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Sample records for great plains cloud

  1. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W.

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  2. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  3. A comparison of radiometric fluxes influenced by parameterization cirrus clouds with observed fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; George, A.T.

    1996-04-01

    The data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Southern Great plains Site (SCP) is a valuable resource. We have developed an operational data processing and analysis methodology that allows us to examine continuously the influence of clouds on the radiation field and to test new and existing cloud and radiation parameterizations.

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains ... Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy ... and their daughters Allison Moore (husband ...

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) ... Niamey, Niger, to the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. Dr. ...

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANLEVSNL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains...

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has helped to correct problems related to signal interference. The WACR is a 95-GHz system designed for a unique purpose -...

  8. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  9. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Site Operations Manager to Retire Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operations manager Jim Teske has announced that he will retire in October

  10. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ACRF Instrument Team Meets at SGP The ARM Program has had unprecedented success in operating a large array of sophisticated

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-01 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ARM Archive Sets Record for User Accounts The ARM Archive stores and distributes the large quantities of data generated by routine

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare visual data with the non-visual data retrieved by

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  17. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Dimming: A Hot Climate Topic Global dimming, also referred to as solar dimming, is a new buzz word in the scientific community. Coined

  18. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. 2004 ARM Science Team Meeting Sets Attendance Record A record-breaking 316 scientists and researchers from 22 different

  19. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  20. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  1. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Radiometer Calibration Facility Equipment Repair Lab Main Office Raman Lidar Doppler Lidar and Radar Wind Profiler Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Ka-Zenith Radar...

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds, water vapor, dust, and other aerosol particles can interfere with the transmission of solar radiation. The amount of radiant energy reaching the ground depends on the type ...

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the site (Figure 1). The term cold air funnel was introduced into the meteorology vocabulary in 1973. Although much research has focused on tornadoes and funnel clouds in...

  4. Analytical study of the effects of the Low-Level Jet on moisture convergence and vertical motion fields at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, X.; Zhong, S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Stage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) is located in a region that is strongly affected by a prominent meteorological phenomenon--the Great Plains Low-Level Jet (LLJ). Observations have shown that the LLJ plays a vital role in spring and summertime cloud formation and precipitation over the Great Plains. An improved understanding of the LLJ characteristics and its impact on the environment is necessary for addressing the fundamental issue of development and testing of radiational transfer and cloud parameterization schemes for the general circulation models (GCMs) using data from the SGP CART site. A climatological analysis of the summertime LLJ over the SGP has been carried out using hourly observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wind Profiler Demonstration Network and from the ARM June 1993 Intensive Observation Period (IOP). The hourly data provide an enhanced temporal and spatial resolution relative to earlier studies which used 6- and 12-hourly rawinsonde observations at fewer stations.

  5. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prell L. R. Roeder

    2010-09-01

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  6. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With the rapid changes in the arctic environment, the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research. Since 1997, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has gathered climate data at its NSA site in Barrow, the northernmost city in the United States located on the edge of the Arctic Ocean. The ARM Facility established multiple climate research sites on the North Slope to provide data about Arctic clouds and

  7. Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  8. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  9. ITC Great Plains, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ITC Great Plains, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Great Plains, LLC Place: Kansas Phone Number: Topeka (785) 783-2226 or Dodge City (620) 371-6534 or (785) 783-2226...

  10. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  11. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  12. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  13. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111...

  14. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomPublicationsSouthern Great Plains Newsletter Archive Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive 2011 March PDF - 2.7MB 2010 September PDF - 1.6MB 2009 January PDF - 472KB February PDF - 472KB 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 January PDF - 7.4MB

  15. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  16. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of ...

  17. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Great Plains The Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma, is the world's largest and most extensive climate research facility. SGP data are providing details about cloud, aerosol, and atmospheric processes that have never before been available for computer models that simulate Earth's climate. Scientists use these data to dramatically improve the representation of radiative and cloud processes in global climate models. Being able to understand and accurately predict these

  18. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  19. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  20. GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van ... and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. ...

  1. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the

  2. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS Summary Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a ...

  3. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  4. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  5. A one-year climatology using data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site micropulse lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; Spinhirne, J.; Scott, S.

    1996-04-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) has been operational at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program for the past 15 months. The compact MPL is unique among research lidar systems in that it is eye-safe and operates continuously, except during precipitation. The MPL is capable of detecting cloud base throughout the entire depth of the troposphere. The MPL data set is an unprecedented time series of cloud heights. It is a vital resource for understanding the frequency of cloud ocurrence and the impact of clouds on the surface radiation budget, as well as for large-scale model validation and satellite retrieval verification. The raw lidar data are processed for cloud base height at a temporal frequency of one minute and a vertical resolution of 270 m. The resultant time series of cloud base is used to generate histograms as a function of month and time of day. Sample results are described.

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region.

  7. A case study of the Great Plains low-level jet using wind profiler network data and a high resolution mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, S.; Fast, J.D.; Bian, X.; Stage, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) has important effects on the life cycle of clouds and on radiative and surface heat and moisture fluxes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. This diurnal phenomenon governs the transport and convergence of low-level moisture into the region and often leads to the development of clouds and precipitation. A full understanding of the life cycle of clouds at the SGP CART site and their proper representation in single column and global climate models cannot be obtained without an improved understanding of this important phenomenon.

  8. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for ...

  9. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  10. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  11. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field

  12. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  13. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  14. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  15. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  16. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  17. Aerosol measurements at the Southern Great Plains Site: Design and surface installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leifer, R.; Knuth, R.H.; Guggenheim, S.F.; Albert, B.

    1996-04-01

    To impropve the predictive capabilities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program radiation models, measurements of awserosol size distributions, condensation particle concentrations, aerosol scattering coefficients at a number of wavelenghts, and the aerosol absorption coefficients are needed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Alos, continuous measurements of ozone concnetrations are needed for model validation. The environmental Measuremenr Laboratory (EMK) has the responsibility to establish the surface aerosol measurements program at the SGP site. EML has designed a special sampling manifold.

  18. Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains L. Bianco, D. Cimini, and F. Marzano Center of Excellence CETEMPS University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy L. Bianco and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado R. Ware Radiometrics Co. and University Consortium for Atmospheric Research

  19. Instrumentation for Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 accept the instrument but operates it in a degraded mode until the problems are fixed, or does not operate the instrument. Similar procedures are followed for other types of equipment and some aspects of the site data system. Central Facility Table 1 shows the progress to date on implementation of instruments, facilities, and general aspects of the site data system

  20. SuomiNet efforts in the U. S. Southern Great Plains.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R. A.; Carr, F. H.; Ahern, J. L.; Liljegren, J. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Smith, J. J.

    2000-10-10

    SuomiNet provides great promise for advancing research at the University of Oklahoma in numerical weather prediction and plate tectonics studies, and will further help the U.S. DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program better specify the measurement of water vapor over the Southern Great Plains. The SuomiNet program is also allowing ARM to upgrade its data collection infrastructure to provide more reliable and near real-time observations not only to SuomiNet but also to other researchers.

  1. Subtask 7.3 - The Socioeconomic Impact of Climate Shifts in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Tera Buckley; Troy Simonsen

    2007-12-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated the water demand response/vulnerability to climate change factors of regional economic sectors in the northern Great Plains. Regardless of the cause of climatic trends currently observed, the research focused on practical evaluation of climate change impact, using water availability as a primary factor controlling long-term regional economic sustainability. Project results suggest that the Upper Missouri, Red River, and Upper Mississippi Watersheds exhibit analogous response to climate change, i.e., extended drought influences water availability in the entire region. The modified trend suggests that the next period for which the Red River Basin can expect a high probability of below normal precipitation will occur before 2050. Agriculture is the most sensitive economic sector in the region; however, analyses confirmed relative adaptability to changing conditions. The price of agricultural commodities is not a good indicator of the economic impact of climate change because production and price do not correlate and are subject to frequent and irregular government intervention. Project results confirm that high water demand in the primary economic sectors makes the regional economy extremely vulnerable to climatic extremes, with a similar response over the entire region. Without conservation-based water management policies, long-term periods of drought will limit socioeconomic development in the region and may threaten even the sustainability of current conditions.

  2. Vision Statement for Research and Educationall Outreach for tl1e ARM CART Southern Great Plains Locale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Vision Statement for Research and Educationall Outreach for tl1e ARM CART Southern Great Plains Locale P. J. lamb Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies K. C. Crawford Oklahoma Climatological Survey F. V. Brock School of Meteorology R. M. Rabin National Severe Storms Laboratory University of Oklahoma/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration "Weather Center" Norman, OK 73019 .National Weather Service Forecast Office (NWSFO) Dennis H. McCarthy, Director As

  3. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grasses (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.

  4. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern

  5. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; et al

    2016-07-28

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters  ∼  1 to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid–base chemistrymore » in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid–Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the

  6. The Low-Level Jet over the Southern Great Plains Determined from Observations and Reanalyses and Its Impact on Moisture Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Huang, Maoyi

    2015-09-01

    This study utilizes five commonly used reanalysis products, including the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 (NCEP2), ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA)-Interim, Japanese 25-year Reanalysis (JRA-25), Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) to evaluate features of the Southern Great Plains Low Level Jet (LLJ) above the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. Two sets of radiosonde data are utilized: the six-week Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), and a ten-year period spanning 2001-2010. All five reanalysis are compared to MC3E data, while only the NARR and MERRA are compared to the ten-year data. Each reanalysis is able to represent most aspects of the composite LLJ profile, although there is a tendency for each reanalysis to overestimate the wind speed between the nose of the LLJ and 700 mb. There are large discrepancies in the number of LLJ observed and derived from the reanalysis, particularly for strong LLJs that leads to an underestimate of the water vapor transport associated with LLJs. When the ten-year period is considered, the NARR overestimates and MERRA underestimates the total moisture transport, but both underestimate the transport associated with strong LLJs by factors of 2.0 and 2.7 for the NARR and MERR, respectively. During MC3E there were differences in the patterns of moisture convergence and divergence, with the MERRA having an area of moisture divergence over Oklahoma, while the NARR has moisture convergence. The patterns of moisture convergence and divergence are more consistent during the ten-year period.

  7. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore » (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  8. Parameterizing atmosphere-land surface exchange for climate models with satellite data: A case study for the Southern Great Plains CART site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, W.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution satellite data provide detailed, quantitative descriptions of land surface characteristics over large areas so that objective scale linkage becomes feasible. With the aid of satellite data, Sellers et al. and Wood and Lakshmi examined the linearity of processes scaled up from 30 m to 15 km. If the phenomenon is scale invariant, then the aggregated value of a function or flux is equivalent to the function computed from aggregated values of controlling variables. The linear relation may be realistic for limited land areas having no large surface contrasts to cause significant horizontal exchange. However, for areas with sharp surface contrasts, horizontal exchange and different dynamics in the atmospheric boundary may induce nonlinear interactions, such as at interfaces of land-water, forest-farm land, and irrigated crops-desert steppe. The linear approach, however, represents the simplest scenario, and is useful for developing an effective scheme for incorporating subgrid land surface processes into large-scale models. Our studies focus on coupling satellite data and ground measurements with a satellite-data-driven land surface model to parameterize surface fluxes for large-scale climate models. In this case study, we used surface spectral reflectance data from satellite remote sensing to characterize spatial and temporal changes in vegetation and associated surface parameters in an area of about 350 {times} 400 km covering the southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  11. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last week, scientists from across the country met in Ponca City, Oklahoma, to simulate ... For CHAPS, two aircraft will fly primarily in the plume emanating from Oklahoma City, and ...

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is in place at its first field research site in scenic Point Reyes, California. The AMF, an array of instruments in a pair of movable shelters, will...

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of science degree ("Boundary Layer Momentum Budgets as Determined by a Single Scanning Doppler Radar") at Colorado State University. Brad enjoyed a long association with the...

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    problems. Senator Muegge suggested informing Oklahoma Secretary of Technology Skip Porter of the situation. When Secretary Porter toured the SGP site, he saw the road concerns...

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    world, including China, Japan, Australia, Niger, Africa, France, and Germany. ... the following results: * High-quality data sets of fair-weather cumulus, stratus, and deep ...

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... designated electrical equipment inspector training at Los Alamos National Laboratory. ... is constructed according to electrical code standards and is safe for site staff to operate. ...

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... before they hit the surface, forming small ice pellets more commonly known as sleet. ... graupel: snowflakes that become rounded pellets as a result of riming (Typical diameters ...

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... He worked closely with teams from several laboratories to develop the measurement facilities that were ultimately deployed at Manus, Papua New Guinea; Nauru Island, Republic of ...

  20. Northern Great Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northern G reat P lains Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The N orthern G reat P lains i s h ome t o l ess t han 2 % o f t he U .S. population b ut i s a m ajor s upplier o f c ritical e nergy r esources used t hroughout t he n ation. T hese r esources i nclude c oal f rom the P owder R iver B asin, e lectricity e xported v ia i nterstate transmission l ines, a nd r apidly g rowing o il p roduction f rom t he

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of rain. As the bucket tips to empty, it activates a magnetic reed switch and sends a signal to a data acquisition system that records the time of each tip. Figure 1. A...

  2. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uses laser technology to measure vertical profiles of atmospheric properties. The system will be out of service from late June until mid August. New signal acquisition and...

  3. Coal. [Great Plains Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The status of various research projects related to coal is considered: gasification (approximately 30 processes) and in-situ gasification. Methanol production, retrofitting internal combustion engines to stratified charge engines, methanation (Conoco), direct reduction of iron ores, water resources, etc. Approximately 200 specific projects related to coal are considered with respect to present status. (LTN)

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use in computing aerosol optical thickness from the surface up to an altitude of 7 kilometers. Figure 1. The NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-Channel Sunphotometer mounted on a...

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ocean wave spray, soot from factory smokestacks or internal combustion engines, and sulfate from volcanic activity. For many years, the SGP site has been sampling atmospheric...

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dowell and SGP assistant site scientist Daniel Hartsock, Rusk also led the group on a walking tour. The students observed a radiosonde (weather balloon) launch by SGP upper air...

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Water Vapor Data Support Severe Weather Forecasting in Oklahoma and Kansas The ARM ... GPS receiver costs have decreased in recent years, making the technology affordable for ...

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These particles intercept the laser light and scatter it in different directions. Some of the scattered light returns to Earth's surface. A receiver on the ground collects ...

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... inches of snow took aim on the SGP. This storm caused several intermittent power outages lasting 2-3 hours, affecting the Central Facility and a few northern instrument stations. ...

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident (ARM photo). April 2005 2 Annual Quality Improvement Inspections Take Place The Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) implemented by the ARM Program in 1998...

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov ... (http:oco.jpl.nasa.gov), a satellite scheduled for launch in 2007. The ...

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... Scientists to Validate Satellite-Based Ozone Measurements Aura, the third and final ...

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... SGP Study Will Test Satellite-Borne Instrument The accuracy of a satellite-based carbon ...

  14. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2004 ANLERNL-04-05 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: ... Please visit the new ARM website at http:www.arm.gov. May 2004 2 Satellite ...

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... Researchers will use instruments on aircraft, satellite, and enhanced surface platforms to ...

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov ... In contrast, the traditional satellite imaging techniques use only 5-10 spectral bands. ...

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MFRSR Calibration Capabilities. The SGP recently acquired from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory equipment needed to calibrate Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers ...

  18. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B y m id---century, t he a verage n umber o f cooling d egree d ays ( CDDs) m ay i ncrease ... p olicies, new p eak l oad c apacity Thermoelectric Power Generation; Electric G rid ...

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12, 2007. Munchkin has been with us since 1993. He has been a fine and loyal friend, guardian, and companion on long shifts and a part of the ARM family. He personally greeted...

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ACRF SGP site recently established a repair capability for its wind sensor equipment that is saving the program money and improving the availability of data. Wind sensor ...

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass burning, water treatment, waste management ... Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world ... be burned via a flare or used to run electrical generators. ...

  2. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    installed together at the SGP central facility (ARM photo). October 2004 3 Okmulgee Turkey Vultures Thwarted . . . Finally After years of trying to keep messy turkey vultures...

  3. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of DOE's funding for ACRF is to provide educational resources to anyone interested in learning more about climate sciences, weather, research techniques, or instrumentation. ACRF...

  4. Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollister, Emily B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ansley, R J; Boutton, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

  5. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  6. Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Feingold, Graham NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Frisch, Shelby NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties We will present an analysis of the effect of aerosol on clouds at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. New methods for retrieving cloud droplet effective radius with radar (MMCR), multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and microwave

  7. A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions from Six Different Platforms over the Southern Great Plains in the United States Citation Details In-Document ...

  8. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B.

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  9. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  10. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (first echo). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  11. Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qiu, Guanzhou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P<0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared to control samples. All of the results demonstrated that the whole microbial communities increase functional

  12. ARM Southern Great Plains Site Observations of the Smoke Pall Associated with the 1998 Central American Fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R A.; Bahrmann, C P.; Barnard, James C.); Campbell, J R.; Cheng, M.-D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Halthore, R N.; Heilman, L. A.; Laulainen, Nels S.); Lin, C.-J.; Ogren, J. A.; Poellot, M R.; Remer, L. A.; Sassen, K.; Spinhirne, J D.; Splitt, Mike E.; Turner, David D.)

    2000-11-01

    Drought-stricken areas of Central America and Mexico were victimized in 1998 by forest and brush fires that burned out of control during much of the first half of the year. Wind currents at various times during the episode helped transport smoke from these fires over the Gulf of Mexico and into portions of the U.S. Visibilities were greatly reduced during favorable flow periods from New Mexico to south Florida and northward to Wisconsin as a result of this smoke and haze. In response to the reduced visibilities and increased pollutants, public health advisories and information statements were issued by various agencies in Gulf Coast states and in Oklahoma.

  13. ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux [ ARM Principal Investigator (PI) Data Product ] Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the

  14. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  15. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  16. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  17. Infrared Cloud Imager Measurements of Cloud Statistics from the 2003 Cloudiness Intercomparison Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Cloud Imager Measurements of Cloud Statistics from the 2003 Cloudiness Intercomparison Campaign B. Thurairajah and J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana Introduction The Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Intensive Operational Period (CIC IOP) occurred at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility site in Lamont, Oklahoma from mid-February to mid-April 2003 (Kassianov et al. 2004).

  18. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  19. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  20. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  1. Shortwave, Clear-sky Diffuse Irradiance in the 350 to 1050 nm Range: Comparison of Models with RSS Measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM Site in September/October 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shortwave, Clear-Sky Diffuse Irradiance in the 350 to 1050 nm Range: Comparison of Models with RSS Measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM Site in September/October 2001 J. J. Michalsky, P. W. Kiedron, Q.-L. Min, and L. C. Harrison Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York J. J. Michalsky Surface Radiation Research Branch Air Resources Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Abstract A rotating shadowband

  2. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  3. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore » and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  4. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  5. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (HI-SCALE) Science Plan (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the

  6. An Analysis of Cloud Absorption During

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Cloud Absorption During ARESE II (Spring 2000) D. M. Powell, R. T. Marchand, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction In early spring 2000, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program researchers held an intensive operational period (IOP) at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This IOP had several objectives, one of which was to was to re-evaluate (with redundant measurements wherever possible) absorption by low-level

  7. Thermodynamic phase profiles of optically thin midlatitude cloud and their relation to temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naud, C. M.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Turner, David D.; Lo, Chaomei; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2010-06-03

    Winter cloud phase and temperature profiles derived from ground-based lidar depolarization and radiosonde measurements are analyzed for two midlatitude locations: the United States Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique (SIRTA) in France. Because lidars are attenuated in optically thick clouds, the dataset only includes optically thin clouds (optical thickness < 3). At SGP, 57% of the clouds observed with the lidar in the temperature range 233-273 K are either completely liquid or completely glaciated, while at SIRTA only 42% of the observed clouds are single phase, based on a depolarization ratio threshold of 11% for differentiating liquid from ice. Most optically thin mixed phase clouds show an ice layer at cloud top, and clouds with liquid at cloud top are less frequent. The relationship between ice phase occurrence and temperature only slightly changes between cloud base and top. At both sites liquid is more prevalent at colder temperatures than has been found previously in aircraft flights through frontal clouds of greater optical thicknesses. Liquid in clouds persists to colder temperatures at SGP than SIRTA. This information on the average temperatures of mixed phase clouds at both locations complements earlier passive satellite remote sensing measurements that sample cloud phase near cloud top and for a wider range of cloud optical thicknesses.

  8. Data assimilation of a ten-day period during June 1993 over the Southern Great Plains Site using a nested mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, J.; Guo, Y.R.

    1996-04-01

    A goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been to obtain a complete representation of physical processes on the scale of a general circulation model (GCM) grid box in order to better parameterize radiative processes in these models. Since an observational network of practical size cannot be used alone to characterize the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site`s 3D structure and time development, data assimilation using the enhanced observations together with a mesoscale model is used to give a full 4D analysis at high resolution. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) has been applied over a ten-day continuous period in a triple-nested mode with grid sizes of 60, 20 and 6.67 in. The outer domain covers the United States` 48 contiguous states; the innermost is a 480-km square centered on Lamont, Oklahoma. A simulation has been run with data assimilation using the Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction System (MAPS) 60-km analyses from the Forecast Systems Laboratory (FSL) of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The nested domains take boundary conditions from and feed back continually to their parent meshes (i.e., they are two-way interactive). As reported last year, this provided a simulation of the basic features of mesoscale events over the CART site during the period 16-26 June 1993 when an Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was under way.

  9. Aspects of the quality of data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site broadband radiation sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitt, M.E.; Wesely, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    A systmatic evaluation of the performance of broadband radiometers at the Radiation Testbed (CART) site is needed to estimate the uncertainties of the irradiance observations. Here, net radiation observed with the net radiometer in the enrgy balance Bowen ratio station at the Central facility is compared with the net radiation computed as the sum of component irradiances recorded by nearby pyranameters and pyrgeometers. In addition, data obtained from the central facility pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and pyrheliometers are examined for April 1994, when intensive operations periods were being carried out. The data used in this study are from central facility radiometers in a solar and infrared observation station, and EBBR station, the so-called `BSRN` set of upward pointing radiometers, and a set of radiometers pointed down at the 25-m level of a 60-m tower.

  10. Great Plains Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and implement policies, technologies and practices in the areas of energy security and bio-based materials. Coordinates: 44.979035, -93.264929 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: DeMott, PJ 1 ; Suski, KJ 1 ; Hill, TCJ 1 ; Levin, EJT 1 + Show Author Affiliations Colorado State University Publication Date: 2015-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1232637 ...

  12. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account ... attribute the INP activity primarily to soil dust emissions. ... weather and aerosol scenarios has direct application, ...

  13. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation (Program Document) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  14. ARM - Lesson Plans: Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  15. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  16. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D.

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  17. Modeling Springtime Shallow Frontal Clouds with Cloud-Resolving...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Southern Great Plains and moisture transport from northwestern part of the Gulf of Mexico. This study emphasizes quantitative comparisons among model simulations and with data,...

  18. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, JD; Berg, LK

    2015-12-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in boundary layer and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign is designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. HI-SCALE consists of 2, 4-week intensive observational periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer, to take advantage of different stages and distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as well as aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. Most of the proposed instrumentation will be deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream 1 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface will be supplemented with aerosol microphysical properties measurements. The G-1 aircraft will complete transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds.

  19. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  20. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; T Jackson; B.Kustas; PJ Lamb; GM McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Turner

    2007-06-30

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these interactions modulate the abundance and characteristics of small and medium size cumuliform clouds that are generated by local convection. These interactions are not well understood and are responsible for large uncertainties in global climate models, which are used to forecast future climate states. The campaign will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations.

  1. Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Writing Implementation Plan Plain Writing Implementation Plan Plain Writing Implementation Plan July 13, 2011.pdf (120.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013) Plain Language Compliance Report (2014

  2. Development and Testing of a Life Cycle Model and a Parameterization of Thin Mid-level Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    2008-03-03

    We used a cloud-resolving model (a detailed computer model of cloud systems) to evaluate and improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models used for numerical weather prediction and climate modeling. We also used observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, made at DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Climate Research Facility located in the Southern Great Plains (Kansas and Oklahoma) during Intensive Observation Periods to evaluate our detailed computer model as well as a single-column version of a global atmospheric model used for numerical weather prediction (the Global Forecast System of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction). This so-called Single-Column Modeling approach has proved to be a very effective method for testing the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models. The method relies on detailed observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, in an atmospheric column comparable in size to a grid column used in a global atmospheric model. The required observations are made by a combination of in situ and remote sensing instruments. One of the greatest problems facing mankind at the present is climate change. Part of the problem is our limited ability to predict the regional patterns of climate change. In order to increase this ability, uncertainties in climate models must be reduced. One of the greatest of these uncertainties is the representation of clouds and cloud processes. This project, and ARM taken as a whole, has helped to improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models.

  3. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

    2012-06-30

    A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

  4. Cloud Optical Properties from the Multifilter Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSRCLDOD). An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Riihimaki, L.; Shi, Y.; Lo, C.; Min, Q.

    2014-02-01

    The microphysical properties of clouds play an important role in studies of global climate change. Observations from satellites and surface-based systems have been used to infer cloud optical depth and effective radius. Min and Harrison (1996) developed an inversion method to infer the optical depth of liquid water clouds from narrow band spectral Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements (Harrison et al. 1994). Their retrieval also uses the total liquid water path (LWP) measured by a microwave radiometer (MWR) to obtain the effective radius of the warm cloud droplets. Their results were compared with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) retrieved values at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site (Min and Harrison 1996). Min et al. (2003) also validated the retrieved cloud optical properties against in situ observations, showing that the retrieved cloud effective radius agreed well with the in situ forward scattering spectrometer probe observations. The retrieved cloud optical properties from Min et al. (2003) were used also as inputs to an atmospheric shortwave model, and the computed fluxes were compared with surface pyranometer observations.

  5. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2015-12-28

    We proposed to analyze in-situ cloud data collected during ARM/ASR field campaigns to create databases of cloud microphysical properties and their uncertainties as needed for the development of improved cloud parameterizations for models and remote sensing retrievals, and for evaluation of model simulations and retrievals. In particular, we proposed to analyze data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North Slope of Alaska during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), and over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) during The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), to meet the following 3 objectives; derive statistical databases of single ice particle properties (aspect ratio AR, dominant habit, mass, projected area) and distributions of ice crystals (size distributions SDs, mass-dimension m-D, area-dimension A-D relations, mass-weighted fall speeds, single-scattering properties, total concentrations N, ice mass contents IWC), complete with uncertainty estimates; assess processes by which aerosols modulate cloud properties in arctic stratus and mid-latitude cumuli, and quantify aerosol’s influence in context of varying meteorological and surface conditions; and determine how ice cloud microphysical, single-scattering and fall-out properties and contributions of small ice crystals to such properties vary according to location, environment, surface, meteorological and aerosol conditions, and develop parameterizations of such effects.In this report we describe the accomplishments that we made on all 3 research objectives.

  6. Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud

  7. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  8. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  9. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10

    Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and

  10. Dual-wavelength millimeter-wave radar measurements of cirrus clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    In April 1994, the University of Massachusetts` 33-GHz/95-GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) participated in the multi-sensor Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Intensive Operation Period (IOP), which was conducted at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART). During the 3-week experiment, CPRS measured a variety of cloud types and severe weather. In the context of global warming, the most significant measurements are dual-frequency observations of cirrus clouds, which may eventually be used to estimate ice crystal size and shape. Much of the cirrus data collected with CPRS show differences between 33-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity measurements that are correlated with Doppler estimates of fall velocity. Because of the small range of reflectivity differences, a precise calibration of the radar is required and differential attenuation must also be removed from the data. Depolarization, which is an indicator of crystal shape, was also observed in several clouds. In this abstract we present examples of Mie scattering from cirrus and estimates of differential attenuation due to water vapor and oxygen that were derived from CART radiosonde measurements.

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  12. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore » relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  15. EIS-0072: Great Plains Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the impacts of a project to construct a 125 million cubic feet per day coal gasification facility located in Mercer County, North Dakota. The Office of Fossil Energy adopted three environmental impact evaluation documents prepared by other Federal agencies to develop this EIS.

  16. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

  17. Regional Community Wind Conferences, Great Plains Windustry Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Lisa

    2013-02-28

    Windustry organized and produced five regional Community Wind Across America (CWAA) conferences in 2010 and 2011 and held two CWAA webinars in 2011 and 2012. The five conferences were offered in regions throughout the United States: Denver, Colorado October 2010 St. Paul, Minnesota November 2010 State College, Pennsylvania February 2011 Ludington, Michigan (co-located with the Michigan Energy Fair) June 2011 Albany, New York October 2011

  18. RACORO long-term, systematic aircraft observations of boundary layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; McFarquhar, G.; Ogren, J.; Turner, D. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Feingold, G.; Long, C. N.; Jonsson, H. H.; Bucholtz, A.; Collins, D. R.; Diskin, G.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, R. P.; Woods, R. K.; Hubbe, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Schmid, B.

    2010-06-27

    Our knowledge of boundary layer cloud processes is insufficient to resolve pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 gm{sup 2}, which are defined here as being 'thin' Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes in their optical properties. However, it is difficult to retrieve accurately their cloud properties via remote sensing because they are tenuous and often occur in partly cloudy skies. This interferes with our ability to obtain the routine, long-term statistics needed to improve their representation in climate models. To address this problem, in-situ data are needed to investigate cloud processes and to evaluate and refine existing retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign conducted long-term, systematic flights in boundary layer, liquid-water clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 22 January and 30 June 2009. This was the first time that a long-term aircraft campaign was undertaken for systematic in-situ sampling of cloud properties. Using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a comprehensive set of instruments to measure solar and thermal radiation, cloud microphysics, aerosol properties and atmospheric state, the RACORO team logged an unprecedented 59 flights and 259 research hours above the SGP site. Data gathered during the RACORO campaign will provide researchers with a statistically relevant data set of boundary-layer cloud and aerosol properties for future study. These data can be used to validate retrieval algorithms and support process studies and model simulations of boundary layer clouds and, in particular, CLOWD-type clouds. In addition to cloud observations, complementary clear-sky flight patterns were conducted to map the surface

  19. Cloud properties derived from two lidars over the ARM SGP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Morille, Y.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-02-16

    [1] Active remote sensors such as lidars or radars can be used with other data to quantify the cloud properties at regional scale and at global scale (Dupont et al., 2009). Relative to radar, lidar remote sensing is sensitive to very thin and high clouds but has a significant limitation due to signal attenuation in the ability to precisely quantify the properties of clouds with a 20 cloud optical thickness larger than 3. In this study, 10-years of backscatter lidar signal data are analysed by a unique algorithm called STRucture of ATmosphere (STRAT, Morille et al., 2007). We apply the STRAT algorithm to data from both the collocated Micropulse lidar (MPL) and a Raman lidar (RL) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 1998 and 2009. Raw backscatter lidar signal is processed and 25 corrections for detector deadtime, afterpulse, and overlap are applied. (Campbell et al.) The cloud properties for all levels of clouds are derived and distributions of cloud base height (CBH), top height (CTH), physical cloud thickness (CT), and optical thickness (COT) from local statistics are compared. The goal of this study is (1) to establish a climatology of macrophysical and optical properties for all levels of clouds observed over the ARM SGP site 30 and (2) to estimate the discrepancies induced by the two remote sensing systems (pulse energy, sampling, resolution, etc.). Our first results tend to show that the MPLs, which are the primary ARM lidars, have a distinctly limited range where all of these cloud properties are detectable, especially cloud top and cloud thickness, but even actual cloud base especially during summer daytime period. According to the comparisons between RL and MPL, almost 50% of situations show a signal to noise ratio too low (smaller than 3) for the MPL in order to detect clouds higher than 7km during daytime period in summer. Consequently, the MPLderived annual cycle of cirrus cloud base (top) altitude is

  20. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  1. Precipitating clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A suggestion for a new focus on cloud microphysical process study in the ARM program 1. Retrieving precipitating mixed- phase cloud properties Zhien Wang University of Wyoming zwang@uwyo.edu Retrieving Precipitating Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Global distribution of supercooled water topped stratiform clouds (top > 1 km and length> 14km) Most of them are mixed-phase with precipitation or virga An multiple sensor based approach to provide water phase as well as ice phase properties

  2. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  3. ARM - Measurement - Cloud size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements as cloud thickness, cloud area, and cloud aspect ratio. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  4. Plain Language Training Classes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Classes Plain Language Training Classes February 18, 2016 7:30AM to 10:30AM MST Plain Language Training Classes When you write, do you write what you want ...

  5. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and...

  6. Plain Language Compliance Report (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  7. PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  8. Plain Language Compliance Report (2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  9. Plain Language Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Plain Language Training The Department has an active and popular Plain Language Training Program. Between April 2013 and March 2014, there were six Plain Language Training Classes at Forrestal and two at Germantown, attended by a total of 189 employees and contractors. Classes generally reach their size limit, and overflows are placed in the next scheduled class. Since August 2011, there have been 23 Plain Language Classes at Forrestal and eight at Germantown. In April

  10. An ensemble constrained variational analysis of atmospheric forcing data and its application to evaluate clouds in CAM5: Ensemble 3DCVA and Its Application

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Zhang, Minghua; Xie, Shaocheng

    2016-01-05

    Large-scale atmospheric forcing data can greatly impact the simulations of atmospheric process models including Large Eddy Simulations (LES), Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and Single-Column Models (SCMs), and impact the development of physical parameterizations in global climate models. This study describes the development of an ensemble variationally constrained objective analysis of atmospheric large-scale forcing data and its application to evaluate the cloud biases in the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM5). Sensitivities of the variational objective analysis to background data, error covariance matrix and constraint variables are described and used to quantify the uncertainties in the large-scale forcing data. Application of the ensemblemore » forcing in the CAM5 SCM during March 2000 intensive operational period (IOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program shows systematic biases in the model simulations that cannot be explained by the uncertainty of large-scale forcing data, which points to the deficiencies of physical parameterizations. The SCM is shown to overestimate high clouds and underestimate low clouds. These biases are found to also exist in the global simulation of CAM5 when it is compared with satellite data.« less

  11. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  12. ARM - Measurement - Cloud type

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as cirrus, stratus, cumulus etc Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  13. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aquifer THE INL & THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER underneath the Idaho National Laboratory is one of the most productive groundwater resources in the U.S. Each year about 2 million acre-feet of water is drawn from the aquifer. Approximately 95 percent of the water withdrawn from the aquifer is used for irrigation, 3 per- cent for domestic water, and 2 percent for industrial purposes. The aquifer is the primary water source for more than 280,000 people in

  14. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  15. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Change.org Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  16. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Fallon Sanford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean ...

  17. Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  18. Unlocking the Secrets of Clouds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds may look soft, fluffy and harmless to the untrained eye, but to an expert climate model scientist they represent great challenges. Fortunately the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate and Research Facility is kicking off a five-month study which should significantly clear the air.

  19. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  20. High Plains Tech Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner High Plains Tech Center Energy Purchaser High Plains Tech Center Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.40645133, -99.4282195 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  1. Final report (Grant No. DOE DE-FG02-97ER62366) [Retrieval of cloud fraction and type using broadband diffuse and total shortwave irradiance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clothiaux, Eugene

    2001-05-17

    The primary research effort supported by Grant No. DOE DEFG02-97ER62366 titled ''Retrieval of Cloud Fraction and Type Using Broadband Diffuse and Total Shortwave Irradiance Measurements'' was application of clear-sky identification and cloud fraction estimation algorithms developed by Charles N. Long and Thomas P. Ackerman to the downwelling total, direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance measurements made at all of the central, boundary, and extended facilities of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SOP) site. Goals of the research were finalization and publication of the two algorithms in the peer-reviewed literature and operational application of them to all of aforementioned data streams from the ARM SGP site. The clear-sky identification algorithm was published as Long and Ackerman (2000) in the Journal of Geophysical Research, while a description of the cloud fraction estimation algorithm made it to the scientific literature as Long et al. (1999) in the Proceedings of the 10th American Meteorological Association Conference on Atmospheric Radiation held in Madison, Wisconsin. The cloud fraction estimation algorithm relies on empirical relationships between the outputs of the clear-sky identification algorithm and cloud fraction; as such, the cloud fraction estimation algorithm requires significant amounts of data both to properly develop the empirical relationships and to thoroughly test them. With this perspective in mind the major focus of our research efforts in the later half of the project became the operational implementation of the clear-sky identification algorithm on DOE ARM SGP data so that we could develop the data set necessary for final tuning of the cloud fraction estimation algorithm in research extending beyond the lifetime of the project.

  2. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma | Department of Energy Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Block Plains & Eastern Clean Line Arkansas and Oklahoma 06-08-15.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block

  3. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-27

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results in up to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.

  4. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-27

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results inmoreup to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.less

  5. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Marble Drop Learning objective: for students to analyze a problem, and test and refine solutions. This will demonstrate a key skill needed in engineering and scientific...

  6. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  7. ARM - Measurement - Cloud location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    point in space and time, typically expressed as a binary cloud mask. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  8. High Plains Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    owned subsidiary of Seaboard Foods, is a renewable energy company focused on producing alternative fuels from the Seaboard Foods integrated system. References: High Plains...

  9. Western Plains Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Western Plains Energy LLC Place: Oakley, Kansas Zip: 67748 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates: 40.714855, -111.298899 Show Map...

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Cloud Infrared Imaging Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging 2012.07.16 - 2014.07.31 Lead Scientist : Joseph Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract The 3rd-generation Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) instrument was deployed close to the Great White facility at the North Slope of Alaska site and operated as

  11. Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-02-17

    Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction

  12. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud radars measure an incoming storm at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma. Cloud radars measure an incoming storm at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma. ...

  13. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  14. White Plains, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in White Plains, New York 3 Registered Financial Organizations in White Plains, New York 4 References US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in White Plains, New York Power Authority...

  15. Science Cloud 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Cloud 2011 Science Cloud 2011 June 17, 2011 The Magellan teams at NERSC and Argonne recently presented a joint paper detailing their progress and conclusions. At Science Cloud 2011: The Second Workshop on Scientific Cloud Computing, in a paper titled "Magellan: Experiences from a Science Cloud" (PDF, 320KB), lead author Lavanya Ramakrishnan outlined the groups' most recent achievements and conclusions, including a successful run of real-time data analysis for the STAR

  16. Comparing Clouds Using Cloud Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How To Graph Goals: The goal of this activity is to learn how to make a coordinate or line graph. Materials: Graph paper Pencil Introduction: Graphs and charts are great because they communicate information visually. Graphs are often used by scientists, but also by newspapers, magazines and businesses around the world. Sometimes, complicated information is difficult to understand and needs an illustration. Other times, a graph or chart helps impress people by getting the point across quickly and

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations Related Campaigns ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night...

  18. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on ...

  19. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  20. Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Mr. Garrett Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Rutherford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Campbell

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain, a 5 percent ...

  3. City of West Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of West Plains Place: Missouri Phone Number: 417-256-7176 Website: westplains.nethallelectricde Twitter:...

  4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Downwind, LLC Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Crystal Yarbrough

  5. High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Solar Power Plant Facility High Plains Ranch Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Sun Power Location Carizzo Plain, California Coordinates 35.1913858,...

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register ...

  7. Additional development of remote sensing techniques for observing morphology, microphysics, and radiative properties of clouds and tests using a new, robust CO{sub 2} lidar. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, W.L.; Brewer, W.A.; Intrieri, J.M.

    1998-09-28

    A three-year project with a goal of advancing CO{sub 2} lidar technology and measurement techniques for cloud studies was successfully completed. An eyesafe, infrared lidar with good sensitivity and improved Doppler accuracy was designed, constructed, and demonstrated. Dual-wavelength operation was achieved. A major leap forward in robustness was demonstrated. CO{sub 2} lidars were operated as part of two Intensive Operations Periods at the Southern Great Plains CART site. The first used an older lidar and was intended primarily for measurement technique development. The second used the new lidar and was primarily a demonstration and evaluation of its performance. Progress was demonstrated in the development, evaluation, and application of measurement techniques using CO{sub 2} lidar.

  8. Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR)

  9. ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption andor ...

  10. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  11. ARM - Campaign Instrument - wsicloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (WSICLOUD) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties Campaigns Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation Download Data Southern Great Plains, 1995.04.01 - 1995.05.31 The...

  12. ARM - Campaign Instrument - mmcr94psu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MMCR (MMCR94PSU) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties Campaigns Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation Download Data Southern Great Plains, 1994.04.01 - 1994.05.31...

  13. Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions July 1, 2011 Part of the Magellan project was to understand both the possibilities and the limitations of cloud computing in the pursuit of science. At a recent conference, Magellan investigator Shane Canon outlined some persistent misconceptions about doing science in the cloud - and what Magellan has taught us about them. » Read the ISGTW story. » Download the slides (PDF, 4.1MB

  14. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  15. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  16. plain-language-compliance-report-2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plain-language-compliance-report-2016 plain-language-compliance-report-2016 The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative. The areas referenced in this report are only a few of the successes we have encountered as we continue to implement the Act. Plain Language Compliance Report 2016.pdf (182.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plain

  17. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility.

  18. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, ...

  19. ANG coal gasification project management control system report. [Great Plains project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Much time, money and effort has been spent in the forefront of this project for project controls. The work breakdown structure for the systems has been custom designed. The systems, both manual and computerized, have been well scrutinized and chosen by ANG to represent the most cost effective and efficient way of controlling a project the magnitude of $1.5 billion. These systems have been developed in a manner so that information can be gathered as detailed or as summarized as necessary, and in the most timely and expeditious ways.

  20. DOE/SC-ARM-14-021 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the brown dog tick, and the black-legged tick, or deer tick, frequent Oklahoma and Kansas. ... or mouth and pull gently to remove the whole tick without crushing it. 2. Wash area ...

  1. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Sponsoring Org: DOE-ARM & DOE-ASR Country of Publication: United States Language: English Dataset File size NAView Dataset View Dataset DOI: 10.17190AMF124602

  2. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory Sponsoring Org: DOEARM Country of Publication: United States Language: English Dataset File size NAView Dataset View Dataset DOI: 10.17190AMF1246025

  3. Angola: a great future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The companies represented in Angola and their concessions by area are tabulated, including offshore leases. The government of this only recently independent country puts great emphasis on petroleum development and welcomes foreign companies. The major portion of the production comes from the fields in the Cabinda area. In the future, the reserves in the Congo basin will become more important. Exploration activity is intense and concentrated on the near offshore area of the country. The gas reserves are still not entirely known; present production serves only the needs of petroleum production, including a gas injection project in the Cabinda area and the production of LPG. A map of the offshore concession blocks also is shown.

  4. The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P Kollias; MA Miller; KB Widener; RT Marchand; TP Ackerman

    2005-12-30

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates millimeter wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several climatological regimes. The MMCRs, are the primary observing tool for quantifying the properties of nearly all radiatively important clouds over the ACRF sites. The first MMCR was installed at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site nine years ago and its original design can be traced to the early 90s. Since then, several MMCRs have been deployed at the ACRF sites, while no significant hardware upgrades have been performed. Recently, a two-stage upgrade (first C-40 Digital Signal Processors [DSP]-based, and later the PC-Integrated Radar AcQuisition System [PIRAQ-III] digital receiver) of the MMCR signal-processing units was completed. Our future MMCR related goals are: 1) to have a cloud radar system that continues to have high reliability and uptime and 2) to suggest potential improvements that will address increased sensitivity needs, superior sampling and low cost maintenance of the MMCRs. The Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) technology, the frequency (35-GHz), the radio frequency (RF) layout, antenna, the calibration and radar control procedure and the environmental enclosure of the MMCR remain assets for our ability to detect the profile of hydrometeors at all heights in the troposphere at the ACRF sites.

  5. ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flux Analysis SWFLUXANAL : Shortwave Flux Analysis TSI : Total Sky Imager UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett WSI : Whole Sky Imager WSICLOUD : Whole Sky Imager Cloud Products ...

  6. ARM - Measurement - Cloud phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that involves property descriptors such as stratus, cumulus, and cirrus. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  7. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  8. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics Virendra Ghate Bruce Albrecht Parameter Observational Readiness (/10) Modeling Need (/10) Cloud Boundaries 9 9 Cloud Fraction Variance Skewness Up/Downdraft coverage Dominant Freq. signal Dissipation rate ??? Observation-Modeling Interface

  9. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain;...

  10. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) | Department of Energy Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) (654.41 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line

  11. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hughes | Department of Energy from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Marshall Hughes 07-10-15.pdf (14.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Patti McCutchen

  12. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  13. Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds" Project ID: 0011106 ... measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well ...

  14. ARM - Measurement - Cloud effective radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the number size distribution of cloud particles, whether liquid or ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  15. TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intensity (e.g. May and Ballinger, 2007) Resulting Cloud Properties Examine rain DSD using polarimetric radar Examine ice cloud properties using MMCR and MPL Expect...

  16. Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on

  17. Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magellan News & Announcements Archive Petascale Initiative Exascale Computing APEX Home » R & D » Archive » Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists? That was one of the questions NERSC's Magellan cloud computing testbed explored between 2009 and 2011. The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oce

  18. Final Technical Report on Scaling Models of the Internal Variability of Clouds DoE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63773

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, Kristinka

    2008-04-24

    The purpose of this proposal is to gain a better understanding of the space-time correlations of atmospheric fluctuations in clouds through application of methods from statistical physics to high resolution, continuous data sets of cloud observations available at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program archive. In this report we present the accomplishments achieved during the four year period. Starting with the most recent one, we report on two break-throughs in our research that make the fourth year of the project exceptionally successful and markedly outperforming the objectives. The first break-through is on characterization of the structure of cirrus radiative properties at large, intermediate and small, generating cells scales by applying the Fokker-Planck equation method and other methods to ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations collected at the Southern Great Plains site. The second break-through is that we show that different characterizations of the cirrus radiative properties are obtained for different synoptic scale environments. We outline a stochastic approach to investigate the internal structure of radiative properties of cirrus clouds based on empirical modeling and draw conclusions about cirrus dynamical properties in the context of the synoptic environment. Results on the structure of cirrus dynamical properties are consistent with the structure of cirrus based on aircraft in situ measurements, with results from ground-based Raman lidar, and with results from model studies. These achievements would not have been possible without the accomplishments from the previous years on a number of problems that involve application of methods of analysis such as the Fokker-Planck equation approach, Tsallis nonextensive statistical mechanics, detrended fluctuation analysis, and others. These include stochastic analysis of neutrally stratified cirrus layers, internal variability and turbulence in cirrus, dynamical model and

  19. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  20. Comparison of mean properties of simulated convection in a cloud-resolving model with those produced by cumulus parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, J.; Parsons, D.B.

    1996-04-01

    An Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program took place at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site from June 16-26, 1993. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) has been used to simulate this period on a 60-km domain with 20- and 6.67-km nests centered on Lamont, Oklahoma. Simulations are being run with data assimilation by the nudging technique to incorporate upper-air and surface data from a variety of platforms. The model maintains dynamical consistency between the fields, while the data correct for model biases that may occur during long-term simulations and provide boundary conditions. For the work reported here the Mesoscale Atmospheric Prediction System (MAPS) of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 3-hourly analyses were used to drive the 60-km domain while the inner domains were unforced. A continuous 10-day period was simulated.

  1. Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane cloud hunting Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting Los Alamos researchers go ... Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting When our team from Los Alamos National ...

  2. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric

  3. New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight December 16, 2015 - 10:04am Addthis New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight Timothy J. Welch Hydropower Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office What You Need to Know About Section 242 Funding The Energy Department began accepting applications today from hydropower owners and operators that produced hydroelectric power in 2014 from new equipment added to an existing dam or conduit since 2005. Applications for

  4. Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric transmission

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... Section 1002 of ANILCA deferred a decision on the management of oil and gas exploration ...

  6. Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River...

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Dr. Contreras ...

  8. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ms. Callahan Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Ms. Callahan ...

  9. Des Plaines, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Des Plaines, Illinois Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) NARI National...

  10. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...