feather moss

  16. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental consulting and engineering firm Stantec is observing patterns in offshore bat activity and species composition in the Gulf of Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions.

  17. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wissemann, Chris; White, Stanley M

    2014-02-28

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant Layout and O&M Strategies The report details lowering LCOE by 22.3% and identified additional strategies that could further lower LCOE when building an utility scale wind farm in the Great Lakes.

  18. Seasonal and multiannual roost use by Rafinesque's Big-eared Bats in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Zarnoch, Stanley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about factors affecting year-round use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) or the long-term fidelity of this species to anthropogenic or natural roosts. The objectives of this study were to test whether seasonal use of roosts by Rafinesque's big-eared bats varied with roost type and environmental conditions within and among seasons and to document multiannual use of natural and anthropogenic structures by this species. We inspected 4 bridges, 1 building, and 59 tree roosts possessing basal cavity openings; roosts were inspected at least once per week from May through October in every year from 2005 through 2008 and once a month from November through April in every year from 2005 through 2009. We found that use of anthropogenic roosts was significantly greater than the use of tree roosts in summer but that the use of structure types did not differ in other seasons. There was significant seasonal variation in use of anthropogenic and tree roosts. Anthropogenic roost use was higher in summer than in all other seasons. There was no significant difference in tree use among spring, summer, and fall, but use in winter was significantly lower in 2 years of the study. Overall use of anthropogenic and tree roosts was positively related to minimum temperature, but the relationship between use of roosts and minimum temperature varied among seasons. Bats showed multiannual fidelity ({ge} 4 years) to all anthropogenic roosts and to some tree roosts, but fidelity of bats to anthropogenic roosts was greater and more consistent than to tree roosts. Our data indicate that Rafinesque's big-eared bats responded differently to environmental conditions among seasons; thus, a variety of structure types and characteristics are necessary for conservation of these bats. We suggest long-term protection of roost structures of all types is necessary for conservation of Rafinesque's big-eared bats in the southeast Coastal Plain.

  19. Effects of Warming on Tree Species’ Recruitment in Deciduous Forests of the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Clark, James S.; Mohan, Jacqueline

    2015-03-25

    Climate change is restructuring forests of the United States, although the details of this restructuring are currently uncertain. Rising temperatures of 2 to 8oC and associated changes in soil moisture will shift the competitive balance between species that compete for light and water, and so change their abilities to produce seed, germinate, grow, and survive. We have used large-scale experiments to determine the effects of warming on the most sensitive stage of species distributions, i.e., recruitment, in mixed deciduous forests in southern New England and in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Two questions organized our research: (1) Might temperate tree species near the “warm” end of their range in the eastern United States decline in abundance during the coming century due to projected warming? and (2) Might trees near the “cool” end of their range in the eastern United States increase in abundance, or extend their range, during the coming 100 years because of projected warming? To explore these questions, we exposed seedlings to air and soil warming experiments in two eastern deciduous forest sites; one at the Harvard Forest (HF) in central Massachusetts, and the other at the Duke Forest (DF) in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. We focused on tree species common to both Harvard and Duke Forests (such as red, black, and white oaks), those near northern range limits (black oak, flowing dogwood, tulip poplar), and those near southern range limits (yellow birch, sugar maple, Virginia pine). At each site, we planted seeds and seedlings in common gardens established in temperature-controlled, open-top chambers. The experimental design was replicated and fully factorial and involved three temperature regimes (ambient, +3oC and +5oC) and two light regimes (closed forest canopy (low light) and gap conditions (high light)). Measured variables included Winter/Spring responses to temperature and mid-Summer responses to low soil moisture. This research will advance our understanding of how the abundances and geographic distributions of several important eastern tree species near the cool and warm ends of their ranges will change during the century because of projected warming. Warming-induced changes in eastern tree abundances and distributions have the potential to affect both the quality and quantity of goods and services provided by eastern forests, and will therefore be of importance to society.

  20. 2014 Student Poster Session marks the conclusion of another great program!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 2014 Student Poster Session marks the conclusion of another great program! September 2, 2014 As the 2014 summer student program ends, students have the opportunity to show the progress they've made this summer at the annual student poster session. On Wednesday, August 13, approximately 30 students presented their projects to attending staff at PPPL. Presented projects included (but not limited to): "Optimization of Antenna Layout for ITER Low Field Side

  1. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Engman, J.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.; Brence, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River above and below the Fernald sit was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous nine years and to collect samples for uranium analysis in fish filets. This document contains information describing the findings of this program. Topics discussed include: physical and chemical parameters, species richness, species diversity, and water analysis.

  2. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2014-11-04

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  3. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2013-10-29

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  4. We create materials and energy solutions. Our 60+ year history of doing great

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    create materials and energy solutions. Our 60+ year history of doing great science has had a significant impact on our nation. Our research programs reflect our multi-disciplinary, cross-cutting approach to scientific discovery. Chemical and Biological Sciences: We conduct fundamental and applied studies of how to control and manipulate chemicals and biological materials, with expertise in developing new tools and advanced computational methods to understand what drives chemical and biological

  5. Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoj, L.; Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Boeck, H.

    2012-07-01

    The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

  6. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  7. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  8. Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, G.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.

  9. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; et al

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty aboutmore » a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.« less

  10. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  11. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  12. Sedimentology and cyclicity in the Lower Permian De Chelly sandstone on the Defiance Plateau: Eastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanesco, J.D. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Lithofacies in the De Chelly Sandstone consist of (1) a large-scale trough to tabular- and/or wedge-planar cross-stratified sandstone facies of large-scale eolian dune origin, (2) a small- to medium-scale, trough cross-stratified sandstone also of eolian dune origin, (3) a horizontally stratified, wind-rippled sandstone of sand sheet origin, (4) a wavy, horizontally stratified, wind-rippled sandstone of sabkha origin, and (5) a mud-draped ripple-laminated sandstone of mud-flat origin. The De Chelly Sandstone in the northern Defiance Plateau consists mainly of large-scale dune deposits. Stratigraphic sections in the middle of the plateau are dominated by small- to medium-scale dune and sand sheet deposits whereas those along the southern end of the plateau are composed largely of sabkha and supratidal mud-flat deposits. The lateral distribution of these facies suggests a north-south juxtaposition of central-erg, fore-erg, and mixed sabkha-supratidal depositional environments. Repetitive interbedding of facies in the De Chelly indicates at least twelve depositional cycles in which sabkha and/or supratidal to coastal-plain mud-flats were sequentially overridden by eolian sand sheets and cross-stratified dunes. Lateral and vertical facies relations within the lower and upper members of the De Chelly Sandstone record episodic expansion of the De Chelly erg southward. The comparative abundance of large-scale dune deposits in the upper member suggests that progradation was more extensive during latter stages of deposition. The intervening tongue of Supai Formation and the redbeds that overlie the upper member of the De Chelly at Bonito Canyon document northward transgression of sabkha and supratidal to coastal-plain mud-flat environments. Eolian dune deposition was restricted to the northern Defiance Plateau during deposition of these units.

  13. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  14. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. -K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Lieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the "Market Characterization" project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University, and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within the Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as "archetypes" by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market.

  15. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L.

    1993-03-01

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  16. Catagenesis of organic matter of oil source rocks in Upper Paleozoic coal formation of the Bohai Gulf basin (eastern China)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, R.X.; Li, Y.Z.; Gao, Y.W.

    2007-05-15

    The Bohai Gulf basin is the largest petroliferous basin in China. Its Carboniferous-Permian deposits are thick (on the average, ca. 600 m) and occur as deeply as 5000 m. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Formation formed in inshore plain swamps. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are fluorescent vitrinite, exinite, alginite, etc. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Permian Shanxi Formation were deposited in delta-alluvial plain. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are vitrinite, exinite, etc. The carbonaceous rocks of these formations are characterized by a high thermal maturity, with the vitrinite reflectance R{sub 0} > 2.0%. The Bohai Gulf basin has been poorly explored so far, but it is highly promising for natural gas.

  17. Lg excitation, attenuation, and source spectral scaling in central and eastern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, B.J.; Xie, J.; Baqer, S.

    1997-10-01

    Seismic moments and corner frequencies were obtained for many earthquakes in the central and eastern United States, and for a few events in the western United States, using the Lg phase and a recently developed inversion algorithm. Additionally, Q values for the Lg phase along paths to individual stations were obtained simultaneously with the source parameters. Both corner frequencies and magnitudes were found to vary systematically with moment. For moments between 0.15 and 400 x 10{sup 15} N-m corner frequencies vary between about 4 and 0.2 Hz while body-wave magnitude varies between about 3.5 and 5.8. A map of Lg Q values displays a systematic decrease from east and west. Maximum and minimum values are 989 and 160, respectively. Lg coda Q values were obtained for the entire United States with excellent coverage in the eastern and western portions of the country and somewhat poorer coverage in the central portion. Lg coda Q is highest (700-750) in a region of the northeastern United States that includes portions of New York and Pennsylvania and lowest (>200) in California. Lg coda Q is lower (250-450) everywhere west of Rocky Mountains than in the rest of the country (450-750). Q determinations for both the direct Lg phase and Lg coda indicate that, for an earthquake of a given magnitude, Lg and its coda will propagate much more efficiently, and cause damage over a wider area, in the eastern and central United States than it will in the United States.

  18. EMBARGOED FOR 1 P.M. Eastern Standard Time Wed, Feb. 4, 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project February 4, 2015 EMBARGOED FOR 1 P.M. Eastern Standard Time Wed, Feb. 4, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 4, 2015-More than 100 researchers from around the world have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified, a project potentially on the scale of the now-completed Human Genome Project. "We propose that antibodies be defined by their sequences, just as genes

  19. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and RDH for conodont alteration index determination to better define regional P-T conditions. Efforts are being made to calibrate and standardize geophysical log correlation, seismic reflection data, and Ordovician lithologic signatures to better resolve subsurface stratigraphy and structure beneath the poorly explored Plateau in Tennessee and southern Kentucky. We held a successful workshop on Ordovician rocks geophysical log correlation August 7, 2003 that was cosponsored by the Appalachian PTTC, the Kentucky and Tennessee geological surveys, the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association, and small independents. Detailed field structural and stratigraphic mapping of a transect across part of the Ordovician clastic wedge in Tennessee was begun in January 2003 to assist in 3-D reconstruction of part of the southern Appalachian basin and better assess the nature of a major potential source rock assemblage. (3) Laying the groundwork through (1) and (2) to understand reservoir architecture, the petroleum systems, ancient fluid migration, and conduct 3-D analysis of the southern Appalachian basin.

  20. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  1. The United States after the great recession: the challenge of sustainable growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meltzer, Joshua

    2013-02-15

    The paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. economic growth model, assesses its’ ability to respond to the key economic, environmental and social challenges currently facing the U.S. and proposes policies that if adopted would move the U.S. onto a more sustainable growth path. The paper provides scenarios of projected future growth trajectories, as well as recommendations for specific policies in key areas: employment, infrastructure, energy and fiscal rebalancing. To reach this goal this paper focuses on four areas for action: Increasing employment, which is the most urgent priority to accelerate recovery from the Great Recession, while addressing underlying structural issues that have led to a decade of poor economic outcomes for most citizens; Investing in the future, as the key marker of whether the United States is prepared to make farsighted decisions to improve education, build new infrastructure and increase innovation; Maximizing an increased energy endowment in a way that grows the economy, while reinforcing the trend towards reducing resource demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and, Fiscal rebalancing, where the United States must insulate economic recovery from the process of fiscal reform while reducing and stabilizing debt over the long term. Finally, we argue that President Obama can re-energize America’s global leadership if he builds on a platform of domestic actions that enhance the sustainability of America’s society and economy.

  2. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  3. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  4. Temporal trends in and influence of wind on PAH concentrations measured near the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes, D.R.; Basu, I.; Sweet, C.W.; Hites, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on temporal trends in gas- and particle-phase PAH concentrations measured at three sites in the Great Lakes' Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network: Eagle Harbor, near Lake Superior, Sleeping Bear Dunes, near Lake Michigan, and Sturgeon Point, near Lake Erie. While gas-phase concentrations have been decreasing since 1991 at all sites, particle-phase concentrations have been decreasing only at Sleeping Bear Dunes. To determine whether these results represent trends in background levels or regional emissions, the average concentrations are compared to those found in urban and rural studies. In addition, the influence of local wind direction on PAH concentrations is investigated, with the assumption that dependence on wind direction implies regional sources. Using these two methods, it is found that PAH concentrations at Eagle Harbor and Sleeping Bear Dunes represent regional background levels but that PAH from the Buffalo Region intrude on the background levels measured at the Sturgeon Point site. At this site, wind from over Lake Erie reduces local PAH concentrations.

  5. Simulation of oil-slick transport in Great Lakes connecting channels. Theory and model formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, H.T.; Yapa, P.D.; Petroski, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    Two-dimensional computer models for simulating oil slick movement in rivers and lakes were developed and then applied to the connecting channels of the upper Great Lakes. In these models the oil slick is considered to be a collection of discrete oil patches. The transformation of an oil slick due to advection, spreading, evaporation and dissolution are considered. In open-water regions the advection of oil patches in the slick are determined by the water current and wind using the drifting factor formulation. Formulas consider the balance of inertia, gravity, viscous and surface tension forces. The oil slick transformation model developed in this study contains as many processes as can be effectively and analytically modeled. The model has several special features, including the ability to model instantaneous and continuous spills, the ability to realistically describe the irregular shapes of an oil slick and the ability to account for the time-dependent variation of the flow conditions. The computer programs are designed so that it will be easy to refine the model elements and expand the model to include additional slick transformation processes.

  6. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 7, 1995--September 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.L.; Miller, M.C.; Moller, B.J.; Marsh, S.L.

    1996-03-01

    Fish were collected, using electroshocking techniques, from three sites in the Great Miami River (GMR) (September 7 and 8, 1995) as part of an annual survey for Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO). The objective was to collect fish fillets for uranium analysis and examine the health of the fish community in comparison to data collected during the past eleven years. Samples were taken from upstream (river mile = RM; RM 38) and downstream (RM 19) of the Fernald site as well as from near the Fernald effluent line (RM 24). RM 38 is isolated from upstream fish migration by two dams located near Hamilton, Ohio and fish collected from this site should not be influenced by processes at the downstream sites. Samples of 549 fish from 29 species belonging to nine families provided seventy-two samples for uranium analysis by an independent laboratory. Chemical analysis of water samples collected at each site was used to determine the effect of chemical parameters on the fish community. This study focused on comparison of the density, biomass and diversity of the fish community between sites and between years.

  7. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 17--18, 1996. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, B.; Miller, M.C.; Buschelmann, F.; Evans, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The electrofishing survey of fish from the Great Miami River at RM 19, 24 and 38 from late summer 1996 demonstrated the sensitivity of the fish community to microhabitat variation. The variation was particularly clear between the pooled, low flow sections of the river and the runs, where fast current habitats occurred. In 1996, like most recent years, the differences were obvious between Rm 24 and RM 19 and RM 38. River Mile 24 was characterized by a fish community of current-loving fish, dominated by Catastomidae (suckers), and Ictaluridae (catfish). In contrast, samples from pooled stations at RM 19 and 38 were dominated by Centrarchidae, Clupeidae and Cyprinidae, particularly the carp. The microhabitats sampled around the abutments of bridges at RM 19 and 38 where fast current and physical structure occurred, both resembled the community at RM 24. Changes in the fish communities associated with the upstream/downstream changes in stream volume, channel size, morphology, etc., were evidenced by the community coefficients which showed least similarity between the most distant sites.

  8. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  9. The recycling of waste oxides at Great Lakes Division, National Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landow, M.P.; Martinez, M.; Barnett, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design, construction, and startup operations of a briquetting plant to recycle the revert dust, sludges and other materials generated from the iron and steelmaking processes. The specific plant constructed for National Steel Corporation`s Great Lakes Division was designed to recycle 273,000 metric tons (300,000 net tons) of integrated steel plant revert materials, such as BOP dust, blast furnace flue dust and sludge, and mill scale. The majority of the briquette plant production, about 80 percent, will recycle through the blast furnace and the remaining 20 percent through the steelmaking furnaces. This paper discusses the criteria used for plant design, construction, and startup. The plant design and construction period was 12 months with construction during the last 33 week period. The startup of the plant proceeded extremely well with the ramping up of production rates faster than the proposed startup plan. In addition, the blast furnace production was initiated using a newly developed blast furnace binder.

  10. Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

    1985-02-01

    Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

  11. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  13. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River upstream and downstream the Fernald site (September 25 and 26, 1994) was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous ten years and to collect samples for uranium analyses in fish fillets. Samples of 853 fish, from 27 species, eight families and three sites at river mile (RM) 38, RM 24, and RM 19 provided seventy-eight samples for uranium analyses by an independent laboratory. The biomass of fish caught per hour was greatest at RM 24 > RM 19 > RM 3 8. The diversity index and the heaviest fish community was RM 24 > RM 38 > RM 19. The pooled site at RM 38 near Hamilton was diagnostically separated from the other sites by the young-of-the-year (YOY) golden redhorse, smallmouth bass and golden shiner. The darns at Hamilton acted as an effective barrier against fish migration upriver. Larger freshwater drum, gizzard shad, channel catfish and flathead catfish, which might be expected in rapid current reaches of mid-sized rivers characterize RM 24. The pool at RM 19 was distinguished from the others by YOY gizzard shad, bluegill, and longear sunfish. Thus the fish community in 1994 was separated ecologically by the physical features of the habitat more than by water quality differences between sites. These data suggest that the Fernald effluents in September were having no detectable effects on the distribution of fishes, independent of changes in habitat quality separated on physical attributes of the river channel at each site.

  14. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  15. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  16. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 905,018 584,386 467,210 599,207 831,273 1,086,355 1,342,894 1,578,648 1,775,994 1,885,465 1,819,517 1,589,500 1995 301,098 230,240 196,675 75,216 19,017 -596 -42,455 -91,460 -85,538 -74,452 -211,340 -356,599 1996

  17. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  18. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  19. Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

  20. Geology and geophysics of Proterozoic basement rocks in the eastern midcontinent of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidiak, E.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Upper crustal Proterozoic rocks of the eastern midcontinent of the U.S. are part of the transcontinental Proterozoic province, a 3,000 km-long belt of anorogenic igneous rocks that extends from western Ohio to southern California. Regional magnetic and gravity anomaly maps reveal a variety of prominent anomalies and gradients that reflect major basement or intrabasement structures. Widespread are pronounced (10--20 km diameter), high-amplitude (600--700 gamma) circular to elliptical positive magnetic anomalies that are associated with magnetite-series granites and coeval rhyolites. Also present (in Indiana) are a series of ring-shaped magnetic anomalies that have a diameter of about 50 km and form circular to elliptical patterns of narrow positive anomalies bordered by negative anomalies and ringing a central minimum. Modeling of the anomalies suggests that they may be ring dike complexes associated with calderas. Two prominent circular gravity lows associated with large granitic batholiths have also been identified. The larger of these, the Wisconsin gravity minimum, has a diameter of about 250 km and an amplitude of about [minus]65 mgals and is associated with the Wolf River batholith. The second gravity low has a diameter of about 75 km and an amplitude of about [minus]25 mgals and is in east-central Kentucky. Several major rift zones are present in the eastern midcontinent. The most prominent of these is the New Madrid rift complex, a failed-arm structure that extends into the craton beneath the Mississippi embayment. Also present are linear arrays of positive magnetic and gravity anomalies that are associated with basaltic rift zones. These include the mid-Michigan rift and the Ft. Wayne rift, as well as with possible rifts associated with the mid-Tennessee and Louisville positive anomalies.

  1. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Annual report, June 1991--May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.; Schultz, C.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Misra, M.; Bonner, W.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

  2. An examination of scale-dependent resource use by Eastern Hognose snakes in southcentral New Hampshire.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K. E.; Walston, L. J.; Goulet, C; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Najjar, S.; Andrews, C.; Environmental Science Division; Univ. of New Hampshire; U.S. Air Force

    2009-11-01

    The decline of many snake populations is attributable to habitat loss, and knowledge of habitat use is critical to their conservation. Resource characteristics (e.g., relative availability of different habitat types, soils, and slopes) within a landscape are scale-dependent and may not be equal across multiple spatial scales. Thus, it is important to identify the relevant spatial scales at which resource selection occurs. We conducted a radiotelemetry study of eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) home range size and resource use at different hierarchical spatial scales. We present the results for 8 snakes radiotracked during a 2-year study at New Boston Air Force Station (NBAFS) in southern New Hampshire, USA, where the species is listed by the state as endangered. Mean home range size (minimum convex polygon) at NBAFS (51.7 {+-} 14.7 ha) was similar to that reported in other parts of the species range. Radiotracked snakes exhibited different patterns of resource use at different spatial scales. At the landscape scale (selection of locations within the landscape), snakes overutilized old-field and forest edge habitats and underutilized forested habitats and wetlands relative to availability. At this scale, snakes also overutilized areas containing sandy loam soils and areas with lower slope (mean slope = 5.2% at snake locations vs. 6.7% at random locations). We failed to detect some of these patterns of resource use at the home range scale (i.e., within the home range). Our ability to detect resource selection by the snakes only at the landscape scale is likely the result of greater heterogeneity in macrohabitat features at the broader landscape scale. From a management perspective, future studies of habitat selection for rare species should include measurement of available habitat at spatial scales larger than the home range. We suggest that the maintenance of open early successional habitats as a component of forested landscapes will be critical for the persistence of eastern hognose snake populations in the northeastern United States.

  3. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which has less measured fault displacement. The main difference between the DGZ and the LSOZ appears to be the presence of a sandpoor area in the LSOZ in eastern Elk Hills. The lack of permeable migration pathways in this area would not allow eastern bacterial gas to migrate farther updip into western Elk Hills. A similar sand-poor area does not appear to exist in the DGZ but future research may be necessary to verify this.

  4. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  5. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Windpower, Nautica; Marrone, Joseph; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method was developed and implemented in FAST to extend its capability for ice load modeling.Both upwind and downwind 2-bladed rotor wind turbine designs were developed and studied. The new rotor blade uses a new twist angle distribution design and a new pitch control algorithm compared with the baseline model. The coning and tilt angles were selected for both the upwind and downwind configurations to maximize the annual energy production. The risk of blade-tower impact is greater for the downwind design, particularly under a power grid fault; however, this risk was effectively reduced by adjusting the tilt angle for the downwind configuration.

  6. Behind Every Good Metabolite there is a Great Enzyme (and perhaps a structure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Phan, Isabelle; Cron, Lisabeth; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Tom E.; Varani, Gabriele; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2012-11-01

    Today, due to great technological advancements, it is possible to study everything at the same time. This ability has given birth to totality studies in the fields of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. In turn, the combined study of all these global analyses gave birth to the field of systems biology. Another totality field brought to life with new emerging technologies is structural genomics, an effort to determine the three-dimensional structure of every protein encoded in a genome. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a specialized structural genomics effort composed of academic (University of Washington), government (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), not-for-profit (Seattle BioMed), and commercial (Emerald BioStructures) institutions that is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Federal Contract: HHSN272200700057C and HHSN27220120025C) to apply genome-scale approaches in solving protein structures from biodefense organisms, as well as those causing emerging and re-emerging disease. In five years over 540 structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by SSGICD. About one third of all SSGCID structures contain bound ligands, many of which are metabolites or metabolite analogues present in the cell. These proteins structures are the blueprints for the structure-based design of the next generation of drugs against bacterial pathogens and other infectious diseases. Many of the selected SSGCID targets are annotated enzymes from known metabolomic pathways essential to cellular vitality since selectively knocking-out one of the enzymes in an important pathway with a drug may be fatal to the organism. One reason metabolomic pathways are important is because of the small molecules, or metabolites, produced at various steps in these pathways and identified by metabolomic studies. Unlike genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics that may be influenced by epigenetic, post-transcriptional, and post-translational modifications, respectively, the metabolites present in the cell at any one time represent downstream biochemical endproducts, and therefore, metabolite profiles may be most closely associated with a phenotype and provide valuable information for infectious disease research. Metabolomic data would be even more useful if it could be linked to the vast amount of structural genomics data. Towards this goal SSGCID has created an automated website (http://apps.sbri.org/SSGCIDTargetStatus/Pathway) that assigns selected SSGCID target proteins to MetaCyc pathways (http://metacyc.org/). Details of this website will be provided here. The SSGCID-Pathway website represents a first big step towards linking metabolites and metabolic pathways to structural genomic data with the goal of accelerating the discovery of new agents to battle infectious diseases.

  7. Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Transmission Owners and Operators within the Eastern and Western Interconnections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Steps to establish a real-time transmission monitoring system for transmission owners and operators within the Eastern and Western interconnections: a report to congress pursuant to section 1839 of...

  8. The Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar Aaron Bloom, Aaron Townsend, and David Palchak The National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PR-6A20-64795 IEEE PES General Meeting Denver, Colorado July 26-30, 2015 2 Simulated dispatch for high solar period in FRCC Simulated

  9. Weathering the cold of `94. A review of the January 1994 energy supply disruptions in the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This report examines the causes of and responses to the very low temperatures over a wide region of the Eastern US causing unprecedented sustained demand for energy during the week of January 16--22, 1994. The topics of the report include the vagaries of the weather, the North American power supply structure, a chronology of major events of January, natural gas industry operations during peak demand periods, and recommendations for fuel supply, load forecasting, and energy emergency response exercises.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface waters of Alessandria District, South Eastern Piedmont (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trova, C.; Cossa, G.; Gandolfo, G.

    1992-10-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Because of the high toxicity of some polycyclic compounds, such as benzopyrenes, the determination of their levels in air, water, soil and aquatic organisms was the object of several papers. Anthropogenic pyrolitic and combustion processes, related to industrial plants, domestic heating, automobile traffic, are the major sources of these compounds; from these sources they enter atmospheric environment where their concentration is reduced by scavenging during precipitation events: rain, snow and fog in urban areas usually show high contents of PAHs. Dry and wet atmospheric polluted depositions effluents transport appreciable amounts of PAHs to aquatic environment, where they are rapidly taken up and accumulated by both fish and shellfish. Alessandria District, in South-Eastern Piedmont (Italy), lies in the middle of Torino-Milano-Genova industrial area: in addition to local sources, a relatively long range transport of polluted air masses may conduct to this region atmospheric contaminants, such as polynuclear compounds, that can enter fluvial environments through meteoric precipitation. The object of this work was to evaluate PAH content in surface waters flowing across the described territory. Samplings were carried on during winter season, when the concentration of these pollutants usually reaches the highest levels. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Multi-criteria assessment of socio-environmental aspects in shrinking cities. Experiences from eastern Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schetke, Sophie Haase, Dagmar

    2008-10-15

    Demographic change and economic decline produce modified urban land use pattern and densities. Compared to the beginning of the 90s after the German reunification, nowadays massive housing and commercial vacancies followed by demolition and perforation come to pass in many cities of the former GDR. In consequence, a considerable surplus of urban brownfields has been created. Furthermore, the decline in the urban fabric affects social infrastructure and urban greenery of local neighbourhoods. Here, urban planning enters into 'uncharted territory' since it needs to assess the socio-environmental impact of shrinkage. In order to carry out such an evaluation quantitatively, a multi-criteria assessment scheme (MCA) was developed and applied. Firstly, we identified infrastructure and land use changes related to vacancy and demolition. Secondly, demolition scenarios for the coming 20 years were applied in order to give an idea for a long-term monitoring approach at the local district level. A multi-criteria indicator matrix quantifies the socio-environmental impact on both urban greenery and residents. Using it, we set demolition scenarios against urban 'quality of life' targets. Empirical evidence comes from Leipzig, in eastern Germany, a representative case study for urban shrinkage processes. The results show that shrinkage implies socio-environmental changes of residential livelihoods, however, does not simply increase or decrease the overall urban quality of life. The integrated assessment of all indicators identifies environmental and social opportunities, as well as the challenges a shrinking city is faced with.

  12. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Percent) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 -32.70 -36.20 -48.60 -41.00 -28.00 -18.00 -8.30 -2.10 0.30 1.50 3.50 15.50 1997 18.80 36.80 52.90 35.70 20.10 10.70 3.20 1.30 0.40 -1.20 2.50 -0.50 1998 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.10 15.10 1999 6.40 4.40 -1.40 -6.50 -7.30

  13. Reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands in eastern China --- A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhenqi Hu; Hehe Gu

    1995-09-01

    China has a long history of coal mining and more than 96% of coal output is taken from underground mines each year. With the excavation of coal from underground, severe subsidence often results, which produces many subsidence lands. Since the Chinese government enacted a reclamation stipulation in 1989, many abandoned mining subsidence lands were produced before 1989. Therefore, reclamation of abandoned subsidence lands has become the focus of research activities in our country. This paper explores the principle and methods of reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands and presents a case study in eastern China. A 373 ha of abandoned mining subsidence land in Anhui province was selected as an experiment site. Since China is a developing country and land shortage is severe in this area, the high economic benefits from the reclaimed land was the final reclamation goal. Based on the topography of subsidence lands --- some parts of the abandoned lands were wetland or lake-like troughs, restoring farmlands and fishponds were chosen as post-reclamation land uses. The elevation of reclaimed lands was the key for restoring farmland successfully because of the high underground water level in this area, and the optimum fishpond size and side-slope design were the keys to reach high reclamation income. The HDP (Hydraulic Dredge Pump) reclamation technique was used for restoring farmland and creating fishpond. A farming and aquaculture plan for high economic benefits was also designed. This project will make farmers, who own the lands, richer through reclamation.

  14. Review of the Recent Frequency Performance of the Eastern, Western and ERCOT Interconnections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2010-12-20

    The reliable operation of an electric power system depends on careful management of the balance between generation and load to ensure that system frequency is maintained within narrow bounds around a scheduled value. Yet, maintaining frequency at the scheduled value is challenging because the load served is continuously changing, and occasionally, events such as the sudden loss of a large generation plant or large amount of load, cause frequency to deviate abruptly. This report reviews the recent history of frequency performance for all three U.S. interconnections: Eastern, Western, and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The review is based on data collected by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). The review focuses on frequency response, which measures the performance of the interconnections immediately following sudden, large imbalances between load and generation. Trends in frequency response are presented and preliminary efforts are made to relate frequency response to other aspects of frequency performance and to examine aspects of the methods used to calculate frequency response.

  15. Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

    2014-09-20

    Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

  16. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  17. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  18. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 5 well - Lorain County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to evaluate recoverable reserves of gas contained in the shales; (2) to enhanced recovery technology for production from shale gas reservoirs; and (3) to stimulate interest among commercial gas suppliers in the concept of producing large quantities of gas from low-yield, shallow Devonian Shale wells. The EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well was cored under a cooperative cost-sharing agreement between the Department of Energy (METC) and Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation. Detailed characterization of the core was performed at the Eastern Gas Shale Project's Core Laboratory. At the well site, suites of wet and dry hole geophysical logs were run. Characterization work performed at the Laboratory included photographic logs, lithologic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition samples were tested for physical properties by Michigan Technological University. Physical properties data obtained were for: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength; strength in point load; and trends of microfractures.

  19. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  20. EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Public Comment Period Extension | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Public Comment Period Extension EIS-0486: DOE Notice of Public Comment Period Extension Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE is extending the public comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (DOE/EIS-0486) to April 20, 2015. Comments submitted to DOE concerning the Plains & Eastern EIS prior to this announcement do not need to be resubmitted as a result of this extension of the