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  1. Chester County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Chester County, South Carolina Chester, South Carolina Eureka Mill, South Carolina Fort Lawn, South Carolina Gayle Mill, South Carolina Great Falls,...

  2. Chester, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chester, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4031547, -72.4509204 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. Chester Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chester Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.400461, -72.453803 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  4. Chester, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chester, New Hampshire: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9567525, -71.2572846 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  5. Port Chester, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Port Chester is a village in Westchester County, New York. It falls under New York's 18th...

  6. Olde West Chester, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Olde West Chester is a census-designated place in Butler County, Ohio.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA Retrieved...

  7. AUTHORS Charles E. Whittle Edward L. Allen Chester L. Cooper

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AUTHORS Charles E. Whittle Edward L. Allen Chester L. Cooper Herbert G. MacPherson Doan L. Phung Alan D. Poole William G. Pollard Ralph M. Rotty Ned L. Treat Alvin M. Weinbecg OTHER CONTRIBUTORS William U. Chandler Alfred M. Perry Frances C. Edmonds David B. Reister James A. Edmonds Ernest G. Silver Harold L. Federow Paul C. Tompkins James A. Lane Eva M. Wike Gregg Marland Leon W. Zelby This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLE Authorizing C&icial Date: Id/25/11. C W L W ORAU/lEA 76-4 September

  8. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  9. Gray County Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gray County Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Gray County Wind Farm Facility Gray County Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  10. gray-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiatively Forced Diurnal Circulations and the Distribution of Tropical Water Vapor W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Overview Because the tropical ocean regions are the primary source of available energy for the general circulation, their principal cyclic variations (e.g., factors governing the diurnal convective cycle) must be accurately represented in global climate models (GCMs). The observed morning maximum of

  11. Corporate Gray Job Fair | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corporate Gray Job Fair Corporate Gray Job Fair April 21, 2016 9:00AM to 12:30PM EDT Springfield, VA

  12. Grays Harbor Demonstration Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Facility Grays Harbor Demonstration Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company LLC...

  13. Stephen Gray | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen Gray Group Leader, Theory & Modeling Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley Research activities include the theory and modeling of dynamical processes in nanosystems with particular emphasis on modeling light interactions with metallic nanostructures via rigorous electrodynamics simulations and the quantum dynamics of molecular systems within nanoscale environments. News Shape-shifting nanorods release heat differently Telephone 630.252.3594 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail gray@anl.gov

  14. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  15. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  16. Design and Implementation of Geothermal Energy Systems at West Chester University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Cuprak

    2011-08-31

    West Chester University is launching a comprehensive transformation of its campus heating and cooling systems from traditional fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas) to geothermal. This change will significantly decrease the institution's carbon footprint and serve as a national model for green campus efforts. The institution is in the process of designing and implementing this project to build well fields, a pumping station and install connecting piping to provide the geothermal heat/cooling source for campus buildings. This project addresses the US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) goal to invest in clean energy technologies that strengthen the economy, protect the environment, and reduce dependence on foreign oil. In addition, this project advances EERE's efforts to establish geothermal energy as an economically competitive contributor to the US energy supply. For this grant, WCU will extend piping for its geo-exchange system. The work involves excavation of a trench approximately 8 feet wide and 10-12 feet deep located about 30 feet north of the curb along the north side of West Rosedale for a distance of approximately 1,300 feet. The trench will then turn north for the remaining distance (60 feet) to connect into the mechanical room in the basement of the Francis Harvey Green Library. This project will include crossing South Church Street near its intersection with West Rosedale, which will involve coordination with the Borough of West Chester. After installation of the piping, the trench will be backfilled and the surface restored to grass as it is now. Because the trench will run along a heavily-used portion of the campus, it will be accomplished in sections to minimize disruption to the campus as much as possible.

  17. QER- Comment of Mike Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biggest issue with wind energy in ND is the Transmission System. There was a proposal recently by Clean Line Energy This type of forward thinking would allow wind energy to go forward.... The other huge issue is the blockade that the fossil fuel industry has placed on Master Limited Partnerships in 1978!! If the Master Limited Partner Parity Act is passed THAT WOULD BE A GAME CHANGER!! ( this is sponsored bu Senator Coons From DE) Call me directly..... You can also aske Heidi Heitkamp about me.... Mike Gray

  18. Healthcare Energy: Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building Healthcare Energy: Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the Gray Building at Massachusetts General Hospital. In the figure above, click on items in the legend to focus on specific end uses. See below for basic information about the building. Photo

  19. Gray, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gray, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.885632, -70.3317195 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"g...

  20. Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named president of TMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rusty Gray named president of TMS Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named president of TM George T. "Rusty" Gray III was selected as 2010 president of The Minerals, Metals & Materials...

  1. Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and ...

  2. EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric tons of CO2 over a 4-year period. The project and EA are on hold.

  3. George T. "Rusty" Gray named TMS Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gray joined TMS in 1986. He has Served on the Programming, Titanium, and Mechanical Behavior committees Completed two terms on the board of directors Chaired the Board of Key ...

  4. Grays Harbor County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Grays Harbor County, Washington Aberdeen Gardens, Washington Aberdeen, Washington Brady, Washington Central Park, Washington Chehalis Village, Washington Cohassett Beach,...

  5. Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential Rebate Program offers financial incentives to its small and large commercial customers, agricultural customers, industrial customers, and institutional customers...

  6. Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Wind energy Product: Grays Harbor has started a demonstration project for offshore windwave renewable power generation in Washington State and has applied for up...

  7. Gray County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 069. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. Gray County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  9. Grays Prairie, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Grays Prairie is a village in Kaufman County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 5th congressional district.12 References...

  10. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  11. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within riparian buffers around each stream or river channel. Included in the overall watershed assessment are field habitat surveys and analyses of the physical and hydrological characteristics of primary chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and spawning habitat availability and use. This assessment is a significant step in a comprehensive program to ensure the survival and recovery of Columbia River chum salmon in its most productive system and builds on existing recovery planning efforts for these ESA-listed salmonids within the Grays River and the lower Columbia River. This assessment also provides a basis for the recovery of other fish species in the Grays River, including coho salmon, winter steelhead, coastal cutthroat trout, and Pacific lamprey.

  12. Training Session: West Chester, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  13. EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts | Department of Energy Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Energy Literacy is a key initiative within Education and Workforce Development in EERE's Office of Strategic Programs. Enhancing U.S. citizens' energy

  14. Joe W. Gray, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joe W. Gray, 1986 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1980's Joe W. Gray, 1986 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For his exceptional

  15. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  16. The 21st LH Gray Conference (June 4-6, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, C. M.L.; Martin, C. J.; Sutton, D. G.; Wright, E. G.

    2009-01-12

    The 21st LH Gray Conference, organised by the LH Gray Trust with the Society for Radiological Protection, brought together international experts in radiobiology, epidemiology and risk assessment, and scientists involved in diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure. The meeting - held in Edinburgh, Scotland 4?6 June 2008 - aimed to raise awareness, educate and share knowledge of important issues in radiation protection. A distinguished group of speakers discussed topics which included: non-targeted effects of radiation, exposure to high natural background radiation, non-cancer effects in Japanese bomb survivors, lessons learnt from Chernobyl, radiation in the workplace, biokinetic modelling, uncertainties in risk estimation, issues in diagnostic medical exposures, lessons leant from the polonium-210 incidence and how the radiobiology-radiation oncology community is needed to help society prepare for potential future acts of radiation terrorism. The conference highlighted the importance, relevance and topicality of radiobiology today.

  17. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

  18. Testing the effectiveness of an acoustic deterrent for gray whales along the Oregon coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagerquist, Barbara; Winsor, Martha; Mate, Bruce

    2012-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine whether a low-powered sound source could be effective at deterring gray whales from areas that may prove harmful to them. With increased interest in the development of marine renewal energy along the Oregon coast the concern that such development may pose a collision or entanglement risk for gray whales. A successful acoustic deterrent could act as a mitigation tool to prevent harm to whales from such risks. In this study, an acoustic device was moored on the seafloor in the pathway of migrating gray whales off Yaquina Head on the central Oregon coast. Shore-based observers tracked whales with a theodolite (surveyors tool) to accurately locate whales as they passed the headland. Individual locations of different whales/whale groups as well as tracklines of the same whale/whale groups were obtained and compared between times with the acoustic device was transmitting and when it was off. Observations were conducted on 51 d between January 1 and April 15, 2012. A total of 143 individual whale locations were collected for a total of 243 whales, as well as 57 tracklines for a total of 142 whales. Inclement weather and equipment problems resulted in very small sample sizes, especially during experimental periods, when the device was transmitting. Because of this, the results of this study were inconclusive. We feel that another season of field testing is warranted to successfully test the effectiveness of the deterrent, but recommend increasing the zone of influence to 3 km to ensure the collection of adequate sample sizes. Steps have been taken to acquire the necessary federal research permit modification to authorize the increased zone of influence and to modify the acoustic device for the increased power. With these changes we are confident we will be able to determine whether the deterrent is effective at deflecting gray whales. A successful deterrent device may serve as a valuable mitigation tool to protect gray whales, and other baleen whales, in the event that marine energy development poses a collision or entanglement risk.

  19. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M. ); Hopper, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  20. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.; Hopper, T.

    1993-05-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI`s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  1. Chester County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lionville-Marchwood, Pennsylvania Malvern, Pennsylvania Modena, Pennsylvania Oxford, Pennsylvania Paoli, Pennsylvania Parkesburg, Pennsylvania Phoenixville, Pennsylvania...

  2. Chester, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4086674, -68.4997474 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  3. Chester, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.2792551, -72.978712 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  4. Gray QB-sing-faced version 2 (SF2) open environment test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J.; Immel, D.; Bobbitt, J.; Negron, M.

    2015-02-16

    This report details the design upgrades incorporated into the new version of the GrayQbTM SF2 device and the characterization testing of this upgraded device. Results from controlled characterization testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering Imaging and Radiation Lab (IRL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) is presented, as well as results from the open environment field testing performed in the E-Area Low Level Waste Storage Area. Resultant images presented in this report were generated using the SRNL developed Radiation Analyzer (RAzerTM) software program which overlays the radiation contour images onto the visual image of the location being surveyed.

  5. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for gray radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2015-03-15

    The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due to the large variation of photon's mean-free path and its interaction with the material. In the small mean free path limit, the nonlinear time-dependent radiative transfer equations can converge to an equilibrium diffusion equation due to the intensive interaction between radiation and material. In the optical thin limit, the photon free transport mechanism will emerge. In this paper, we are going to develop an accurate and robust asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme (AP-UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation. The current work is based on the UGKS framework for the rarefied gas dynamics [14], and is an extension of a recent work [12] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two-dimensional gray radiative system. The newly developed scheme has the asymptotic preserving (AP) property in the optically thick regime in the capturing of diffusive solution without using a cell size being smaller than the photon's mean free path and time step being less than the photon collision time. Besides the diffusion limit, the scheme can capture the exact solution in the optical thin regime as well. The current scheme is a finite volume method. Due to the direct modeling for the time evolution solution of the interface radiative intensity, a smooth transition of the transport physics from optical thin to optical thick can be accurately recovered. Many numerical examples are included to validate the current approach.

  6. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  7. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. Inmore » every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.« less

  8. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-86-053-1933, Gray Pprinting Company, Fostoria, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, M.S.; Boiano, J.M.; Fidler, A.T.; Cantor, F.

    1988-10-01

    The Gray Printing Company, located in Fostoria, Ohio was studied for potential employee exposures to solvents used in the offset-printing process at that site. The company produced 30 monthly magazines plus various commercial catalogs and brochures. The employment at the site was 185 persons. Equipment used in the production of printed material included photographic-typesetting and sheet-fed and roll fed offset lithographic printing processes. Over two workdays the sheet fed press operator's isopropanol exposures ranged from 247 to 501 mg/m/sup 3/ with personal breathing zone naphtha concentrations of 0.03 to 8.9 mg/m/sup 3/. The web press operator's naphtha exposures ranged from 0.03 to 7.7 mg/m/sup 3/. These workers were also exposed to low concentrations of isopropanol. The highest short term isopropanol exposure was 726 mg/m/sup 3/. Short term exposures to blanket and roller cleaning solvent were low, less than 10 mg/m/sup 3/. A higher than expected reporting of symptoms related to central nervous system depression, difficulty in concentrating, dizziness, cough, chest pain, and dry skin were noted among workers. The authors conclude that there was an increased prevalence of neurotoxic, respiratory, and skin problems among workers using organic solvents. Due to the prevalence of these symptoms, the authors recommend measures for reducing employee exposure to solvents.

  9. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. In every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.

  10. GrayQbTM Single-Faced Version 2 (SF2) Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) deployment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J. R.; Immel, D. M.; Serrato, M. G.; Dalmaso, M. J.; Shull, D. J.

    2015-11-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in partnership with CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) deployed the GrayQbTM SF2 radiation imaging device at the Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) to assist in the radiological characterization of the canyon. The deployment goal was to locate radiological contamination hot spots in the PRF canyon, where pencil tanks were removed and decontamination/debris removal operations are on-going, to support the CHPRC facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) effort. The PRF canyon D&D effort supports completion of the CHPRC Plutonium Finishing Plant Decommissioning Project. The GrayQbTM SF2 (Single Faced Version 2) is a non-destructive examination device developed by SRNL to generate radiation contour maps showing source locations and relative radiological levels present in the area under examination. The Hanford PRF GrayQbTM Deployment was sponsored by CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) through the DOE Richland Operations Office, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO), DOE-RL IEWO- M0SR900210.

  11. Significance of recurrent fault movement at Grays Point quarry, southeast Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, S.F.; Throckmorton, C.K. ); Clendenin, C.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Geologic relationships indicate recurrent movement on a fault exposed at Grays Point, MO. Faulting offsets Middle-Late Ordovician Plattin Group, Decorah Group, Kimmswick Limestone, and Maquoketa Group strata. In plan, the fault is characterized by a relatively narrow zone (30--70 m) of northeast-striking fault slices associated with a northwest-striking zone of right-stepping en echelon fractures. This systematic fracture-fault array identifies right-lateral strike-slip movement. A vertically offset basal Decorah Group contact shows 22 m of down-to-the-southeast dip slip, which indicates a component of oblique slip. Oldest recognizable movement on the fault is evidenced by Maquoketa Group strata that fill a northeast-striking, wedge-shaped synform. Post-Ordovician movement along an adjacent subvertical fault displaces part of this synform 300 m right laterally. In thin section, the northwest-striking fracture set shows a polyphase history of deformation indicated by cataclastic textures and intrusion of carbonate-rich fluids. Three periods of movement occurred: (1) initial fracturing sealed by authigenic mineral cements; (2) renewed fracturing associated with recrystallization of sub-rounded clasts; and (3) subsequent brecciation marked by angular clasts and filling of fractures and vugs. Each successive fluid intrusion is characterized by an increase in grain size of the authigenic cement. The fault is subparallel to the regional, northeast-striking English Hill fault system. Polyphase oblique-slip deformation suggests that the fault, like others in southeastern Missouri, is a reactivated Late Proterozoic-Cambrian zone of weakness. Initial fault reactivation occurred during Middle-Late Ordovician as opposed to Devonian, as commonly interpreted for southeast Missouri. Multiple authigenic mineral cements imply that fluids may have been an important factor influencing the fault's tendency to be reactivated.

  12. Town of Chester, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 413-354-7811 Website: townofchester.netmunicipal-el Outage Hotline: 413-354-7811 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  13. Chester County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4270939, -88.6723578 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  14. Chester, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7842667,"lon":-74.6968284,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Women @ Energy: Neda Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    " If we can convince mothers and fathers to treat their daughters and sons equally, to instill in them a sense of value for education, responsibility for their actions and decisions, love for others (not only family members), and a desire for spiritual enlightenment, we can begin to change the world."

  16. Corporate Gray Job Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location:  Army-Navy Country Club, Arlington, VAContact: Recruitment@doe.govWebsite Link: www.corporategray.com/jobfairs/366

  17. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  18. QER- Comment of Heather Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I live in Western Massachusetts and we don't need a pipeline going through us to get to CT or anywhere else -- especially when fracked materials are involved. I am against the pipeline -- let them refine that dangerous stuff up north, if they can't be persuaded to stop entirely. We need cleaner, safer fuels, more effective use of fuel (which probably means smaller, more local power units, not huge ones). We also need to support smarter uses of resources, such as more insulation in houses and apartments, so that less energy is needed to heat and cool them. Let's stimulate the local economy of New England, not just roll over for the rich guys!

  19. Grays Harbor PUD- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington's original net-metering law, which applies to all electric utilities, was enacted in 1998 and amended in 2006. Individual systems are limited to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Net...

  20. Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to grant surplus and available used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges in the United States for use in energy oriented educational programs. This grant program is sponsored by the Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS). The listing of equipment

  1. Windsor County, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Vermont Andover, Vermont Baltimore, Vermont Barnard, Vermont Bethel, Vermont Bridgewater, Vermont Cavendish, Vermont Chester, Vermont Chester-Chester Depot, Vermont...

  2. Chester R. Richmond, 1974 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    A A A FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For meritorious research on the radiation biology of internally deposited radionuclides, for outstanding contributions to the...

  3. Surveillance study of health effects associated with cleanup of a hazardous waste site, Ralph Gray Trucking Company (a/k/a Westminster Tract Number 2633), Westminster, Orange County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CAD981995947

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshiko, S.; Underwood, M.C.; Smith, D.; DeLorenze, G.; Neuhaus, J.

    1999-04-01

    Excavation of a Superfund site, the Ralph Gray Truncking Company located in Westminster Orange County, California was anticipated to release sulfur dioxide and other chemicals. The California Department of Health Services, under cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, conducted a surveillance study to assess whether illnesses were associated with cleanup activities. A panel primarily composed of more sensitive persons (n = 36) was selected to report daily respiratory symptoms and odors. Exposures included sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) measurements and daily tonnage of waste removed. Analysis used Conditional Likelihood Regression and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) methods. Levels of SO{sub 2} were generally higher than usual ambient air, at times exceeding levels which can cause health effects among asthmatics in laboratory settings. Wheeze and cough were significantly associated with tonnage of waste removed, especially on days when the highest amounts of waste were removed. Upper respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with SO{sub 2}, and weak relationships were found with nausea and burning nose and SO{sub 2}.

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Pamela Gray-Hann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet map server applications GIS web page PVWatts Outreach Meeting planning Project support Education and background training University of Minnesota-Duluth GIS Technical ...

  5. Gray scale x-ray mask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2006-03-07

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  6. PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. Grays Harbor PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Income Weatherization assistance is also provided. Specific information regarding various guidelines and applications may be found on the web site.  

  8. The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr.&Gray)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, G.A.; DiFazio, S.; Jansson, S.; Bohlmann, J.; Grigoriev,I.; Hellsten, U.; Putnam, N.; Ralph, S.; Rombauts, S.; Salamov, A.; Schein, J.; Sterck, L.; Aerts, A.; Bhalerao, R.R.; Bhalerao, R.P.; Blaudez, D.; Boerjan, W.; Brun, A.; Brunner, A.; Busov, V.; Campbell, M.; Carlson, J.; Chalot, M.; Chapman, J.; Chen, G.-L.; Cooper, D.; Coutinho,P.M.; Couturier, J.; Covert, S.; Cronk, Q.; Cunningham, R.; Davis, J.; Degroeve, S.; Dejardin, A.; dePamphillis, C.; Detter, J.; Dirks, B.; Dubchak, I.; Duplessis, S.; Ehiting, J.; Ellis, B.; Gendler, K.; Goodstein, D.; Gribskov, M.; Grimwood, J.; Groover, A.; Gunter, L.; Hamberger, B.; Heinze, B.; Helariutta, Y.; Henrissat, B.; Holligan, D.; Holt, R.; Huang, W.; Islam-Faridi, N.; Jones, S.; Jones-Rhoades, M.; Jorgensen, R.; Joshi, C.; Kangasjarvi, J.; Karlsson, J.; Kelleher, C.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Kirst, M.; Kohler, A.; Kalluri, U.; Larimer, F.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Leple, J.-C.; Locascio, P.; Lou, Y.; Lucas, S.; Martin,F.; Montanini, B.; Napoli, C.; Nelson, D.R.; Nelson, D.; Nieminen, K.; Nilsson, O.; Peter, G.; Philippe, R.; Pilate, G.; Poliakov, A.; Razumovskaya, J.; Richardson, P.; Rinaldi, C.; Ritland, K.; Rouze, P.; Ryaboy, D.; Schmutz, J.; Schrader, J.; Segerman, B.; Shin, H.; Siddiqui,A.; Sterky, F.; Terry, A.; Tsai, C.; Uberbacher, E.; Unneberg, P.; Vahala, J.; Wall, K.; Wessler, S.; Yang, G.; Yin, T.; Douglas, C.; Marra,M.; Sandberg, G.; Van der Peer, Y.; Rokhsar, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. Over 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event, with approximately 8,000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event surviving in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially slower in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average between 1.4-1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with disease resistance, meristem development, metabolite transport and lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis.

  9. MHK Projects/Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Company LLC Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesTitan Platform Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. Benchmarking of Competitive Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * ORNL Team Members - Steve Campbell, Chester Coomer - Andy Wereszczak, Materials Science and Technology Division Partners ...

  11. CX-002046: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chester County (Pennsylvania): Chester Valley Trail Extension - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block GrantCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/20/2010Location(s): Chester County, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The creation of an energy-literate society is critical in advancing the next generation's energy workforce. EERE is providing the energy principles and concepts that are essential ...

  13. ORISE Video: What are the differences between rad/gray and rem/sievert in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measuring radiation?

  14. Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First nationally recognized framework for teaching energy using an interdisciplinary, systems-based approach (natural sciences, technology, engineering, economics, social sciences, and policy), with focus on improving energy decision-making by all citizens.

  15. Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Literacy Framework webinar was held on February 6, 2013 at 4 pm EST. It focused on outlining the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies concepts every citizen should know to be...

  16. Text-Alternative Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michelle Fox: Hi, good afternoon everyone and welcome to today's webinar on energy literacy. Thank you for joining. I want to thank also the Department of Education for their Green Strides Webinar...

  17. THE AEROSPACE CORPORA-iION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barrel Company Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Berylliunl (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (horizons, Inc.) DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  18. En/ant Plaza. S. W,. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Telephones...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barrel Company Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Beryllium (Perkins Avenue) Clecon bletals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.) DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  19. I,.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City BarrelCompany Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Beryllium (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.) DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  20. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barrel Company Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Berylliunl (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.1 DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  1. Suite 4000. 9.5 L%nfcinr Pi& S. Ic:, W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barre,lCompany Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Beryllium (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.) DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  2. THE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Queen City Barre-l;.Company Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Berylliunl (Perkins Avenue) Clecon bletals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.). DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Barrel-..Company.,...- e i- Ohmart Brush Beryllium (Chester Street) Brush Beryllium (Perkins Avenue) Clecon Metals, Inc. (Horizons, Inc.1 DuPont Grasselle Plant Harshaw Chemical ...

  4. Chesterfield County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Places in Chesterfield County, Virginia Bellwood, Virginia Bensley, Virginia Bon Air, Virginia Chester, Virginia Chesterfield Court House, Virginia Ettrick, Virginia...

  5. 2014 AISES National Conference (STEM and Career Expo)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: Orlando, FLPOC: Chester ScottAttendees: Sandra Cortez (Fossil Energy) and Dameone Ferguson (NNSA)Web: http://www.aises.org/conference

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator Morgan, Chester S. ; Johnson, William R. Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a ...

  7. Butler County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Middletown, Ohio Millville, Ohio Monroe, Ohio New Miami, Ohio Olde West Chester, Ohio Oxford, Ohio Ross, Ohio Seven Mile, Ohio Sharonville, Ohio Somerville, Ohio South Middletown,...

  8. Howard County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Howard County, Iowa Chester, Iowa Cresco, Iowa Elma, Iowa Lime Springs, Iowa Protivin, Iowa Riceville, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  9. Benchmarking State-of-the-Art Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Budget Barriers & Targets Partners * Remy * ANL * NREL * ORNL Team members - Steven Campbell - Chester Coomer - Zhenxian Liang - Andy Wereszczak * Materials Science and ...

  10. Contact: Rod Hunt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington TRU Solutions is jointly owned by Washington Group and Weston Solutions, of West Chester, Pennsylvania. The extension was granted when the DOE exercised a five-year ...

  11. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Physics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carl (Carl Salvaggio) - Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester ... Institute of Technology (MIT) Schmeiser, Bruce (Bruce Schmeiser) - School of Industrial ...

  12. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Clarkson University Fegley Jr., Bruce (Bruce Fegley Jr.) - Department of Earth ... Donald F. (Donald F. Figer) - Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester ...

  13. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Pelz, Jeff (Jeff Pelz) - Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester ... of Maryland at College Park Porter, Bruce W. (Bruce W. Porter) - Department of ...

  14. Crawford County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Crawford County, Arkansas Alma, Arkansas Cedarville, Arkansas Chester, Arkansas Dyer, Arkansas Kibler, Arkansas...

  15. UGIES Midstream Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Other Potential for Oil to Gas SE Pennsylvania * Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties * Over 300,000 potential conversions to natural gas * Total ...

  16. A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company Address: 38000 Chester Road Place: Avon, OH Zip: 44011 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Manufacturing Phone Number:...

  17. CX-005208: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chester County (PA) Installation of Cool Roof at Coatesville District CourtCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 02/16/2011Location(s): Chester County, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jan. 08, 2014 Jan. 09, 2014 Jan. 10, 2014 Jan. 11, 2014 Jan. 12, 2014 DOWNAP AP 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray AP 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray...

  19. Challenge Home Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sorted By Date Sort By Location Sort By Event Description Contact TBA West Chester, Pennsylvania DOE Challenge Home Zero Net-Energy-Ready Home Training DOE Challenge Home is...

  20. CX-005465: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joining Technology for the Improved Solar Cell Module ManufacturingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/14/2011Location(s): West Chester, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-004717: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Earl Fisher BiofuelsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Chester, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  2. Public Attitudes and Elite Discourse in the Realm of Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding III: Engaging Key Audiences in Bioenergy Public Attitudes and Elite Discourse in the Realm of Biofuels Ashlie B. Delshad, Assistant Professor of Political Science, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

  3. HBCU College Festival sponsored by Alfred Street Baptist Church

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: T.C. Williams High School, 3330 King St, Alexandria, VA 22302Attendees: Rauland Sharp (HC) and Dameone Ferguson (NNSA)POC: Chester Scott Website: http://bit.ly/1BARRqp

  4. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 6 0 0 Night Shift 18:00 AP 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 0 0 6 Jan 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Day...

  5. Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray: A Webcast on the Department of Energy's Energy Literacy Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Literacy Framework webinar was held on February 6, 2013 at 4 pm EST. The presentation, webcast and resources are available below.

  6. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  7. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Elisha Gray Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray Application from Northern Pass Transmission to construct, ...

  8. Research and Development Roadmap for Emerging HVAC Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DLB Associates Ashok Gidwani Booz Allen Hamilton ARPA-e Chris Gray Southern Company ... DLB Associates Ashok Gidwani Booz Allen Hamilton ARPA-e Chris Gray Southern Company ...

  9. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George T. (Rusty) Gray III image of George Gray Contact Information Laboratory Fellow Los Alamos National Laboratory Dynamic Materials Properties, Testing, and Modeling Los Alamos,...

  10. QER Public Meeting in Chicago, IL: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - Statement PDF icon John Gray, Senior Vice President for Policy and Economics, the Association of American Railroads (AAR) - Statement PDF icon John Gray, Senior Vice President ...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Equipment, Vending Machine Controls, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment, Other EE, Wind (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Savings Category: Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fadley, Charles S. (1) Gaididei, Yuri (1) Gray, Alexander (1) Gullikson, Eric M. (1) Han, ... to Co microdot magnetic arrays Gray, Alexander ; Kronast, Florian ; Papp, Christian ; ...

  15. CX-006894: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership/Frito Lay Cincinnati Propane Fueling InfrastructureCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/28/2011Location(s): West Chester, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-005376: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Design and Implementation of Geothermal Energy Systems at West Chester University - 2CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1, B5.2Date: 02/28/2011Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-000697: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pennsylvania - Energy Harvest Mined Grants - Chester County Intermediate UnitCX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B5.1Date: 01/05/2010Location(s): Downingtown, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT SONABOND ULTRASONICS FORMERLY AEROPROJECTS, INC. 200-T E. ROSEDALE AVENUE WEST CHESTER,~PENNSYLVANIA December 1991 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Environmental Restoration Office of Eastern Area Programs . . . CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site Function Site Description Radiological History and

  19. CX-005375: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Design and Implementation of Geothermal Energy Systems at West Chester University - 1CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1, B5.2Date: 02/28/2011Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. CX-003887: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Design and Implementation of Geothermal Energy Systems at West Chester UniversityCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 09/01/2010Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Capital One Financial Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporation Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Capital One Financial Corporation Joined the Challenge: January 2014 Headquarters: McLean, VA Charging Locations: Richmond, VA; McLean, VA; Chester, VA; Plano, TX; Wilmington, DE Domestic Employees: 41,300 Capital One's Environmental Program seeks to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the organization's facilities

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coomer, Chester" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  3. Mr. William Steuteville

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    45 DEC 18 13% Mr. William Steuteville 3 HW 33 EPA Region III 841 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 Dear Mr. Steuteville: I am enclosing for your information a copy of the radiological survey report for the former Aeroprojects Facility in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Only background levels of radioactivity were found during the course of the survey. A copy of the survey has been

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Brush Beryllium Co - Clevland - OH 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Clevland - OH 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Brush Beryllium Co. (OH.02) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 4201 Perkins Avenue and 3714 Chester Street (two locations) , Cleveland , Ohio OH.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 OH.02-2 Site Operations: Performed thorium rod extrusion activities in the 1950s. OH.02-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria OH.02-1 OH.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled:

  5. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Energy Storage, Conversion, And

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Utilization | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Energy Storage, Conversion, And Utilization Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III (2002) 169 Evaluation of the 2010 Toyota Prius Hybrid Synergy Drive System Burress, Timothy A [ORNL]; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL]; Coomer, Chester [ORNL]; Ayers, Curtis William [ORNL]; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL]; Cunningham,

  6. CX-003173: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    173: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003173: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Phase III Test Well CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/28/2010 Location(s): Chester, Michigan Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The purpose of this action is to drill and characterize a stratigraphic well to determine if the potential formation in this region is suitable for a future Phase III carbon dioxide injection project.

  7. Thermal boundary conductance accumulation and interfacial phonon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transmission: Measurements and theory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect interfacial phonon transmission: Measurements and theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal boundary conductance accumulation and interfacial phonon transmission: Measurements and theory Authors: Cheaito, Ramez ; Gaskins, John T. ; Caplan, Matthew E. ; Donovan, Brian F. ; Foley, Brian M. ; Giri, Ashutosh ; Duda, John C. ; Szwejkowski, Chester J. ; Constantin, Costel ; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan J. ;

  8. I STEPHEN M. KIM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Well l 15 20 ' 25 30 35 Fine Sand Orange Fine to Coarse Sand Multi-Colored Soil Fill Brown & Black Color ' Tan 81 Brown White-Gray Gray & Brown ' Coal Fill (winclusions-Ind. ...

  9. I. V. Khalzov, F. Ebrahimi, D. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Rev. Lett. 74, 2945 (1995). 5 C. D. Cothran, M. R. Brown, T. Gray, M. J. Schaffer, and G. Marklin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 215002 (2009). 6 C. D. Cothran, M. R. Brown, T. Gray, M. J. ...

  10. Other State and Local Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To learn more, click on one of the topic or technology areas below. Energy-Saving Homes, Building, and Manufacturing Resources homes-gray.jpg Homes building-gray.jpg Buildings ...

  11. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7470 Judith Gomez, Engineer IV judith.gomez@nrel.gov 303-275-4290 Matthew Gray, Scientist IV matthew.gray@nrel.gov 303-275-3917 Will Huddleston, Undergraduate Intern...

  12. Computational Nanophotonics: modeling optical interactions and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This research project was part of a larger research project with the same title led by Stephen Gray at Argonne. A significant amount of our work involved collaborations with Gray,...

  13. CX-000002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gray's River Chum Supplementation ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 10/08/2009Location(s): Gray's River,WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray | Department of Energy Elisha Gray Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray Application from Northern Pass Transmission to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon ElishaGray_PP-371Comment.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments

  15. Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana Bayou Cane, Louisiana Chauvin, Louisiana Dulac, Louisiana Gray, Louisiana Houma, Louisiana Montegut, Louisiana Schriever, Louisiana Retrieved from...

  16. Crosscutting Success Stories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts http:energy.goveeresuccess-storiesarticlesenergizing-k-gray-community-energy-literacy-essential-principles-and

  17. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  18. Hydrate Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.fueleconomy.gov button banner graphic: orange to gray bar Hybrid button hilighted Full Hybrid button Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar subbanner graphic: gray bar Overview button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Hybrid-electric vehicles combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors to provide improved fuel economy. The engine provides most of the vehicle's power, and the

  19. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1 CHAPTER 9 GLOSSARY absorbed dose - The energy imparted to matter by ionizing radiation per unit mass of the irradiated material (e.g., biological tissue). The units of absorbed dose are the rad and the gray. (One rad equals 0.01 grays, which equals 100 ergs per gram of material.) (See erg, gray, ionizing radiation, irradiated, and radiation absorbed dose [rad].) accelerator (particle) - An apparatus for imparting high velocities by electromagnetic or electrostatic means to charged particles

  20. CX-011534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays River Confluence Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. SREL Reprint #3180

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rest of the eastern United States. Indicators of molecular diversity and tests for demographic expansion confirmed this division and suggested a very recent expansion of gray...

  2. Spontaneous Formation of Biomimetic, Nanoporous Membrane Channels...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Carbon nanotubes insert into artificial and active cell membranes, reproducing major ... Depiction of carbon nanotube (gray) inserted into a cell membrane, with a single strand of ...

  3. The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer > Archived...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titanium atoms (yellow) preferentially bond with oxygen atoms (gray) and sit at the center of a complete octahedron, making it energetically more favorable for titanium to switch ...

  4. Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Kapilevich, G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Smith, J. L. Publication Date: 2015-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1212325 Grant...

  5. Precipitation Processes During ARM (1997), TOGA COARE (1992)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boundary layer PBL), and their detailed dynamic and thermodynamic budget calculations. ... with large horizontal domains (Grabowski et al. 1998; Petch and Gray 2001; and Tao 2003). ...

  6. Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001; Nesbitt and Zipser 2003). ... has a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing. ...

  7. Power Africa's Beyond the Grid Increasing Access through Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Acumen Fund Bamboo Finance BBOXX Capricorn Investment Group CrossBoundary d.light Embark Energy Energiya Global Fenix International Global Off-Grid Lighting Association Gray Ghost ...

  8. Educational Materials | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmenta...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Snapshots The Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park The History of Radioecology Research at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Gray Foxes of the ...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building, CustomOthers pending approval, Other EE, Food Service Equipment, Vending Machine Controls, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy...

  10. Section 26

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On the Fundamental Role of Day Versus Night Radiation Differences in Forcing Nocturnal Convective Maxima and in Assessing Global Warming Prospects W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer ...

  11. stenchikov-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and W. Chen Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland S. Gray Appalachian Trail Formerly at Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College...

  12. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quanxi Jia image of George Gray Contact Information Laboratory Fellow Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Physics and Applications Division Phone: (505) 667-2716...

  13. Laurens County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clinton, South Carolina Cross Hill, South Carolina Fountain Inn, South Carolina Gray Court, South Carolina Joanna, South Carolina Laurens, South Carolina Mountville, South...

  14. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation-induced damage is completely absorbed by the interface. blue: interface Cu gray: interface Nb yellow: high energy Cu atoms (including vacancies, interstitials, and the...

  15. Jones County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Jones County, Georgia Alterra Bioenergy LLC Places in Jones County, Georgia Gray, Georgia Macon, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJonesCo...

  16. Washington County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Washington County, Tennessee Fall Branch, Tennessee Gray, Tennessee Johnson City, Tennessee Jonesborough, Tennessee Midway, Tennessee Oak Grove,...

  17. Section 41

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forcing of the Diurnal Cycle of Intense Convection in the Tropical Pacific W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort...

  18. Franklin County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Franklin County, Missouri Berger, Missouri Gerald, Missouri Gray Summit, Missouri Leslie, Missouri Miramiguoa Park, Missouri New Haven, Missouri Oak...

  19. SREL Reprint #3150

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from across the species range, several unnamed distinct forms of Trachemys venusta (Gray, 1855) were recognized, leading to the description here of three biogeographically...

  20. NNSA, IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    News Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray DOENNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA Additional Protocol...

  1. Microsoft Word - sensitive-species-table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goshawk NMS, FSOC High Lanius ludovicianus Loggerhead Shrike NMS High Vireo vicinior Gray Vireo NMT Moderate Amazilia violiceps Violet-crowned Hummingbird NMT Low Myotis...

  2. Sandia Corporate Ombuds Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and interpersonal conflicts are occasionally part of all business relationships. "Gray areas" may exist and situations develop that may not be easily or clearly handled. Work...

  3. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yongqiang Wang image of George Gray Contact Information Los Alamos National Laboratory Ion Beam Materials Laboratory, Team Leader Phone: (505) 665-1596 yqwang@lanl.gov Bio...

  4. Tal Heilpern | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Stephen Gray) Tal Heilpern Telephone 630.252.5884 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail theilpern

  5. Microsoft Word - Fe-S_Clusters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coloring scheme: rust, iron; orange, sulfur; gray, carbon; red, oxygen; blue, nitrogen. ... The overall structure of HydA EFG reveals the formation of a positively charged channel ...

  6. Cumberland County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maine Freeport, Maine Frye Island, Maine Gorham, Maine Gray, Maine Harpswell, Maine Harrison, Maine Little Falls-South Windham, Maine Long Island, Maine Naples, Maine New...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... States) Use SRNL - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Aiken, SC (United ... The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard ; Gray, ...

  8. King County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecology Environment Inc EnerG2 Energy Priorities Frybrid General Biodiesel General Biodiesel Incorporated Go Green Save Fuel LLC Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company GreenFoot...

  9. University of Alaska Fairbanks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam Gray, Glenn Fuller, Khalid Bachkar....

  10. Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Smith, J. L. Publication Date: 2015-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1212325 GrantContract Number:...

  11. Tunable, superconducting, surface-emitting teraherz source (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the grating period using a superimposed magnetic control field. Inventors: Welp, Ulrich 1 ; Koshelev, Alexei E. 2 ; Gray, Kenneth E. 3 ; Kwok, Wai-Kwong 3 ; ...

  12. Tunable, superconducting, surface-emitting teraherz source (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the grating period using a superimposed magnetic control field. Inventors: Welp, Ulrich ; Koshelev, Alexei E. ; Gray, Kenneth E. ; Kwok, Wai-Kwong ; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii ...

  13. Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is transmitted in streams of laser pulses. September 3, 2015 A solitary oxygen dopant (red sphere) covalently attached to the sidewall of the carbon nanotube (gray) can generate...

  14. Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Bahns, J. T.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; Gray, S. K.; Chen, L. Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE...

  15. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gray, Alexander ; Kronast, Florian ; Papp, Christian ; Yang, See-Hun ; Cramm, Stefan ; Krug, Ingo P. ; Salmassi, Farhad ; Gullikson, Eric M. ; Hilken, Dawn L. ; Anderson, ...

  16. In-Process Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gamma radiation contour maps showing source locations and relative radiological contamination levels present. SRNL GrayQb(tm) Single Faced, Version 2 (SF2) PSP plate (shown in...

  17. Theory & Modeling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions with nanostructures Methods and software development, including multiscale approaches to assembly Group Lead Stephen Gray People Maria K. Y. Chan Larry Curtiss...

  18. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2004-07-01

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... a quasi-monochromatic g-ray beam up to an energy very close to 8GeV. The intensity of the g-ray beam in the energy range of 6.6z7.8GeV has been estimated at 2z104 per second. ...

  20. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  1. SINGLE-FACED GRAYQB{trademark} - A RADIATION MAPPING DEVICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.; Farfan, E.; Immel, D.; Phillips, M.; Bobbitt, J.; Plummer, J.

    2013-12-12

    GrayQb{trademark} is a novel technology that has the potential to characterize radioactively contaminated areas such as hot cells, gloveboxes, small and large rooms, hallways, and waste tanks. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} is to speed the process of decontaminating these areas, which reduces worker exposures and promotes ALARA considerations. The device employs Phosphorous Storage Plate (PSP) technology as its primary detector material. PSPs, commonly used for medical applications and non-destructive testing, can be read using a commercially available scanner. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} technology is to locate, quantify, and identify the sources of contamination. The purpose of the work documented in this report was to better characterize the performance of GrayQb{trademark} in its ability to present overlay images of the PSP image and the associated visual image of the location being surveyed. The results presented in this report are overlay images identifying the location of hot spots in both controlled and field environments. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been mainly tested in a controlled environment with known distances and source characteristics such as specific known radionuclides, dose rates, and strength. The original concept for the GrayQb{trademark} device involved utilizing the six faces of a cube configuration and was designed to be positioned in the center of a contaminated area for 3D mapping. A smaller single-faced GrayQb{trademark}, dubbed GrayQb SF, was designed for the purpose of conducting the characterization testing documented in this report. This lighter 2D version is ideal for applications where entry ports are too small for a deployment of the original GrayQb version or where only a single surface is of interest. The shape, size, and weight of these two designs have been carefully modeled to account for most limitations encountered in hot cells, gloveboxes, and contaminated areas. GrayQb{trademark} and GrayQb{trademark} SF share the same fundamental detection system design (e.g., pinhole and PSPs). Therefore, performance tests completed on the single face GrayQB in this report is also applicable to the six- faced GrayQB (e.g., ambient light sensitivity and PSP response). This report details the characterization of the GrayQb{trademark} SF in both an uncontrolled environment; specifically, the Savannah River Site (SRS) Plutonium Fuel Form Facility in Building 235-F (Metallurgical Building) and controlled testing at SRSs Health Physics Instrument Calibration Facility and SRSs R&D Engineering Imaging and Radiation Systems Building. In this report, the resulting images from the Calibration Facility were obtained by overlaying the PSP and visual images manually using ImageJ. The resulting images from the Building 235-F tests presented in this report were produced using ImageJ and applying response trends developed from controlled testing results. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been developed in two main stages at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL): 1) the GrayQb{trademark} development was supported by SRNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program and 2) the GrayQb{trademark} SF development and its testing in Building 235-F were supported by the Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13), U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management.

  2. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kevin A. Gray, PhD, Vice President, Beta Renewables Ron Meeusen, Managing Partner, Cultivian Sandbox Ventures, LLC Hans van der Sluis, Joint Venture Director, POET-DSM Advanced ...

  3. Table A34. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",74,3,3,"W","W",13,27,10.3 3331," Primary Copper",22,"*",0,"W","W",16,0,1.1 3334," Primary Aluminum",252,"*","*","*","W",148,"W",4 ...

  4. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",74,3,3,"W","W",13,27,10.3 3331," Primary Copper",21,"*",0,"W","W",16,0,1.1 3334," Primary Aluminum",254,"*","*","*","W",148,"W",4 ...

  5. Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries","74 ","W",15,17,13,"W",0,8.5 3331," Primary Copper","22 ","W",0,"*","W",12,"W",1 3334," Primary Aluminum","252 ","*","*",0,112,"W","W",3....

  6. Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",74,"W",15,17,13,"W",0,8.5 3331," Primary Copper",21,"W",0,"*","W",12,"W",1 3334," Primary Aluminum",254,"*","*",0,112,"W","W",3.5 ...

  7. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2","Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert","2014-07-31T04:00:00Z",1093542,"10.21721093542","None","FC26-06NT423...

  8. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy...

  9. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project Clean Coal Power Initiative Round Stone Richard Gray Gordon Evans Robert COAL LIGNITE AND PEAT FOSSIL FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy Project is a...

  10. Liquid Fuels via Upgrading of Syngas Intermediates Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11.2.13 Liquid Fuels via Upgrading of Syngas Intermediates March 26 th , 2015 Indirect Liquefaction Technology Area Review Robert A. Dagle, Karthi Ramasamy, Michel J. Gray Pacific ...

  11. Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... CrC silver- gray 2300 650 corrosion and oxidation resistance; Al and Mg die casting ZrN ... and K. G. Mller, "The anodic vacuum arc and its application to coatings," J. Vac. ...

  12. BPA-2015-00030-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Satsop Business Park, Grays Harbor Due Date Date: Friday, October 03, 2014 11:08:15 A1 Importance: High 11032014 -- Tracking Number: Kim and Wendy, BPA201 5-00030-F Okay....

  13. Charging Your Plug-in Electric Vehicle at Home | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which compares the power and energy used to charge a PEV with a Level 2 charger (in red) compared to the total power and energy consumed by other household appliances (in gray). ...

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Near Real-Time Geographic Representation of Solar Radiation Measurement Data for the Southern Great Plains Network Brady, E., Gray-Hann, P., Anderberg, M.H.L., Wilcox, S.M., and ...

  15. Pantex Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    TX Collingsworth County, TX Crosby County, TX Dallam County, TX Dawson County, TX Deaf Smith County, TX Donley County, TX Floyd County, TX Gaines County, TX Garza County, TX Gray ...

  16. Microsoft Word - L3-RTM.PRT.P5.04.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the helium-filled gap, the gray indicates zircalloy cladding, and the blue indicates water. This is because the MoC mesh relies on the same Cartesian mesh as the S N solution...

  17. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. J. Beyerlein, F. L. Addessio, B. H. Sencer, C.P. Trujillo, E. K. Cerreta, and G. T. Gray III, "Orientation Dependence of Shock Induced Twinning and Substructures in a Copper...

  18. Audubon County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Audubon County, Iowa Audubon, Iowa Brayton, Iowa Exira, Iowa Gray, Iowa Kimballton, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAudubonC...

  19. Cytoplasmic Domain Structures of Kir2.1 and Kir3.1 Shows Sites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in yellow merged with KirBac1.1 transmembrane region's backbone and surface in gray. The gate forming tip of the G-loop, amino acids 304-306, is highlighted in red. The...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    released on Tuesday, April 4, 2007, in a report by Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray titled Extended Range Forecast of Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity and U.S....

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Investigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CPI) it is now possible to capture ice crystal images with 2.3 m resolution and 256 gray scales of illumination, providing an unprecedented wealth of information to utilize in...

  2. Microsoft Word - Kir.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in yellow merged with KirBac1.1 transmembrane region's backbone and surface in gray. The gate forming tip of the G- loop, amino acids 304-306, is highlighted in red....

  3. BPA-2016-00103-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN FORMATION ACT PROGRAM In reply refer to: FOIA BPA-2016-00103-F Andrew Zorn DiGioia Gray & Associates 570 Beatty Road Monroeville, P A 15229 Mr. Zorn: We have received your...

  4. ORISE: Understanding Radiation Video Series from REAC/TS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    media and the general public. Radiation Dose Explained (1:07) Differences Between RadGray and RemSievert (1:37) Radiation Exposure vs. Radioactive Contamination (1:34) How...

  5. B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... N. Holmgren Phacelia beatleyae Reveal and Constance Phacelia filiae N.D. Atwood, F.J. Smith and T.A. Knight Phacelia mustelina Coville Phacelia parishii Gray Primary Highway (with ...

  6. ANNUAL REPORT FY2012 S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... roadways, and residences. Anyone can register to use the free online SGHAT tool at www.sandia.govglare. n e W S M A ... National Laboratories n Allison Gray, Engineer I for ...

  7. Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    day) tropospheric cooling rates differ by a factor of approximately two to one (see Jacobson and Gray 1977). Comparatively strong nocturnal cooling in clear areas gives rise to a...

  8. CX-005680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympia-South Elma #1 Upgrade (21/10 and 21/11) 2011CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 04/20/2011Location(s): Grays Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments","Bahns, J. T.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; Gray, S. K.; Chen, L.","2011-02-01T05:00:00Z",1099937,"10.1103...

  10. Microsoft Word - FINAL_2015_Hydropower_Meeting_Agenda_061215...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dam Safety Updates Miles Waldron, SWD 9:15 a.m. Scheduling of Blakely and DeGray in MISO ... Supply Storage Reallocation - MAWA Dam Safety Issues MISO Operations ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard ; Gray, ... The Project is based on ConocoPhillips? E-Gas? Technology and is designed to be fuel ...

  12. Climate Change Adaptation for an At Risk Community – Shaktoolik Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Norton Sound village of Shaktoolik faces serious threats of erosion and flooding resulting from climate change.  University of Alaska Sea Grant agent Terry Johnson and consultant Glenn Gray...

  13. Videos | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Motion Google+ STEM Hangout Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray What's Your Energy Pledge? Conversation on the Future of the Wind Industry Webcast of...

  14. DOE Tour of Zero: The Passive House #1 at Columbia Station by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    42 homes in a micro-community of ultra-modern, energy-efficient homes built on an urban gray-field site in South Seattle. 6 of 13 The single ultra-efficient ductless heat pump...

  15. CX-013790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aberdeen Substation (Grays Harbor PUD) Tree Clearing CX(s) Applied: B1.32Date: 06/24/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. Microsoft Word - S05374_SARE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of gray to dark-green shale and siltstone interbedded with thin, very fine grained sandstone. Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  17. Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... row 4: ZVI row 5: ZVI U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over ... PRB Wells Redupgradient alluvium (row 1) Greengravel + zvi (row 2 and 3) Gray ZVI (row ...

  18. Microsoft Word - S04019_GSB.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... At the Gasbuggy site these formations U.S. Department of Energy Gasbuggy, New Mexico ... S04019 Page 2-5 together are 260 ft thick and consist of gray to dark-green shale and ...

  19. 9800 South Cass Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... H. Smith, C. B. Mayes, P. C. Gray, D. W . Reilly. SMALL ANIMAL FACILITY As a .participant in the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Argonne ...

  20. Controlling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... is the distance between the n1 and n1 grid points, and E h is the axial electric ... The light gray arrows indicate the power spectral peak frequency and its harmonic. FIG. ...

  1. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Bahns J T Sankaranarayanan S K R S Gray S K Chen L Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE United States...

  2. Comprehensive Study of the Impact of Steam on Polyethyleneimine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hammache, Sonia ; Hoffman, James S. ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth, Daniel J ; Howard, Bret H. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1127155 ...

  3. Parametric study for an immobilized amine sorbent in a regenerative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoffman, James S. ; Hammache, Sonia ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth, Daniel J. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2014-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1168807 Report Number(s): ...

  4. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoffman, James S. ; Hammache, Sonia ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth Daniel J. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2012-04-24 OSTI Identifier: 1044172 Report Number(s): ...

  5. Regenerable sorbent technique for capturing CO.sub.2 using immobilized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Pennline, Henry W ; Hoffman, James S ; Gray, McMahan L ; Fauth, Daniel J ; Resnik, Kevin P Publication Date: 2013-08-06 OSTI Identifier: 1089416 Report Number(s): ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rewind Unit 2 l l First Coil Samples DeGray Hydro l l l Replace Voltage Regulators Blakely Mountain Water Blakely Mountain Water * Supply Storage Reallocation - MAWA Supply ...

  7. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual site energy use intensities (EUIs) for the "reheat and heating" category were 108.4 kBtuft2-yr at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 52.0 kBtu...

  8. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced ...

  9. Main Title 32pt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Harvey; http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiFile:MaleOliveBaboon2.jpg Gray wolf, canis lupus, courtesy of Chris Muiden. http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiFile:Canislupus265b.jpg Red...

  10. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gray Wolves in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone I. SPATIAL ECOLOGY AND SUB-LETHAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC RADIATION EXPOSURE IN GRAY WOLVES SREL Collaborators: Jim Beasley, Stacey Lance, Sarah Webster, Mike Byrne, Cara Love Outside Collaborators: Tom Hinton (IRSN), Dima Shamovich (Belarussian researcher), Biologists at the Polyesye State Radioecological Reserve in Belarus It is widely recognized that acute exposure to high levels of radiation causes morbidity and mortality in wildlife. However, the most

  11. Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Thomas Gray | National Nuclear Security Administration Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy Secretary Ernest

  12. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKQROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NfS Cukural Rasowcmr Studks: Background Research for Project Shot11 Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson MAY 1993 DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NTS Cultural Resources Studies: Background Research for Project Shoal Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Las Vegas, Nevada

  13. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Forum | Jefferson Lab W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was chosen this year by American Physical Society members as chair-elect for the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs.

  14. Automatic anatomically selective image enhancement in digital chest radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezan, M.I. ); Minerbo, G.N. ); Schaetzing, R. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors develop a technique for automatic anatomically selective enhancement of digital chest radiographs. Anatomically selective enhancement is motivated by the desire to simultaneously meet the different enhancement requirements of the lung field and the mediastinum. A recent peak detection algorithm and a set of rules are applied to the image histogram to determine automatically a gray-level threshold between the lung field and mediastinum. The gray-level threshold facilitates anatomically selective gray-scale modification and/or unsharp masking. Further, in an attempt to suppress possible white-band or black-band artifacts due to unsharp masking at sharp edges, local-contrast adaptivity is incorporated into anatomically selective unsharp masking by designing an anatomy-sensitive emphasis parameter which varies asymmetrically with positive and negative values of the local image contrast.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Fed Hydro Presentation 2015.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entergy Hydro Operations Ted Smethers tsmethe@entergy.com 501-620-0601 2 Ouachita River System 3 Ouachita River System LAKE OUACHITA LAKE HAMITLON LAKE CATHERINE Blakely Mountain Dam Carpenter Dam Remmel Dam OUACHITA RIVER CITY OF HOT SPRINGS DeGray Lake & Dam 4 Who Controls What? * Entergy's Lake Catherine Plant - Carpenter - Remmel * ACOE at Blakely Mountain Dam - Blakely - DeGray - Others 5 Blakely Mtn. Dam/Lake Ouachita * Built in 1955 * forms Lake Ouachita * Owned & Operated by ACOE

  16. ARM - Blog Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 25, 2016 [Blog, Field Notes, HI-SCALE] HI-SCALE Day 1: Calm Before the Storm Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Siegfried Schobesberger, a postdoctoral researcher at University of Washington, sent this update. A large hangar at Bartlesville Municipal Airport is the home of the G-1 aircraft for the next 4 weeks. The gray containers right next to it provide extra office space. A large hangar at Bartlesville Municipal Airport is the home of the G-1 aircraft for the next 4 weeks. The gray

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects Branson Conf. 6-2-10 .pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects Blakely Mountain Hydro DeGray Hydro DeGray Hydro Narrows Hydro Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit #1 ll Rotor Installation Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit #2 l l Coil Removal Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit #2 l Pole Key Design Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit #2 i l i h l d Removing Pole Key With Sledge Hammer Blakely Rewind Unit #2 Bigger Hammer & Operator Blakely Mountain Rewind Unit #2 l h Removing Rotor Poles With A Saw

  18. Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Project Title: Program or Program Office:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    radiation mapping dosimeter will be placed in a shielded cell in 773-A E-wing Shielded Cell Operations (SCO) facility for in-cell exposure to ambient radiation. Either the RadBall or GrayQb technologies will be selected for deployment; details of these two radiation mapping technologies are discussed below. --The RadBall consists of an inner spherical core made of a radiation sensitive polymer and an outer tungsten based collimation sheath. --The GrayQb is a alternate type of radiation mapping

  19. CX-003624: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replacement of Twenty 22-L Structures on the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 230-kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/12/2010Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. Fact #672: April 25, 2011 Freight Gateways in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The top 25 places (in terms of freight value) that freight is shipped into and out of the U.S. are listed on the map below. Import values are shown by the gray bar, while export values are shown by...

  1. CX-003025: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maintenance of Access Roads Serving the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 and Number 3, and the Aberdeen Tap to South Elma-Cosmopolis Transmission LinesCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/30/2010Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",5,4,1,0,0,0,0,0,"W",22.4 3331," Primary Copper","W",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1.3 3334," Primary Aluminum",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 3339," Primary ...

  3. " Energy Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",144,8,128,"*",7,0,0,0,1,1,26 3331," Primary Copper","W","W",25,1,"W","W",0,0,"W",0,1.1 3334," Primary Aluminum",127,0,123,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,5...

  4. " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",28,8,18,"*",3,1,0,0,5,"*",13 3331," Primary Copper",15,7,7,0,"W","W","*",0,"W",0,1.3 3334," Primary Aluminum",20,10,10,0,3,2,0,0,8,0,3.6 ...

  5. "Table A7. Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",61.2,517,122.7,30.5,49.8,4.2 3331," Primary Copper",8.8,20,469.2,1.2,13.5,0.9 3334," Primary Aluminum",31.8,44,944.4,4.1,12.9,1.6 3339," ...

  6. Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",105,9,86,0,5,0,0,"*",0,2,30.7 3331," Primary Copper",3,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1.4 3334," Primary Aluminum",42,10,29,0,10,"W",0,0,0,0,4.7 3339," ...

  7. " Sources by Industry Group, Selected Industries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 3321," Gray and Ductile Iron Foundries",4,"W","Q",0,"W",0,0,0,0,0,34.2 3331," Primary Copper","W","W",0,0,"W","W",0,0,0,"W",1.2 3334," Primary Aluminum","*","*","*",0,"*","*",0,0,...

  8. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-01-01

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  9. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2013-05-29

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  10. The crystal structures of strontium exchanged sodium titanosilicates in relation to selectivity for nuclear waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Akhilesh; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Clearfield, Abraham . E-mail: clearfield@mail.chem.tamu.edu

    2005-01-15

    A perspective view of the polyhedral representation in Sr exchanged titanosilicate with sitinakite topology. The eight ring tunnel along c-axis depicts a nine coordinated Sr complex. Dark and light gray spheres in the eight ring channel represent water molecules and Sr{sup 2+} cations respectively.

  11. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  12. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  13. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN February...

  14. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN March 2016 Back to the...

  15. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN December 2015 Back to the...

  16. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN January...

  17. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS ON December 3, 2015 Show all...

  18. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN November 2015 Back to the...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.32 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aberdeen Substation (Grays Harbor PUD) Tree Clearing CX(s) Applied: B1.32 Date: 06242015 ... Routine Maintenance Activities CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, B1.6, B1.7, B1.8, B1.11, ...

  20. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  1. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  2. Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternative water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water.

  3. Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

    1981-04-01

    The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence of eastern North America is a distinctive stratigraphic interval generally characterized by low clastic influx, high organic production in the water column, anaerobic bottom conditions, and the relative absence of fossil evidence for biologic activity. The laminated black shales which constitute most of the black-shale sequence are broken by two major sequences of interbedded greenish-gray, clayey shales which contain bioturbation and pyritized micromorph invertebrates. The black shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence of benthic life. The rare brachiopods, crinoids, and molluscs that occur in the black shales were probably epiplanktic. A significant physical distinction between the environment in which the black sediments were deposited and that in which the greenish-gray sediments were deposited was the level of dissolved oxygen. The laminated black shales point to anaerobic conditions and the bioturbated greenish-gray shales suggest dysaerobic to marginally aerobic-dysaerobic conditions. A paleoenvironmental model in which quasi-estuarine circulation compliments and enhances the effect of a stratified water column can account for both depletion of dissolved oxygen in the bottom environments and the absence of oxygen replenishment during black-shale deposition. Periods of abundant clastic influx from fluvial environments to the east probably account for the abundance of clays in the greenish-gray shale as well as the small amounts of oxygen necessary to support the depauparate, opportunistic, benthic faunas found there. These pulses of greenish-gray clastics were short-lived and eventually were replaced by anaerobic conditions and low rates of clastic sedimentation which characterized most of black-shale deposition.

  4. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

    2006-06-01

    Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling. Digital and hard copy data have been compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin, including a detailed summary of 20 fields in the vicinity of the demonstration well. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  5. Implementing A Novel Cyclic CO2 Flood In Paleozoic Reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2005-03-31

    Recycled CO{sub 2} is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO{sub 2} injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and is presently producing 52 BOPD. The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 21 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO{sub 2} injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO{sub 2} injection volume has reached approximately 1.6 BCF. The CO{sub 2} injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been successfully increased to a stable rate of 73 BOPD. Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling Digital and hard copy data continue to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  6. Inventory of landslides in southern Illinois near the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the possible failure mechanism at three sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Wen June . Engineering Geology Section)

    1992-01-01

    A total of 221 landslides was inventoried along a 200-kilometer reach of the Ohio and the Mississippi Rivers from Olmsted to Chester, IL using Side-Looking Airborne Radar imagery, vertical, stereoscopic, black and white aerial photography at various scales, and low altitude, oblique color and color infrared photography. Features observed on aerial photographs were used to classify landslides into three types (rock/debris fall, block slide, and rotational/translational slide) at three levels of confidence: certain, probable, or possible. Some landslides combined two or more types at a single site. Only a few of the landslides showed evidence of repeated activity; most are ancient landforms. Most of the landslides were developed in the loess, alluvium, colluvium, and weak clay layers of the Chesterian Series or in the Porter's Creek Clay and McNairy Formation. Failure of three representative landslides was modeled under static (aseismic) and dynamic (seismic) situations using three different sliding mechanisms. Both the pseudo-static method and a simplified method of the Newmark displacement analysis were used to determine the stability of the slope under earthquake conditions. The three representative landslides selected for detailed slope stability analysis were the Ford Hill, Jones Ridge, and Olmsted landslides. The Ford Hill and Jones Ridge landslides have similar slope geometries. Their modes of failure were recognized as a translational block slide on a weak clay layer. The Olmsted landslide is a complex of several rotational slides of different ages and a mega block slide on weak clay layers. The stability analyses of these three landslides suggest that they would not have occurred under aseismic conditions. However, under earthquake loadings similar to those generated by the 1811-12 earthquakes, most of the slopes could have experienced large displacements leading to landslide initiation.

  7. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a geophysical consultant ) and Dr. Chester J. Weiss (recently rejoined with Sandia National Laboratories) for many stimulating (and reciprocal!) discussions regar ding the topic at hand.

  8. Wavelet/scalar quantization compression standard for fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.

    1996-06-12

    US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has recently formulated a national standard for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. Fingerprints are scanned at a spatial resolution of 500 dots per inch, with 8 bits of gray-scale resolution. The compression algorithm for the resulting digital images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition (wavelet/scalar quantization method). The FBI standard produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. The compression standard specifies a class of potential encoders and a universal decoder with sufficient generality to reconstruct compressed images produced by any compliant encoder, allowing flexibility for future improvements in encoder technology. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations.

  9. Computer simulation of the probability that endangered whales will interact with oil spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.; Jayko, K.; Bowles, A.; Anderson, E.; Leatherwood, S.

    1987-03-01

    A numerical model system was developed to assess quantitatively the probability that endangered bowhead and gray whales will encounter spilled oil in Alaskan waters. Bowhead and gray whale migration and diving-surfacing models, and an oil-spill trajectory model comprise the system. The migration models were developed from conceptual considerations, then calibrated with and tested against observations. The movement of a whale point is governed by a random walk algorithm which stochastically follows a migratory pathway. The oil-spill model, developed under a series of other contracts, accounts for transport and spreading behavior in open water and in the presence of sea ice. Historical wind records and heavy, normal, or light ice cover data sets are selected at random to provide stochastic oil-spill scenarios for whale-oil interaction simulations.

  10. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING: PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See

  11. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. The battery continues to power auxillary systems, such as the air conditioning and dashboard displays. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See

  12. Hybrid: Starting

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar STARTING When the vehicle is started, the gasoline engine "warms up." If necessary, the electric motor acts as a generator, converting energy from the engine into electricity and storing it in the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is moving. There are arrows flowing from the gasoline

  13. Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies In optical communication, critical information ranging from a credit card number to national security data is transmitted in streams of laser pulses. September 3, 2015 A solitary oxygen dopant (red sphere) covalently attached to the sidewall of the carbon nanotube (gray) can generate single photons (red) at room temperature when excited by laser pulses (green). A solitary oxygen

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Improving GCM Simulation of Convection Using ARM Observations at the SGP Site G. J. Zhang Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Atmospheric convection undergoes strong diurnal variation over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001). This diurnal variation has a large impact on the atmospheric radiation budget. Convection also affects the surface energy budget by modulating the surface sensible and latent heat

  15. Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo insulator SmB

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    6 : Spin exciton scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo insulator SmB 6 : Spin exciton scattering Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 19, 2016 Title: Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo insulator SmB 6 : Spin exciton scattering Authors: Kapilevich, G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Smith, J. L.

  16. International Cooperation Holiday Cheer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration International Atomic Energy Agency Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the

  17. Natural resources management activities and biodiversity maintenance. Progress report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1994-05-01

    This progress report briefly outlines activities at the Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area. Thirty-nine days were spent administering hunts with 1524 people participating. Biological data was collected on 89 deer, 6 turkeys, 8 feral hogs, 40 ducks of two species, 24 bobwhite, 3 rabbits, 2 gray squirrels, and 313 fish of 8 species. Public relations, maintenance and hunt preparation activities are summarized as well.

  18. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fans and Pumps Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps Chilled water pumps at a central plant. Image by Warren Gretz, NREL/06196 Chilled water pumps at a central plant. Image by Warren Gretz, NREL/06196 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for a few highlights from monitoring fan and pump energy use. Fans At the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building, supply, return/exhaust, and

  19. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gray, Gordon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  1. Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Authors: Bahns, J. T. ; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S. ; Gray, S. K. ; Chen, L. Publication Date: 2011-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 1099937 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN

  2. X:\ARM_19~1\P317-334.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v Z LCL v v z LCL v z LCL Session Papers 327 Figure 1. Heterogeneous land use, illustrated with the black and gray line segments at the bottom, cause turbulent temperature fluctuations in the surface-layer air, illustrated with air parcels of different shading. These parcels rise to their level of neutral buoyancy, shown by the vertical arrows. Moisture also varies from parcel to parcel, causing corresponding fluctuations in the height of the lifting condensation level (LCL), shown by the black

  3. Novel Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Novel Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryFrank McLarnon and Robert Kostecki at Berkeley Lab have designed a two-component electrode, fabricated with titanium and nickel oxides, reacts to both light and electricity. DescriptionDirect exposure to natural sunlight transforms exposed areas of the electrode from transparent to gray. Nonuniform illumination produces patterned

  4. Jefferson Lab Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers Jefferson Lab Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers March 11, 2005 Newport News, Va. - Two young physicists participating in research at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab have joined nearly 30 other scientists in celebrating the World Year of Physics through blogging in "Quantum Diaries." Sarah Phillips, from the United States, and Claire Gray, from South Africa, have just begun their blogging adventures.

  5. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  6. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  7. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  8. The wavelet/scalar quantization compression standard for digital fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    A new digital image compression standard has been adopted by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation for use on digitized gray-scale fingerprint images. The algorithm is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform image decomposition and is referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization standard. The standard produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20:1 and will allow the FBI to replace their current database of paper fingerprint cards with digital imagery.

  9. Part I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    a. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.a. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is for an assisted acquisition. An assisted acquisition is a type of interagency acquisition where the servicing agency and requesting agency enter into a written interagency agreement pursuant to which the

  10. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geospatial Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Data Science Team The following are members of NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team: Jon Duckworth Michael Gleason Nick Grue Pamela Gray-Hann Donna Heimiller Dylan Hettinger Jim Leyshon Anthony Lopez Galen Maclaurin Meghan Mooney Billy J. Roberts If you have questions about our programs or would like to contact our staff, please email Webmaster. Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources

  11. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Advanced Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Energy Photo of a large gray inverter connected to numerous power cords. 500-kilowatt Advanced Energy inverter at the ESIF PSIL. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL As the first industry partner to use the ESIF, Advanced Energy Industries is using the ESIF's Power Systems Integration Laboratory (PSIL) to test its new solar photovoltaic (PV) inverter technology with the facility's hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt-scale grid simulators. Solar inverters are responsible for a number of

  12. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tungsten films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured tungsten films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured tungsten films Authors: Ungaro, Craig [1] ; Shah, Ankit [1] ; Kravchenko, Ivan I [2] ; Hensley, Dale K [2] ; Gray, Stephen K. [3] ; Gupta, Mool C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations University of Virginia, Charlottesville ORNL Argonne

  13. Parametric study for an immobilized amine sorbent in a regenerative carbon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dioxide capture process (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Parametric study for an immobilized amine sorbent in a regenerative carbon dioxide capture process Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Parametric study for an immobilized amine sorbent in a regenerative carbon dioxide capture process Authors: Hoffman, James S. ; Hammache, Sonia ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth, Daniel J. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2014-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1168807 Report Number(s):

  14. SREL Reprint #3207

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) from South Carolina D. S. Lindsay1, J. L. Weston2, and S. E. Little3 1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Virginia–Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 1410 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0342, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 3Department

  15. Comparison of line-imaging VISAR inferences of spalled sample distension

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with metallographic analysis of spalled samples. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Comparison of line-imaging VISAR inferences of spalled sample distension with metallographic analysis of spalled samples. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of line-imaging VISAR inferences of spalled sample distension with metallographic analysis of spalled samples. No abstract prepared. Authors: Furnish, Michael David ; Bingert, John F. ; Gray, George T., III Publication Date: 2010-06-01 OSTI

  16. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.a. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is for an assisted acquisition. An assisted acquisition is a type of interagency acquisition where the servicing agency and requesting agency enter into a written interagency agreement pursuant to which the

  17. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    b. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.b. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is an interagency transaction. An interagency transaction is an intra-governmental transaction when the servicing agency uses internal resources to support the requesting agency requirement and is a reimbursable

  18. sheaffer-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diurnal Variations of Outgoing Longwave Radiation Over the Tropical Oceans J. D. Sheaffer and W. M. Gray Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Several current problems in atmospheric radiation over the tropical oceans may have at least partial solutions as effects of diurnal variations of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). At issue are explanations for the following: a) excessively large amplitudes (in relation to theory) of the diurnal

  19. stenchikov-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 The Study of Regional Climate and Chemical Processes with Single-Column Models G. Stenchikov, S. Gray, M. Gamazaychikov, and R. Park University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. Robock. Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Observations show that the diurnal cycle of surface air temperature changes as climate changes, with the diurnal range becoming smaller as the climate warms. We investi- gated the causes of this behavior using a single-column model (SCM). Our previous results

  20. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory Pascal Bellon image of George Gray Contact Information Professor University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Department of Materials Science and Engineering Phone: (217)2675-0284 bellon@uiuc.edu http://www.mse.uiuc.edu/faculty/Bellon.html Bio Education Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1993-1994 Ph.D., Materials Science, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France, 1989

  1. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2010-01-08

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  2. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  3. About STI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thesis or dissertation is an academic paper often based on original research, using scholarly resources, which is written by a candidate as a graduate school requirement for a higher academic degree (a master's or doctoral degree) or professional qualification. Dissertations and theses may be considered "gray literature" since they are not typically published commercially. In cases where the author's research was funded by DOE or conducted at a DOE facility, submission to OSTI as a

  4. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility An example of a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution An example of a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution. Precipitable water (gray scale) shows the detailed dynamical structure in the flow. Strong precipitation is overlaid in red. High resolution is necessary to simulate reasonable numbers of tropical cyclones including Category 4 and 5 storms. Alan Scott and Mark Taylor, Sandia National Laboratories Accelerated Climate Modeling

  5. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfire Smoke on SIRS Shortwave and Longwave Irradiance Tom Stoffel, Mary Anderberg, Pamela Gray-Hann National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado Conclusions Cloud Free Over Study Area GOES-E Images 2 January 2006 11:15 CST SIRS Measurements from 24 January 2006 in Agreement Except Upwelling Shortwave Irradiance Due to Surface Albedo Variations * By comparing SIRS measurements from two sites on 2 January 2006 under cloudless sky conditions, one site effected by wildfire smoke, we

  6. Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research June 14, 2015, Research Highlights Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields Top: Snapshots of molecular dynamics simulations of alkali ions in DMSO at 298 K and zero-applied electric field: (left) Li+ and (right) Cs+. Sulfur atoms are shown in yellow, oxygen atoms in red, and methyl groups in gray. Graph: Average

  7. LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subsurface reservoir conditions LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions This increasing demand for energy around the globe requires a better understanding of subsurface energy resources and their associated environmental issues. March 7, 2016 Shown are time lapse images of supercritical CO2 displacing water in a fracture etched into a shale micromodel. The white, blue and gray colors represent supercritical CO2, water and shale, respectively. Shown are time

  8. secretary of energy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    energy Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... Apex Gold discussion fosters international cooperation in run-up to 2016 Nuclear Security Summit Participants in

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration International Atomic Energy Agency Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the

  10. EEG, transmission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose /sup 18/F. Their use in adults with gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, M.E.; Theodore, W.H.; Sato, S.; De La Paz, R.; Patronas, N.; Brooks, R.; Jabbari, B.; Di Chiro, G.

    1983-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between findings from EEG, transmission computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in 23 adults with gliomas. The cortical metabolic rate was suppressed in patients with and without focal slowing. Focal delta activity was not related to involvement of gray or white matter. Rhythmic delta activity and focal attenuation of background amplitude on EEG, however, were correlated with involvement of the thalamus.

  11. Understanding the Role of Thiolate Ligation in Nature's Hydroxylating Heme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes Michael T. Green1, John H. Dawson2, Harry B. Gray3 1Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, PA 16802 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of South Carolina, SC 29208 3Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 Cytochromes P450 are thiolate-ligated heme enzymes that play critical roles in a number of important physiological processes. P450s are involved in the metabolism of carcinogens and pesticides and in the

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Enhancements_Lee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) Willie J. Lee U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 14, 2014 Overview * Part 73 Spent Nuclear Fuel in Transit (Update) * Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials * Part 37 Provisions * Transportation Security Requirements * Conclusion 2 Part 73 Update * Amended rule (73.37) affects NRC licensees shipping or transporting SNF > 100 grams (dose > 1 Gray per hour @ 1 meter) * Replaces transportation security

  13. Wave Propagation and Dispersion in Elasto-Plastic Microstructured Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Where microstructure matters... Stunt computing option Math savvy option Perspective and summary OOOO OOO OOOOOOOO OO SAND2015-1780C Wave Propagation and Dispersion in Elasto-Plastic Microstructured Materials Remi Dingreville, Joshua Robbins and Thomas E. Voth Sandia National Laboratories1 rdingre@sandia.gov TMS Annual Meeting: Constitutive Response and Modeling of Structural Materials: An SMD Symposium in Honor of G.T. Gray III's 60th Birthday Interfaces and Surfaces session Orlando, FL, March

  14. California Maritime Academy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Maritime Academy California Maritime Academy Cal Maritime Team: From Left: Tom Nordenholz, Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam Gray, Glenn Fuller, Khalid Bachkar. Photo from California Maritime Academy. Cal Maritime Team: From Left: Tom Nordenholz, Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam

  15. Charles Worthington | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charles Worthington Charles Worthington is a product designer and software developer serving as a Presidential Innovation Fellow working on Open Data Initiatives at the Department of Energy. Previously, he founded Gray Duck Labs, a web/mobile product design firm. In his spare time, Charles works on Preamp.fm, a live music discovery app. Charles holds a BA in Social Studies from Harvard University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his fiancée. Most Recent American Energy Data Challenge

  16. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von L. Richards

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ???¢???????¢ Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  17. Petrographic and reservoir features of Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon in the Malay gas field, Amu-Darya basin, east Turkmenia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, H.; Ersan, A.

    1996-08-01

    Malay gas field in Amu-Darya basin, eastern Turkmenia, is located on the structural high that is on the Malay-Bagadzha arch north of the Repetek-Kelif structure zone. With 500 km{sup 2} areal coverage, 16 producing wells and 200 billion m{sup 3} estimated reserves, the field was discovered in 1978 and production began in 1987 from 2400-m-deep Hauterivian-age (Early Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon. The Shatlyk elastic sequence shows various thickness up to 100 m in the Malay structural closure and is studied through E-log, core, petrographic data and reservoir characteristics. The Shatlyk consists of poorly indurated, reddish-brown and gray sandstones, and sandy gray shales. The overall sand-shale ratio increases up and the shales interleave between the sand packages. The reservoir sandstones are very fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, compositionally immature, subarkosic arenites. The framework grains include quartz, feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Quartz grains are monocrystalline in type and most are volcanic in origin. Feldspars consist of K- Feldspar and plagioclase. The orthoclases are affected by preferential alteration. The sandstones show high primary intergranular porosity and variations in permeability. Patch-like evaporate cement and the iron-rich grain coatings are reducing effects in permeability. The coats are pervasive in reddish-brown sandstones but are not observed in the gray sandstones. The evaporate cement is present in all the sandstone samples examined and, in places, follows the oxidation coats. The petrographic evidences and the regional facies studies suggest the deposition in intersection area from continental to marine nearshore deltaic environment.

  18. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst, E-mail: rousseau@uri.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 92 Upper College Rd., Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370?MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490?MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.941.2?GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  19. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G.

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  20. The Effects of Heterogeneity in Magma Water Concentration on the Development of Flow Banding and Spherulites in Rhyolitic Lava

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, S.; Dyar, D; Marinkovic, N

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the origin of flow-banded rhyolites that consist of compositionally similar darker and lighter flow bands of contrasting texture and color. Infrared radiation was used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from which water concentrations were calculated, and to map variations in water concentrations across zones of spherulites and glass from the 23 million year old Sycamore Canyon lava flow of southern Arizona. Lighter-colored, thicker flow bands consist of gray glass, fine-grained quartz, and large (1.0 to 1.5 mm) spherulites. Darker-colored, thinner flow bands consist of orange glass and smaller (0.1 to 0.2 mm) spherulites. The centers of both large and small spherulites are occupied by either (1) a quartz or sanidine crystal, (2) a granophyric intergrowth, or (3) a vesicle. Mapping of water concentration (dominantly OH- in glass and OH- and H2O in sanidine crystals) illustrates fluctuating water availability during quenching of the host melt. Textures of large spherulites in the lighter (gray) bands in some cases indicate complex quenching histories that suggest that local water concentration controlled the generation of glass versus crystals. Small spherulites in darker (orange) bands have only one generation of radiating crystal growth. Both the glass surrounding spherulites, and the crystals in the spherulites contain more water in the gray flow bands than in the orange flow bands. Flow banding in the Sycamore Canyon lava flow may have originated by the stretching of a magma that contained pre-existing zones (vesicles or proto-vesicles) of contrasting water concentration, as the magma flowed in the conduit and on the surface. Variation in the original water concentration in the alternating layers is interpreted to have resulted in differences in undercooling textures in spherulites in the lighter compared to the darker flow bands.

  1. Stop/Start: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Driving button Braking button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Stop/Start hybrids are not true hybrids since electricity from the battery is not used to propel the vehicle. However, the Stop/Start feature is an important, energy-saving building block used in hybrid vehicles. Stop/Start technology conserves energy by shutting off the gasoline engine when the vehicle is at rest, such as at a traffic light, and automatically re-starting it when the driver pushes the gas pedal to go

  2. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  3. Wind Program R&D Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News » Wind Program R&D Newsletter Wind Program R&D Newsletter This U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Newsletter provides recent news about the program's R&D projects, its accomplishments, upcoming events, funding opportunities, and recent publications. Letter from the Wind Program Director DOE In the News Current R&D Past Issues Articles by Topic Letter from the Wind Program Director Photo of man with short-cropped black hair wearing gray pin-striped suite, blue shirt and

  4. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Conference April 7, 2009 (1) Economic prosperity is intimately tied to affordable energy. (2) There is potential for geopolitical conflict due to escalating competition for energy resources. (3)The risk of adverse Climate Change. The Energy Problem Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy (Using EIA data) Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy FRBSF Economic Letter 11/18/05 Gray bars indicate a recession Percentage price increase US oil became a net oil importer in the 1940s China's Oil

  5. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chiller Plants Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for a few highlights from monitoring chiller plant energy. Image of a chiller plant. Chiller Energy Annual site energy use intensities (EUIs) for chiller energy were estimated to be 27.7 kBtu/ft2-yr for the the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 26.8 kBtu/ft2-yr for the State

  6. Line VISAR and post-shot metallography comparisons for spall analysis.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Line VISAR and post-shot metallography comparisons for spall analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Line VISAR and post-shot metallography comparisons for spall analysis. No abstract prepared. Authors: Furnish, Michael David ; Bingert, John F. [1] ; Gray, George T., Jr. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Publication Date: 2010-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 989998 Report Number(s): SAND2010-1731C TRN: US201020%%15 DOE Contract

  7. Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton to 1% Precision and Determination

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Pseudoscalar Coupling gP (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Muon Capture on the Proton to 1% Precision and Determination of the Pseudoscalar Coupling gP Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton to 1% Precision and Determination of the Pseudoscalar Coupling gP Authors: Andreev, V. A. ; Banks, T. I. ; Carey, R. M. ; Case, T. A. ; Clayton, S. M. ; Crowe, K. M. ; Deutsch, J. ; Egger, J. ; Freedman, S. J. ; Ganzha, V. A. ; Gorringe, T. ; Gray,

  8. CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5512: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiation Mapping Dosimeter Exposure in Shielded Cell in 773-A: RadBall and GrayQb technologies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A radiation mapping dosimeter will be placed in a shielded cell in 773-A E-wing Shielded Cell Operations (SCO) facility for in-cell exposure to ambient radiation. Either the

  9. Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II Friday, October 31, 2014 Fig 1 Figure 1. The biomimetic complexes that model the OEC in the final step of water oxidation. In these complexes, a redox-active iron atom (orange) is bound to a TMC ligand (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, shown in gray and blue) and a peroxide moiety (red), which binds a redox- inactive metal ion (Mn+, green). Mn+ =

  10. Electrochemistry of Magnesium Electrolytes in Ionic Liquids for Secondary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 23, 2014, Research Highlights Electrochemistry of Magnesium Electrolytes in Ionic Liquids for Secondary Batteries Cyclic voltammograms of neat DEME-BF4 (light gray) and 100 mM Mg(BH4)2 in DEME-BF4 (black). CV scan limits are chosen to represent the electrochemical stability window. Inset: magnified view with voltage range restricted to -1.5 to 1.5 V vs. Mg/Mg2+. Scientific Achievement Ionic liquids (ILs) have wide electrochemical stability

  11. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    journey from Trinity to Trinity begins with the New Mexico desert night sky turning instantly to day at 05:29 am on July 16, 1945. An eyewitness recalled, "The effects could well be called unprecedented, magnificent, beautiful, stupendous, and terrifying. The lighting effects beggared description. The whole country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple, violet, gray, and blue." It was the Trinity Test: the world's

  12. Pre-treatment for molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy articles to be plated

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Ralph R.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for etching a molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy surface to promote the formation of an adherent bond with a subsequently deposited metallic plating. In a typical application, the method is used as a pre-treatment for surfaces to be electrolessly plated with nickel. The pre-treatment comprises exposing the crystal boundaries of the surface by (a) anodizing the surface in acidic solution to form a continuous film of gray molybdenum oxide thereon and (b) removing the film.

  13. Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles & Fuels » Vehicles » Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:05am Addthis Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) have an internal combustion engine and are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (a high-level blend of gasoline and ethanol), or a mixture of both. There are more than 10.6 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today. However, many flexible fuel vehicle owners don't realize

  14. Temperature and melting of laser-shocked iron releasing into an LiF window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Henry, E.; Vinci, T.; Faral, B.; Tomasini, M.; Telaro, B.; Batani, D.

    2005-06-15

    Absolute reflectivity and self-emission diagnostics are used to determine the gray-body equivalent temperature of laser-shocked iron partially releasing into a lithium fluoride window. Pressure and reflectivity are measured simultaneously by means of velocity interferometer system for any reflector interferometers. In the temperature-pressure plane, a temperature plateau in the release is observed which is attributed to iron's melting line. Extrapolation of data leads to a melting temperature at Earth's inner-outer core boundary of 7800{+-}1200 K, in good agreement with previous works based on dynamic compression. Shock temperatures were calculated and found to be in the liquid phase.

  15. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Conference April 7, 2009 (1) Economic prosperity is intimately tied to affordable energy. (2) There is potential for geopolitical conflict due to escalating competition for energy resources. (3)The risk of adverse Climate Change. The Energy Problem Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy (Using EIA data) Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy FRBSF Economic Letter 11/18/05 Gray bars indicate a recession Percentage price increase US oil became a net oil importer in the 1940s China's Oil

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of

  17. Fellows' Officers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Officers Fellows' Officers Current officers and listing of coordinators from 1982 to present. Current and past officers, coordinators 2015-2016 Dipen Sinha, Coordinator Chuck Farrar, Deputy Coordinator Secretary (vacant) Past coordinators 2014-2015: Brad Meyer 2013-2014: Toni Taylor 2012-2013: Pat Colestock 2011-2012:Quanxi Jia 2010-2011: Joyce Guzik 2009-2010: Darryl L. Smith 2008-2009: S. Peter Gary 2007-2008: R. S. Hixson 2006-2007: W. C. Priedhorsky 2005-2006: G. T. Gray III 2004-2005: M. M.

  18. Microsoft Word - goldnano.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fig. 1. X-ray crystal structure determination of Au 102 (p-MBA) 44 nanoparticle. Electron density map (red mesh) and atomic structure (gold atoms depicted as yellow spheres, p-MBA shown as framework and small spheres sulfur in cyan, carbon in gray and oxygen in red). Structure of a Thiol Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticle at 1.1 Å Resolution Nanometer-size metal particles are of fundamental interest for their chemical and quantum electronic properties, and of practical interest for many

  19. Nitroxylcob(III)Alamin: Synthesis And X-Ray Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannibal, L.; Smith, C.A.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Brasch, N.E.

    2009-06-01

    The long-elusive crystal structure of nitrosylcobalamin (NOCbl) reveals that the Co-N-O angle is 117.4-121.4{sup o}; hence, NOCbl is best described as nitroxylcob(III)alamin in the solid state (see picture: Co purple, N blue, O red, P orange, C gray, H white). The length of the Co-N bond trans to the NO ligand is typical of those seen when strong {beta}-axial ligands are positioned trans to the 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole group.

  20. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2011-09-30

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

  1. 15.08.07 RH Si Microwire Photoanode - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A High-Performance Si Microwire Photocathode Coupled with Ni-Mo Catalyst Shaner, M. R., McKone, J. R., Gray, H. B. & Lewis, N. S. Functional integration of Ni-Mo electrocatalysts with i microwire array photocathodes to simultaneously achieve high fill factors and light-limited photocurrent densities for solar-driven hydrogen evolution. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01076D (2015). Scientific Achievement We have designed and demonstrated a H2-evolving Si microwire

  2. 2013 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Publications Journal Papers T. A. Addington, R. W. Mertz, J. B. Siegel, J. M. Thompson, A. J. Fisher, V. Filkov, N. M. Fleischman, A. A. Suen, C. Zhang and M. D. Toney, "Janus: Prediction and Ranking of Mutations Required for Functional Interconversion of Enzymes", J. Mol. Biol. 425, 1378 (2013) doi: 10.1016/j.jmb.2013.01.034 N. B. Aetukuri, A. X. Gray, M. Drouard, M. Cossale, L. Gao, A. H. Reid, R. Kukreja, H. Ohldag, C. A. Jenkins, E. Arenholz, K. P. Roche, H. A. Dürr, M. G.

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Entergy-Hydro-Operations_Smethers [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ouachita River System LAKE OUACHITA CITY OF HOT SPRINGS LAKE CATHERINE Blakely Mountain Dam LAKE HAMITLON Carpenter Dam Remmel Dam 1 OUACHITA RIVER DeGray Lake & Dam Blakely Mtn. Dam/Lake Ouachita * Built in 1955 * forms Lake Ouachita * Owned & Operated by ACOE * 2 Units - 6600 CFS * 84 MW @178 ft. Head * AGC Capable Large volume of water * Large volume of water storage * Flood Control is a project purpose 2 project purpose Lake Hamilton / Lake Catherine * 6,897 acres surface * 198 miles

  5. BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL

    BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey makes the most precise calibration yet of the universe's "standard ruler" January 8, 2014 Contact: Paul Preuss, Paul_Preuss@lbl.gov , +1 415-272-3253 BOSS-BAOv1.jpg Baryon acoustic oscillations (gray spheres), which descend from waves of increased density in the very early universe, are where galaxies have a tendency to cluster or

  6. Y-12's Protective Force donates coats to VMC | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex 's Protective Force ... Y-12's Protective Force donates coats to VMC Posted: January 25, 2016 - 1:17pm Veterans and current Y-12 Security Police Officers delivered former uniform coats to the Volunteer Ministry Center. A few years ago, Y-12's Protective Force changed from solid gray uniforms to their current digital camouflage gear. The old uniforms-some of which were actually new, with tags still on-were considered excess and likely headed toward a landfill. Around that same time,

  7. Microsoft Word - Map and Directions to UV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schilletter-University Village (SUV) Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Ames Laboratory - Public Affairs 111 TASF Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-3020 Page 1 515.294.9557 1 Enter Ames from Interstate 35 using the 13 th Street Exit (mile marker 113) 2 Continue west on 13 th Street to Stange Rd 3 Turn right (N) on Stange for approx. ½ mile. Look for the Main Office/Community Center (gray bldg-just before the stop lights). Take a right onto Edenburn Dr. and look for your building number.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The journey from Trinity to Trinity begins with the New Mexico desert night sky turning instantly to day at 05:29 am on July 16, 1945. An eyewitness recalled, "The effects could well be called unprecedented, magnificent, beautiful, stupendous, and terrifying. The lighting effects beggared description. The whole country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple, violet, gray, and blue." It was the Trinity Test: the world's

  9. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense Dynamic equation of state and strength properties of unreacted PBXW-128 explosive Chhabildas, L.C.; Grady, D.E.; Reinhart, W.D.; Wilson, L.T. From separations to reconstitution - a short history of Plutonium in the U.S. and Russia Gray, L W Condensation induced water hammer safety Gintner, M.A. Direct calibration of the yield of nuclear explosion Nakanishi, K.; Nikolayev, A.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Challenge Home is one of 42 homes in a micro-community of ultra-modern, energy-efficient homes built by Dwell Development on an urban gray-field site in South Seattle. Every home will achieve a 5-Star Built Green rating from the regional master builders association and meet the criteria of the Northwest ENERGY STAR program, which is more strict than the national ENERGY STAR criteria. Also, the home won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the "systems builder" category.

  11. Component failures that lead to reactor scrams. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Lim, E. Y.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the operating experience scram data compiled from 35 operating US light water reactors (LWRs) to identify the principal components/systems related to reactor scrams. The data base utilized to identify the scram causes is developed from a EPRI-utility sponsored survey conducted by SAI coupled with recent data from the USNRC Gray Books. The reactor population considered in this evaluation is limited to 23 PWRs and 12 BWRs because of the limited scope of the program. The population includes all the US NSSS vendors. It is judged that this population accurately characterizes the component-related scrams in LWRs over the first 10 years of plant operation.

  12. Flexible Medical Radioisotope Production | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicles & Fuels » Vehicles » Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:05am Addthis Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) have an internal combustion engine and are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (a high-level blend of gasoline and ethanol), or a mixture of both. There are more than 10.6 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today. However, many flexible fuel vehicle owners don't realize

  13. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 [Data Announcements] New VAP Yields Aerosol Optical Depth from Irradiance Measurements Bookmark and Share This plot shows spectral AOD versus time of day from the SASHE at the AMF1 Cape Cod site. The plot shows a cloudy morning (gray symbols) followed by cloud-free conditions (colored symbols in a "rainbow" pattern) with aerosol burden evolving over the course of the day. This plot shows spectral AOD versus time of day from the SASHE at the AMF1 Cape Cod site. The plot shows a

  14. Computational Nanophotonics: modeling optical interactions and transport in tailored nanosystem architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, George; Ratner, Mark

    2014-02-27

    This report describes research by George Schatz and Mark Ratner that was done over the period 10/03-5/09 at Northwestern University. This research project was part of a larger research project with the same title led by Stephen Gray at Argonne. A significant amount of our work involved collaborations with Gray, and there were many joint publications as summarized later. In addition, a lot of this work involved collaborations with experimental groups at Northwestern, Argonne, and elsewhere. The research was primarily concerned with developing theory and computational methods that can be used to describe the interaction of light with noble metal nanoparticles (especially silver) that are capable of plasmon excitation. Classical electrodynamics provides a powerful approach for performing these studies, so much of this research project involved the development of methods for solving Maxwell’s equations, including both linear and nonlinear effects, and examining a wide range of nanostructures, including particles, particle arrays, metal films, films with holes, and combinations of metal nanostructures with polymers and other dielectrics. In addition, our work broke new ground in the development of quantum mechanical methods to describe plasmonic effects based on the use of time dependent density functional theory, and we developed new theory concerned with the coupling of plasmons to electrical transport in molecular wire structures. Applications of our technology were aimed at the development of plasmonic devices as components of optoelectronic circuits, plasmons for spectroscopy applications, and plasmons for energy-related applications.

  15. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Grillmair, Carl J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze all existing secondary eclipse time series spectroscopy of hot Jupiter HD 189733b acquired with the now defunct Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument. We describe the novel approaches we develop to remove the systematic effects and extract accurate secondary eclipse depths as a function of wavelength in order to construct the emission spectrum of the exoplanet. We compare our results with a previous study by Grillmair et al. that did not examine all data sets available to us. We are able to confirm the detection of a water feature near 6 μm claimed by Grillmair et al. We compare the planetary emission spectrum to three model families—based on isothermal atmosphere, gray atmosphere, and two realizations of the complex radiative transfer model by Burrows et al., adopted in Grillmair et al.'s study. While we are able to reject the simple isothermal and gray models based on the data at the 97% level just from the IRS data, these rejections hinge on eclipses measured within a relatively narrow wavelength range, between 5.5 and 7 μm. This underscores the need for observational studies with broad wavelength coverage and high spectral resolution, in order to obtain robust information on exoplanet atmospheres.

  16. Characterization of solid state nuclear track detectors of the polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39/PM-355) type for light charged particle spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowska, A. Jask?a, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Szyd?owski, A.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a method which uses the characteristics of the etch pits induced in a polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (PADC) detector of the CR-39/PM-355 type to estimate particle energy. This method is based on the data provided by a semiautomatic system that selects tracks according to two parameters, crater diameters, and mean gray level values. In this paper we used the results of the calibration measurements that were obtained in our laboratory in the period 20002014. Combining the information on the two parameters it is possible to determine unambiguously the incident projectile energy values. The paper presents the results of an attempt to estimate the energy resolution of the method when analyzing the tracks produced in the CR-39/PM-355 detector by energetic ions such as alpha particles, protons, and deuterons. We discuss the energy resolution of the measurement of light charged particle energy which is based on the parameters (crater diameter and mean gray level value) of tracks induced in solid state nuclear track detectors of the PADC type.

  17. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Properties of Cool Roofing Materials (1) Asphalt Shingles Shasta White 0.26 0.91 Generic White 0.25 0.91 Generic Grey 0.22 0.91 Light Brown 0.19 0.91 Medium Brown 0.12 0.91 Generic Black 0.05 0.91 White Coatings White Coating (1 coat, 8 mil) 0.80 0.91 White Coating (2 coats, 20 mil) 0.85 0.91 Aluminum Coatings Aluminum 0.61 0.25 Fibered on Black 0.40 0.56 Membranes Gray EPDM (4) 0.23 0.87 White EPDM (4) 0.69 0.87 T-EPDM (4) 0.81 0.92 Light Gravel on Built-Up Roof 0.34 0.90 Metal Roof New, Bare

  19. Early F-type stars - refined classification, confrontation with Stromgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.O.; Garrison, R.F.

    1989-02-01

    The classification for early F-type stars in the MK spectral classification system presented by Gray and Garrison (1987) is refined. The effect of rotation on spectral classification and ubvy-beta photometry of early F-type stars is examined. It is found that the classical luminosity criterion, the 4417 A/4481 A ratio gives inconsistent results. It is shown that most of the stars in the Delta Delphini class of metallic-line stars are either normal or are indistinguishable from proto-Am stars. It is suggested that the designation Delta Delphini should be dropped. The classifications are compared with Stromgren photometry. The effects of rotation on the delta-c sub 1 index in the early-F field dwarfs is demonstrated. 55 references.

  20. Coal recovery from mine wastes of the historic longwall mining district of north-central illinois. Illinois mineral notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Camp, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of coal from mine wastes produced by historic longwall mines in northeastern Illinois was studied as part of a project undertaken in 1982 for the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council. About 100 of these mines operated in the Wilmington and La Salle Districts of the Illinois Coal Field between about 1870 and 1940; all worked the Colchester (No. 2) Coal Seam, using a manual high-extraction mining method. Large samples of the three major kinds of mine waste - gray mining gob, preparation gob, and preparation slurry - were collected from deposits at nine of the larger mine sites and analyzed to determine their general ranges of sulfur, ash, and heating values. Preparation gob and slurry from six of the sites had significant combustible contents, and were evaluated by a simple procedure in which ash analyses and wet-screening tests were used to determine the washability and yield of combustibles to recovery processes.

  1. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Onyshczak, R.J.; Hopper, T.

    1996-10-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  2. Evaluation of Neutron Elastic Scatter (NES) technique for detection of graphitic corrosion in gas cast iron pipe. Final report, March 1996-April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charatis, G.; Hugg, E.; McEllistrem, M.

    1997-04-01

    PENETRON, Inc., in two phases, demonstrated the effectiveness of its Neutron elastic Scatter (NES) techniques in detecting the change in the carbon weight percentage (CWt%) as a measure of corrosion in gray cast iron pipe. In Phase I, experiments were performed with synthetic standards supplied by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) to test the applicability of the NES techniques. Irradiation experiments performed at the University of Kentucky showed that CWt% could be detected, ranging from 1.6% to 13%, within an uncertainty of around 4%. In Phase II, experiments were performed on seven (7) corroded pipe sections supplied by MichCon. Tests were made on pipe sliced lengthwise into quarter sections, and in re-assembled whole pipe sections. X-ray films of the quarter sections indicated probable areas of corrosion for each quarter section.

  3. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  4. Corrosion and hydriding performance evaluation of three zircaloy-2 clad fuel assemblies after continuous exposure in PWR cores 1 and 2, at Shippingport, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillner, E.

    1980-01-01

    Three original Zircaloy-2 clad blanket fuel bundles from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station were discharged after continuous exposure during Cores 1 and 2. Detailed visual examination of these components after approx. 6300 calendar days of operation (51,140 EFPH) revealed only the anticipated uniform light gray (post-transition) corrosion products with no evidence of unexpected corrosion deterioration, fuel rod warpage, or other damage. All corrosion films were found to be tightly adherent to the underlying cladding. An extensive destructive examination of a selected fuel rod from each of three fuel bundles produced appreciably greater end-of-life rod average oxide film thickness when compared with corresponding values produced from a set of empirical equations generated from the out-of-pile (autoclave) testing of Zircaloy coupons.

  5. Continuous production of strip by Rheocasting. Final report, August 16, 1978-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemings, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The report presents results of the mathematical and experimental modeling study undertaken, and also (1) describes the basic mechanism and process of Rheocasting (shaping in semisolid state), (2) outlines work done to date, and (3) attempts to delineate areas of potential engineering applications of the process. Two such areas appear most fruitful for further work. One is that of forming shapes, where processes such as die casting or forging are used today. Pilot projects in industry indicate this process is well advanced for the nonferrous alloys of aluminum and magnesium, but important potential applications also exist for copper, gray iron, and steel. The second is in continuous casting, especially of strip. Significant technical and economic advantages could result from Rheocasting strip of aluminum, magnesium, and steel alloys. Potential technical advantages include improved surface, greater freedom from cracking and segregation, ability to strip cast alloys not now castable, and increased productivity.

  6. Absorption chillers: Part of the solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Occhionero, A.J. ); Hughes, P.J. ); Reid, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, and implementation economics are considered as they relate to the advisability of expanding the application of absorption chillers. Introductory and background information are provided to put the discussion in the proper context. Then all four issues are discussed separately as they relate to absorption chillers. Acid rain and ozone depletion concerns, and implementation economics, are found to support the expanded use of absorption chillers. The global warming concern is found to be more of a gray area, but the areas of benefit correspond well with the conditions of greatest economic advantage. All things considered, absorption chillers are believed to be part of the environmental and economic solution. It is further believed that integrated resource planning (IRP) processes that consider electric and gas technologies on an equal footing would come to the same conclusion for many regions of the United States. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. A Novel Charge Recycling Approach to Low-Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulaganathan, Chandradevi; Britton Jr, Charles L; Holleman, Jeremy; Blalock, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    A novel charge-recycling scheme has been designed and implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of operating digital circuits using the charge scavenged from the leakage and dynamic load currents inherent to digital logic. The proposed scheme uses capacitors to efficiently recover the ground-bound charge and to subsequently boost the capacitor voltage to power up the source circuit. This recycling methodology has been implemented on a 12-bit Gray-code counter within a 12-bit multichannel Wilkinson ADC. The circuit has been designed in 0.5 m BiCMOS and in 90nm CMOS processes. SPICE simulation results reveal a 46 53% average reduction in the energy consumption of the counter. The total energy savings including the control generation aggregates to an average of 26 34%.

  8. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  9. Spatially addressable design of gradient index structures through spatial light modulator based holographic lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlinger, Kris; Lutkenhaus, Jeff [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Arigong, Bayaner; Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Lin, Yuankun, E-mail: yuankun.lin@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we present an achievable gradient refractive index in bi-continuous holographic structures that are formed through five-beam interference. We further present a theoretic approach for the realization of gradient index devices by engineering the phases of the interfering beams with a pixelated spatial light modulator. As an example, the design concept of a gradient index Luneburg lens is verified through full-wave electromagnetic simulations. These five beams with desired phases can be generated through programming gray level super-cells in a diffractive spatial light modulator. As a proof-of-concept, gradient index structures are demonstrated using synthesized and gradient phase patterns displayed in the spatial light modulator.

  10. The Telephone: An Invention with Many Fathers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brenni, Paolo [CNR-FST-IMSS, Florence, Italy

    2010-01-08

    The names of A.G. Bell, A. Meucci, P.Reis, E. Gray, just to mention the most important ones, are all connected with the invention of the telephone. Today, the Italian inventor A. Meucci is recognized as being the first to propose a working prototype of the electric telephone. However, for a series of reasons his strenuous efforts were not rewarded. I will not repeat here the endless and complex disputes about the ?real father? of the telephone. From an historical point of view it is more interesting to understand why so many individuals from different backgrounds conceived of a similar apparatus and why most of these devices were simply forgotten or just remained laboratory curiosities. The case of the development of the telephone is an emblematic and useful example for better understanding the intricate factors which are involved in the birth of an invention and reasons for its success and failure.

  11. Using Focused Regression for Accurate Time-Constrained Scaling of Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, B; Garren, J; Lowenthal, D; Reeves, J; de Supinski, B; Schulz, M; Rountree, B

    2010-01-28

    Many large-scale clusters now have hundreds of thousands of processors, and processor counts will be over one million within a few years. Computational scientists must scale their applications to exploit these new clusters. Time-constrained scaling, which is often used, tries to hold total execution time constant while increasing the problem size along with the processor count. However, complex interactions between parameters, the processor count, and execution time complicate determining the input parameters that achieve this goal. In this paper we develop a novel gray-box, focused median prediction errors are less than 13%. regression-based approach that assists the computational scientist with maintaining constant run time on increasing processor counts. Combining application-level information from a small set of training runs, our approach allows prediction of the input parameters that result in similar per-processor execution time at larger scales. Our experimental validation across seven applications showed that median prediction errors are less than 13%.

  12. Calculating nonlocal optical properties of structures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-16

    In a recent Letter [J. M. McMahon, S. K. Gray, and G. C. Schatz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 097403 (2009)], we outlined a computational method to calculate the optical properties of structures with a spatially nonlocal dielectric function. In this paper, we detail the full method and verify it against analytical results for cylindrical nanowires. Then, as examples of our method, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. We first calculate the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of thin films. Because of their simplicity, these systems demonstrate clearly the longitudinal (or volume) plasmons characteristic of nonlocal effects, which result in anomalous absorption and plasmon blueshifting. We then study the optical properties of spherical nanoparticles, which also exhibit such nonlocal effects. Finally, we compare the maximum and average electric field enhancements around nanowires of various shapes to local theory predictions. We demonstrate that when nonlocal effects are included, significant decreases in such properties can occur.

  13. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  14. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Moab Quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Lupe, R.D.; Peterson, F.

    1982-09-01

    Portions of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison, the Chinle, the Rico, the Cutler, and the Entrada Formations are favorable for uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the US Department of Energy within the Moab 1' x 2' Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. Nine areas are judged favorable for the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member. The criteria used to evaluate these areas as favorable include the presence of (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Three favorable areas have been outlined for the Late Triassic Chinle Formation. The criteria used to evaluate these areas are the sandstone-to-shale ratios for the Chinle Formation and the distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle, which is considered the source for the uranium. Two favorable areas have been delineated for the Permian Cutler Formation, and one for the Permian Rico Formation. The criteria used to outline favorable areas are the distribution of favorable facies within each formation. Favorable facies are those that are a result of deposition in environments that are transitional between fluvial and marine. One favorable area is outlined in the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district. Boundaries for this area were established by geologic mapping.

  16. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizing for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J A

    1982-09-01

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains.

  18. Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System User`s Guide, June 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitus, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Jatko, W.B.; Manges, W.W.; Treece, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (LS-FICS) uses a Sun workstation controlling a Lenzar ElectroOptics Opacity 1000 imaging system to digitize fingerprint card images to support the Federal Bureau of Investigation`s (FBI`s) Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) program. The system also supports the operations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- (ORNL-) developed Image Transmission Network (ITN) prototype card scanning system. The input to the system is a single FBI fingerprint card of the agreed-upon standard format and a user-specified identification number. The output is a file formatted to be compatible with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) draft standard for fingerprint data exchange dated June 10, 1992. These NIST compatible files contain the required print and text images. The LS-FICS is designed to provide the FBI with the capability of scanning fingerprint cards into a digital format. The FBI will replicate the system to generate a data base of test images. The Host Workstation contains the image data paths and the compression algorithm. A local area network interface, disk storage, and tape drive are used for the image storage and retrieval, and the Lenzar Opacity 1000 scanner is used to acquire the image. The scanner is capable of resolving 500 pixels/in. in both x and y directions. The print images are maintained in full 8-bit gray scale and compressed with an FBI-approved wavelet-based compression algorithm. The text fields are downsampled to 250 pixels/in. and 2-bit gray scale. The text images are then compressed using a lossless Huffman coding scheme. The text fields retrieved from the output files are easily interpreted when displayed on the screen. Detailed procedures are provided for system calibration and operation. Software tools are provided to verify proper system operation.

  19. Semiautomatic segmentation and follow-up of multicomponent low-grade tumors in longitudinal brain MRI studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weizman, Lior; Sira, Liat Ben; Joskowicz, Leo; Rubin, Daniel L.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Constantini, Shlomi; Shofty, Ben; Bashat, Dafna Ben

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Tracking the progression of low grade tumors (LGTs) is a challenging task, due to their slow growth rate and associated complex internal tumor components, such as heterogeneous enhancement, hemorrhage, and cysts. In this paper, the authors show a semiautomatic method to reliably track the volume of LGTs and the evolution of their internal components in longitudinal MRI scans. Methods: The authors' method utilizes a spatiotemporal evolution modeling of the tumor and its internal components. Tumor components gray level parameters are estimated from the follow-up scan itself, obviating temporal normalization of gray levels. The tumor delineation procedure effectively incorporates internal classification of the baseline scan in the time-series as prior data to segment and classify a series of follow-up scans. The authors applied their method to 40 MRI scans of ten patients, acquired at two different institutions. Two types of LGTs were included: Optic pathway gliomas and thalamic astrocytomas. For each scan, a “gold standard” was obtained manually by experienced radiologists. The method is evaluated versus the gold standard with three measures: gross total volume error, total surface distance, and reliability of tracking tumor components evolution. Results: Compared to the gold standard the authors' method exhibits a mean Dice similarity volumetric measure of 86.58% and a mean surface distance error of 0.25 mm. In terms of its reliability in tracking the evolution of the internal components, the method exhibits strong positive correlation with the gold standard. Conclusions: The authors' method provides accurate and repeatable delineation of the tumor and its internal components, which is essential for therapy assessment of LGTs. Reliable tracking of internal tumor components over time is novel and potentially will be useful to streamline and improve follow-up of brain tumors, with indolent growth and behavior.

  20. Measurements in large pool fires with an actively cooled calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The pool fire thermal test described in Safety Series 6 published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) in the United States is one of the most difficult tests that a container for larger ``Type B`` quantities of nuclear materials must pass. If retests of a container are required, costly redesign and project delays can result. Accurate measurements and modeling of the pool fire environment will ultimately lower container costs by assuring that containers past the pool fire test on the first attempt. Experiments indicate that the object size or surface temperature of the container can play a role in determining local heat fluxes that are beyond the effects predicted from the simple radiative heat transfer laws. An analytical model described by Nicolette and Larson 1990 can be used to understand many of these effects. In this model a gray gas represents soot particles present in the flame structure. Close to the container surface, these soot particles are convectively and radiatively cooled and interact with incident energy from the surrounding fire. This cooler soot cloud effectively prevents some thermal radiation from reaching the container surface, reducing the surface heat flux below the value predicted by a transparent medium model. With some empirical constants, the model suggested by Nicolette and Larson can be used to more accurately simulate the pool fire environment. Properly formulated, the gray gas approaches also fast enough to be used with standard commercial computer codes to analyze shipping containers. To calibrate this type of model, accurate experimental measurements of radiative absorption coefficients, flame temperatures, and other parameters are necessary. A goal of the calorimeter measurements described here is to obtain such parameters so that a fast, useful design tool for large pool fires can be constructed.

  1. Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

  2. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizingmore » for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.« less

  4. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Lu [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thall, Peter F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need confirmation, IMRT should be considered for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  5. PDS SHRINK. PDS SHRINK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillion, D.

    1991-12-15

    This code enables one to display, take line-outs on, and perform various transformations on an image created by an array of integer*2 data. Uncompressed eight-bit TIFF files created on either the Macintosh or the IBM PC may also be read in and converted to a 16 bit signed integer image. This code is designed to handle all the formats used for PDS (photo-densitometer) files at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These formats are all explained by the application code. The image may be zoomed infinitely and the gray scale mapping can be easily changed. Line-outs may be horizontal or vertical with arbitrary width, angled with arbitrary end points, or taken along any path. This code is usually used to examine spectrograph data. Spectral lines may be identified and a polynomial fit from position to wavelength may be found. The image array can be remapped so that the pixels all have the same change of lambda width. It is not necessary to do this, however. Lineouts may be printed, saved as Cricket tab-delimited files, or saved as PICT2 files. The plots may be linear, semilog, or logarithmic with nice values and proper scientific notation. Typically, spectral lines are curved.

  6. Distribution system stability, reliability and protective relaying due to incorporation of dispersed energy sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis discusses impacts and issues brought about by the enactment of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The United States power grid has a history of safe, economical, reliable service that, some feel, is threatened by the encroachment of small Dispersed Energy Sources, with possible inexperienced developers. The quality of electrical power from such sources is in question, as is power grid stability and reliability. Safety is another factor where methodry is subject to the incentives of the party whose viewpoint is sought. Much controversy is caused by the Act leaving methods of implementation to the individual States. The settlement, in one State, of some question in dispute forms no basis for extrapolation into other States. This leaves a potential developer with some uncertainty as to his options and advantages in assessing the incentives for investing in a Dispersed Energy Source. And such incentives form the thrust of the Act. This thesis brings these issues to the force and examines them for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook of the Utility, the Dispersed Energy Source, and the Public for motivation and attempts to strike a balance between their opinions in reaching conclusions. Gray areas are addressed and possible remedies are offered.

  7. Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

    2005-03-30

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  8. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  9. Sustainable Building in China -- A Green Leap Forward?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, Richard; Ye, Qing; Feng, Wei; Yan, Tao; Mao, Hongwei; Li, Yutong; Guo, Yongcong; Wang, Jialiang

    2013-09-01

    China is constructing new commercial buildings at an enormous rate -- roughly 2 billion square meters per year, with considerable interest and activity in green design and construction. We review the context of commercial building design and construction in China, and look at a specific project as an example of a high performance, sustainable design, the Shenzhen Institute of Building Research (IBR). The IBR building incorporates over 40 sustainable technologies and strategies, including daylighting, natural ventilation, gray-water recycling, solar-energy generation, and highly efficient Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems. We present measured data on the performance of the building, including detailed analysis by energy end use, water use, and occupant comfort and satisfaction. Total building energy consumption in 2011 was 1151 MWh, with an Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of 63 kWh/m2 (20 kBtu/ft2), which is 61% of the mean EUI value of 103 kWh/m2 (33 kBtu/ft2) for similar buildings in the region. We also comment on the unique design process, which incorporated passive strategies throughout the building, and has led to high occupant satisfaction with the natural ventilation, daylighting, and green patio work areas. Lastly we present thoughts on how the design philosophy of the IBR building can be a guide for low-energy design in different climate regions throughout China and elsewhere.

  10. Weapons proliferation and organized crime: The Russian military and security force dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turbiville, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    One dimension of international security of the post-Cold War era that has not received enough attention is how organized crime facilitates weapons proliferation worldwide. The former Soviet Union (FSU) has emerged as the world`s greatest counterproliferation challenge. It contains the best developed links among organized crime, military and security organizations, and weapons proliferation. Furthermore, Russian military and security forces are the principle source of arms becoming available to organized crime groups, participants in regional conflict, and corrupt state officials engaged in the black, gray, and legal arms markets in their various dimensions. The flourishing illegal trade in conventional weapons is the clearest and most tangible manifestation of the close links between Russian power ministries and criminal organizations. The magnitude of the WMD proliferation problem from the FSU is less clear and less tangible. There have been many open reports of small-scale fissile material smuggling out of the FSU. The situation with regard to the proliferation of chemical weapon usually receives less attention but may be more serious. With an acknowledged stockpile of 40,000 metric tons of chemical agents, the potential for proliferation is enormous.

  11. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  12. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  13. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  14. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  15. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-5 (C-3002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-18

    SNL-5 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-3002) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation in an area north of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site where data are sparse and where a pumping or monitoring well for the northern pumping test is needed. SNL-5 is located in the southeast quarter of section 6, T22S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-5 was drilled to a total depth of 687 ft below ground level (bgl), based on driller's measurements. Below the caliche pad, SNL-5 encountered the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, and Rustler Formations. Two intervals of the Rustler were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and into the upper Los Meda?os Members. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to a depth of ~672 ft. No water was observed to flow into the open drillhole until the Culebra was penetrated. includes horizontal beds and laminae near the base, and the uppermost part shows some inclined bedding. The mudstone unit shows mostly reddish brown claystone and siltstone with some gray mottling. Clasts or intraclasts are also included in the unit. The upper Tamarisk sulfate is somewhat brecciated near the base.

  16. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 14753) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dosevolume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  17. Optical method and apparatus for detection of defects and microstructural changes in ceramics and ceramic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A.; Todd, Judith A.; Sun, Jiangang

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus detects defects and microstructural changes in hard translucent materials such as ceramic bulk compositions and ceramic coatings such as after use under load conditions. The beam from a tunable laser is directed onto the sample under study and light reflected by the sample is directed to two detectors, with light scattered with a small scatter angle directed to a first detector and light scattered with a larger scatter angle directed to a second detector for monitoring the scattering surface. The sum and ratio of the two detector outputs respectively provide a gray-scale, or "sum" image, and an indication of the lateral spread of the subsurface scatter, or "ratio" image. This two detector system allows for very high speed crack detection for on-line, real-time inspection of damage in ceramic components. Statistical image processing using a digital image processing approach allows for the quantative discrimination of the presence and distribution of small flaws in a sample while improving detection reliability. The tunable laser allows for the penetration of the sample to detect defects from the sample's surface to the laser's maximum depth of penetration. A layered optical fiber directs the incoming laser beam to the sample and transmits each scattered signal to a respective one of the two detectors.

  18. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-08-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  19. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-05-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  20. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-12-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  1. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  2. The wave energy flux of high frequency diffracting beams in complex geometrical optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele; Mariani, Alberto; Farina, Daniela

    2013-04-15

    We consider the construction of asymptotic solutions of Maxwell's equations for a diffracting wave beam in the high frequency limit and address the description of the wave energy flux transported by the beam. With this aim, the complex eikonal method is applied. That is a generalization of the standard geometrical optics method in which the phase function is assumed to be complex valued, with the non-negative imaginary part accounting for the finite width of the beam cross section. In this framework, we propose an argument which simplifies significantly the analysis of the transport equation for the wave field amplitude and allows us to derive the wave energy flux. The theoretical analysis is illustrated numerically for the case of electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas by using the GRAY code [D. Farina, Fusion Sci. Technol. 52, 154 (2007)], which is based upon the complex eikonal theory. The results are compared to those of the paraxial beam tracing code TORBEAM [E. Poli et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 136, 90 (2001)], which provides an independent calculation of the energy flow.

  3. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  4. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  5. Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menguec, M.P.

    1992-02-01

    A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

  6. AOI 1 COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the optically thin approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di#14;fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gasparticulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  7. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C; Indelicato, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  8. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  9. Cardiovascular Comorbidity and Mortality in Men With Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy-Based Radiation With or Without Hormonal Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, Ming-Hui; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and sequelae on the risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) in men treated for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 5077 men with PC consecutively treated with curative intent between 1997 and 2006 at the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center. Cox and Fine and Gray's competing risks regression multivariable analyses were performed, assessing whether cardiovascular comorbidity impacted the risk of ACM and PC-specific mortality, respectively, adjusting for CAD risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, or hypertension) and sequelae (congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction), age, year and type of treatment, and known PC prognostic factors. Results: When compared with men with no comorbidity there was a significantly increased risk of ACM in men with congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.96, P<.001) and in men with diabetes mellitus (AHR 1.60, P=.03) and hypertension (AHR 1.25, P=.04). In contrast, men with hypercholesterolemia had a similar risk of ACM (AHR 0.68, P=.17) when compared with men with no comorbidity. Other factors associated with a significantly increased risk of ACM included age (AHR 1.09, P<.001), prostate-specific antigen level (AHR 1.25, P=.008), and Gleason score 8-10 disease (AHR 1.71, P=.003). Cardiovascular comorbidity did not impact the risk of PC-specific mortality. Conclusions: In addition to age and unfavorable PC prognostic factors, select CAD risk factors and sequelae are associated with an increased risk of ACM in men treated for PC. These comorbidity prognostic factors predict time courses of mortality from competing causes, which may be factored into the decision-making process when considering management options for PC in a given individual.

  10. Measurement of relative output factors for the 8 and 4 mm collimators of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion by film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Lunsford, L. Dade; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-05-15

    Three types of films, Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55, were used to measure relative output factors of 4 and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The optical density to dose calibration curve for each of the film types was obtained by exposing the films to a range of known doses. Ten data points were acquired for each of the calibration curves in the dose ranges from 0 to 4 Gy, 0 to 8 Gy, and 0 to 80 Gy for Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55 films, respectively. For the measurement of relative output factors, five films of each film type were exposed to a known dose. All films were scanned using EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL scanner with 200 dpi resolution in 16 bit gray scale for EDR2 film and 48 bit color scale for Gafchromic films. The scanned images were imported in the red channel for both Gafchromic films. The background corrections from an unexposed film were applied to all films. The output factors obtained from film measurements were in a close agreement both with the Monte Carlo calculated values of 0.924 and 0.805 for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively. These values are provided by the vendor and used as default values in the vendor's treatment planning system. The largest differences were noted for the Kodak EDR 2 films (-2.1% and -4.5% for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). The best agreement observed was for EBT Gafchromic film (-0.8% and +0.6% differences for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). Based on the present values, no changes in the default relative output factor values were made in the treatment planning system.

  11. Lyalpha RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH DUST: ESCAPE FRACTIONS FROM SIMULATED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Anja C. E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.d

    2009-10-20

    The Lyalpha emission line is an essential diagnostic tool for probing galaxy formation and evolution. Not only is it commonly the strongest observable line from high-redshift galaxies, but from its shape detailed information about its host galaxy can be revealed. However, due to the scattering nature of Lyalpha photons increasing their path length in a nontrivial way, if dust is present in the galaxy, the line may be severely suppressed and its shape altered. In order to interpret observations correctly, it is thus of crucial significance to know how much of the emitted light actually escapes the galaxy. In the present work, using a combination of high-resolution cosmological hydrosimulations and an adaptively refinable Monte Carlo Lyalpha radiative transfer code including an environment dependent model of dust, the escape fractions f {sub esc} of Lyalpha radiation from high-redshift (z = 3.6) galaxies are calculated. In addition to the average escape fraction, the variation of f {sub esc} in different directions and from different parts of the galaxies is investigated, as well as the effect on the emergent spectrum. Escape fractions from a sample of simulated galaxies of representative physical properties are found to decrease for increasing galaxy virial mass M {sub vir}, from f {sub esc} approaching unity for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} to f {sub esc} less than 10% for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 12} M {sub sun}. In spite of dust being almost gray, it is found that the emergent spectrum is affected nonuniformly, with the escape fraction of photons close to the line center being much higher than of those in the wings, thus effectively narrowing the Lyalpha line.

  12. Sensing system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kychakoff, George; Afromowitz, Martin A.; Hogle, Richard E.

    2008-10-14

    A system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers includes one or more deposit monitoring sensors operating in infrared regions of about 4 or 8.7 microns and directly producing images of the interior of the boiler, or producing feeding signals to a data processing system for information to enable a distributed control system by which the boilers are operated to operate said boilers more efficiently. The data processing system includes an image pre-processing circuit in which a 2-D image formed by the video data input is captured, and includes a low pass filter for performing noise filtering of said video input. It also includes an image compensation system for array compensation to correct for pixel variation and dead cells, etc., and for correcting geometric distortion. An image segmentation module receives a cleaned image from the image pre-processing circuit for separating the image of the recovery boiler interior into background, pendant tubes, and deposition. It also accomplishes thresholding/clustering on gray scale/texture and makes morphological transforms to smooth regions, and identifies regions by connected components. An image-understanding unit receives a segmented image sent from the image segmentation module and matches derived regions to a 3-D model of said boiler. It derives a 3-D structure the deposition on pendant tubes in the boiler and provides the information about deposits to the plant distributed control system for more efficient operation of the plant pendant tube cleaning and operating systems.

  13. Proposed first-generation WSQ bit allocation procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1993-09-08

    The Wavelet/Scalar Quantization (WSQ) gray-scale fingerprint image compression algorithm involves a symmetric wavelet transform (SWT) image decomposition followed by uniform scalar quantization of each subband. The algorithm is adaptive insofar as the bin widths for the scalar quantizers are image-specific and are included in the compressed image format. Since the decoder requires only the actual bin width values -- but not the method by which they were computed -- the standard allows for future refinements of the WSQ algorithm by improving the method used to select the scalar quantizer bin widths. This report proposes a bit allocation procedure for use with the first-generation WSQ encoder. In previous work a specific formula is provided for the relative sizes of the scalar quantizer bin widths in terms of the variances of the SWT subbands. An explicit specification for the constant of proportionality, q, that determines the absolute bin widths was not given. The actual compression ratio produced by the WSQ algorithm will generally vary from image to image depending on the amount of coding gain obtained by the run-length and Huffman coding, stages of the algorithm, but testing performed by the FBI established that WSQ compression produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20 to 1. The bit allocation procedure described in this report possesses a control parameter, r, that can be set by the user to achieve a predetermined amount of lossy compression, effectively giving the user control over the amount of distortion introduced by quantization noise. The variability observed in final compression ratios is thus due only to differences in lossless coding gain from image to image, chiefly a result of the varying amounts of blank background surrounding the print area in the images. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the proposed method`s effectiveness.

  14. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  15. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  16. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptista, António M.

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

  17. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  18. Mechanical and substructural response of incipiently spalled 316L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G. T. , III; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-01-01

    316L SS samples were shock prestrained to a peak stress of 6.6 GPa using a 0.75 {mu}sec pulse duration square-topped shock profile and 'soft' recovered while a second sample was similarly shock loaded, without spall momentum trapping, leading to incipient spall damage. Shock prestraining and 'soft' shock recovery to 6.6 GPa led to an increase in the post-shock flow strength of 316L SS by {approx}100 MPa over the starting material while the reload yield strength of the incipiently spall damaged sample increased by {approx}200 MPa. In this paper the sequential processes of defect generation and damage operative during the shock prestraining, spallation, and reloading of incipiently spalled 316L SS is presented. The influence of shock prestraining, using both triangular-wave loading, via both direct HE and triangular-wave pulses on a gas launcher, as well as 'square-topped' shock prestaining via conventional flyer-plate impact, is crucial to understanding the shock hardening and spallation responses of materials(Gray III, et al. [2003]). The development of predictive constitutive models to describe the mechanical response of incipiently damaged metals and alloys requires an understanding of the defect generation and storage due to shock hardening as well as the additional plasticity and damage evolution during spallation. In this paper the influence of shock-wave prestraining on the process of shock hardening and thereafterthe hardeningand damage evolution accompanying incipient spallation in 316L stainless steel (316L SS) on post-shock constitutive behavior is examined using 'soft' recovery techniques and mechanical behavior measurements.

  19. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

  20. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  1. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  2. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-15

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI{sub 2} solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 ?m and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI{sub 2} concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  3. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56years (range, 18-85years). The median dose administered was 30Gy (range, 30-46Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9years (range, 0.9-22years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ?4cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  4. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  5. SU-F-BRE-12: Optical Resonator Water Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J; DeMarco, J; Low, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Water calorimetry based on resistance thermometry has matured as a primary standard. Developing an optical technique hold the promise to push the boundaries of what is currently achievable with dosimetry. We will present a feasibility study and the current progress of construction of a Fabry-Perot resonator for dose to water measurement. Additionally, estimations of the theoretical limits resonator sensitivity and potential sources of noise for the system are described. Methods: A temperature change from the dose to water would be measured by the change in the index of refraction from the water in the cavity. Calculations are presented of the expected signal from the resonator for dose to water. The Fabry-Perot resonator constructed from optical quality narrowband mirrors is described. A water cell will be inserted into the cavity gap to provide the medium swept cavity length technique is explored as a specific implementation of this technique. Results: Calculations indicate that a dose to water on the order of a Gray is measureable with a reasonably implementable system. A resonator is currently under construction and progress towards a proof of principle measurement will be presented. The primary sources of noise, in order of importance, are expected to be; optical absorption by the medium, mechanical perturbations of the cavity length and thermal expansion of the optical mounts. Estimations of these noise sources and mitigation techniques will be discussed. Conclusion: A Fabry-Perot resonator is a promising technique for measuring the absorbed dose to water from a radiotherapy beam. This technique has the potential to serve as a check on the current primary standard for dose to water measurements. As well, i0074 may be the foundation for a new class of optical property based dosimetry measurement.

  6. Heating 7.2 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  7. Heating 7. 2 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  8. Improved laboratory assays of Pu and U for SRP purification and finishing processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, M K; Dorsett, R S

    1986-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in routine assay techniques for uranium and plutonium as part of an effort to improve accountability at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Emphasis was placed on input/output accountability points and key physical inventory tanks associated with purification and finishing processes. Improvements were made in existing assay methods; new methods were implemented; and the application of these methods was greatly expanded. Prior to assays, samples were validated via density measurements. Digital density meters precise to four, five, and six decimal places were used to meet specific requirements. Improved plutonium assay techniques are now in routine use: controlled-potential coulometry, ion-exchange coulometry, and Pu(III) diode-array spectrophotometry. A new state-of-the-art coulometer was fabricated and used to ensure maximum accuracy in verifying standards and in measuring plutonium in product streams. The diode-array spectrophotometer for Pu(III) measurements was modified with fiber optics to facilitate remote measurements; rapid, precise measurements made the technique ideally suited for high-throughput assays. For uranium assays, the isotope-dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method was converted to a gravimetric basis. The IDMS method and the existing Davies-Gray titration (gravimetric basis) have met accountability requirements for uranium. More recently, a Pu(VI) diode-array spectrophotometric method was used on a test basis to measure plutonium in shielded-cell input accountability samples. In addition, tests to measure uranium via diode-array spectrophotometry were initiated. This rapid, precise method will replace IDMS for certain key sample points.

  9. Using multispectral videography to distinguish the pattern of zonation and plant species composition in brackish water marshes of the Rio Grande Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, F.W.; Lonard, R.I.; Everitt, J.H. [Univ. of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Cyclical flooding of the Rio Grande and movement of floodwater into distributary channels formerly constituted significant freshwater input into the marshes of the Rio Grande Delta, but dams and flood control projects have eliminated this source of freshwater. The marshes are now dependent on rainfall alone for freshwater input and may be experiencing significant change in species of vegetation, abundance and patterns of distribution. Unfortunately, little is known of the ecology of these marshes. As a first step in providing needed information, multispectral videography was used to distinguish species composition and patterns of zonation in a brackish water marsh at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron County, Texas. The line intercept method of vegetation analysis provided ground truth and quantified species distribution and abundance. The vegetation of a typical brackish water marsh is organized into three zones along an elevation gradient. At the lowest elevations there is a distinct zone dominated by maritime saltwort, Batis maritime. At the lowest elevations in this zone where rainwater remains the longest, stands of California bulrush, Scirpus californicus, occur. An intermediate zone supports shoregrass, Monanthochloe littoralis, as the dominant species. A third (highest) zone is dominated by Gulf cordgrass, Spartina spartinae. The upper margin of this zone grades gradually into a shrub-grassland community that occurs on lomas (clay dunes). Each of the zones is distinguished by a distinctive signature in the multispectral videography. The Batis maritime community has a bright pink to red image response. Monanthochloe littoralis has a dark brown color and Spartina spartinae has a light gray to pinkish-tan color. Brackish water marshes may be distinguished from saltwater marshes by the relative positions of the Monanthochloe littoralis and Spartina spartinae communities, but additional data are needed before this possibility is confirmed.

  10. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  11. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 ; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5; Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P5 ; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrummidband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-interceptwere determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor grades further improved when the textural features of the effective scatterer diameter parametric map were combined with the mean value of the map (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Overall, the binary classification results (tumor versus normal tissue) were more promising than tumor grade assessment. Combinations of advanced parameters can further improve the separation of tumors from normal tissue compared to the use of linear regression parameters. While the linear regression parameters were sufficient for characterizing breast tumors and normal breast tissues, advanced parameters and their textural features were required to better characterize tumor subtypes.

  12. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ?50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use increased. These changes contributed to the observed declining LR rates among patients treated with breast-conserving therapy.

  13. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  14. A Phase 2 Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost After Surgical Resection for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Cameron; Yang, T. Jonathan; Hilden, Patrick; Zhang, Zhigang; Chan, Kelvin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Lymberis, Stella C.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H.; Ballangrud, se; Lis, Eric; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after surgical resection and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients (50 lesions) were enrolled and available for analysis. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed malignancy with 1 or 2 intraparenchymal brain metastases, age ?18 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ?70. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test for significant associations between clinical factors and overall survival (OS). Competing risks regression models, as well as cumulative incidence functions, were fit using the method of Fine and Gray to assess the association between clinical factors and both local failure (LF; recurrence within surgical cavity or SRS target), and regional failure (RF; intracranial metastasis outside of treated volume). Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months (range, 1.0-94.1 months). After surgical resection, 39 patients with 40 lesions were treated a median of 31 days (range, 7-56 days) later with SRS to the surgical bed to a median dose of 1800 cGy (range, 1500-2200 cGy). Of the 50 lesions, 15 (30%) demonstrated LF after surgery. The cumulative LF and RF rates were 22% and 44% at 12 months. Patients who went on to receive SRS had a significantly lower incidence of LF (P=.008). Other factors associated with improved local control include non-small cell lung cancer histology (P=.048), tumor diameter <3 cm (P=.010), and deep parenchymal tumors (P=.036). Large tumors (?3 cm) with superficial dural/pial involvement showed the highest risk for LF (53.3% at 12 months). Large superficial lesions treated with SRS had a 54.5% LF. Infratentorial lesions were associated with a higher risk of developing RF compared to supratentorial lesions (P<.001). Conclusions: Postoperative SRS is associated with high rates of local control, especially for deep brain metastases <3 cm. Tumors ?3 cm with superficial dural/pial involvement demonstrate the highest risk of LF.

  15. Relative output factor and beam profile measurements of small radiation fields with an L-alanine/K-Band EPR minidosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Abrego, Felipe; Calcina, Carmen Sandra Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2007-05-15

    The performance of an L-alanine dosimeter with millimeter dimensions was evaluated for dosimetry in small radiation fields. Relative output factor (ROF) measurements were made for 0.5x0.5, 1x1, 3x3, 5x5, 10x10 cm{sup 2} square fields and for 5-, 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields. In beam profile (BP) measurements, only 1x1, 3x3, 5x5 cm{sup 2} square fields and 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields were used. For square and circular field irradiations, Varian/Clinac 2100, and a Siemens/Mevatron 6 MV linear accelerators were used, respectively. For a batch of 800 L-alanine minidosimeters (miniALAs) the average mass was 4.3{+-}0.5 (1{sigma}) mg, the diameter was 1.22{+-}0.07 (1{sigma}) mm, and the length was 3.5{+-}0.2 (1{sigma}) mm. A K-Band (24 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used for recording the spectrum of irradiated and nonirradiated miniALAs. To evaluate the performance of the miniALAs, their ROF and BP results were compared with those of other types of detectors, such as an ionization chamber (PTW 0.125 cc), a miniTLD (LiF: Mg,Cu,P), and Kodak/X-Omat V radiographic film. Compared to other dosimeters, the ROF results for miniALA show differences of up to 3% for the smallest fields and 7% for the largest ones. These differences were within the miniALA experimental uncertainty ({approx}5-6% at 1{sigma}). For BP measurements, the maximum penumbra width difference observed between miniALA and film (10%-90% width) was less than 1 mm for square fields and within 1-2 mm for circular fields. These penumbra width results indicate that the spatial resolution of the miniALA is comparable to that of radiographic film and its dimensions are adequate for the field sizes used in this experiment. The K-Band EPR spectrometer provided adequate sensitivity for assessment of miniALAs with doses of the order of tens of Grays, making this dosimetry system (K-Band/miniALA) a potential candidate for use in radiosurgery dosimetry.

  16. Biologically Effective Dose (BED) Correlation With Biochemical Control After Low-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Edward F.; Nelson, John W.; Alkaissi, Ali K.; Das, Shiva; Clough, Robert W.; Broadwater, Gloria; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Chino, Junzo P.; Oleson, James R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of postimplant dosimetric quantifiers with biochemical control of prostate cancer after low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose (BED), dose in Gray (Gy) to 90% of prostate (D{sub 90}), and percent volume of the prostate receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) were calculated from the postimplant dose-volume histogram for 140 patients undergoing low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy from 1997 to 2003 at Durham Regional Hospital and the Durham VA Medical Center (Durham, NC). Results: The median follow-up was 50 months. There was a 7% biochemical failure rate (10 of 140), and 91% of patients (127 of 140) were alive at last clinical follow-up. The median BED was 148 Gy (range, 46-218 Gy). The median D{sub 90} was 139 Gy (range, 45-203 Gy). The median V{sub 100} was 85% (range, 44-100%). The overall 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate was 90.1%. On univariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, no pretreatment characteristic (Gleason score sum, age, baseline prostate-specific antigen, or clinical stage) was predictive of bRFS. The BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} were all highly correlated (Pearson coefficients >92%), and all were strongly correlated with bRFS. Using the Youden method, we identified the following cut points for predicting freedom from biochemical failure: D{sub 90} >= 110 Gy, V{sub 100} >= 74%, and BED >= 115 Gy. None of the covariates significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions: We observed significant correlation between BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} with bRFS. The BED is at least as predictive of bRFS as D{sub 90} or V{sub 100}. Dosimetric quantifiers that account for heterogeneity in tumor location and dose distribution, tumor repopulation, and survival probability of tumor clonogens should be investigated.

  17. Forward osmosis :a new approach to water purification and desalination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2006-07-01

    Fresh, potable water is an essential human need and thus looming water shortages threaten the world's peace and prosperity. Waste water, brackish water, and seawater have great potential to fill the coming requirements. Unfortunately, the ability to exploit these resources is currently limited in many parts of the world by both the cost of the energy and the investment in equipment required for purification/desalination. Forward (or direct) osmosis is an emerging process for dewatering aqueous streams that might one day help resolve this problem. In FO, water from one solution selectively passes through a membrane to a second solution based solely on the difference in the chemical potential (concentration) of the two solutions. The process is spontaneous, and can be accomplished with very little energy expenditure. Thus, FO can be used, in effect, to exchange one solute for a different solute, specifically chosen for its chemical or physical properties. For desalination applications, the salts in the feed stream could be exchanged for an osmotic agent specifically chosen for its ease of removal, e.g. by precipitation. This report summarizes work performed at Sandia National Laboratories in the area of FO and reviews the status of the technology for desalination applications. At its current state of development, FO will not replace reverse osmosis (RO) as the most favored desalination technology, particularly for routine waters. However, a future role for FO is not out of the question. The ability to treat waters with high solids content or fouling potential is particularly attractive. Although our analysis indicates that FO is not cost effective as a pretreatment for conventional BWRO, water scarcity will likely drive societies to recover potable water from increasingly marginal resources, for example gray water and then sewage. In this context, FO may be an attractive pretreatment alternative. To move the technology forward, continued improvement and optimization of membranes is recommended. The identification of optimal osmotic agents for different applications is also suggested as it is clear that the space of potential agents and recovery processes has not been fully explored.

  18. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 40 cm) rotated over 2? about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 ?s pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 ?m) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  19. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  20. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 3 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 3.44 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 0.43 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 1.7)% to (20.9 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  1. SU-E-I-58: Detecting Tumors with Extremely Low Contrast in CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Kupelian, P; Steiberg, M; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors such as the prostate focal lesions and the brain metastases have extremely low CT contrast and MRI is usually used for target delineation. The target contours are propagated to the CT for treatment planning and patient positioning. We have employed an advanced denoising method eliminating the noise and allow magnification of subtle contrast of these focal lesions on CT. Methods: Five prostate and two brain metastasis patients with MRI T2, diffusion or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images confirmed focal lesions were included. One brain patients had 5 metastases. A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise of kVCT images used for treatment planning. The gray-level range of the resultant images was narrowed to magnify the tumor-normal tissue contrast. Results: For the prostate patients, denoised kVCT images showed focal regions at 5, 8,11-1, 2, and 8–10 oclock for the 5 patients, this is highly consistent to the radiologist confirmed focal lesions based on MRI at 5, 7, 11-1, 2 and 8–10 oclock in the axial plane. These CT focal regions matched well with the MRI focal lesions in the cranio-caudal position. The average increase in density compared to background prostate glands was 0.86%, which corresponds to ∼50% increase in cellularity and is lower than the average CT noise level of 2.4%. For the brain patients, denoised kVCT showed 5/6 metastases. The high CT-density region of a metastasis is 2-mm off from its corresponding elevated MRI perfusion center. Overall the detecting sensitivity was 91%. Conclusion: It has been preliminarily demonstrated that the higher tumor cellularity can be detected using kVCT. The low contrast-to-noise information requires advanced denoising to reveal. The finding is significant to radiotherapy by providing an additional tool to locate focal lesions for confirming MRI-CT registration and providing a highly accessible outcome assessment tool.

  2. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control and survival in the setting of chemoradiotherapy.

  3. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78.8% (±3.9% SD) classification reproducibility in terms of OS, LRC, and FFDM, respectively. Conclusions: Pretreatment tumor texture may provide prognostic information beyond that obtained from CPFs. Models incorporating feature reproducibility achieved classification rates of ∼80%. External validation would be required to establish texture as a prognostic factor.

  4. SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-11

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond monitoring and mapping. The potential uses, within the nuclear sector alone, are both numerous and significant in terms of the proceeding effort to clean up the UK's nuclear waste legacy.

  5. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Ryan, Mathur; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Alex, Carone; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

  6. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Mathur, Ryan; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Carone, Alex; Brantley, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

  7. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding Support: Siemens-UCLA Radiology Master Research Agreement; Disclosures - Michael McNitt-Gray: Institutional Research Agreement, Siemens AG; Research Support, Siemens AG; Consultant, Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC; Consultant, Fulbright and Jaworski.

  8. MO-E-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING) - Calculating SSDE From CT Exams Using Size Data Available in the DICOM Header of CT Localizer Radiographs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; McNitt-Gray, M; McCollough, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of using existing data stored within the DICOM header of certain CT localizer radiographs as a patient size metric for calculating CT size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). Methods: For most Siemens CT scanners, the CT localizer radiograph (topogram) contains a private DICOM field that stores an array of numbers describing AP and LAT attenuation-based measures of patient dimension. The square root of the product of the AP and LAT size data, which provides an estimate of water-equivalent-diameter (WED), was calculated retrospectively from topogram data of 20 patients who received clinically-indicated abdomen/pelvis (n=10) and chest (n=10) scans (WED-topo). In addition, slice-by-slice water-equivalent-diameter (WED-image) and effective diameter (ED-image) values were calculated from the respective image data. Using TG-204 lookup tables, size-dependent conversion factors were determined based upon WED-topo, WED-image and ED-image values. These conversion factors were used with the reported CTDIvol to calculate slice-by-slice SSDE for each method. Averaging over all slices, a single SSDE value was determined for each patient and size metric. Patientspecific SSDE and CTDIvol values were then compared with patientspecific organ doses derived from detailed Monte Carlo simulations of fixed tube current scans. Results: For abdomen/pelvis scans, the average difference between liver dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 18.70%, 8.17%, 6.84%, and 7.58%, respectively. For chest scans, the average difference between lung dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 25.80%, 3.33%, 4.11%, and 7.66%, respectively. Conclusion: SSDE calculated using WED derived from data in the DICOM header of the topogram was comparable to SSDE calculated using WED and ED derived from axial images; each of these estimated organ dose to within 10% for both abdomen/pelvis and chest CT examinations. The topogrambased method has the advantage that WED data are already provided and therefore available without additional post-processing of the image data. Funding Support: NIH Grant R01-EB017095; Disclosures - Michael McNitt-Gray: Institutional Research Agreement, Siemens AG; Research Support, Siemens AG; Consultant, Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC; Consultant, Fulbright and Jaworski; Disclosures - Cynthia McCollough: Research Grant, Siemens Healthcare.

  9. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Hope, Andrew J.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant therapy after SBRT.

  10. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the numerical model. These parameters include production/destruction of interfacial area as a function of saturation and capillary pressure. Our preliminary results for primary drainage in porous media show that the specific interfacial area increased linearly with increasing gas saturation until breakthrough of the displacing gas into the exit manifold occurred.

  11. Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the numerical model. These parameters include production/destruction of interfacial area as a function of saturation and capillary pressure. Our preliminary results for primary drainage in porous media show that the specific interfacial area increased linearly with increasing gas saturation until breakthrough of the displacing gas into the exit manifold occurred.

  12. EVIDENCE AGAINST AN EDGE-ON DISK AROUND THE EXTRASOLAR PLANET, 2MASS 1207 b AND A NEW THICK-CLOUD EXPLANATION FOR ITS UNDERLUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Szucs, Laszlo; Apai, Daniel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Biller, Beth A.

    2011-05-10

    Since the discovery of the first directly imaged, planetary-mass object, 2MASS 1207 b, several works have sought to explain a disparity between its observed temperature and luminosity. Given its known age, distance, and spectral type, 2MASS 1207 b is underluminous by a factor of {approx}10 ({approx}2.5 mag) when compared to standard models of brown-dwarf/giant-planet evolution. In this paper, we study three possible sources of 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. First, we investigate Mohanty et al.'s hypothesis that a near edge-on disk, comprising large, gray-extincting grains, might be responsible for 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. After radiative transfer modeling, we conclude that the hypothesis is unlikely due to the lack of variability seen in multi-epoch photometry and unnecessary due to the increasing sample of underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets that cannot be explained by an edge-on disk. Next, we test the analogous possibility that a spherical shell of dust could explain 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. Models containing enough dust to create {approx}2.5 mag of extinction, placed at reasonable radii, are ruled out by our new Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 {mu}m photometric upper limit for 2MASS 1207 b. Finally, we investigate the possibility that 2MASS 1207 b is intrinsically cooler than the commonly used AMES-DUSTY fits to its spectrum, and thus it is not, in fact, underluminous. New, thick-cloud model grids by Madhusudhan et al. fit 2MASS 1207 b's 1-10 {mu}m spectral energy distribution well, but they do not quite fit its near-infrared spectrum. However, we suggest that with some 'tuning', they might be capable of simultaneously reproducing 2MASS 1207 b's spectral shape and luminosity. In this case, the whole class of young, underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets might be explained by atmospheres that are able to suspend thick, dusty clouds in their photospheres at temperatures lower than field brown dwarfs.

  13. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81101132, 11305203) and Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (11040606Q55, 1308085QH138)

  14. THE GALACTIC CENTER IN THE FAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etxaluze, M.; Smith, Howard A.; Tolls, V.; Stark, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gonzalez-Alfonso, E., E-mail: metxaluz@cfa.harvard.edu [CfA and Universidad de Alcala, Alcala de Henares 28801 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the far-infrared dust emission from the Galactic center region, including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with 10 detectors observing at 10 different wavelengths in the range from 46 {mu}m to 180 {mu}m, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the Midcourse Space Experiment at 21.3 {mu}m for completeness. We model the combined ISO-LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), a region that includes the CND. We find that the far-infrared spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three gray body curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be {approx}5.0 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}, with luminosities: L{sub cavity} {approx} 2.2 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} and L{sub CND} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} in the central 2 pc radius around Sgr A*. We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of {approx}3.2 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature variations, and we map that distribution.

  15. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a mineralizing agent and a ligand.

  16. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  17. Estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full field digital mammography images via adaptive fuzzy c-means clustering and support vector machine segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Wang Yan; Zheng Yuanjie; Gee, James C.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The amount of fibroglandular tissue content in the breast as estimated mammographically, commonly referred to as breast percent density (PD%), is one of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Approaches to quantify breast density commonly focus on either semiautomated methods or visual assessment, both of which are highly subjective. Furthermore, most studies published to date investigating computer-aided assessment of breast PD% have been performed using digitized screen-film mammograms, while digital mammography is increasingly replacing screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening protocols. Digital mammography imaging generates two types of images for analysis, raw (i.e., 'FOR PROCESSING') and vendor postprocessed (i.e., 'FOR PRESENTATION'), of which postprocessed images are commonly used in clinical practice. Development of an algorithm which effectively estimates breast PD% in both raw and postprocessed digital mammography images would be beneficial in terms of direct clinical application and retrospective analysis. Methods: This work proposes a new algorithm for fully automated quantification of breast PD% based on adaptive multiclass fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and support vector machine (SVM) classification, optimized for the imaging characteristics of both raw and processed digital mammography images as well as for individual patient and image characteristics. Our algorithm first delineates the breast region within the mammogram via an automated thresholding scheme to identify background air followed by a straight line Hough transform to extract the pectoral muscle region. The algorithm then applies adaptive FCM clustering based on an optimal number of clusters derived from image properties of the specific mammogram to subdivide the breast into regions of similar gray-level intensity. Finally, a SVM classifier is trained to identify which clusters within the breast tissue are likely fibroglandular, which are then aggregated into a final dense tissue segmentation that is used to compute breast PD%. Our method is validated on a group of 81 women for whom bilateral, mediolateral oblique, raw and processed screening digital mammograms were available, and agreement is assessed with both continuous and categorical density estimates made by a trained breast-imaging radiologist. Results: Strong association between algorithm-estimated and radiologist-provided breast PD% was detected for both raw (r= 0.82, p < 0.001) and processed (r= 0.85, p < 0.001) digital mammograms on a per-breast basis. Stronger agreement was found when overall breast density was assessed on a per-woman basis for both raw (r= 0.85, p < 0.001) and processed (0.89, p < 0.001) mammograms. Strong agreement between categorical density estimates was also seen (weighted Cohen's {kappa}{>=} 0.79). Repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated no statistically significant differences between the PD% estimates (p > 0.1) due to either presentation of the image (raw vs processed) or method of PD% assessment (radiologist vs algorithm). Conclusions: The proposed fully automated algorithm was successful in estimating breast percent density from both raw and processed digital mammographic images. Accurate assessment of a woman's breast density is critical in order for the estimate to be incorporated into risk assessment models. These results show promise for the clinical application of the algorithm in quantifying breast density in a repeatable manner, both at time of imaging as well as in retrospective studies.

  18. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schller, Sren; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hlsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrie, Marc

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The polychromatic nature of the x-ray beams and their effects on the reconstructed image are often disregarded during standard image reconstruction. This leads to cupping and beam hardening artifacts inside the reconstructed volume. To correct for a general cupping, methods like water precorrection exist. They correct the hardening of the spectrum during the penetration of the measured object only for the major tissue class. In contrast, more complex artifacts like streaks between dense objects need other techniques of correction. If using only the information of one single energy scan, there are two types of corrections. The first one is a physical approach. Thereby, artifacts can be reproduced and corrected within the original reconstruction by using assumptions in a polychromatic forward projector. These assumptions could be the used spectrum, the detector response, the physical attenuation and scatter properties of the intersected materials. A second method is an empirical approach, which does not rely on much prior knowledge. This so-called empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) and the previously mentioned physical-based technique are both relying on a segmentation of the present tissues inside the patient. The difficulty thereby is that beam hardening by itself, scatter, and other effects, which diminish the image quality also disturb the correct tissue classification and thereby reduce the accuracy of the two known classes of correction techniques. The herein proposed method works similar to the empirical beam hardening correction but does not require a tissue segmentation and therefore shows improvements on image data, which are highly degraded by noise and artifacts. Furthermore, the new algorithm is designed in a way that no additional calibration or parameter fitting is needed. Methods: To overcome the segmentation of tissues, the authors propose a histogram deformation of their primary reconstructed CT image. This step is essential for the proposed algorithm to be segmentation-free (sf). This deformation leads to a nonlinear accentuation of higher CT-values. The original volume and the gray value deformed volume are monochromatically forward projected. The two projection sets are then monomially combined and reconstructed to generate sets of basis volumes which are used for correction. This is done by maximization of the image flatness due to adding additionally a weighted sum of these basis images. sfEBHC is evaluated on polychromatic simulations, phantom measurements, and patient data. The raw data sets were acquired by a dual source spiral CT scanner, a digital volume tomograph, and a dual source micro CT. Different phantom and patient data were used to illustrate the performance and wide range of usability of sfEBHC across different scanning scenarios. The artifact correction capabilities are compared to EBHC. Results: All investigated cases show equal or improved image quality compared to the standard EBHC approach. The artifact correction is capable of correcting beam hardening artifacts for different scan parameters and scan scenarios. Conclusions: sfEBHC generates beam hardening-reduced images and is furthermore capable of dealing with images which are affected by high noise and strong artifacts. The algorithm can be used to recover structures which are hardly visible inside the beam hardening-affected regions.

  19. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.2 1.3 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. With the heart inside the radiation field, the mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. The optimal leaf margins were ?1.0 0.6 mm for both beams. Dmax to the spinal cord showed no clear trend for changes in leaf margin. Conclusions: The differences in doses to OARs between FFF and FF beams were negligible. Conformity index, modified GI, MLD, lung V20 Gy, lung V5 Gy, and mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. There were no significant differences in optimal leaf margins to minimize these parameters between both FFF and FF beams. The authors results suggest that a leaf margin of ?1 mm achieves high conformity and minimizes doses to OARs for both FFF and FF beams.

  20. Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

    2005-07-01

    Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at PFP. Samples varied in appearance depending on the original source of material. Rocky Flats items were mostly dark olive green with clumps that crushed easily with a mortar and pestle. PRF/RMC items showed more variability. These items were mostly rust colored. One sample contained white particles that were difficult to crush, and another sample was a dark grey with a mixture of fines and large, hard fragments. The appearance and feel of the fragments indicated they might be an alloy. The color of the solution samples was indicative of the impurities in the sample. The double-pass filtrate solution was a brown color indicative of the iron impurities in the sample. The other solution sample was light gray in color. Radiochemical analyses, including thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha and gamma energy analysis (AEA and GEA), and kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), indicate that these materials are all weapons-grade plutonium with consistent plutonium isotopics. A small amount of uranium (<0.14 wt%) is also present in these samples. The isotopic composition of the uranium varied widely but was consistent among each category of material. The primary water-soluble anions in these samples were Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and PO43-. The only major anion observed in the Rocky Flats materials was Cl-, but the PRF/RMC samples had significant quantities of all of the primary anions observed. Prompt gamma measurements provide a representative analysis of the Cl- concentration in the bulk material. The primary anions observed in the solution samples were NO3-, and PO43-. The concentration of these anions did not exceed the mixed oxide (MOX) specification limits. Cations that exceeded the MOX specification limits included Cr, Fe, Ni, Al, Cu, and Si. All of the samples exceeded at least the 75% specification limit in one element.

  1. A support vector machine classifier reduces interscanner variation in the HRCT classification of regional disease pattern in diffuse lung disease: Comparison to a Bayesian classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongjun; Lim, Jonghyuck; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Lynch, David A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of using different computed tomography (CT) scanners on the accuracy of high-resolution CT (HRCT) images in classifying regional disease patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease, support vector machine (SVM) and Bayesian classifiers were applied to multicenter data. Methods: Two experienced radiologists marked sets of 600 rectangular 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 pixel regions of interest (ROIs) on HRCT images obtained from two scanners (GE and Siemens), including 100 ROIs for each of local patterns of lungs-normal lung and five of regional pulmonary disease patterns (ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity, honeycombing, emphysema, and consolidation). Each ROI was assessed using 22 quantitative features belonging to one of the following descriptors: histogram, gradient, run-length, gray level co-occurrence matrix, low-attenuation area cluster, and top-hat transform. For automatic classification, a Bayesian classifier and a SVM classifier were compared under three different conditions. First, classification accuracies were estimated using data from each scanner. Next, data from the GE and Siemens scanners were used for training and testing, respectively, and vice versa. Finally, all ROI data were integrated regardless of the scanner type and were then trained and tested together. All experiments were performed based on forward feature selection and fivefold cross-validation with 20 repetitions. Results: For each scanner, better classification accuracies were achieved with the SVM classifier than the Bayesian classifier (92% and 82%, respectively, for the GE scanner; and 92% and 86%, respectively, for the Siemens scanner). The classification accuracies were 82%/72% for training with GE data and testing with Siemens data, and 79%/72% for the reverse. The use of training and test data obtained from the HRCT images of different scanners lowered the classification accuracy compared to the use of HRCT images from the same scanner. For integrated ROI data obtained from both scanners, the classification accuracies with the SVM and Bayesian classifiers were 92% and 77%, respectively. The selected features resulting from the classification process differed by scanner, with more features included for the classification of the integrated HRCT data than for the classification of the HRCT data from each scanner. For the integrated data, consisting of HRCT images of both scanners, the classification accuracy based on the SVM was statistically similar to the accuracy of the data obtained from each scanner. However, the classification accuracy of the integrated data using the Bayesian classifier was significantly lower than the classification accuracy of the ROI data of each scanner. Conclusions: The use of an integrated dataset along with a SVM classifier rather than a Bayesian classifier has benefits in terms of the classification accuracy of HRCT images acquired with more than one scanner. This finding is of relevance in studies involving large number of images, as is the case in a multicenter trial with different scanners.

  2. GROUT TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN 105-R DISASSEMBLY BASIN D AND E CANAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogle, R.; Collins, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2010-06-03

    The 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin Grout Placement Strategy Report (SRNL-TR-2009-00157) identifies various portions of the facility that will undergo an in-situ decommissioning process. The estimated residual radioactive contamination in the 105-R facility is shown in Figure 1. Cementitious grout formulations developed by SRNL are being used to immobilize and isolate the radioactive contamination in existing below grade portions of the 105-R building as shown by the gray-hatched area in Figure 2. A Zero Bleed flowable fill was formulated for both dry placement and for underwater placement. The first major area in the 105-R Disassembly Basin to undergo the grouting process was the D&E Canal and an underlying void space known as the Chase. Grout temperature data was needed to ensure that the grout mix design was on the correct grout curing trajectory to meet the material compressive strength requirement of 50 pounds per square inch. Initial grout temperature measurements were needed to confirm and optimize grout mix design fresh property characteristics; i.e. material strength, and set time. Grout curing temperature is an integrating fresh property characteristic that is used to estimate cementitious material strength in accordance with the Standard Practice for Estimating Concrete Strength by the Maturity Method, ASTM C 1074. The Maturity Method is used in the construction industry to estimate in-place strength of concrete to allow the start of critical construction activities; e.g. formwork removal, removal of cold weather protection, opening of roadways to traffic, etc. Applying this methodology provides an expeditious means to estimate in-place grout strength based on compressive strength laboratory results. The Maturity Method results define the relationship between strength-time and age-time that may be utilized in the field for estimating strength after a given time of placement. Maturation curves were developed under the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin Cementitious Materials Laboratory Test Plan (SRNL-TR-2009-00175) to establish grout mix maturation indices for this relationship. Temperature data collected from the D&E grout placement will be evaluated against these maturation indices in a subsequent analysis. Grout temperature data outside the maturation indices highlight the opportunity to adjust the grout mix design for future placements. The pre-existing grout placement will not be removed since this material will comply with strength requirements under the normal curing duration. SRNL designed a standalone measurement system to collect grout mass placement temperature data in the D&E Canal. Four vertical poles instrumented with thermocouples were positioned in the canal prior to grout placement. The thermocouples were connected to stand-alone, battery-powered data recorders mounted nearby that were configured to take temperature recordings every 10 minutes for up to 100 days. Unfortunately, after just 2 weeks, data collection was terminated because the thermocouple wires connecting the data loggers to the thermocouple poles were severed during construction activities. This report will highlight the unique challenges in designing a data collection system for the D&E canal, describe the temperature measurement system and its installation, and present calculated as well as measured temperature values.

  3. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

  4. COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PLANTNAME","KIND","CONSTRUC","INSTALLED","MAXCAP","NE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EQUIP","TOTCOST","COSTCAP","GROSSEXP","OPERENG","FUEL","COOLANTS","STEXP","STOTH","STTRANS","ELECEXP","MISCST","RENTS","MAINSUP","MAINSTRUC","MAINBOIL","MAINELEC","MAINMISC","TOTPROD","EXPKWH","UNITCL","QUANTCL","AVGHEATCL","ACDELCL","ACBURNCL","ACBTUCL","ACNETGENCL","ABTUNETGCL","UNITGAS","QUANTGAS","AVGHEATGAS","ACDELGAS","ACBURNGAS","ACBTUGAS","ACNETGNGAS","ABTUNETGAS","UNITOIL","QUANTOIL","AVGHEATOIL","ACDELOIL","ACBURNOIL","ACBTUOIL","ACNETGNOIL","ABTUNETOIL" "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Sequoyah","Nuclear","01/01/81",,2441160,2303000,8760,1008,1.8570502e+10,3184031,533636867,2488511062,3025331960,1239,33187938,21080862,86166618,4316783,11925073,0,0,13329621,28360769,0,16330987,1528775,8295886,3650336,7012139,201997849,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",189924066,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10230 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Nuclear","01/01/96","1/1/1996",1269000,1200000,8208,728,8230350000,1953589,2108999339,4827648621,6938601549,5468,30551823,12179502,38261150,3963151,7056493,0,0,10400580,24553068,0,14243155,2328791,9244870,870737,990214,124091711,15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",84467683,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10260 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",1088000,1407000,8760,14,256798000,0,6064116,119609619,125673735,116,112893140,2747882,9870790,0,0,0,0,0,477926,0,2274,1326,0,475339,7436,13582973,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",24224936,139600,0,0.41,0.03,0,13170 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",325200,431000,8760,8,176258000,0,3324533,63486109,66810642,205,80539157,665541,6810251,0,0,0,0,0,151587,0,1339166,1553,0,3922,4338,8976358,51,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2252179,1024,0,2.67,2.61,0,0,"Gallons",2063233,139100,0,0.37,0,0.03,14710 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Browns Ferry","Nuclear","01/01/74","1/1/1977",3456000,2529000,8760,1085,1.771301e+10,890631,909522117,3830292072,4740704820,1372,47061477,58344025,102890781,3642332,11672365,0,0,16130309,26099224,0,5560106,0,25822517,1921329,0,252082988,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",186421503,0,0,0,0.53,0,10520 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Cumberland","Steam","01/01/73","1/1/1973",2600000,2591000,8760,323,1.6530325e+10,1829568,103903145,1638681020,1744413733,671,63827428,5077791,197194700,0,86656,0,0,3945,13987241,0,1210473,1306476,16946838,4232440,841362,240887922,15,"Tons",6868849,10459,26.16,27.86,1.2,0.01,9746,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","1/1/1972",820300,622000,8760,9,264695000,0,3063638,102977658,106041296,129,1709273,879771,11709062,0,0,0,0,0,72128,0,301000,0,0,150309,2816,13115086,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3589538,1024,0,3.06,3.03,0,0,"Gallons",1173222,139500,0,0.55,0,0.03,14460 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",476000,420000,8760,7,326221000,0,2826177,64911682,67737859,142,3078759,1248563,12167389,0,0,0,0,0,69117,0,27275,0,0,74,2699,13515117,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3866688,1024,0,2.8,2.71,0,0,"Gallons",3619161,138400,0,0.35,0,0.03,13670 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Bull Run","Steam","01/01/67","1/1/1967",950000,912000,8760,87,4389788000,2220883,35786684,300943172,338950739,357,21987402,2324904,50419615,0,2286709,0,0,1742,6906593,0,754423,481980,8505768,2788903,314448,74785085,17,"Tons",1593346,11895,28.85,30.74,1.24,0.01,9257,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1959",990000,858000,8760,122,4102572000,142024,73025058,451231229,524398311,530,20254094,1206283,60294160,0,16,0,0,0,9854407,0,392524,824748,8011764,5402527,184253,86170682,21,"Tons",2039487,9680,25.5,29.45,1.39,0.01,10585,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Steam","01/01/42","1/1/1945",240000,0,8760,0,-1381000,11997,4933530,18578656,23524183,98,-6629,177,0,0,0,0,0,0,109802,0,908,5,0,0,0,110892,-80,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Paradise","Steam","01/01/63","1/1/1970",2558200,2286000,8760,296,1.4181992e+10,8519495,115906466,1287447341,1411873302,552,57696636,6093708,168293657,0,752026,0,0,536,10779025,0,3529172,4127133,18094770,3094627,676700,215441354,15,"Tons",6332104,10413,21.43,26.2,1.14,0.01,10280,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Steam","01/01/56","1/1/1959",1255200,992000,8760,131,7002818000,690082,44703289,427469961,472863332,377,5073325,1612720,80238724,0,1258244,0,0,73323,7350012,0,1803476,714460,6039653,3054984,792751,102938347,15,"Tons",3266195,9540,22.99,24.49,1.19,0.01,9651,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"John Sevier","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1957",800000,748000,8760,129,5522165000,1570328,37309270,253176616,292056214,365,2993416,946133,70531483,0,3286201,0,0,0,4864155,0,569877,953882,3537596,666934,559907,85916168,16,"Tons",2120222,11710,32.44,33.21,1.3,0.01,9802,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Kingston","Steam","01/01/54","1/1/1955",1700000,1583000,8760,275,1.0147089e+10,3475653,55125946,433125237,491726836,289,31839874,1201130,133624099,0,732904,0,0,671,15993919,0,2888077,697638,10886872,3114678,359796,169499784,17,"Tons",4038449,11134,31.75,32.96,1.34,0.01,9845,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1965",1350000,1283000,8760,222,6557785000,279029,50717782,608908796,659905607,489,12808186,3684548,92134159,0,115314,0,0,3096,11894009,0,1552144,1216679,16776178,4392373,150021,131918521,20,"Tons",2890398,10787,27.4,31.47,1.38,0.01,10066,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Shawnee","Steam","01/01/53","1/1/1956",1750000,1368000,8760,264,8060005000,504507,64076435,534941906,599522848,343,20760203,5379072,113531307,0,6565666,0,0,278,7470171,0,2988378,2163530,11022440,5415043,396055,154931940,19,"Tons",3766896,10234,28.54,29.83,1.34,0.01,10474,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Steam","01/01/51","1/1/1959",1485200,1213000,8760,269,6638234000,87967,76839994,522564850,599492811,404,5328716,12443723,83697340,0,-481100,0,0,6321,6501533,0,2973740,1891947,6444598,2867797,430252,116776151,18,"Tons",2922958,11389,26.49,28.52,1.16,0.01,10912,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Widows Creek","Steam","01/01/52","1/1/1965",1968760,1652000,8760,332,8498846000,855691,74795817,748521437,824172945,419,22653730,3695032,119092329,0,6555644,0,0,1697,9854746,0,1449646,2594983,13869309,4635675,4932791,166681852,20,"Tons",3858785,10808,28.8,30.16,1.27,0.01,10896,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"PALO VERDE 17.49%","n","01/01/86","01/01/88",666364,659000,8760,0,5317709000,1244457,281584974,735793972,1018623403,1529,6013000,4282694,25651422,2986065,4032493,0,0,2276671,26939892,0,5837013,1933729,6303817,3749209,2418208,86411213,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBTU",57406,0,0,440.13,0.44,0.01,10795,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"San Tan","Combined Cy","01/01/74","01/01/75",414000,292000,4112,43,714062000,149179,2773141,65463525,68385845,165,-5000,380221,14107193,0,1594474,0,0,0,845877,0,332730,170816,0,7389209,249749,25070269,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",6579686,1017,2.12,2.12,2.08,0.02,9372,"BBL",291,485968,0,24.61,4.22,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"SOLAR PV1 & PV2","So1ar","01/01/98","01/01/98",216,100,3000,0,119493,0,0,1676818,1676818,7763,1852000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Steam","01/01/52","01/01/54",108000,106000,736,12,50072000,313326,2433283,15283485,18030094,167,726000,180057,1483303,0,338591,0,0,169009,304652,0,157896,27729,608781,344347,214929,3829294,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",651225,1016,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.03,13215,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/73",226850,149000,290,0,18990000,0,0,16888448,16888448,74,0,114913,724438,0,85074,0,0,0,40298,0,64493,11249,0,291038,96634,1428137,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",281631,1017,2.09,2.09,2.06,0.04,15094,"BBL",60,488889,0,24.61,4.19,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"MOHAVE 10%","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",163620,158000,8715,0,996913000,42812,5046928,50920964,56010704,342,1221000,250561,13703464,0,389195,0,0,245787,1776796,-12611,497248,178489,1673455,685271,112185,19499840,20,"Tons",457815,10939,28.47,29.64,1.35,0.01,10093,"MCF",45107,1028,0,2.94,2.86,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CORONADO","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",821880,760000,8760,213,5039392000,8300198,158523884,696108809,862932891,1050,7523000,1228492,96325127,0,4607490,0,0,403466,4002498,10446,1754276,1703703,12035645,3902862,1238765,127212770,25,"Tons",2632698,9886,34.53,35.42,1.79,0.02,10357,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",24155,137315,24.21,26.79,4.65,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CRAIG 29%","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/81",259414,248000,8760,0,2050747000,83589,52424794,181936864,234445247,904,680000,368849,22362014,0,1036824,0,0,425951,1689040,12271,323682,251566,1760910,701820,370069,29302996,14,"Coal",1040589,10060,22.56,21.42,1.06,0.01,10223,"MCF",28100,1000,0,2.49,2.49,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CROSS CUT","Steam","01/01/42","01/01/49",30000,3000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 21.7%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",522857,488000,8760,539,3676183000,42866,27115117,246304509,273462492,523,5605000,1396220,45545213,0,1123640,0,0,257918,3750053,132023,667722,165042,7069421,2110905,434407,62652564,17,"Tons",1685726,10956,23.51,26.74,1.22,0.01,10061,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",8625,139078,22.75,28.63,4.9,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 100%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",2409480,2250000,8760,539,1.6020912e+10,197537,124954457,1135043822,1260195816,523,25829493,6236459,196347455,0,5554459,0,0,1293757,8406791,0,3306198,769371,29759456,10024854,2263428,263962228,16,"Tons",7339290,10979,23.5,26.63,1.21,0.01,10074,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",39756,139079,22.75,22.47,3.85,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"FOUR CORNERS 10%","Steam","01/01/69","01/01/70",163620,148000,8760,0,1176172000,11573,7334703,91939839,99286115,607,37000,105696,11684589,0,978340,0,0,90099,1040379,83795,135949,61864,1112429,291525,340786,15925451,14,"Tons",644302,8885,17.41,17.97,1.01,0.01,9757,"MCF",26430,1008,0,4.13,4.1,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"HAYDEN 50%","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",137700,131000,6809,0,812423000,482702,13855905,64632670,78971277,574,16419000,157050,8427442,0,469402,0,0,101091,1360780,0,245277,92834,431566,123971,241674,11651087,14,"Tons",413486,10561,22.49,20.28,0.96,0.01,10759,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1248,138870,26.63,32.67,5.6,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/61",390472,407000,4062,62,888092000,139014,5833721,51714773,57687508,148,23000,345003,21091146,0,1032200,0,0,1186582,715713,0,741888,530777,2232219,897096,413430,29186054,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",9553025,1009,2.14,2.14,2.12,0.02,10859,"BBL",3,500000,0,24.61,4.1,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Gas Turbine","01/01/74","01/01/75",222950,197000,451,0,42223000,0,299904,22692012,22991916,103,0,108584,1469697,0,233742,0,0,0,36481,0,284381,9332,0,296342,34359,2472918,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",617372,1007,2.12,0,2.1,0.03,14371,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Alexandria City",298,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/56","01/01/74",171000,170000,5326,20,194429,0,0,0,0,0,0,708998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,199997,14994,0,404462,0,1328451,6833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346281,10,2.24,2.24,2.14,0.03,12.45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/50",,102500,103000,8760,45,381623000,0,0,0,0,0,0,4120850,6152121,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,10272971,27,,239196,8800,25.72,25.72,1.46,0.02,11031,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","1/1/1972",22000,18000,95,0,1007000,0,0,0,0,0,0,9422,53460,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62882,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,99000,137300,0.54,0.54,3.93,0.05,13498 "Anaheim City of",590,1999,,"GAS TRUBINE","01/01/90","01/01/91",49270,45998,638,6,27719000,0,9226000,27237000,36463000,740,0,280835,699954,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,187223,0,0,0,1146979,2314991,84,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258683,1009,2.76,2.76,2.74,25.7,9394,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#1","4 Gas 2 Int","01/01/62","01/01/72",85000,33000,1010,14,9983618,80839,3457655,22418738,25957232,305,380194,55796,353989,0,0,0,0,809120,0,3922,67280,67353,0,442853,0,1800313,180,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,273580,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.03,19744,778,0,133500,33.82,33.82,6.03,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#2","3 Gas 1 Ste","01/01/75","01/01/84",243200,151000,19516,30,759258360,11240,8928538,75136820,84076598,346,5364843,257796,10642281,0,678572,0,0,1623991,233929,0,330573,231135,303990,1190866,118352,15611485,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7701758,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.01,10144,570,0,133500,34.71,34.71,6.19,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Gas Turbine","01/01/54","01/01/54",5500,5000,0,0,493000,0,0,1065016,1065016,194,0,142,36663,0,0,0,0,7532,0,0,143,0,0,142049,0,186529,378,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1347,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Northeast","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",31500,31300,7566,24,120607160,70498,2376720,5711293,8158511,259,0,42490,2760067,0,395223,0,0,366434,798118,0,24135,51518,290200,20129,3652,4751966,39,"TON",58175,12000,39.8,39.48,1.64,0.02,12637,"MCF",125541,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.03,12648,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Steam","01/01/35","01/01/54",27500,22500,465,11,4508000,24099,1221355,5587700,6833154,248,0,31568,193351,0,41643,0,0,12652,492890,0,23781,136549,88433,55977,1897,1078741,239,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",70119,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.04,15874,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER TURBINES","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",200000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER SOLAR","SOLAR","01/01/86","01/01/86",300,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER","STEAM","01/01/70","01/01/77",726000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/74",558000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"SEAHOLM","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/55",120000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Braintree Town of",2144,1999,"Potter II","Gas Turbine","01/01/77","01/01/77",97500,79500,1284,27,72929000,20271,3762859,18429374,22212504,228,132748,176565,2625145,0,1154442,0,0,0,0,0,158096,316309,488498,491410,262035,5672500,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",931167,1035,3.03,3.03,2.92,0.03,11631,"BBLS",14190,138809,15.72,15.72,2.7,0.03,10520 "Brownsville Public Utils Board",2409,1999,"SILAS RAY","STEAM GAS T","01/01/46","01/01/77",155000,197000,5256,29,206,528443,4499041,192117166,197144650,1272,0,205477,6239714,0,1311,0,0,155739,309455,0,74856,224382,203068,176038,1264465,8854505,42983034,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346974,1059,2.65,2.65,2.5,0.03,12048,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2439,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/70","01/01/87",39,30,265,8,5177,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,311874,0,0,0,0,499578,0,0,0,0,0,216081,0,1027533,198480,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",72688,1000,3.8,3.8,3.8,0.06,29839,"Bbl29839",639,128000,55.63,55.63,7.12,0.06,29839 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Bryan Municipal","STEAM, GAS","01/01/55","01/01/74",138000,115000,0,20,118273000,0,7590674,7546886,15137560,110,46427,76607,3529286,0,372623,0,0,606045,154868,9320,63805,20315,520977,159461,31344,5544651,47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1626575,1,2.25,2.25,2.21,0.03,14.05,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Roland C. Dandy","STEAM","01/01/77","01/01/77",105000,106000,0,19,461142000,1183486,10201555,18752019,30137060,287,105283,76291,11510542,0,391030,0,0,512056,181517,12858,53081,31539,405327,91686,57727,13323654,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",5120070,1,2.24,2.24,2.21,0.02,11.36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Gas Turbine","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/71",25500,25000,106,1,2093500,13587,531143,3214616,3759346,147,17164,6073,130467,0,0,0,0,324,5442,16648,0,0,0,75762,0,234716,112,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",6016,137674,20.61,21.69,3.75,0.06,16616 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Joseph C McNeil GenrЬ ","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50,53,4305,48,183109400,278455,18147811,50484579,68910845,1378217,571376,140467,6439721,0,788415,0,0,291816,360657,0,131396,35661,553086,1325161,20193,10086573,55,"Wood-Tons",263762,4750,23.46,23.52,2.47,0.03,13742,"MCF",66041,1012124,2.82,2.82,2.78,0.24,86785,"BBL",2260,136430,20.13,21.19,3.7,0,71.02 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Streeter Station","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/73",51500,50000,1650,23,38111600,281328,3758281,14375110,18414719,358,699506,97410,1113417,0,230220,0,0,102634,142771,0,90418,180725,588058,55402,9122,2610177,68,"Tons",19527,12429,38.79,36.49,1.47,0.02,14033.99,"MCF",49410,1000,2.75,2.75,2.75,0.04,14033.99,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Combustion Turbine","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/68",25000,20000,193,0,2814300,70777,134588,3497629,3702994,148,3062,4978,122537,0,0,0,0,5713,0,0,6674,9708,0,32837,0,182447,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",50599,1000,2.42,2.42,2.42,0.04,17979.25,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"Reid Garner #4","Steam-coal","01/01/83","01/01/83",275000,250000,0,96,1597086000,319709000,0,0,319709000,1163,0,0,22054817,0,0,0,0,0,21659183,0,0,0,0,0,0,43714000,27,"Tons",672949,11858,0,13.11,1.31,0.01,11079,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7515,133622,0,25,4.55,0.05,11570 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"BottleRock & S Geysep","Steam-Geoth","01/01/85","01/01/85",55000,0,0,0,0,10000,0,0,10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Chanute City of",3355,1999,"Plant #3","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/91",31915,39975,595,8,10378156,50000,612000,15500000,16162000,506,0,369525,245371,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,166666,0,0,136912,0,918474,89,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",78668,1000,2.66,2.66,2.66,0.02,0.02,"Barrels",3969,138000,26.57,26.57,0.08,0.01,0.01 "PUD No 1 of Clark County",3660,1999,"River Road CCCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","01/01/97",248000,258504,7058,21,1711891704,1053160,141767983,13187783,156008926,629,2319343,4203148,23066109,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,91900,0,0,0,27361157,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",11463,1060,2042,2012,1.9,0.01,7114,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Combine Cyc","01/01/71","01/01/71",25550,24000,2149,6,43507,0,0,4581109,4581109,179,0,10000,1053091,0,0,0,0,130000,80000,0,10000,0,12009,328580,0,1623680,37320,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",374997,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.02,8.62,"BBL",70,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.05,13.99 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/65","01/01/65",11500,11500,754,6,12158,0,0,1445133,1445133,126,0,10000,478409,0,0,0,0,100000,50000,0,20000,0,0,226974,0,885383,72823,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",169662,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.03,13.99,"BBL",115,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.07,20.18 "Coffeyville City o",3892,1999,"COFFEYVILLE","STEAM","01/01/01","01/01/73",56985,55900,4013,23,68578900,0,0,0,0,0,0,57285,2419645,0,0,0,0,0,1146750,0,0,0,8610,0,0,3632290,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",938070,1000,2.25,2.58,2.58,0.03,1368,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Steam","01/01/00","01/01/64",11125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,68864,7301,41,105,51389,127700,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Diesel","01/01/48","01/01/78",13250,45933,1719,6,7081208,0,0,0,0,0,0,40423,214682,0,0,0,0,37863,0,0,0,12739,0,71418,0,377125,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",65604,9530000,2.84,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1725,126000,17.7,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Birdsall","Steam-Gas","01/01/53","01/01/57",62500,4500,1717,4,20716000,10761,2593301,11384249,13988311,224,0,67716,1180669,0,107787,0,0,227078,88988,0,31363,89311,290603,224308,38374,2346197,113,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",412714,806,2.83,2.83,3.52,0.06,16212,"GALLONS",22000,137420,0.11,0.11,0.81,0.01,16212 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Drake","Steam-Gas","01/01/25","01/01/74",257300,256000,8760,106,1484262000,2725551,23014851,80547185,106287587,413,0,1059853,25816108,0,1094453,0,0,3228406,1184954,0,462905,237248,4111443,1735831,152472,39083673,26,"TONS",769313,10914,29.13,31.49,1.44,0.01,11585,"MCF",494125,808,2.73,2.73,3.38,0.03,11585,"BARRELS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Nixon","Steam-Gas","01/01/80","01/01/80",207000,214000,6081,81,1117841000,5059222,39785705,107090082,151935009,734,0,969721,11571054,0,779121,0,0,1343687,1057607,0,489855,218501,3309067,2974204,146609,22859426,20,"TONS",538337,10432,18.31,18.84,0.9,0,10120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13952,136738,24.87,24.87,4.33,0.04,10120 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"CTS","Gas","01/01/99","01/01/99",71660,73000,458,0,22292000,418573,123167,32084223,32625963,455,0,0,715385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26204,0,741589,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",291394,983,2.89,2.87,2.92,0.03,12852,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbia City of",4045,1999,,"Steam/Gas T","01/01/10","01/01/70",86000,226000,8760,46,62152000,115894,3578025,15986526,19680445,229,5320808,43503,2133251,0,531664,0,0,967929,376491,0,170114,28005,512239,452108,0,5215304,84,"Tons",37319,13265,53.83,53.69,2.02,3.22,15930,"Mcf",34179,0,3.64,3.64,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbus City of",4065,1999,"O'Shaughnessy",,,,5000,5000,0,1,5860000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,49898,0,0,0,0,0,2864,0,52762,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Concord City of",4150,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,545243,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Connecticut Mun Elec Engy Coop",4180,1999,"Millstone Unit 3","Nuclear (e)","01/01/86","01/01/86",1253100,1164700,7329,933,8277624400,0,20415627,29930688,50346315,40,0,324496,363329,24201,162455,0,0,48209,296706,13608,313554,74201,315415,228127,1354,2165655,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Wansley 1 & 2","Coal fired","01/01/76","01/01/78",22220,0,0,0,149590620,0,0,9113036,9113036,410,28304,29233,2186381,0,24950,0,0,15863,81536,0,42895,19710,138435,167350,13819,2720172,18,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Scherer 1 & 2","Coal fired","/ /","01/01/84",22680,0,0,0,144814966,0,0,13467749,13467749,594,50818,27106,2605498,0,25617,0,0,15303,77539,0,34949,22981,256897,16076,11927,3093893,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Denton City of",5063,1999,"SPENCER PLANT","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/73",179000,259100,11980,36,305539695,0,0,0,0,0,0,233373,9138796,0,348227,0,0,468112,432003,0,71604,11794,211613,467529,210327,11593378,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3800668,1,2.24,2.24,2.24,2.99,12.43,"BBl",0,139.68,7.82,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Willamette","Steam","01/01/31","01/01/50",25000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1189332,1189332,48,0,0,260,0,1204,0,0,-975,0,0,0,0,0,5095,7459,13043,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Energy Center","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",51200,41000,0,0,192829000,1280,320371,7521672,7843323,153,0,13058,1366594,0,0,0,0,261785,0,0,0,94,0,127793,0,1769324,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,321587,0,2.51,0,0,0,2495.24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"ANIMAS","STEAM-COMBI","01/01/55","01/01/94",32180,28000,7808,14,170805000,5968,1109574,25033191,26148733,813,0,70145,3611891,0,225548,0,0,460952,226694,0,122984,0,217797,1021413,38103,5995527,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1668856,1013,2.13,2.13,2.1,0.02,9897,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"SAN JUAN","STEAM-COAL","/ /","/ /",4300042200,43000,7919,10,293222700,0,5471749,62874731,68346480,0,0,71242,5641682,0,114021,0,0,120758,93838,131,62021,34762,382623,77158,65298,6663534,23,"TONS",167448,9421,32.33,32.33,1.72,0.01,10774,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Fayetteville Public Works Comm",6235,1999,"Butler-Warner Gen PtP","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/88",303400,276500,1134,33,0,749336,5123088,100277060,106149484,350,4108529,0,-6665,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,292639,-141172,144802,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1724674,1046,2.72,2.72,2.6,0.03,12249.5,"Barrels",4,138800,27.15,27.87,4.78,0.06,13375.25 "Fort Pierce Utilities Auth",6616,1999,"Steam","Steam","01/01/21","01/01/89",120011,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,564929,6990,0,231196,0,0,428922,138247,0,21508,56082,204594,1437831,87424,3177723,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #1","Internal Co",,"01/01/64",13190,0,0,9,2066120,5022,1113459,3036221,4154702,315,51721,42612,209909,0,0,0,0,518539,0,0,0,79604,0,0,0,850664,412,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",293755,138788,0.81,0.68,0.18,0.97,14.88 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #2","Internal Co","1/1/1968","01/01/73",37390,57000,1,9,1277200,1827,3178208,8088951,11268986,301,0,52596,205053,0,0,0,0,634322,0,28573,0,101784,0,0,0,1022328,800,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",319336,138788,0.86,0.64,0.13,0.16,9.2 "Fremont City of",6779,1999,"Wright","Steam","01/01/56","01/01/76",132700,83390,8760,47,336075,202231,5905920,42850719,48958870,369,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"DEERHAVEN","STEAM (330-","01/01/69","01/01/81",327500,290000,12226,0,1352589900,254025,31881608,176716069,208851702,638,0,357675,29040171,0,1948913,669408,0,709824,318849,0,0,234571,2947099,1471570,212996,37911076,28,"Tons",434183,13091,0,43.31,1.65,0.02,10917.81,"Mcf",3363772,1047,0,2.65,2.53,0.03,12133.79,"Barrels",37465,152355.8,0,17.6,2.75,0.03,11346.38 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"DEERHAVEN","GAS TURBINE","01/01/76","01/01/97",121000,106000,1766,0,84018600,0,1321304,28064043,29385347,243,0,39742,3231130,0,28286,26111,0,2792,9961,0,0,15073,36357,60563,3746,3453761,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1122969,1047,0,2.86,2.74,0.04,14030.74,"Barrels",692,139057.2,0,20.13,3.45,0.06,18331.59 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"CRYSTAL RIVER","NUCLEAR","01/01/77","01/01/77",12530,13000,8736,0,100282800,3267,4269194,7051636,11324097,904,0,649986,434350,0,10743,21,0,0,421140,180700,453410,74742,63458,47809,56124,2392483,24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mmbtu",1060237,1,0,0.41,0.41,0,10572.47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"KELLY","STEAM (310,","01/01/13","01/01/65",69000,70000,6288,38,122927200,29000,3448845,16424862,19902707,288,0,116270,4283336,0,725363,41979,0,353107,42098,0,37872,118991,299095,266800,56631,6341542,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1386371,1041,0,2.8,2.69,0.04,1359.07,"Barrels",27416,150944,0,14.6,2.3,0.03,11701.63 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"KELLY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/38","01/01/65",48900,23000,187,0,1323700,0,3911,6914299,6918210,141,0,2848,102069,0,3654,898,0,156,983,0,56884,2806,253,6844,9228,186623,141,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",34317,1041,0,2.97,2.85,0.08,27441.76,"Barrels",125,137462.3,0,2.18,0.38,0.01,33607.61 "Garland City of",6958,1999,"C E Newman","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/64",90,0,0,15,52988540,0,0,0,0,0,0,393626,2065599,0,337730,0,0,304378,0,0,0,95143,576059,204996,14547,3992078,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",751031,1027,2.68,2.68,2.61,0.03,14558,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Garland City of",6958,1999,"Ray Olinger","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/75",340,0,0,53,1124489300,352431,77747728,0,78100159,229706,0,925754,28773849,0,899894,0,0,340126,0,0,75135,141289,2796239,1696904,58564,35707754,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",12530666,1015,2.29,2.29,2.25,0.02,11307,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","C.C. 8 & St","01/01/77","01/01/77",98000,30000,6550,46,83627000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2304766,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2304766,28,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,885159,1032,2.6,2.6,2.52,0.02,10922,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","Steam 3, 4,","01/01/53","01/01/64",117000,79000,8095,46,235016000,0,0,0,0,0,0,83118,12398533,0,2564287,0,0,0,199205,0,21789,81361,407902,1157488,0,16913683,72,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,6354878,665,1.96,1.96,2.94,0.04,13452,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","01/01/74",53000,1000,34332,46,295600,0,0,0,0,0,0,60626,127128,0,0,0,0,0,312,0,0,0,73,124,0,188263,637,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,49491,1032,2.57,2.57,2.49,0.04,17276,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Haven City of",7483,1999,"Sims 111","Steam","01/01/61","01/01/83",65000,65640,7248,34,325839300,194823,17546372,59386460,77127655,1187,608741,60314,5842025,0,518785,0,0,229677,414863,0,31843,59567,1244336,91370,29265,8522045,26,"tons",160760,11367,0,36.34,1.59,17.93,11338,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",13850,1000,0,4.34,0,0,0 "Grand Haven City of",7483,1999,"Diesel Plant","internal co","01/01/31","01/01/74",20430,9030,28,1,72500,27458,445645,4740308,5213411,255,22625,776,38089,0,0,0,0,0,30018,0,0,2297,0,0,74851,146031,2014,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",933,1000,0,4.34,11.87,525.39,44239,"brls",376,144000,0,0.05,0,0,0 "Grand River Dam Authority",7490,1999,"GRDA #1","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",490000,519,8044,97,3074727000,1689890,98855201,234243925,334789016,683,0,134410,29404628,0,904037,0,0,798928,375518,0,169174,314792,2121091,430639,266073,34919290,11,"TONS",1895637,8384,14.42,14.42,0.86,0,10337.97,"MCF",107483,1006,2.44,2.44,2.39,0,35.72,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand River Dam Authority",7490,1999,"GRDA #2","STEAM","01/01/86","01/01/86",520000,553,8023,120,2084345000,0,53986144,402596506,456582650,878,0,83334,20574802,0,2216945,0,0,525668,233196,0,104888,178859,2453678,344835,172902,26889107,13,"TONS",2049199,8701,14.76,15.18,0.87,0,10756.78,"MCF",67904,1006,2.52,2.52,2.46,0,20.98,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty",7548,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,82928,2208894,12774993,15066815,0,0,61617,6477957,0,27174,0,0,0,581817,934,212,0,14634,18437,28696,7211478,0,"Tons",249975,8218,25.98,25.74,1.56,0.02,10782,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,445,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,"Wright","Steam","1/1/1902","1/1/1955",17500,11721,1472,12,10291142,44232,477968,5142250,5664450,324,0,43208,293538,0,168488,0,0,154435,29059,1228,19461,29411,12072,62764,5858,819522,80,"Tons",140,13248,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",93243,1019,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,"Henderson","Steam","1/1/1960","1/1/1967",46179,40900,2903,23,50661210,117233,1499663,13202167,14819063,321,0,56586,2045916,0,255116,0,0,157434,117767,0,52669,867,272422,88793,111926,3159496,62,"Tons",545,13100,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",687608,1019,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",120,138486,0,0,0,0,0 "Harrisonburg City of",8198,1999,"PLEASANT VALLEY","GAS-TURBINE","01/01/97","01/01/98",14000,13795,0,2,1546628,18753,975623,6407017,7401393,529,0,9077,75597,0,0,0,0,10595,4440,0,0,5214,15176,0,188,120287,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GALLONS",186918,0,0.4,0.4,0,0,0 "Harrisonburg City of",8198,1999,"MT. CLINTON","GAS-TURBINE","01/01/98","01/01/99",14000,8846,0,2,525731,0,139162,2862528,3001690,214,0,1057,18332,0,0,0,0,6844,366,0,0,5001,1332,0,21,32953,63,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GALLONS",66356,0,0.4,0.4,0,0,0 "Henderson City Utility Comm",8449,1999,"STATION ONE","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/68",40591,20000,0,30,4898138,0,2293070,8187353,10480423,258,0,312060,1078245,0,309093,0,0,263344,276291,0,0,14500,164236,186376,9722,2613867,534,"TONS",34517,11434,28.82,28.66,1.31,20.31,11501,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Henderson City Utility Comm",8449,1999,"STATION TWO","STEAM","01/01/73","01/01/74",350000,312000,0,0,2104822040,0,0,115186365,115186365,329,0,469431,479283,0,1971482,0,0,894387,491084,0,272097,167212,3356917,539212,306867,8947972,4,"TONS",249039,11435,23.99,24.09,1.05,10.97,11458,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"48th Street","Oil/Gas Tur","01/01/94","01/01/94",75300,75651,1207,0,55601071,336770,5131914,24597253,30065937,399,33140,0,1847609,0,0,0,0,304910,0,0,0,0,0,70013,0,2222532,40,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",717801,1020,2.6,2.6,2.55,0.03,13168,"Brls",2149,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0,222 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"James DeYoung","Steam","01/01/41","01/01/68",62250,55503,8760,45,321994740,803565,5456558,33980556,40240679,646,169931,203954,7360870,0,1786693,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1639115,0,10990632,34,"Tons",168615,12700,41,41,1.57,0.02,13300,"Mcf",4050,1020,3,3,2.94,0,13,"Brs",250,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0,4.46 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"6th Street","Oi/Gas Turb","01/01/74","/ /",24000,13000,54,0,139040,20548,219739,2965966,3206253,134,0,0,27012,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11677,0,38689,278,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Brs",1208,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0.25,49992 "Holyoke City of",8774,1999,"Steam","Conventiona","01/01/02","01/01/61",25500,18000,272,32,-1054,143821,1991971,11336832,13472624,528,0,1028334,2937101,0,124366,0,0,0,0,0,416066,0,0,0,0,307775,-292007,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",57642,1020,2.74,2.74,2.68,0.05,23544,"Barrels",265,152297,16.24,22.59,3.53,0.05,23544 "Homestead City of",8795,1999,"G.W.","Int. Combus","01/01/26","01/01/81",59100,63000,8700,21,73393186,7431029,52158226,0,59589255,1008,3549232,0,2715528,0,0,0,0,211533,0,0,749417,13328,0,1665477,0,5355283,73,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCP",652925,1091,2.85,3.21,2.85,0,10060,"BARRELS",13090,140600,24,24,0,0,1038 "Terrebonne Parish Consol Govt",8884,1999,"Houm plnt","Stem","01/01/62","01/01/76",78950,67,8908,26,108812349,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",1412914,1,2.82,2.82,2.66,0.03,13778,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hudson Town of",8973,1999,"Cherry St Station","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/72",15200,15200,328,10,2018120,3500,332760,3278258,3614518,238,0,29030,151138,0,0,0,0,177436,0,0,27887,98252,0,122644,0,606387,300,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,33210,910,2.98,2.98,3.27,0,0,,2307,140000,24.47,22.62,3.85,0.04,0 "Hudson Town of",8973,1999,"HLP Peaking","Internal Co","01/01/62","01/01/62",4400,4400,283,0,1552200,0,1503,711956,713459,162,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lafayette City of",9096,1999,"Doc Bonin","Steam","01/01/65","01/01/77",331500,276000,14682,26,772281,302436,6849008,50156340,57307784,173,1732453,190840,21238385,0,398587,0,0,563223,268406,0,110983,25741,202633,459320,729180,24187298,31319,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",8285542,1055,2.47,2.47,2.34,0.02,11586,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lafayette City of",9096,1999,"Curtis A. Rodemacherи","Steam","01/01/51","01/01/60",33700,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.2","GAS TURBINE","01/01/75","01/01/95",90500,52000,3484,8,143171,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1199515,1000000,1.94,1.94,1.94,0.02,857,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.1","INTERNAL CO","01/01/41","01/01/63",19280,13000,481,17,1411,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",10876,1000000,2.5,2.5,2.5,0.02,11409,"BARRELS",898,138500,21.33,21.33,3.67,0.04,11409 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.1","GAS TURBINE","01/01/71","01/01/71",16000,12600,1947,17,18870,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",210955,1000000,2.16,2.16,2.16,0.02,11179,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"YUMA AXIS (YUCCA)","STEAM/GAS T","01/01/59","01/01/59",97000,88000,8721,26,352808000,64181,2260883,23196343,25521407,263,0,379434,10637888,0,935878,0,0,640464,495843,0,99827,69611,406661,211055,674585,14551246,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",4064674,1009,2.34,2.34,2.32,0.03,11.62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"BRAWLEY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/62","01/01/62",22500,0,0,0,0,5071,76410,2726341,2807822,125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1734,0,0,0,2153,82770,0,0,86657,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"ROCKWOOD","GAS TURBINE","01/01/77","01/01/80",49900,43000,449,3,8735400,3032,432127,10030106,10465265,210,0,48642,178668,0,0,0,0,31135,0,0,83679,478,0,196364,0,538966,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",120588,1009,2.77,2.77,2.75,0.03,13.81,"BBLS",309,139000,31.32,31.32,5.36,0.08,12.78 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"EC STEAM PLANT","STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/93",236000,200000,14438,32,346976000,145322,8507545,92188450,100841317,427,0,435334,9038913,0,564914,0,0,928726,354013,0,378925,35949,1083557,364726,297164,13482221,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",3854124,1009,2.73,2.73,2.7,0.03,11.2,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"COACHELLA PLANT","GAS TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/76",92600,79900,484,3,8735400,0,660201,8509765,9169966,99,0,0,384991,0,0,0,0,16129,0,0,0,0,0,221825,0,622945,71,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",133342,1009,2.68,2.68,2.65,0.07,15.4,"BBLS",161,139000,19.82,19.82,3.4,0.03,15.49 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station H","Combustion","01/01/72","01/01/72",43900,35000,768,0,9679000,0,264494,7881342,8145836,186,3650000,0,418654,0,0,0,0,259,6023,0,1558,1922,0,40063,6460,474939,49,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",165620,1006,2.52,2.52,2.5,4.32,17250,"barrel",70,137380,0,22.9,3.97,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station I","Combustion","01/01/72","01/01/72",39200,20000,84,0,913000,0,302177,5529062,5831239,149,1900000,0,60551,0,0,0,0,165,6970,0,5781,13239,0,25841,31762,144309,158,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",2704,137380,19.9,22.39,3.88,6.63,17087 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station J","Combustion","01/01/69","01/01/69",36000,25000,236,0,2002000,0,0,7805061,7805061,217,0,0,125702,0,0,0,0,222,1531,0,871,4113,0,24419,8730,165588,83,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",6516,137380,19.17,19.29,3.34,6.28,18779 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Missouri City","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/55",46000,39000,1671,4,15124000,35409,3991334,17761788,21788531,474,0,7082,502886,0,176489,0,0,179516,70526,0,12705,8751,225619,212687,60099,1456360,96,"tons",12047,11335,30.77,38.88,1.72,3.33,18669,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",1600,137380,20.32,22.13,3.83,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Blue Valley Steam","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/65",115000,84320,13965,66,241792052,334550,7113970,51575531,59024051,513,0,419819,4808525,0,524873,0,0,530126,996421,0,397024,47705,1359676,212400,446582,9743151,40,"tons",141859,10419,27.47,28,1.34,1.99,13563,"Mcf",318933,1007,2.6,2.6,2.58,0,0,"barrel",381,137380,19.7,29.02,5.03,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Blue Valley RCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",61000,0,0,0,-34900,0,79423,9483847,9563270,157,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6781,13176,0,85297,2666,107920,-3092,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",0,0,19.7,0,0,0,0 "Indiana Municipal Power Agency",9234,1999,"Anderson","Combustion","01/01/92","01/01/92",77400,0,677,1,16207699,338303,2059957,27858215,30256475,391,24719,109921,852328,0,0,0,0,-99533,0,0,0,0,0,35406,0,898122,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",221255,1008,3.76,3.76,0,0.03,13866,"Barrels",913,135000,0,21.44,0,0,0 "Indiana Municipal Power Agency",9234,1999,"Richmond","Combistion","01/01/92","01/01/92",77400,0,672,2,16681301,285908,1897137,27678416,29861461,386,24719,109412,777649,0,0,0,0,63041,0,0,0,0,0,113291,0,1063393,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",205930,1008,3.25,3.25,0,0.03,13826,"Barrels",4618,135000,0,22.83,0,0,0 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"St. Johns River Powr","Steam","01/01/87","01/01/88",1359200,1254800,16230,379,9769075000,8261567,216790382,1265014325,1490066274,1096,3558053,1278911,141047857,0,5601281,0,0,1074855,5428044,46697,1187268,2385486,20285812,4095589,1403840,183835640,19,"Ton",3747220,12457,34.89,34.89,1.42,0.02,9594,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"bbl",63214,139174,0,21.47,2.12,0,0 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Southside Station","Steam","01/01/50","01/01/64",231600,212500,10904,10,554635000,260352,9143119,32049310,41452781,179,1629842,271851,15520408,0,1599580,0,0,0,206567,0,326718,25186,630482,191705,280057,19052554,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2507368,1060,0,2.34,3.06,0.03,11179,"Bbl",557864,151168,0,15.84,3.06,0.03,11179 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Northside Station","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/77",1158700,770000,15844,253,3351845000,2786108,56942751,225240754,284969613,246,33142204,2784678,74049151,0,5992982,0,0,44719,4602152,0,1374517,505398,7585701,1471833,857253,99268384,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",8655547,1061,0,2.25,2.88,0.02,10216,"Bbl",3945407,150694,0,13.69,2.88,0.02,10216 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Northside Station","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/75",248400,133600,1573,0,37400000,0,13725,30470646,30484371,123,788220,0,2222304,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2222304,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",106276,141886,0,20.19,4.14,0.05,16933 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Kennedy Station","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/69",149600,99000,5097,10,347132000,1512681,17018214,28634062,47164957,315,401104,268512,9068081,0,772026,0,0,0,215330,0,64213,51497,330526,641660,660280,12072125,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",391837,1061,0,2.34,2.97,0.02,11107,"Bbl",540582,151503,0,14.74,2.97,0.02,11107 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Kennedy Station","Combustion","01/01/69","01/01/78",168600,154000,1125,0,42180000,0,1327436,21421124,22748560,135,25091556,0,2490159,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2490159,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",112392,139127,0,20.19,4.14,0.05,15570 "Jamestown City of",9645,1999,"Samuel A. Carlson","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/68",57700,49026,8760,35,150393293,431201,4905918,44660838,49997957,867,0,307142,3248587,0,767918,0,0,67674,0,0,323990,45918,307513,223184,92412,5384338,36,"Tons",90599,12698,32.64,32.62,1.3,0.02,15.15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"NEARMAN","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",235000,0,6232,0,1163529000,1149455,33440175,132136477,166726107,709,0,2403060,10767308,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4927543,0,0,0,0,18097911,16,"Tons",816559,11608,0,13.63,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",337856,0,0,0.53,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"QUINDARO","GAS TURBINE","01/01/61","01/01/77",121100,0,848,0,37328000,0,0,12878040,12878040,106,0,0,2472937,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,154961,0,0,0,0,2627898,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",82098,0,0,2.67,0,0,0,"Gallons",3996910,10968,0,0.56,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"Kaw","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/62",144000,0,735,0,52780000,226366,10485751,61538861,72250978,502,0,1219250,2547603,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,120227,0,0,0,0,3887080,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",768569,14616,0,2.89,0,0,0,"Gallons",2470,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"Quindaro","STEAM","01/01/66","01/01/71",232000,0,7553,0,432609000,318548,21469578,113626934,135415060,584,0,4220013,12201830,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6446514,0,0,0,0,22868357,53,"Tons",257094,10922,0,18.02,0,0,0,"MCF",136450,0,0,2.53,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kaukauna City of",10056,1999,"Gas-Turbine","Gas-Turbine","01/01/69","01/01/69",20000,20000,0,0,1633000,27532,147667,1773210,1948409,97,0,6258,0,0,0,0,0,5950,179,0,5243,0,0,25424,859,43913,27,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kaukauna City of",10056,1999,"Diesel","Internal Co","01/01/66","01/01/66",6000,6000,0,1,2547740,0,0,750737,750737,125,0,1797,0,0,0,0,0,17685,70,0,1675,0,0,119575,865,141667,56,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kennett City of",10152,1999,,,"01/01/42","01/01/75",31906,0,0,11,1634000,22309,787483,6445027,7254819,227,0,388548,59743,0,0,0,0,90225,0,0,0,0,0,71100,0,609616,373,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERAT","STOCK ISLAN","01/01/65","01/01/65",6000,1830,504,3,787200,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1537,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.04,12420 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"BIG PINE & CUDJOE KE","PEAKING DIE","01/01/66","01/01/66",7800,6000,1241,3,1626000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",3240,147619,25.24,22.91,3.69,0.04,12353 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERAT","COMBUSTION","01/01/98","01/01/98",19770,17800,170,3,6338385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",19072,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.07,18656 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","COMBUSTION","01/01/98","01/01/98",19770,17800,312,3,4201594,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",12081,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.06,17828 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","MEDIUM SPEE","01/01/92","01/01/92",19200,17400,1348,4,7680400,725946,2129491,33095400,35950837,1872,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",15168,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.04,12245 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","COMBUSION T","01/01/78","01/01/78",23450,20000,338,3,3341400,102063,3836252,41439758,45378073,1935,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",10618,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.07,19703 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Cane Island Unit 1","Gas Turbine","01/01/94","01/01/95",40000,40500,959,0,14625850,2178026,8322640,16405426,26906092,673,0,155794,616975,0,21370,0,0,0,47552,0,0,82207,42233,3552,0,969683,66,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Cane Island Unit 2","Combined Cy","01/01/95","01/01/95",120000,120900,8016,0,410918450,0,18118934,33576386,51695320,431,0,574702,9819459,0,1048989,0,0,0,317852,44,602,7445,273743,228456,0,12271292,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Hansel 8-20","Internal Co","01/01/59","01/01/80",18350,17800,1896,7,2753500,83022,1284485,18177017,19544524,1065,0,0,60138,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,60138,22,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Hansel 21-23","Combined Cy","01/01/83","01/01/83",55000,52300,3391,23,48803800,188985,8733288,12117381,21039654,383,1360859,467366,1917038,0,669123,0,0,0,263562,0,0,9168,294075,290,407232,4027854,83,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",30000,0,0,0,9028400,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",34000,0,10495,35,57950539,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Internal Co","01/01/65","01/01/65",10000,0,1433,0,2538120,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Steam","01/01/71",,404000,382000,7228,201,1839190600,1885069,31460078,296239998,329585145,816,8226431,522705,41752998,0,2155417,0,0,1371320,950229,0,705662,501402,5163353,1063922,1302923,55489931,30,"Tons",500198,12850,43.47,43.81,0,0,0,"MCF",5551769,953000,2.45,2.45,0,0,0,"BBLS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Internal Co","01/01/70","1/1/1970",5500,5500,344,0,892340,0,0,1320630,1320630,240,0,0,34735,0,0,0,0,9947,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,44682,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBLS",1518,138953,25.45,22.89,3.92,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","1/1/1973",20200,20000,284,0,22266010,0,0,4357281,4357281,216,21292755,0,764571,0,0,0,0,494377,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1258948,57,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",67719,953000,2.51,2.51,2.39,0,0,"BBLS",927,138953,25.45,23.77,4.07,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"Larsen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1966",70000,87000,3471,7,109781131,18222,3205076,39859999,43083297,615,1568340,-458515,4264086,0,661973,0,0,352157,157768,0,224398,35362,686445,74964,71417,6070055,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1067068,953000,2.52,2.52,2.4,0,0,"BBLS",62536,149341,15.9,15.4,2.46,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"Larsen","GasTurbine","01/01/62","1/1/1992",141000,144000,5825,39,519222486,10000,355941,47760931,48126872,341,1320675,0,14688881,0,0,0,0,57111,49377,0,75387,135332,474794,0,18035,15498917,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",4954465,953000,2.5,2.5,2.38,0,0,"BBLS",778,138657,18.94,23.73,4.07,0,0 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Erickson","Steam","01/01/73","01/01/73",154716,155993,7562,28,902816777,503834,8008408,37441310,45953552,297,9431143,598448,15649944,0,1139751,0,0,375627,144309,0,521787,398880,1081673,289370,373441,20573230,23,"Tons",359532,12604,40.78,41.97,1.66,0.02,10054,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",2451,137028,18.35,17.87,3.1,0.03,10213 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Ottawa","Steam","01/01/38","01/01/54",2500,0,0,0,0,608570,3547880,114658,4271108,1708,1064667,0,0,0,43886,0,0,0,127,0,0,16474,0,0,716,61203,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Eckert","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/00",375000,313553,8760,81,1359307426,17065,20619486,113409313,134045864,357,7390092,1095136,26848959,0,3418600,303612,0,443302,132055,0,712432,787553,4216929,2271054,978202,40742496,30,"tons",809048,10575,30.23,30.51,1.51,0.02,12067,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",12900,138067,18.25,18.61,3.21,0.03,9035 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Laramie River","Steam","01/01/80",,183000,0,0,0,1368728000,948685,27384698,112496736,140830119,770,162367,402737,7659439,0,0,0,0,2448015,0,0,0,0,3077883,0,0,13588074,10,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Rokeby 2","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","1/1/1997",95400,85000,472,10,27550000,292531,1645078,27003893,28941502,303,4175680,124454,675616,0,0,0,0,179579,0,0,6681,10203,0,200778,21818,1219129,44,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",338164,996,2.05,2.05,2.05,0.03,12591,"BBLS",1980,137799,0,22.26,3.78,0.06,14724 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"8th & J","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",27000,31000,81,10,1838000,77662,98128,4865007,5040797,187,164554,41168,79431,0,0,0,0,43462,0,0,1750,5169,0,55828,0,226808,123,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",29571,989,2.75,2.75,2.79,0.04,16104,"BBLS",67,128691,0,22.26,3.78,0.07,17830 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Rokeby #1","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",72400,71000,64,10,2311000,95118,1918857,8492052,10506027,145,175405,74672,114678,0,0,0,0,94085,0,0,40687,67514,0,1328510,21818,1741964,754,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",32475,994,2.33,2.33,2.34,0.03,14499,"BBLS",293,137799,19.45,22.23,3.77,0.08,20315 "Littleton Town of",11085,1999,"NEW HAVEN HARBOR",".225% JOINT",,,0,0,0,0,1732502,0,0,0,0,0,0,90,51512,0,948,0,0,0,0,0,2392,0,0,0,0,54942,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Logansport City of",11142,1999,"Logansport","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/64",38500,0,8760,22,162228320,109642,1405355,19237386,20752383,539,0,190031,3821848,0,128670,0,0,36753,919428,0,140403,20089,563819,408835,480785,6710661,41,90397,92870,11500,41.15,41.15,2.13,0.02,13.17,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Logansport City of",11142,1999,"Logansport","Oil/Gas","01/01/69","01/01/69",17500,0,0,0,577170,0,1025207,0,1025207,59,0,0,42618,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,42618,74,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"VALLEY","STEAM","01/01/54","01/01/56",545600,337000,0,7,27314000,926527,25439704,84246953,110613184,203,3500000,60235,13221495,0,55929,0,0,0,442925,0,11284,70392,77493,61823,114689,14116265,517,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",404724,1,3,3,2.96,37.96,12816,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HARBOR","CONBINED ST","01/01/94","01/01/94",229000,558000,2259,41,524137000,1740059,87786094,289957234,379483387,1657,8879733,276214,3330349,0,62330,0,0,0,1084424,0,580563,202658,212797,374547,185390,6309272,12,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",4522291,1,3,3,2.96,25.77,8701,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HARBOR","GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","01/01/72",38000,36000,48,0,850000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HAYNES","STEAM","01/01/62","01/01/67",1608000,1489000,8015,123,2113574000,933038,37791521,306054386,344778945,214,1741576,1052843,50891914,0,3057224,0,0,1792056,5017847,0,939570,1424717,3202792,2787404,1583937,71750304,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",22709425,1,3,3,2.96,32.1,10839,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"SCATTERGOOD","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/74",823200,835000,8758,91,1679449000,515557,47288037,164431480,212235074,258,46903,1404338,66439099,0,1408691,0,0,0,3756004,0,214277,727252,3701955,1608703,1273919,80534238,48,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",15638964,1,3,3,2.96,28.3,9556,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Ferguson",,"01/01/74","01/01/74",446000000,0,0,0,1378410000,931823,26158508,42319502,69409833,0,0,347319,29342167,0,137242,0,0,734629,899018,0,332791,702887,413738,469747,33658,33413196,24,"TONS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",14169320,1013,2.06,2.06,2.03,0.02,10552,"BBL",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Fayette","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/88",1690000000,0,0,0,1.1015857e+10,13591047,103023934,837863878,954478859,1,0,2157811,109413990,0,3840257,0,0,2391848,4494846,0,2014006,1954362,4931568,1961033,403807,133563528,12,"TONS",6553001,8409,16.17,16.17,0.96,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",19258,141000,14.25,14.25,2.4,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Sim Gideon","Steam","01/01/65","01/01/69",623000000,0,0,0,2101292000,458719,20455136,65676320,86590175,0,0,482445,43723684,0,794924,0,0,891660,1130940,0,200902,1092136,961820,567117,75540,49921168,24,"TONS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",20136681,1095,2.1,2.1,1.91,0.02,10495,"BBL",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/58",72000,51000,5256,6,20565500,6000,300000,13000000,13306000,185,0,105299,1101550,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26625,6656,0,33282,0,1273412,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",382836,1025,2.88,2.88,2.81,0.05,19081,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"BRANDON","GAS TURBINE","01/01/90","01/01/90",20000,21000,8760,8,139296480,0,1000000,15500000,16500000,825,0,233999,3337924,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,59168,14792,0,73959,0,3719842,27,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1543387,1018,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.02,11279,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"HOLLY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/64","01/01/74",52500,45000,4818,3,21967922,10000,300000,5300000,5610000,107,0,11700,962730,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2958,740,0,3698,0,981826,45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",384439,1040,2.5,2.5,2.41,0.04,18200,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/65","01/01/78",98000,102000,8760,32,323909370,62000,1000000,21000000,22062000,225,0,818996,9820907,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,207086,51772,0,258858,0,11157619,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",3921699,1040,2.5,2.5,2.41,0.03,12592,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Gas-Turbine","01/01/99","01/01/99",25000,0,214,0,3613,290255,201403,6104428,6596086,264,0,0,264472,0,0,0,0,30590,0,0,0,0,0,41325,0,336387,93105,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",51,1000,0.41,0.41,4.17,0.07,0,"Barrels",2438,141200,20.88,20.88,3.52,0.07,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/91",79000,107500,8760,39,249415,211671,5013787,36586533,41811991,529,0,138503,5701868,0,541602,0,0,470467,759564,704,62857,42576,1443126,445568,10944,9617779,38561,"Tons",163852,11080,40.02,40.02,1.81,0.02,0,"MCF",2,1000,0.71,0.71,7.13,0.02,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/85",10500,0,207,0,2140,0,352901,5986839,6339740,604,0,6091,84690,0,0,0,0,49736,0,0,0,0,0,58906,0,199423,93188,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",8,1000,0.62,0.62,0.62,0.03,0,"Barrels",1570,141200,22.77,22.77,3.84,0.03,0 "Marquette City of",11701,1999,"Shiras Steam Plant","Steam","01/01/64","01/01/83",77358,52900,24,40,263218000,951797,8431629,56045965,65429391,846,41203,67627,4986648,0,777004,0,0,293702,159196,0,54712,51526,724902,292519,10515,7418351,28,"Tons",181283,9554,21.46,22.7,1.19,0.02,13173,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",582,138200,20.58,26.46,4.56,0.02,13173 "Marquette City of",11701,1999,"#4 Plant","Gas-Turbine","01/01/79","01/01/79",23000,24700,1,0,5060000,0,300285,4190798,4491083,195,0,4733,283345,0,0,0,0,17195,3952,0,4867,6844,0,27249,40,348225,69,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",13164,138200,21.37,23.67,3.68,0.06,15100 "Marshall City of",11732,1999,"Mrshll","Stem/Intern","01/01/36","01/01/94",57000,43,24,56,48751000,313299,4219564,22221117,26753980,469,395259,452378,1560029,0,0,0,0,0,349846,0,37339,40097,532898,65835,0,3038422,62,26848,11000,32,0,0,0,0,0,190844,140000,2,0,0,0,0,0,755,10000,24.17,0,0,0,0,0 "Massachusetts Mun Whls Elec Co",11806,1999,"Stonybrook Intermedil","Combined Cy","01/01/81","01/01/81",360000,352000,12276,33,780857100,1222270,29736068,116789790,147748128,410,161005,341244,19982046,0,0,0,0,1295017,0,0,217695,109254,0,4801314,0,26746570,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",5422522,1025,2.75,2.75,2.68,0,0,"barrel",265482,138500,21.33,19.11,3.28,0.01,9096 "Massachusetts Mun Whls Elec Co",11806,1999,"Stonybrook Peaking","Gas Turbine","/ /","/ /",170000,170000,620,33,40304600,457327,10488903,45433687,56379917,332,41438,85682,1683238,0,0,0,0,251375,0,0,16235,17343,0,119640,0,2173513,54,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",86543,138500,21.33,19.45,3.34,0.04,12490 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Power Plant 3","Gas Turbine","01/01/98","01/01/98",115600,92000,851,5,32881000,95000,0,25388890,25483890,220,483472,16336,1488284,0,0,0,0,2781,65038,0,8158,7240,0,77867,59525,1725229,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",454570,1012,3.19,3.19,3.16,4.5,14233,"bbl",1154,129200,0.39,0.39,3.06,3.42,11185 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 2","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",56,51000,90,5,2234000,0,0,5867669,5867669,104780,0,16153,125470,0,0,0,0,120168,30978,0,8157,0,0,109601,61288,471815,211,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"bbl",5874,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,5.64,14268 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 3","Gas Turbine","01/01/79","01/01/79",57,50000,416,5,11756000,0,0,8189960,8189960,143684,0,16153,502404,0,0,0,0,120168,30977,0,8158,0,0,125268,61288,864416,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",167915,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.78,14473,"bbl",63,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,9,22782 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Plant 2","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/63",27200,25000,1054,5,13725000,103203,908048,4415135,5426386,199,42,16153,666001,0,3889,0,0,120168,30978,0,8158,22083,74263,39108,61287,1042088,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",173245,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.21,12774,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 1","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56400,52000,289,5,10349000,0,0,5796442,5796442,103,0,16153,444620,0,0,0,0,120169,30977,0,8158,0,0,41682,61288,723047,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",142295,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.6,13948,"bbl",74,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,6.37,16124 "Modesto Irrigation District",12745,1999,"Mc Clure","Gas Turbine","01/01/80","01/01/81",142400,114000,458,3,17013650,41196,671200,22702649,23415045,164,0,39428,921989,0,0,0,0,64862,0,0,93204,0,0,143571,0,1263054,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",184791,1,2.85,2.85,2.79,0.04,14761.28,"BBl",9827,139269,36.12,36.12,0,0.09,15255.06 "Modesto Irrigation District",12745,1999,"Woodland","Gas Turbine","01/01/93","01/01/93",56000,50400,3047,11,112459100,734117,28375,53064895,53827387,961,0,276493,3266313,0,0,0,0,513943,0,0,1528,0,0,410220,0,4468497,40,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1012876,1,3.02,3.02,2.96,0.03,9186.75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Menasha City of",12298,1999,"Menasha","Steam","01/01/49","01/01/64",23400,19595,2037,14,13992,6795,1217617,5289233,6513645,278,20649,40246,27120,0,79885,0,0,60710,95780,0,0,31581,159677,52699,457,548155,39176,"TONS",6898,13928,56.5,56.5,2.02,0.03,15599,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan South Central Pwr Agy",12807,1999,"ENDICOTT","STEAM",,,60000,60000,7000,52,254166000,1446080,18162501,58822650,78431231,1307,914746,337766,5265494,0,924558,0,35080,360832,450758,0,195457,66358,661707,192331,74782,8565123,34,"TONS",137701,12027,37.16,36.29,1.51,0.01,12748,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Moorhead City of",12894,1999,"Mhd Power Plant","gas turbine","01/01/61","01/01/61",10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Morgan City City of",12927,1999,"Joe Cefalu Plant","Steam","01/01/62","01/01/73",70000,40000,0,14,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Muscatine City of",13143,1999,"MUSCATINE","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/83",275500,149900,16238,134,1301983501,784560,72060043,213242536,286087139,1038,28455966,817203,14751640,0,1679994,0,0,663199,1356159,0,672523,554305,2370831,1148168,1101042,25115064,19,"TONS",877820,8297,12.88,13.05,0.79,0.01,11188,"MCF",283208,10200,3.26,3.26,3.18,0,0,"BARRELS",610,138500,30.04,21.9,3.77,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Hallam Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,60000,258,0,10894000,0,229583,4830489,5060072,89,0,0,440985,0,0,0,0,60635,0,0,0,89639,0,94772,13125,699156,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Canaday","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/58",108800,121200,2001,14,85089000,0,9403261,329722,9732983,89,328840,152096,2125397,0,407076,0,0,27245,201168,0,32073,131835,231925,109745,195984,3614544,42,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Gerald Gentleman Sta(","Steam","01/01/78","/ /",1362600,1254000,8657,192,8027362000,3015802,318185462,344602325,665803589,489,19495116,1045932,44726329,0,1955325,0,0,1668527,2934342,193314,448908,877355,10569506,3498868,1294889,69213295,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"McCook Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,56000,60,0,211000,0,194256,4595530,4789786,84,0,0,81476,0,0,0,0,25734,0,0,0,2300,0,73703,18199,201412,955,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Hebron Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,57000,75,0,854000,0,301381,5462494,5763875,102,0,0,181334,0,0,0,0,26759,0,0,0,1630,0,58749,11328,279800,328,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Cooper Nuclear Stat.(","Nuclear","01/01/74","01/01/74",835550,783000,8563,726,6510414600,1028504,187460511,519340650,707829665,847,2508133,8619618,38176410,69343,4859991,0,0,93589,58078357,0,1807073,518308,3317219,1964536,2016373,119520817,18,,20216418,0,0,5.67,53.53,0,10598,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Sheldon Station","Steam","01/01/61","01/01/65",228650,220000,8701,78,1347971000,1843119,10754821,79036432,91634372,401,5634223,590917,10462420,0,930249,0,0,633786,1478748,0,168336,7310,2160302,1295964,920587,18648619,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "New Ulm Public Utilities Comm",13488,1999,"No 3 & 4 & 6","Steam Gener","01/01/02","01/01/64",27000,44000,24,21,16916000,0,3055780,9310761,12366541,458,473090,425178,467864,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,31350,152102,138437,0,1214931,72,"tons",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",16576,1000,2.82,2.82,2.82,0.03,10,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "New Ulm Public Utilities Comm",13488,1999,"No 5","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","01/01/75",24000,24000,24,21,2041000,0,0,2465211,2465211,103,0,22377,91296,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1650,0,14351,0,129674,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",4657,140000,26.02,19.6,3.36,0.05,13500 "North Attleborough Town of",13679,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,326,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Attleborough Town of",13679,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,336,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Roxboro 4","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/80",96000,0,8175,0,520837921,1000,1011000,44494000,45506000,474,72000,48000,9137000,0,80000,0,0,22000,837000,0,67000,17000,475000,136000,53000,10872000,21,"Tons",211870,12369,42.51,42.95,1.74,0.02,10083,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1763,140091,22.71,21.55,3.66,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Mayo 1","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",119000,761,7807,69,651982032,3301000,16199000,82569000,102069000,858,26000,92000,11843000,0,79000,0,0,54000,1174000,0,76000,30000,808000,111000,73000,14340000,22,"Tons",265246,12531,44.52,44.47,1.77,0.02,10243,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5203,140620,21.57,9.23,1.56,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Roxboro 4","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/80",96000,0,8175,0,520837921,1000,1011000,44494000,45506000,474,72000,48000,9137000,0,80000,0,0,22000,874000,0,67000,17000,475000,136000,53000,10909000,21,"Tons",211870,12369,42.51,42.95,1.74,0.02,10083,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1763,140091,22.7,21.55,3.66,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Mayo 1","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/00",119000,761,7807,69,651982032,3301000,16199000,82569000,102069000,858,26000,92000,11843000,0,79000,0,0,54000,1221000,0,76000,30000,808000,111000,73000,14387000,22,"Tons",265246,12531,44.52,44.47,1.77,0.02,10243,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5203,140620,21.57,9.23,1.56,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Brunswick","Nuclear","01/01/75","01/01/77",318000,1696,8584,784,2400008776,617000,94117000,339616000,434350000,1366,297000,666000,11776000,401000,2353000,0,0,533000,9457000,0,1849000,3278000,1064000,298000,1353000,33028000,14,"MW Days",308602,3413000,0,38.16,0.47,0,10533,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Harris","Nuclear","01/01/87","01/01/87",154000,905,8485,491,1171376626,10260000,369018000,452494000,831772000,5401,118000,675000,5246000,252000,1018000,0,0,337000,4827000,0,1102000,634000,445000,182000,302000,15020000,13,"MW Days",156551,3413000,0,33.51,0.41,0,10947,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Oklahoma Municipal Power Auth",14077,1999,"PCRP","Combined cy","01/01/95","01/01/95",60000,60000,0,0,138484081,0,11344757,29655189,40999946,683,0,598783,2955212,0,0,0,0,253386,0,0,44427,0,0,105374,0,3957182,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1392824,1040,2.17,0,2.14,0.02,10460,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"FORT CALHOUN","NUCLEAR","01/01/73","01/01/73",502000,492000,7785,634,3580681000,1072930277,146516232,296914274,442618959,882,0,4971003,23034948,164893,24110476,0,0,-21786,44474249,3358,250883,11195901,6710538,736065,-37917,115592611,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GRAMS",315984,120828860,0,72.9,60.33,6.42,10650.7,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"SARPY COUNTY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","01/01/96",216405,248000,8271,0,55696000,23490,2151281,52951321,55126092,255,0,54073,2103596,0,0,0,0,0,404211,0,3965,2988,0,310603,72329,2951765,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",707344,823,2.46,2.46,2.49,0.04,12745,"BARRELS",3829,138176,17.91,17.91,1.41,0.01,8647 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"JONES STREET","GAS TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/74",116000,129400,8332,0,4369000,0,240081,9753334,9993415,86,0,6331,293819,0,0,0,0,0,47413,0,6227,3925,0,20535,134815,513065,117,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13267,138176,13.48,13.48,2.32,0.04,9604 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"NEBRASKA CITY","STEAM","01/01/79","01/01/79",565000,631500,7500,0,4036035000,-2006108,95061544,382545074,475600510,842,0,779178,25569961,0,1719974,0,0,633248,6781672,0,412434,994984,3789696,1154076,1789468,43624691,11,"TONS",2500212,8357,9.58,9.58,0.57,0,9500,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",9924,138281,20.11,20.11,3.46,0,9493 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"NORTH OMAHA","STEAM","01/01/54","01/01/68",644700,664700,7628,0,3047689000,903939,34352799,194479388,229736126,356,0,473699,25644165,0,1556034,0,0,1205626,5794175,56855,619731,1383677,5536481,4204373,2068776,48543592,16,"TONS",1996018,8393,11.99,11.99,0.71,0,11245,"MCF",706934,988,3.06,3.06,5.95,0,11266,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Orrville City of",14194,1999,,"Steam","01/01/16","01/01/71",84,57,8760,65,330508,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"ton",195800,11500,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",6100,1000,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owatonna City of",14246,1999,,"Steam","01/01/24","01/01/69",26000,0,0,0,0,139199,957861,5646398,6743458,259,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owatonna City of",14246,1999,,"Gas Turbine","/ /","/ /",19000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1935528,1935528,102,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owensboro City of",14268,1999,"Plant 1","Steam","01/01/39","01/01/50",52500,0,0,0,0,0,2061142,4570567,6631709,126,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,9106,0,0,0,0,760,9866,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owensboro City of",14268,1999,"Elmer Smith","Steam","01/01/64","01/01/74",415000,183200,8569,99,2600771,835345,8832392,209611123,219278860,528,801542,250280,29285825,0,1422865,0,0,496091,498805,0,465966,39935,4297784,658819,98181,37514551,14424,"Tons",1247843,10825,20.49,20.56,0.95,0.01,10197,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Painesville City of",14381,1999,"ELECTRIC PLANT","STEAM",,"01/01/88",53500,46000,8760,66,154647000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"TONS",92400,12517,0,33.22,1.33,0,0,"MCF",21300,1000,0,4.41,4.41,0,0,"BARRELS",47,138000,0,14.36,2.48,0,0 "Paragould Light & Water Comm",14446,1999,"Jones Road","Gas turbine","01/01/90",,16,14,415,1,400000,0,8093740,0,8093740,505859,0,0,166593,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,45047,0,211640,529,"mmbtu",91074,0,0,1.83,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Pasadena City of",14534,1999,"Broadway Steam Plantф",,"01/01/54","01/01/65",183000,183000,0,25,179950000,489703,3194316,50159075,53843094,294,0,387760,8839709,0,555006,0,0,988783,11216,228337,138986,37842,440585,136394,7625,11772243,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2295070,1019,3.43,3.43,3.36,0.04,13290,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Pasadena City of",14534,1999,"Glenarm Gas Turbine","Included in","01/01/06","01/01/76",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",59150,1,3.43,3.43,3.36,0.04,16342,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Peabody City of",14605,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/91",65900,65900,8760,5,11639468,177260,0,22101467,22278727,338,0,22746,409579,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,176643,0,608968,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",143226,1,3.05,2.96,2.89,0.03,13227,"BBLS",1239,134127,22.14,22.89,4.06,0.05,12185 "Peru City of",14839,1999,"Peru","Steam","01/01/03","01/01/59",34500,35563,1585,13,12600568,5739,1706469,9574492,11286700,327,325600,0,442012,0,172164,0,0,119874,37861,0,0,14278,126165,22675,0,935029,74,"Tons",7915,12797,47.4,47.33,1.85,0.03,16076,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",221,140000,26.47,24.56,4.18,0,103.08 "Piqua City of",15095,1999,"City of Piqua","Steam & Gas","01/01/32","01/01/89",81113,0,159,39,2138000,21863555,0,0,21863555,270,4196219,76685,242280,0,19742,0,0,231157,56432,0,61697,67457,9593,91301,0,856344,401,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",10878,144000,25.3,25.3,4.3,0.09,23092 "Platte River Power Authority",15143,1999,"Craig Station","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",154000,0,0,0,1205402000,60113,33649805,110581113,144291031,937,947978,194976,12128811,0,1172233,0,0,260695,1245083,7283,237766,121071,814536,181154,912508,17276116,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Platte River Power Authority",15143,1999,"Rawhide","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",270000,270000,8668,86,2119444000,1977213,176729012,277169671,455875896,1688,1471951,1258343,14119301,0,2361900,0,0,4034357,686346,1872,639188,491650,2599323,371255,1094312,27657847,13,"Ton",1294255,8825,10.4,10.4,0.6,0.01,10.78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",54089,138,0.78,0.78,5.63,0,3.5 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"C.M. POLETTI","Steam","01/01/77","01/01/77",883000000,831000000,6386000,122000,1826391000,730000,72140000,359400000,432270000,0,10329000,561000,60034000,0,0,0,0,668000,7300000,0,826000,377000,2299000,2700000,411000,75176000,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCFS",10932333,1031,2.95,3.39,3.29,31.61,10284,"BBLS",1348181,148399,15.78,17.33,2.78,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"R.M. FLYNN","GT/Steam-Co","01/01/94","01/01/94",164000000,159000000,7280000,27000,9.96144e+11,0,7238000,129266000,136504000,1,1136000,88000,43602000,0,0,0,0,93000,1585000,0,0,137000,469000,3225000,39000,49238000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCFS",7095707,1012,4.39,5.62,5.55,42.59,7774,"BBLS",120516,141470,19.98,32.3,4.68,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,,,"/ /","/ /",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"JAF","Nuclear","01/01/75","01/01/75",883000000,848000000,8204000,757000,6.567395e+12,805000,166067000,568085000,734957000,1,13913000,23876000,38317000,0,487000,0,0,54000,32618000,0,5766000,184000,4261000,5843000,3143000,114549000,0,"GMU 235",0,82,0,0,0,5.17,0,"Equivalent",842735,0,0,40.32,0.49,0,10508,,0,235,0,0,0,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"IP3","Nuclear","01/01/76","01/01/76",1013000000,1031000000,7662000,828000,7.26917e+12,747000,206897000,755257000,962901000,1,17924000,29680000,39545000,0,11264000,0,0,0,36622000,0,1577000,2648000,15765000,11868000,29759000,178728000,0,"GMU235",0,82,0,0,0,4.76,0,"Equivalent",937453,0,0,36.9,0.45,0,10560,,0,235,0,0,0,0,0 "Rantoul Village of",15686,1999,"Rantoul Light & Powep ","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/67",18132,38,100,3,16000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11984,0,0,0,0,211546,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,223530,13971,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",19070,10500,0.62,0.62,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Reedy Creek Improvement Dist",15776,1999,"CEP TURBINE","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",35000,28000,6321,12,173569000,0,1455178,24161379,25616557,732,0,640027,4274368,0,0,0,0,392603,0,0,0,341,0,1449579,0,6756918,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCP",1545973,1040,2.76,2.76,2.76,0.02,8007,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Reedy Creek Improvement Dist",15776,1999,"CEP HRSG","HRSG","01/01/88","01/01/88",8500,7000,2327,2,30042000,0,0,2731920,2731920,321,0,93944,742496,0,115993,0,0,17882,0,0,0,59,0,247253,0,1217627,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",268549,1049,2.76,2.76,2.76,0.02,8939,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Redding City of",15783,1999,"Redding Power Plant","Steam","01/01/89","01/01/94",28000,28900,1977,16,18060300,602377,15385522,117247,16105146,575,0,1320,443065,0,117993,0,0,77221,568426,0,70690,2368,53194,57222,0,1391499,77,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",287348,1027,1.54,1.54,1.45,0.03,16610,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Redding City of",15783,1999,"Redding Power Plant","Combustion","01/01/96","01/01/96",65680,27400,854,16,18037300,1807131,0,59683477,61490608,936,0,97874,621818,0,0,0,0,25071,0,0,24410,0,0,321071,0,1090244,60,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",216279,1027,2.53,2.53,2.18,0.02,15570,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Richmond City of",15989,1999,"WWVS","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/72",97700,173080,0,40,627786010,80644,2830371,31698586,34609601,354,0,465409,11078167,0,452274,0,0,404016,348230,0,104865,43599,701670,259774,21756,13879760,22,"Tons",308831,11699,29.73,30.79,1.45,0.01,11517,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",708,138000,0.46,0.46,0,0,0 "Rochelle Municipal Utilities",16179,1999,"Caron Rd Steam Plant(","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/63",11000,0,13,0,62,0,0,11112324,11112324,1010,0,0,15556,0,134143,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,193715,0,343414,5538935,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochelle Municipal Utilities",16179,1999,"2nd Ave Diesel Plant(","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/89",24000,7500,900,8,990,0,0,6076110,6076110,253,0,0,130511,0,520866,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,301469,0,952846,962471,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochester Public Utilities",16181,1999,"SILVER LAKE","STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/69",98400,99962,6002,48,206169300,467713,5967620,20459364,26894697,273,0,105471,4663327,0,733957,0,0,427195,653639,0,121158,91168,610473,166756,202286,7775430,38,"Tons",105624,11800,35.06,34.95,1.48,0,0,"Mcf",116790,1022,2.87,2.87,2.81,0.02,12548,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochester Public Utilities",16181,1999,"CASCADE CREEK","GAS TURBINE","01/01/75","01/01/75",35000,31412,214,0,975100,0,0,2553775,2553775,73,0,5098,155418,0,0,0,0,0,2538,0,712,425,0,13749,25610,203550,209,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",6593,140546,25.25,22.87,3.87,0.16,31067 "Ruston City of",16463,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,158085,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,1024,2014,0,0,0,12204,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Sacramento Municipal Util Dist",16534,1999,"McClellanј","Ga","01/01/86","01/01/86",49999,0,0,3,7166000,0,2636791,21642932,24279723,486,280011,128813,308700,0,0,0,0,93215,0,0,46694,4591,0,454373,0,1036386,145,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MC",90473,0,3.39,3.39,3.28,0.04,0,"Diesel/gal",1254,0,1.43,1.43,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Total All Plants",,,,4515000,0,0,345,1.74570025e+10,12977200,1115386160,2245397416,3373760776,747,46882000,12160268,206856386,1142440,9404554,374590,0,6237186,12301280,6685,9401271,2767009,20299658,10510426,3154574,294616327,17,"Tons",5220135,8563,16.23,16.23,0.95,9.82,10370,"MCF",37334239,1010,2.64,2.64,2.62,28.78,10988,"Barrels",12309,139887,18.78,18.78,3.2,32.97,10315 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"J K Spruce","Steam","1/1/1992","1/1/1992",555000,546000,6546,82,3480720800,0,65252301,515684631,580936932,1047,23719,571470,31109011,0,1807766,51663,0,193515,960889,0,759790,205041,2649188,748621,211926,39268880,11,"Tons",1949398,8860,15.91,15.91,1.01,8.91,9857,"MCF",38851,1008,2.27,2.27,2.25,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Mission Road","Steam","1/1/1909","1/1/1958",100000,96000,436,4,5787800,24329,2488463,10241714,12754506,128,128349,114144,487728,0,158813,0,0,102150,168983,0,21233,17234,339856,83899,40097,1534137,265,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",134106,1013,3.64,3.64,3.59,84.27,14024,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Leon Creek","Steam","1/1/1949","1/1/1959",160000,171000,676,4,16974100,44831,2782361,17503846,20331038,127,157506,125267,942872,0,184569,0,0,128819,161398,0,28472,58566,543819,190400,43539,2407721,142,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258204,1002,3.65,3.65,3.64,55.55,12533,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"O W Sommers","Steam","1/1/1972","1/1/1974",880000,846000,7232,55,2199508300,5854171,33295035,79674715,118823921,135,395537,545083,59562142,0,1025490,87705,0,302727,706288,0,702876,370388,615434,259192,190180,64367505,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",23626870,1009,2.54,2.54,2.51,27.24,10444,"Barrels",5652,140932,19.35,19.35,3.27,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"J T Deely","Steam","1/1/1977","1/1/1978",830000,854000,8760,90,5149460300,0,30290474,285476722,315767196,380,12595000,638478,53085711,0,1562761,85357,0,320680,966629,0,838807,331106,3399637,799226,238550,62266942,12,"Tons",3270737,8389,16.42,16.42,0.98,10.43,10513,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5811,141351,18.29,18.29,3.08,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"South Texas Project","Nuclear","1/1/1988","1/1/1989",700000,708000,0,0,5399983000,5170385,957819101,1216165845,2179155331,3113,29619638,9121123,23744212,1142440,2798248,0,0,4436896,8134977,6685,6295439,1408553,10346770,6695513,2005195,76136051,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",56623147,0,0.42,0.42,0.42,4.4,10485,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"W B Tuttle","Steam","1/1/1954","1/1/1963",425000,351000,2570,25,83806100,116166,6081714,40803880,47001760,111,3029638,407804,3903164,0,659061,0,0,371008,270977,0,137334,47220,945777,460460,131033,7333838,88,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1126499,1007,3.47,3.47,3.44,46.57,11568,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"V H Brauning","Steam","1/1/1966","1/1/1970",865000,0,5631,85,1120762100,1767318,17376711,79846063,98990092,114,932613,636899,33301546,0,1207846,149865,0,381391,931139,0,617320,328901,1459177,1273115,294054,40581253,36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",12149759,1011,2.74,2.74,2.71,29.7,10522,"Barrels",846,122847,18.29,18.29,3.55,0,0 "Seattle City of",16868,1999,"Centralia (8% share)","Steam","01/01/72","01/01/72",107200,32000,0,1,689802000,167213,4462081,22916331,27545625,257,0,186229,12042641,0,56382,0,0,0,1030435,2329,557,0,306392,38323,72862,13736150,20,"Tons",453199,7850,27.6,26.57,1.76,0.02,10315,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Shrewsbury Town of",17127,1999,"PEAKING","INTERNAL CO","01/01/69","01/01/78",13750,0,78,0,1082000,4737,38713,3032851,3076301,224,0,0,58499,0,0,0,0,45786,0,0,42833,0,0,0,0,147118,136,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"OIL",1983,138000,28.45,27.35,4.71,0.05,10622 "Sikeston City of",17177,1999,"SIKESTON POWER PLANT<","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",235000,233000,8443,100,1773464000,2528654,38360820,167291312,208180786,886,3085679,204618,18720527,0,834479,0,0,232178,1031476,0,212026,97405,1771411,163729,1555715,24823564,14,"TONS",1085410,8260,16.81,16.81,1.02,0.01,10111,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",2150,141000,22.77,24.41,4.12,0,16.31 "PUD No 1 of Snohomish County",17470,1999,"Centralia Steam Plt","Steam",,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",17543,1999,"WINYAH(1-4)","STEAM","01/01/75","01/01/81",1120000,1204000,31151,198,7364804000,2141000,80365000,380646000,463152000,414,12899000,1811000,102679000,0,2905000,0,0,1172000,4230000,0,835000,1709000,6368000,2320000,450000,124479000,17,"Tons",2805462,12906,35.38,36.6,1.42,1.39,9833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",17543,1999,"CROSS(1-2)","STEAM","01/01/84","01/01/94",1147115,1190000,14859,156,7031840000,149000,105829000,824295000,930273000,811,8568000,612000,95992000,0,3621000,0,0,562000,3226000,0,331000,462000,7502000,2902000,585000,115795000,16,"Tons",2609876,12811,36.41,36.78,1.44,1.37,9510,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"INTERSTATE","NAT GAS/OIL","01/01/97","01/01/97",118000,114000,864,0,89431266,0,0,11583325,11583325,98,2178709,40002,2621094,0,91,0,0,0,0,0,38739,0,0,77237,0,2777163,31,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"DKTHRMS",1205210,100000,2.08,2.08,2.08,28.74,13806,"BARRELS",5093,138000,17.96,22.11,3.81,52.67,13806 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"FACTORY","OIL TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/73",23000,17000,155,0,3128000,0,29188,2322399,2351587,102,0,0,166375,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11905,0,178280,57,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",7959,138000,18.43,20.9,3.61,53.19,14747 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"REYNOLDS","OIL TURBINE","01/01/70","01/01/70",18000,14000,98,0,1502000,0,155353,2975996,3131349,174,0,0,89354,0,539,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,13975,0,103868,69,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",4241,138000,19.02,21.07,3.64,59.49,16366 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"LAKESIDE","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/64",76000,66000,4842,0,191454930,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"TONS",119179,10437,24.15,22.89,1.1,13.33,12994,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",784,138000,20.26,20.76,3.58,0,0 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"DALLMAN","STEAM","01/01/68","01/01/78",441000,324000,8756,209,1931782345,2315629,22827681,167456590,192599900,437,2590219,1382828,24106633,0,7228992,0,0,0,0,224260,1367568,1520197,3381012,3887022,2944868,46043380,24,"TONS",947286,10415,24.07,22.37,1.07,11.37,11338,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",8185,138000,18.13,20.92,3.61,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"James River Gas Turb¬ ","Gas Turbine","01/01/89","01/01/92",150000,162000,1707,2,112871000,0,0,38867000,38867000,259,0,0,3686000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,5000,0,185000,0,3876000,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1413185,1005,2.58,2.58,2.56,32.66,12708,"Barrels",1933,138200,17.18,20.23,3.49,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Southwest Gas Turbin","Gas Turbine","01/01/83","01/01/83",88000,114000,740,2,33605000,0,77000,13480000,13557000,154,0,0,1234000,0,0,0,0,4000,0,0,0,0,0,160000,0,1398000,42,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",467515,1005,2.6,2.6,2.59,36.7,14123,"Barrels",814,138200,17.21,19.54,3.37,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Main Avenue","Gas Turbine","01/01/68","01/01/68",12000,13000,55,1,680000,0,0,1538000,1538000,128,0,0,46000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4000,0,50000,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1981,138200,24.82,23.44,4.03,68.28,16910 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"James River","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/70",255000,237000,33862,81,1450754000,1659000,14631000,79255000,95545000,375,2850000,583000,20746000,0,2519000,0,0,408000,262000,0,130000,65000,3963000,646000,610000,29722000,20,"Tons",853266,9210,7.79,21.61,1.17,13.89,11312,"Mcf",689975,1005,2.49,2.49,2.47,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Southwest","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",195000,183000,7556,65,1185498000,1856000,15406000,80315000,97577000,500,2690000,558000,14080000,0,1555000,0,0,366000,205000,0,581000,137000,2335000,656000,1027000,21332000,18,"Tons",693360,8794,4.54,18.33,1.08,11.66,10684,"Mcf",467597,1007,2.39,2.39,2.36,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "St George City of",17874,1999,"SUGARLOAF","2-Internal","01/01/86","01/01/86",14000,14000,1,6,626000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "St George City of",17874,1999,"Bloomington","7-Internal","01/01/98","01/01/98",12250,10500,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tacoma City of",18429,1999,"Centralia Steam Plntд","Steam","01/01/72","01/01/72",0,0,0,0,0,166897,4289405,25226129,29682431,0,73131,68311,11716542,0,112000,0,0,80230,140403,0,120346,80230,1008476,240691,26146,13593375,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"SAM O. PURDOM","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/66",44000,48000,11136,38,209772978,15500,9202970,33194960,42413430,964,0,773581,8940370,0,537020,0,0,279940,1813670,2800,263170,105370,237360,129170,194990,13277441,63,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2462334,1148,3.22,3.22,3.07,0.04,13261,"bbl",31211,6300,20.25,20.25,3.21,0.08,20734 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"SAM O. PURDOM","GAS TURBINE","01/01/63","01/01/64",25000,20000,415,0,6838100,0,516700,3207630,3724330,149,0,37110,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,27080,0,0,0,0,64190,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",135368,1047,3.22,3.22,3.08,0.06,20734,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"A.D. HOPKINS","STEAM","01/01/71","01/01/72",334350,314000,8760,54,1431868500,243700,15462840,61918010,77624550,232,0,365600,47652750,0,808720,0,0,334300,1440890,0,286010,23770,76650,588440,570760,52259040,36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",14643073,1052,3.16,3.16,3,0.03,10001,"bbl",31324,6300,20.39,20.39,3.24,0.03,10228 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"A.D. HOPKINS","GAS Turbine","01/01/00","01/01/72",43320,36000,870,0,21124800,0,0,4237440,4237440,98,0,109010,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,117890,0,0,0,0,226900,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",398330,1148,3.2,3.2,3.06,0.06,19763,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"Cleary-Flood","Steam-Gas T","01/01/71","01/01/76",110000,110000,3132,54,156001000,576884,4698715,37144991,42420590,386,791678,791678,5245790,0,1114114,0,0,533566,1685023,0,0,0,0,0,0,9370171,60,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",972473,1018,4.2,4.2,4.12,0.13,30320,"Barrels",75356,117188,16.96,15.46,3.14,0.01,3007 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"W. Water Street","Steam","01/01/02","01/01/58",13500,0,0,0,0,24173,3733601,5419707,9177481,680,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1188,0,0,0,0,1188,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"Cleary-Flood","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/66",28300,25000,354,54,9067000,148310,2028703,7526961,9703974,343,0,249139,355473,0,342596,0,0,168675,368569,0,0,0,0,0,0,1484452,164,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",20281,95484,15,17.52,4.37,0.04,8970 "Texas Municipal Power Agency",18715,1999,"Gibbons Creek SES","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",493900,462000,6908,122,2602361000,25930000,158171000,425745000,609846000,1235,3957000,2960000,34144000,0,482000,0,0,300000,111000,0,1160000,322000,2989000,844000,734000,44046000,17,"Tons",1643836,8470,20.78,20.66,1.23,0.01,10711,"MCF",146379,1015,2.35,2.35,2.35,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Traverse City City of",19125,1999,"Bayside Station","Steam","01/01/12","01/01/68",29000,14000,290,15,3250000,83612,1866905,7544366,9494883,327,0,626829,148366,0,0,0,0,23461,10829,42858,365474,17778,92524,76059,12931,1417109,436,"Tons",2113,12500,43.5,43.5,1.74,0.02,16253.85,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Turlock Irrigation District",19281,1999,"Walnut Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/86","01/01/86",49900,45486,222,2,4176400,0,14724791,181069,14905860,299,0,9273,193510,0,0,0,0,45773,0,0,0,0,0,252574,0,501130,120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",70330,1,2.75,2.75,2.7,46.33,17145,"Bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Turlock Irrigation District",19281,1999,"Almond Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/95","01/01/95",49900,49900,3162,12,126500000,149270,24481629,30353821,54984720,1102,0,95458,3736849,0,79785,0,0,1827172,0,0,0,523257,0,640938,0,6903459,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1175749,1,3.18,2.48,2.38,29.54,9446,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Vermont Public Pwr Supply Auth",19780,1999,"J.C. McNeil Station","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50000,53000,5366,35,41562673,79627,4515588,12712285,17307500,346,119308,43331,1497213,0,229588,0,0,81441,92419,0,37321,14987,144967,145773,7437,2294477,55,"tons(wood)",283916,4750,23.48,24.64,2.59,0.03,13455,"mcf",252167,1012000,3.28,3.28,3.25,0.04,12556,"bbl",2124,136321,15.88,21.41,3.74,0,0 "Vernon City of",19798,1999,"Vernon power Plant","Internal Co","01/01/33","01/01/33",30000,19000,0,1,241160,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,18568,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,18568,77,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"42 gal",624,130952,0,29.75,5.41,0.07,14231 "Vernon City of",19798,1999,"Vernon Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/87","01/01/87",14000,11250,1171150,1,117150,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62378,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62378,532,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1031,0,22683.2,2.75,2.66,0.05,19986,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Vero Beach City of",19804,1999,"City of Vero Beach","Steam","01/01/59","01/01/92",158000,151000,8804,41,224236,3059208,26587907,49708983,79356098,502,5414436,1818902,11418,0,0,0,0,647002,0,0,808280,685525,0,1428535,0,5399662,24080,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,2318953,1051,3.87,3.87,3.69,0.04,11858,,45055,144840,18.97,18.97,3.12,0.04,14119 "Vineland City of",19856,1999,"Harry M. Downs","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/70",66250,57100,5104,41,50663680,102765,6943679,34504958,41551402,627,0,194475,1693950,0,506222,0,0,630731,1378637,0,137240,12568,459914,91094,2412,5107243,101,"Tons",16966,12734,49.33,49.07,1.9,0.03,13621,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",2206466,152654,0.35,0.35,2.49,0.03,12734 "Energy Northwest",20160,1999,"Nuclear Plant # 2","Nuclear","01/01/72","01/01/84",1200000,1163000,6519,1018,6975110000,0,1096311831,2199928002,3296239833,2747,38664908,18739254,30590701,2894774,12309953,0,0,75427,21147467,0,3819721,545674,1021005,2269200,18016550,111429726,16,"Grms U-235",726798,4.55e+10,32.01,42.09,41.9,4.39,10460.08,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Western Minnesota Mun Pwr Agny",20421,1999,"Watrtown Power Plant? ","Gas Turbin","01/01/78","01/01/78",60000,42,0,2,2254000,0,0,16335022,16335022,272,39000,17392,54938,0,0,0,0,0,3375,0,0,42360,0,102001,663,220729,98,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7508,0,28.37,24.9,0,0.83,0 "Willmar Municipal Utils Comm",20737,1999,"WILLMAR","STEAM","01/01/00","01/01/70",29350,17500,6239,17,26618660,110447,878898,6858792,7848137,267,13984,40591,1085227,0,259713,0,0,318116,132083,5000,40431,2416,288530,102454,0,2020002,76,"TONS",32320,8600,26.74,33.58,1.95,0.04,17555,"MCF",28158,1022,2.4,2.4,2.4,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Winfield City of",20813,1999,"EAST","STEAM","01/01/69","01/01/69",26500,0,0,12,24657,134138,2513749,6029328,8677215,327,1429863,315408,850195,0,0,0,0,0,152329,0,0,0,0,0,0,1317932,53451,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",356043,1,2.39,2.39,2.39,0.03,0.01,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Winfield City of",20813,1999,"WEST","GAS TURBINE","01/01/61","01/01/61",11500,0,0,1,2972500,0,157556,2719909,2877465,250,97445,56898,232145,0,0,0,0,0,31724,0,0,0,0,0,0,320767,108,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",58535,1,2.39,2.39,2.39,0.03,0.01,".",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 6","01/01/67",,7500,0,0,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 7","01/01/86",,32500,34500,0,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Total Plant","01/01/15","1/1/1986",74000,70000,17360,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 4","01/01/49",,11500,11000,1320,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 5","01/01/59",,22500,24500,8120,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Zeeland City of",21158,1999,"Zeeland Plant","Internal Co","01/01/36","01/01/80",22182,20100,6642,9,10671685,233107,958741,7490195,8682043,391,39130,160274,324998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,130885,11183,123764,0,0,751104,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",110179,1025,2.66,2.66,2.6,25.21,9704.09,"gals",63744,130,0.49,0.49,3.81,3.81,712.06 "Utah Associated Mun Power Sys",40575,1999,"Hunter - Unit II","Steam","01/01/80","01/01/80",62703,65000,8614,0,477394000,24130,12455094,36987524,49466748,789,196762,79885,5146144,0,247463,0,0,117117,474771,220,72026,45503,228073,39173,16505,6466880,14,"Tons",219787,11688,22.14,22.14,0.95,0.01,10767,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",15134,139950,0,0,0,0,0 "Utah Associated Mun Power Sys",40575,1999,"San Juan - Unit IV","Steam","/ /","/ /",35000,36000,8087,0,277529800,0,6606911,34780439,41387350,1182,330940,146935,4915693,0,99850,0,0,107665,90002,0,45259,27595,322125,62872,54783,5872779,21,"Tons",156254,9223,31,31,1.68,0.02,10404,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",37096,134772,0,0,0,0,0 "Intermountain Power Agency",40576,1999,,"Steam Inter","01/01/86","01/01/87",1640000,1600000,8760,472,13211071,95806000,859083000,1682967000,2637856000,1608,0,3439000,172897000,0,8441000,0,0,2062000,781000,0,3925000,2091000,9516000,3866000,3110000,210128000,15905,"Tons",5268671,11851,31.12,25.64,1.06,0.01,9457,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",12309,137273,22.25,26.22,4.55,0,0 "American Mun Power-Ohio Inc",40577,1999,"Richard H. Gorsuch","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/53",212000,194000,8760,106,1376874,822631,5383169,64333905,70539705,333,62261347,1032894,14712122,0,2153372,0,0,180146,1071556522,0,606713,341707,6319652,1253782,0,24415086,17732,"TON",869869,11581,23.16,23.16,0.88,0.01,13479,"MCF",72788,1040,3.65,3.65,3.5,0.04,13479,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern Municipal Power Agny",40581,1999,"COYOTE","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",414588000,0,8150,81,2913837000,0,0,420000000,420000000,1,0,863403,26074593,0,3373195,0,0,1267272,1238167,0,405837,334491,2651805,324789,643962,37177514,13,"TON",2425659,6947,10.64,10.64,0.77,0.89,11.57,"GAL.",236904,136552,0.56,0.56,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Southern Minnesota Mun P Agny",40580,1999,"SHERCO #3","STEAM PLANT","01/01/87",,331954,357000,7219,0,2035404000,0,0,331434191,331434191,998,3571246,1376329,18703611,0,1905690,0,0,392953,4634715,9336,422268,415136,2261396,2483729,678192,33283355,16,"TONS",1161899,8701,16.34,15.53,0.89,0.01,9934,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan Public Power Agency",40582,1999,"Belle River","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/85",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan Public Power Agency",40582,1999,"Campbell #3","Steam","01/01/80","01/01/80",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"BURDICK","GAS TURBINE","01/01/68","01/01/68",14800,16,76,15,984760,0,0,1554976,1554976,105,0,2286,35784,0,5087,0,0,4586,3641,174,142,374,616,5648,0,58338,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",20055,1000,2.26,1.78,1.78,0.04,20365,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"PGS","STEAM","/ /","/ /",100000,100000,8410,49,554461278,1708020,24075151,64351183,90134354,901,0,133740,4506550,0,718768,0,0,867378,199672,0,24187,229866,682366,387132,0,7749659,14,"TONS",358870,8391,10.89,12.56,0.75,0.01,10862,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"BURDICK","STEAM","01/01/57","01/01/72",92500,55000,2977,15,36138330,376970,3684704,31154613,35216287,381,0,102306,1368110,0,305181,0,0,256501,220102,7223,23106,51661,178024,228731,0,2740945,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",504548,1000,2.29,2.71,2.71,0.04,13962,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"CT 1 (5 Units)","Combustion","01/01/86","01/01/86",124000,0,877,5,22025,981098,1465987,45464256,47911341,386,0,0,917842,0,0,0,0,208067,9810,0,95167,0,0,420321,0,1651207,74970,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",328153,0,2.7,2.7,2.44,0.04,15363,"gal",43800,0,0.43,0.43,0.43,0.04,15400 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"CT 2 (STIG)","Combustion","01/01/96","01/01/96",49900,0,1502,9,102136,0,0,62901868,62901868,1261,307564,0,2704183,0,0,0,0,120252,34596,0,411336,0,0,1176957,0,4447324,43543,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",914572,0,2.83,2.83,2.33,0.03,9135,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"Geothermal One","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",110000,110540,8301,30,625621000,47873178,43427882,0,91301060,830,133458,764505,20092994,0,0,0,0,1317733,114299,0,286198,163870,39903,901827,786469,24467798,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Steam",11071643,1210000,0.93,0.93,0.77,0.02,18504,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"Geothermal Two","Steam","01/01/86","01/01/86",110000,110540,8207,30,627369000,58362769,52110952,0,110473721,1004,170987,681966,20079701,0,0,0,0,1433824,67816,0,36,101301,24056,451698,784863,23625261,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Steam",10898373,1200000,0.93,0.93,0.78,0.02,19066,,0,0,0,0,0,0