National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for grass sorghastrum nutans

  1. Energy Grasses for the Masses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Energy Grasses for the Masses Jason Force, Chief Executive Officer, Iron Goat Technology, Inc.

  2. Poverty Grass Biology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Poverty Grass Biology and Management Hilary Sandler, Katherine Ghantous, and Chelsea Hedderig UMass Cranberry Station, East Wareham, MA 02538 www.umass.edu/cranberry Background In the 1950's, Poverty grass identified as our "poverty grass" and has also been known as broom beardgrass. Little bluestem is often

  3. Grasses and Forage Plants. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1898-01-01

    State. A large number of the grasses, including many of the common culti? vated clovers and legumes, and many rare hay plants, on our experi? mental plots during 1897, were gathered and supplied by special agents of the United States Agricultural...), Trifolium hybridum (Alsike Clover), Large Red Clover, Trifolium repens (White Dutch Clover), suffered from the drouth and sun, but have made better growth at this place than during previous years. SPOROBOLUS. 8. wrighti*?Perennial. Germinated April 2...

  4. Grasses for Pasture and Hay in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garren, G. M.

    1916-01-01

    during the summer season provided means are at hand for watering the grass. Grass never becomes a lawn till mown. A lawn mower is absolutely necessary. As soon as the grass covers the ground the mowing should be- gin. Mow as often as the ,grass grows... long enough for the lawn mower to catch it. All the weeds and wild grasses that can not be killed by con- stant mowing must be uprooted and removed by hand. The best of lawns can be had only where means are at hand for watering them. But where...

  5. Grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunk, T. L.

    1888-01-01

    , was JUC testing 46. tail or 40. Trifoliurn hybridurn (Alsika Clover). Made an excellent growth. By September 3, after a drouth of about six weeks, about one-third of the plants were dead. Now, October lo, all dead. 41. I'riyfolium incarnatum... (Crimson Clover). Made a good heavy growth. Firmly rooted, but by September 3 was all dead. 42. Frifoliumpratense iLarge Red or Pea-vine Clover). Stems ro feet in length and numerous; covered the ground. On ber 3 two-thirds dead. October 10, very few...

  6. Bridging the Divide: Linking Genomics to Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Melinda D.

    2014-03-15

    Over the project period, we have addressed the following objectives: 1) assess the effects of altered precipitation patterns (i.e., increased variability in growing season precipitation) on genetic diversity of the dominant C4 grass species, Andropogon gerardii, and 2) experimentally assess the impacts of extreme climatic events (heat wave, drought) on responses of the dominant C4 grasses, A. gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans, and the consequences of these response for community and ecosystem structure and function. Below is a summary of how we have addressed these objectives. Objective 1 After ten years of altered precipitation, we found the number of genotypes of A. gerardii was significantly reduced compared to the ambient precipitation treatments (Avolio et al., 2013a). Although genotype number was reduced, the remaining genotypes were less related to one another indicating that the altered precipitation treatment was selecting for increasingly dissimilar genomes (based on mean pairwise Dice distance among individuals). For the four key genotypes that displayed differential abundances depending on the precipitation treatment (G1, G4, and G11 in the altered plots and G2 in the ambient plots), we identified phenotypic differences in the field that could account for ecological sorting (Avolio & Smith, 2013a). The three altered rainfall genotypes also have very different phenotypic traits in the greenhouse in response to different soil moisture availabilities (Avolio and Smith, 2013c). Two of the genotypes that increased in abundance in the altered precipitation plots had greater allocation to root biomass (G4 and G11), while G1 allocated more biomass aboveground. These phenotypic differences among genotypes suggests that changes in genotypic structure between the altered and the ambient treatments has likely occurred via niche differentiation, driven by changes in soil moisture dynamics (reduced mean, increased variability and changes in the depth distribution of soil moisture) under a more variable precipitation regime, rather than reduced population numbers (A. gerardii tiller densities did not differ between altered and ambient treatments; p = 0.505) or a priori differences in genotype richness (Avolio et al.2013a). This ecological sorting of genotypes, which accounts for 40% of all sampled individuals in the altered plots, is an important legacy of the press chronic climate changes in the RaMPs experiment. Objective 2 In May 2010, we established the Climate Extremes Experiment at the Konza Prairie Biological Station. For the experiment, a gradient of temperatures, ranging from ambient to extreme, were imposed in 2010 and 2011 as a mid-season heat wave under well-watered or severe drought conditions. This study allowed us for the first time to examine species-specific thresholds of responses to climate extremes and assess how these phenotypic responses may impact selection of particular genotypes, with the ultimate goal of linking alterations in individual performance and genetic diversity to ecosystem structure and functioning. We found that tallgrass prairie was resistant to heat waves, but it was not resistant to extreme drought, which reduced aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) below the lowest level measured in this grassland in almost thirty years (Hoover et al. in press(a)). This extreme reduction in ecosystem function was a consequence of reduced productivity of both C4 grasses and C3 forbs. This reduction in biomass of the C4 grasses (Andropogon gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans) was, in part, due to significant reductions in photosynthesis, leaf water potential and productivity with drought in the dominant grasses species, with S. nutans was more sensitive than A. gerardii to drought (Hoover et al. in press(b)). However, the dominant forb was negatively impacted by the drought more than the dominant grasses, and this led to a reordering of species abundances within the plant community. Although this change in community composition persisted post-drought, ANPP recovered completely the year after drought

  7. Updated 2-11-06 Research to Advance Grass Bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    produced grass pellets at 2.8% ash content. Most clean wood products will have an ash content below 1 the grass bioenergy industry. Current Status Grass pellet bioenergy appears to be an economically and environmentally appropriate system for generating some local energy in rural America. A grass pellet system should

  8. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  9. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Ganesh

    1991-01-01

    AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Approved as to style and content by: M. T. 1 e (Chair of Committee) R. W. Flumerfelt (Member) F. M, By (Membe C. R. Engler (Member...

  10. Warm-Season (C4) Grasses Lowell E. Moser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -season perennial grasses as biomass feedstock candidates (Table II-I). Most of this research has focused

  11. Sudan Grass for Hay, Seed and Pasture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby, John Roy; Jones, D. L. (Don L.); Karper, R. E. (Robert Earl)

    1929-01-01

    . At Chillicothe, results from 191 5 to 191 7, inclusive, were air-dry weights, the shrinkage from field-cured to air-dry approximating 25 per cent. Seed weights are given in pounds to the acre of threshed seed. Broadcast plantings were made with a grain drill... seed-producing area for the United States. Sudan grass is the most important cultivated pasture crop in Texas. When grown in rows, it furnishes more continuous pasture than broadcast plantings, especially if the season be unfavorable. Growing in rows...

  12. Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: Energy Resources JumpSouth,GrapeGrass Valley

  13. Updated 2-13-06 Grass Pelleting The Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    to grinding is advisable. Missing from the schematic above is a very significant component of a wood pelletingUpdated 2-13-06 Grass Pelleting ­ The Process Bioenergy Information Sheet #7 Department of Crop is to describe the steps involved in pelleting biofuels. Worldwide Perspective Grass biomass is a bulky material

  14. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  15. AVIAN NEST DENSITIES AND SUCCESS IN INTRODUCED COOL-SEASON GRASS-LEGUME PLANTINGS VERSUS WARM-SEASON NATIVE GRASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of prairie and idle grassland. Studies indicate that warm-season native grass plantings (WSN) generally provide good winter cover. Recently a trend favoring WSN has emerged, but limited information exists on nesting density and success of cool-season grass-legume plantings (dense nesting cover [DNC]) versus WSN

  16. Effect of Cattle Grazing, Seeded Grass, and an Herbicide on Ponderosa Pine Seedling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effect of Cattle Grazing, Seeded Grass, and an Herbicide on Ponderosa Pine Seedling Survival M.; Fiddler, Gary O. 1999. Effect of cattle grazing, seeded grass, and an herbicide on ponderosa forage grass species at plantation age 3, cattle grazing with and without seeded grasses, and applying

  17. The Chemical Composition of Forage Grasses of the East Texas Timber Country. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1940-01-01

    - ing throughout the area on favorable soils. Common lespedeza (Lespedeza striata) occurs on open land, and in the early spring considerable forage is provided by a number of the clovers, of which the principal species is white clover (Trifolium..... ..................... Carpet grass ..................... ..................... Crab grass.. Crab grass, flat. .................. Clover, bur ....................... Clover, California bur. ............ Clover, white.. ................... Dallis grass...

  18. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical Grass Quality and Quantity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical Grass Quality and Quantity Onisimo Mutanga 7 April 2004, The Netherlands Prof. W. J. Bond University of Cape Town, South Africa #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing 1.2 Hyperspectral remote sensing

  19. Chemical composition of biomass from tall perennial tropical grasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Stricker, J.A.; Anderson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The tall perennial tropical grasses, elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.), sugarcane and energycane (Saccharum sp.) and erianthus (Erianthus arundenaceum (Retz) Jesw.) have given very high oven dry biomass yields in Florida and the warm Lower South USA. No good complete analyses of the chemical composition of these grasses for planning potential energy use was available. We sampled treatments of several tall grass demonstrations and experiments containing high-biomass yielding genotypes of the above tall grass crops at several locations in Florida over the two growing seasons, 1992 and 1993. These samples were analyzed for crude protein, NDF, ADF, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and IVDMD or IVOMD. The analysis for the above constituents are reported, along with biomass yields where available, for the tall grass accessions in the various demonstrations and experiments. Particular attention is given to values obtained from the high-yielding tall grasses grown on phosphatic clays in Polk County, FL, the area targeted by a NREL grant to help commercialize bioenergy use from these crops.

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis of Viral and Subviral Agents in Model and Crop Grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyle, Jesse Dylan

    2015-08-10

    Viral diseases cause significant agricultural yield losses globally. Because grasses constitute most of our food, forage, and bioenergy sources, the resulting economic losses caused by grass-infecting viruses are particularly ...

  1. Aalborg Universitet Grasses a potential sustainable resource for biocrude production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Aalborg Universitet Grasses ­ a potential sustainable resource for biocrude production Grigoras for biocrude production. Poster session presented at 22nd European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, Hamburg, Germany. General rights Copyright and moral rights for the publications made accessible in the public

  2. Managing Winter Annual Grasses in South & Southwest Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Livingston, Stephen

    1999-01-19

    and planted shallower than larger seeded small grains. In areas under irrigation or receiving frequent rains, ryegrass seed can be sown broadcast on top of the soil with good success. Ryegrass also requires more frequent rains or irri- gation to establish a... Disadvantages Oats Early fall grazing Poor cold tolerance High forage quality - gains Poor disease tolerance in many cultivars Germinates under limited moisture Ryegrass Most popular cool-season grass Limited fall grazing Can be seeded by surface broadcast Poor...

  3. Sweet Grass County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies95 Jump to:Sweden BuildingSweet Grass

  4. Grass Valley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: Energy Resources JumpSouth,GrapeGrass

  5. Grass Valley, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: Energy Resources JumpSouth,GrapeGrassOregon:

  6. MHK Technologies/eelGrass | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMISPowerTurbine for OWCbioBaseeelGrass

  7. 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilu, Khidir

    165 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It a Taxonomic Artefact? K. W. Hilu .................................................................................................................................... 176 ABSTRACT The grass family (Poaceae) comprises about 10,000 species distributed in some 785 genera, seven large subfamilies and a few small ones. The distribution of species in genera appears skewed

  8. Image analysis of anatomical traits in stalk transections of maize and other grasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heckwolf, Sven; Heckwolf, Marlies; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Kaeppler, Shawn M; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; de Leon, Natalia; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Spalding, Edgar P

    2015-04-09

    Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures, functionally support the transport of water and nutrients, and are harvested for multiple agricultural uses. Research on these basic and applied aspects of grass stalks would benefit from improved capabilities for measuring internal anatomical features. In particular, methods suitable for phenotyping populations of plants are needed.

  9. Phytoliths of common grasses in the coastal environments of southeastern USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kam-biu

    communities and their predominant phytolith contents. The dominant grasses of coastal sand dunes). The coastal zones of the southeastern USA consist of a variety of ecological habitats and vegetation typesPhytoliths of common grasses in the coastal environments of southeastern USA Houyuan Lua,b , Kam

  10. Image analysis of anatomical traits in stalk transections of maize and other grasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heckwolf, Sven; Heckwolf, Marlies; Kaeppler, Shawn M; de Leon, Natalia; Spalding, Edgar P

    2015-12-01

    Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures, functionally support the transport of water and nutrients, and are harvested for multiple agricultural uses. Research on these basic and applied aspects of grass stalks would benefit from improved capabilities for measuring internal anatomical features. In particular, methods suitable for phenotyping populations of plants are needed.

  11. Tree-grass and tree-tree interactions in a temperate savanna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Mark Trevor

    2004-11-15

    , particularly on shallower soils, but only during a season of significant precipitation. Low intensity burning of grasses enhanced growth of adult trees, but patterns were inconsistent between two different sites. Moderate clipping around individual trees had...

  12. A World Wide Web key to the grass genera of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, John Edward

    2001-01-01

    An illustrated dichotomous key to the grass genera of Texas is presented in hypertext markup language (HTML) format. The key combines scanned images of inflorescences, digitized images of dissected spikelets, text descriptions ...

  13. Agriculture, England and Wales: The Heather and Grass Burning (Railways) General Licence,1949 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Her Majesty's Stationary Office

    1949-03-21

    In pursuance of the provisions of Regulation 4 of the Heather and Grass Burning (England and Wales) Regulations, 1949(a), the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries hereby authorises the British Transport Commission and any ...

  14. Engineering phenolics metabolism in the grasses using transcription factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grotewold, Erich [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-26

    The economical competitiveness of agriculture-derived biofuels can be significantly enhanced by increasing biomass/acre yields and by furnishing the desired carbon balance for facilitating liquid fuel production (e.g., ethanol) or for high-energy solid waste availability to be used as biopower (e.g., for electricity production). Biomass production and carbon balance are tightly linked to the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, which are found in crops and in agricultural residues either as lignins, as part of the cell wall, or as soluble phenolics which play a variety of functions in the biology of plants. The grasses, in particular maize, provide the single major source of agricultural biomass, offering significant opportunities for increasing renewable fuel production. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of transcription factors for manipulating plant metabolic pathways, an approach that will be applied here towards altering the composition of phenolic compounds in maize. Previously, we identified a small group of ten maize R2R3-MYB transcription factors with all the characteristics of regulators of different aspects of phenolic biosynthesis. Here, we propose to investigate the participation of these R2R3-MYB factors in the regulation of soluble and insoluble maize phenolics, using a combination of over-expression and down-regulation of these transcription factors in transgenic maize cultured cells and in maize plants. Maize cells and plants altered in the activity of these regulatory proteins will be analyzed for phenolic composition by targeted metabolic profiling. Specifically, we will I) Investigate the effect of gain- and loss-of-function of a select group of R2R3-MYB transcription factors on the phenolic composition of maize plants and II) Identify the biosynthetic genes regulated by each of the selected R2R3-MYB factors. While a likely outcome of these studies are transgenic maize plants with altered phenolic composition, this research will significantly contribute to understanding how different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic grid are regulated. Given the conservation of the selected regulators in other grasses, results derived from this project are likely to provide important tools for the manipulation of phenolic compounds in other emerging biomass producers (e.g., switchgrass or miscanthus), either through conventional breeding techniques (e.g., marker-assisted breeding) or by using transgenic approaches.

  15. Leucaena and tall grasses as energy crops in humid lower south USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Woodard, K.R.; Cunilio, T.V.

    1994-12-31

    The tropical leguminous shrub/tree, leucaena (Leucaena spp. mainly leucocephala), and perennial tropical tall grasses such as elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum), sugarcane, and energycane (Saccharum spp.) are well adapted to the long growing seasons and high rainfall of the humid lower South. In much of the area the topgrowth is killed by frost during winter and plants regenerate from underground parts in spring. Selected accessions from a duplicated 373 accession leucaena nursery had an average annual woody stem dry matter production of 31.4 Mg ha{sup -1}. Average oven dry stem wood yields from selected accessions adjusted for environmental enrichment over the 4 growth seasons were 78.9 Mg ha{sup -1} total and average annual yield of 19.7 Mg ha{sup -1}. The tall perennial grasses have linear growth rates of 18 to 27 g m{sup 2}d{sup -1} for long periods (140 to 196 d and sometimes longer) each season. Oven dry biomass yields of tall grasses have varied from 20 to 45 Mg ha{sup -1} in mild temperature locations to over 60 Mg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in warm subtropics of the lower Florida peninsula. Tall grasses and leucaena, once established, may persist for many seasons. A map showing the possible range of the crops in lower South is shown. Highest biomass yields of tall grasses have been produced when irrigated with sewage effluent or when grown on phosphatic clay and muck soils of south Florida. Several companies are considering using leucaena and/or tall grasses for bioenergy in the phosphatic mining area of Polk County, Florida.

  16. Biomass resource potential for selected crops in Hawaii. [Koa haole (giant leucaena); napier and guinea grass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, A.

    1982-06-01

    The biomass crops selected for review were koa haole (giant leucaena), napier and guinea grass, and eucalyptus (saligna, grandis, and globulus). The islands examined were Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Molokai. The potential land acreage for growing these crops was estimated grossly. As anticipated, the island of Hawaii had the largest land potential with eucalyptus having the greatest potential land acreage.

  17. Insular Organization of Gene Space in Grass Genomes Andrea Gottlieb1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    Insular Organization of Gene Space in Grass Genomes Andrea Gottlieb1. , Hans-Georg Mu¨ ller1 States of America, 2 Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics (Department of Crop and Soil Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America, 6 Institute for Genome Sciences

  18. Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems result in increased risk of flooding in coastal areas. In the Pacific Northwest (USA), coastal dunes and reducing dune height. Here we quantify the relative exposure to storm-wave induced dune overtopping posed

  19. American Journal of Botany 92(6): 10451058. 2005. THE -AMYLASE GENES OF GRASSES AND A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason-Gamer, Roberta J.

    1045 American Journal of Botany 92(6): 1045­1058. 2005. THE -AMYLASE GENES OF GRASSES forms of -amylase in the Triticeae crop plants wheat, barley, and rye: an endosperm-specific form phylogenetic analyses of -amylase gene sequences. First, a phylogenetic analysis of coding sequences from wheat

  20. Effect of Level and Frequency of Protein Supplementation on Utilization of Native South Texas Grass Hay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monson, Greta 1988-

    2011-04-20

    was to quantify forage utilization when grade levels of protein were delivered infrequently. Five ruminally cannulated Angus × Hereford steers (BW = 410 ± 43 kg) were used in a 5 × 4 incomplete Latin square. Steers were provided ad libitum access to native grass...

  1. Grass allometry and estimation of above-ground biomass in tropical alpine tussock grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    ; 4 Universidad Santo Antonio Abad del Cusco, Cusco, Peru; and 5 Departamento de Geología y Geoquímica and multispecies power-law allometric equations for four tussock grass species in Peruvian high altitude grasslands allometric relationships fitted to similar power-law models, with basal area and crown area as the most

  2. Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent Laura K. Fonken lighting during the 20th century, human and nonhuman animals became exposed to high levels of light significant implications for certain ecological niches because of the important influence light exerts

  3. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how) and energy fluxes using the Bowen ratio-energy balance method with measurements of normalized difference

  4. High Energy Forages for Grass-Finishing Beef Kim Cassida, Jason Rowntree, Matt Raven, Janice Harte, Jeannine Schweihofer, and Sarah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Forages for Grass-Finishing Beef Kim Cassida, Jason Rowntree, Matt Raven, Janice Harte phase of the research will be conducted by Matt Raven, Janice Harte, Jeannine Schweihofer, and Sarah

  5. The evolution of LOL, the secondary metabolite gene cluster for insecticidal loline alkaloids in fungal endophytes of grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutil, Brandi Lynn

    2009-05-15

    LOL is a novel secondary metabolite gene cluster associated with the production of loline alkaloids (saturated 1-aminopyrrolizidine alkaloids with an oxygen bridge) exclusively in closely related grass-endophyte species in the genera Epichloë...

  6. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  7. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  8. Sudan Grass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, B.; Conner, A. B.

    1915-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Rog11eing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 ? Field Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Harvesting..., grew under contract, near the Chillicothe Station, an increase field of seed which it proposed to use for distribution in the dry-land region of the United States in 1913. The Texas Station secured six hundred pounds of this :Seed for distribution...

  9. Cost-effective temporary microirrigation system for grass establishment on environmentally sensitive steep slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Y. [University of Central Queensland, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). James Goldston Faculty of Engineering & Physical Systems

    2004-05-15

    An advanced technology cost-effective drip irrigation system design and setup on environmentally sensitive elevated steep slopes (batters) of a coal train derailment site in Central Queensland, Australia, are presented. The final profile of the coal burial site consists of six batters and associated berms with a drop in elevation of about 35 m. A small dam constructed downstream of the confluence of the two main drainage channels at the site supplied water for irrigation of the batters to aid the establishment of grass to control erosion. Water was periodically pumped from the small dam to three storage tanks using a petrol (gas) pump. Three solar pumps drew water from the storage tanks and dam to irrigate the top four batters. Contactors, pressure switches and irrigation control valves in turn shared a single solar power source between the solar pumps. Level balls (floating switches) placed in the storage tanks cut the solar power supply to the pumps when the storage tanks were nearly empty. On the whole, the irrigation system worked very well and excellent grass cover was established within 12 weeks. Given the environmental risks associated with the on-site burying of coal, and the estimated cost of about AU$11.73/m{sup 2} (every 10 years) in maintenance if the railway batters are not treated, the estimated total cost of AU$4.61/m{sup 2} of batter area treated with irrigation, including AU$3.08/m{sup 2} in irrigation cost, is justified.

  10. The reaction of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio Holthuis (1952), to phenol in bio-assay and behavioral tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Geoffrey A

    1969-01-01

    , ment) il, (Member) (member) I&'fo&y ) 1 9' 9 433. 988 The Reaction of the Grass Shrimp, Palaemonetes augie HolthuI. s (1952), to Phenol in Bio-assay and Behavioral Tests. (Nay, 1969) Geoffrev A. i~iatthcws, B. S. , University of Puget Sound... Directed by: Dr. John G. i~lackin ABSTRACT The grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio (Crustacea; Decapoda), which is common in the estuarine marsh- lands along the Texas Gull' Coa't, was shown to bc a suitabie organism for bio-assays and behavioral tests...

  11. Evaluating the Interactive Effects of Seasonal Prescribed Fire and Grazing On Invasive Grass Abundance and Woody Brush Encroachment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Michele Diane

    2014-12-10

    and grazing on invasive grass abundance and woody brush density. Thirty-six 10m x 10m plots were assigned six treatments including: i.) summer burned-fenced ii.) summer burned-unfenced iii.) winter burned-fenced iv.) winter burned-unfenced v.) unburnedfenced...

  12. Chemical and carbon isotopic characteristics of ash and smoke derived from burning of C3 and C4 grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and carbon isotopic characteristics of ash and smoke derived from burning of C3 and C4 material and corresponding ash and smoke pro- duced from burning. The results show that smoke produced from C depletion varies with species from Ash derived from C4 grasses is

  13. Ecophysiological responses of Chihuahuan desert grasses to fire B.W. Allred , K.A. Snyder 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    Nitrogen Photosynthesis a b s t r a c t To better understand the effects of fire in the Chihuahuan desert, gas exchange characteristics of two dominant grass species, Bouteloua eriopoda and Aristida purpurea, and soil nitrogen availability were studied in response to prescribed fire at the Jornada Experimental

  14. Field Studies of Photosynthetic and Growth Responses to Irradiance in Three Forest Understory Species of the C4 Grass Genus Muhlenbergia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Marian; Martin, Craig E.

    1987-01-01

    Three species of the C4 grass genus Muhlenbergia from the forest understory—M. frondosa, M. sobolifera, and M. schreberi—and one species from an open prairie, M. cuspidata, were transplanted to a sunny common garden and ...

  15. Perennial grass community response to severe drought, topo-edaphic variation, and long-term herbivory on the Edwards Plateau of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackelford, Colin Scott

    2005-11-01

    Perennial grass vegetation dynamics of heavy grazing, moderate grazing and ungrazed treatments were analyzed during two extreme drought events: the drought of 1951 to 1956 and the drought events centered on the year 2000. ...

  16. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Sam [University of Massachusetts

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. The potential for tropical restoration legume and non-legume trees to suppress the invasive C4 grass Saccharum spontaneum in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science-Zeitschrift Fur AckerJournal of Agronomy and Crop Science- Zeitschrift Fur Ackerby Leguminous crops. Grass and Forage Science 38:1-11. He,

  18. The Establishment of Several Range Grasses Seeded in Burned and Unburned Slash of Ashe Junipe: (Juniperus Ashei Buchholz) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnett, Norman Neal

    1960-01-01

    requirements fox' thi dejxee ef = ' MASTER OP SCXENCE Vmy, 1960 FJa)ox SubJect: RANGE MANAGRMINY THE ESTABLISHMENT OP SEVERAL RANGE GRASSES SEEDED XN BURNED AND UNBURNED SLASH OP ASHE JUNXPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI BUCHHOLZ) NORMAN NEAL BONNETT Ajpproved aa... that fire prevented a rapid re- growth of Ashe )uniper. Naldrip (1984) also pointed out that burning the cedar slash greatly reduced the rate of cedar reinfestation (Figure 3). Four years following treatment in his experiments there were 447 cedar seed...

  19. The effects of fertilizer treatments on the content of the essential amino acids in Coastal Bermuda grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, James Lewis

    1952-01-01

    . ticss of ll ~ P20 ~ K 0, BCOo ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20 ~ ~ 21 ~ ~ 25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 33 kaalgs is cf Vcrisnce of Pcrcer tv-, e of br~ inc in tbs Credo P. "otein of' Cca "tal Bsrnada Grass ~m Plots... nitrogenocs substances other than proteins to the er tent of aboat one-tenth of the credo protein These nitrogenccs snb- stsnees consist of free amino acids, inorganic salts, sminxe, chloro- phyll, glToosides, and nitrogenoas bases (9, 49) ~ High...

  20. COMPARISON OF THE POPULATIONS OF COMMON WOOD-NYMPH BUTTERFLIES IN BURNED PRAIRIE, UNBURNED PRAIRIE AND OLD FIELD GRASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Walton, R.

    2007-01-01

    Common wood-nymph butterfl ies are found throughout the United States and Canada. However, not much is known about how they overwinter or their preferences for particular grasses and habitats. In this study, the impact of prairie management plans on the abundance of the wood-nymph population was assessed, as well as the preference of these butterfl ies for areas with native or non-native grasses. The abundance of common wood-nymph butterfl ies was determined using Pollard walks; more common wood-nymph butterfl ies were found in the European grasses than were found in the burned and unburned prairie sites. The majority of the vegetation at each of the three sites was identifi ed and documented. Using a 1 X 3 ANOVA analysis, it was determined there were signifi cantly more butterfl ies in the European grasses than in the burned and unburned prairie sites (p < 0.0005). There was no signifi cant difference between the burned and unburned treatments of the prairie on the common wood-nymph population. A multiple variable linear regression model described the effect of temperature and wind speed on the number of observed common wood-nymph butterfl ies per hour (p = 0.026). These preliminary results need to be supplemented with future studies. Quadrat analysis of the vegetation from all three sites should be done to search for a correlation between common wood-nymph butterfl y abundance per hour and the specifi c types or quantity of vegetation at each site. The effect of vegetation height and density on the observer’s visual fi eld should also be assessed.

  1. Drought effects on composition and yield for corn stover, mixed grasses, and Miscanthus as bioenergy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Amber Hoover; Allison Ray; Jeffrey Lacey; Marnie Cortez; Courtney Payne; Doug Karlen; Stuart Birrell; David Laird; Robert Kallenbach; Josh Egenolf; Matthew Sousek; Thomas Voigt

    2014-11-01

    Drought conditions in 2012 were some of the most severe reported in the United States. It is necessary to explore the effects of drought on the quality attributes of current and potential bioenergy feedstocks. Compositional analysis data for corn stover, Miscanthus, and CRP grasses from one or more locations for years 2010 (normal precipitation levels) and 2012 (a known severe drought year nationally) was collected. Results & discussion: The general trend for samples that experienced drought was an increase in extractives and a decrease in structural sugars and lignin. The TEY yields were calculated to determine the drought effects on ethanol production. All three feedstocks had a decrease of 12-14% in TEY when only decreases of carbohydrate content was analyzed. When looking at the compounded effect of both carbohydrate content and the decreases in dry matter loss for each feedstock there was a TEY decrease of 25%-59%. Conclusion: Drought had a significant impact on the quality of all three bioenergy crops. In all cases where drought was experienced both the quality of the feedstock and the yield decreased. These drought induced effects could have significant economic impacts on biorefineries.

  2. Changes in Native Aquatic Vegetation, Associated Fish Assemblages, and Food Habits of Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) Following the Addition of Triploid Grass Carp to Manage Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata) in Lake Conroe, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Patrick Alexander

    2011-10-21

    Nuisance aquatic vegetation (mainly Hydrilla Verticillata ) has become problematic in Lake Conroe, TX. Consequently, triploid grass carp (Ctenopharynogodon idella) were stocked at densities sufficient to completely denude ...

  3. Water relations strategies of two grass and shrub species as influenced by prescribed burning in a semiarid ecosystem in Kenya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Ali Ramadhan

    1984-01-01

    mean was based on an average of 4 dates of each hour of day at the N. R. R. S. , Kiboko, Kenya 1982-83 39 Xylem tension, transpiration rate and diffusive r esistance means for 2 grasses and 2 shrub species from burned and unburned treatments... lilP, C~th 'P ', ~Dt it 1 ~*bl h and Chlor is r oxburghiana were taken from burned and unburned plots at the National Range Research Station, Kiboko, during 1982-83. Results showed that burning had minimal effect on plant water status of the four...

  4. An evaluation of the effects of an alcoholic extract of fescue grass on the plasma prolactin levels of cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeler, Lauren Venette

    1985-01-01

    as to style and content by: Max S. Amoss Jr. (Ch rman of Committee) Gerald R. Bratton (Member) Oavid W. Forrest (Member) J. O. McCrady (Head of Oepartment) ABSTRACT An Evaluat1on of the Effects of an Alcoholic Extract of Fescue Grass on Plasma.... Gerald R. Bratton, for their assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. I would like to recognize the contributions of my colleagues, Lauretta A. Rund and Jay P. Kile, for their invaluable assistance in the conduction of numerous exper- iments...

  5. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  6. Grass Roots Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Micro-Enterprise in Social Care Kelly Hall, Catherine Needham and Kerry Allen, University of Birmingham, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    1 Grass Roots Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Micro-Enterprise in Social Care Kelly Hall conceptions of social care and have been promoted by the UK government as highly innovative, personalised to which they outperform larger care providers in delivering valued, innovative, personalised and cost

  7. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  8. Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantozzi, L., E-mail: l.fantozzi@iia.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy); Ferrara, R., E-mail: romano.ferrara@pi.ibf.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Biophysics, San Cataldo Research Area, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dini, F., E-mail: fdiniprotisti@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via A. Volta 4, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tamburello, L., E-mail: ltamburello@biologia.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via Derna 1, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Pirrone, N.; Sprovieri, F. [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)] [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}, which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28 °C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20 h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. -- Highlights: ? Mercury air/surface exchange from grass covered soil is different from bare soil. ? Light enhances mercury emissions and is the main parameter driving the process. ? The presence of wild vegetation covering the soil reduces mercury emission. ? Vegetative covers could be a solution to reduce atmospheric mercury pollution.

  9. Effects of variable nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with and without magnesium sulfate on the availability of soil nutrients and the percentage composition and yield of Coastal Bermuda grass forage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, Nathan Jackson

    1952-01-01

    EFFECTS OF VARIABLE NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS TREATMENTS WITH AND WITHOUT MAGNESIUM SULFATE ON THE AVAILABILITY OF SOIL NUTRIENTS AND THE PERCENI'AGE COMPOSITION AND YIELD OF COASTAL BERMUDA GRASS FORAGE A Thesis Nathan J ~ Cain Approved...'i~see o ' . ~lant tissue data IV. Analysis of variance of soil phosphorus (P) data V. Analysis of variance of' soil calcium (Ca) data VI. Analysis of variance of soil magnesium (Mg) data VII. Analysis of variance of scil potassium (K) data 34 35 36...

  10. Cereal Grains and Forage Grasses Cereal Grains and Forage Grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slik, Ferry

    ) Why did Wheat become so popular? Impact of Gluten Why did it take so long for Wheat to become popular? It took a long time to cultivate a free threshing variety! Cultivated Wheats are hexapoloids 2n 6n #12

  11. Energy Grasses for the Masses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Environmental Rulesets Species-Selective Harvesting Ecological Engineering Wild Harvesting System Level Implementation Multiple Platforms...

  12. Salt tolerance of grasses for range seeding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Francis Stephen

    1973-01-01

    0 0 0 UDI)DUIWA9Q 9AQD)9+ 37 0 0 UOI)DU}IUJScJ SAI)Di9$ 0 0 0 0 CO CCI cl' Ccl I I I I III III f 0 III 0 4 I 4 0 0 0 CI I/I C CII 0 ~ h U C N E V V E. &0 4 O gP~ O III Z 0 III E4 III 0 OI H 84 L. 0 Og 0 III L'gm K. ~ l l...

  13. Turning Grass into Gas for Less

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    like this switchgrass could be turned into biofuels, rather than using corn or other food crops. Pull up to the pump these days and chances are your gas will be laced with...

  14. Establishment of grass mixtures on roadsides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, Cynthia Lynne

    1992-01-01

    of the mulch. Evaporabon of soil moisture from the seed zone can be reduced with a surface inulch for 6 days to 2 weeks, an advantage which can be crucial in the emergence and development of young plants. A hectare with 0. 9 tons of sorghum residue.../ha Buffalograss Green sprangletop Little bluestem Sideoats grama cv. Haskell Yellow Indiangrass cv. Cheyenne 5. 9 0. 7 1. 2 2. 0 1. 7 Lufkin Bermudagrass (Common) Green sprangletop Little bluestem Switchgrass Yellow Indiangrass 1. 0 0. 8 1. 6 1...

  15. Grass Energy Collaborative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro Electric Co P LtdCollaborative Jump to:

  16. Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro Electric Co P LtdCollaborative Jump

  17. MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaw, A.L.C.

    2011-01-01

    period seismic noise (T>30 sec) . . . 2.5 Geothermal ground226. Clacy, G.R.T. ? 1968, Geothermal ground noise amplitudestudies at the Cos0 geothermal area, China Lake, California:

  18. Geomorphometric analysis of Hebes Chasma, Mars, using the GRASS GIS. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Samantha

    This research addressed the local scale geomorphometric analysis of the Hebes Chasma region on Mars, utilising a new 50 m/pixel digital terrain model derived from stereo imagery. A secondary aspect of the research addressed the role of GIS...

  19. Fire-grazing interactions in a mixed grass prairie 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, John Andrew

    2004-09-30

    experiment investigated the potential effects of these disturbances on above and belowground plant productivity, patch dynamics, and soil respiration over a 2-year period characterized by drought (1998) and normal (1999) rainfall. Spring burning... and mowing had interactive effects on aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Consistent with published single factor studies, burning without mowing doubled ANPP, whereas mowing in the absence of burning had neutral effects. However, subsequent...

  20. PINGREE PARK HERBACEOUS SPECIES LIST GRASSES & GRASSLIKES FORBS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    larkspur Fendlers sandwort daisy sulfur-flower western wallflower strawberry bedstraw geranium whisk

  1. MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaw, A.L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Origin of longitudinal microseismic waves: Izv. , Earthmost areas, the 2-10 Hz microseismic field is predominantlysophisticated analysis of microseismic data in an evaluation

  2. Seed Production Characteristics of Some Introduced Warm-Season Grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ethan C.

    1965-01-01

    1962 1963 Accession or variety Species 1961 1962 1963 Percent Percent ~eave.' pounds Pounds seed Pounds Pretoria 90 Dicanthium annulatum 3.4 1.5 2.6 27.1 90 8 4 2 11.7 70 Medio Dicanthium caricosum .9 .6 1.5 24.5 8 1 10 16 7.2 2 0 Gordo... Dicanthium annulatum .6 101 5 3 4080 Dicanthium annulatum 3 .O 2.0 2.1 30.2 98 19 36 8.2 54 6141 Bothriochloa intermedia 2.3 1.8 1.8 17.6 113 44 18 12.8 5 3 T-20069 Dicanthium sp. 3.5 2.0 1.4 31.5 105 10 2 8 5.6 67 T-20299 Dicanthium sericeus 3.4 1.7 1.2...

  3. Seed of Native Perennial Wildflowers and Native Grasses Allium cernuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Penstemon digitalis Foxglove Beardtongue Petalostemum candida White

  4. More Grass from Controlling Trees and Brush with Chemicals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, A. H.

    1955-01-01

    , black gum, elm, sweet gum, 1 lb. 2,4,5-T in 6 gal. Dec.-March Apply in frills at base of sycamore, water oak diesel oil or kerosene May-August tree or on freshly cut ' stumps. I L Blackjack oak, bur oak, post oak, 1 lb. 2,4,5-T in 6 gal. Bec....-March Apply to freshly cut stumps ! red oak diesel oil or kerosene May-August or trunk base of standin? trees. On all trees over 6" thick make frills and treat. ' 1 Lote, mesquite diesel...

  5. Lawn Fertilization for Texas Warm-Season Grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalmers, David; McAfee, James; Havlak, Roger

    2007-01-31

    This publication explains how to fertilize your lawn effectively, economically and in an environmentally sound way....

  6. Small Grains and Rye Grass for Winter Pasture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison); Dunkle, P. B. (Paul Burtch); Jones, D. L. (Don L.)

    1937-01-01

    as lvell as practicaIIg all classes of livestock. With the uniform success of Sudan as grazing crop in sumlner and fall and with these winter grazillg crops, tile farmer has within his wasp a potential constant supply of green grafiag abundant proteins... cutting to cutting, but has a tendency to increase during the latter part of the growing season. RESULTS AT DENTON Pract.ica1 Problems in Connection with Winter Pastures at Denton Wheat is the principal small grain planted for winter pasture although...

  7. Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 <Kentucky:York: EnergyMagnet MotorEnergy|

  8. Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGeneration Jump to:New

  9. Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility JumpIICalifornia: EnergyC

  10. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article) | SciTechinducedcarbonatesConnect i ..,,,

  11. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch &ENERGYWhoCELL WALLS (Technical

  12. Grasses and Forage Plants: a Study of Composition and Value; Texas Grains: Composition ; Ash Analyses, Grasses and Grains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill)

    1892-01-01

    . ALFALFA-LTCERSE. (Medicago Satiz.~.) "JVhen brought from South America to the United States, it was supposed to be a new plant, and called 'Brazilian Clover.' A few years ago it was taken from Western South America to California, and thence... amount of Amide Nitrogen is also quite no-. ,ble. The albuminoids are higher than in clover, and about the : as incow pea vines. It is remarkable how well the plant support's es, cattle and hogs. I believe it can come nearer replacing grain .ely than...

  13. Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity, EEAP Project No. 208; volume 1 - executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1984-01-01

    This report is a product of the Army Facilities Energy Plan. The plan`s goals are: To reduce baseline FY 1975 total facilities energy consumption (BTU) 20 percent by FY 1985 and 40 percent by FY 2000. To develop the capabilities to use synthetic gases by FY 2000. To reduce heating oil consumption by 75 percent by FY 2000. Five programs have been established to help achieve the above goals. The programs are: (1) The Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). (2) The Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP). (3) The Energy Conservation and Management Program (ECAM). (4) Solid Fuels Conversion Program. (5) The Boiler Efficiency Improvement Program (BEIP).

  14. Factors influencing germination and emergence of four warm-season grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Paxton

    1958-01-01

    incest neight an& this Ls partly enplaiao4 by the high sctrtality of the see&lings of side oats green, as eoccpare& sith ether species la the test. Pretoria 00 blnosten, shilo having a very satisfactory oc?rgonos poroeste@ec &see sot shecc rnpL& early...

  15. Yield and protein content of selected varieties of small grains and annual cool season grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammad Abdullah

    1951-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Sr@ Wligh4 o ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ e e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ o 24, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ e ~ o e ~ o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ SNAN ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 30 SORSQO M4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e o ~ ~ e e e ~ ~ e ~ e e ~ ~ e o ~ ~ 30 P?A4% OOCIN... fall ylaahlag of bbe as?all gssst?N ga oeooet4al fae obbatabsg hLgh yie14a of whAoe yssAaswgoi RA tho col wargeMee? whoa ~ ooely? nese often 4ofolLAs4 hf nwjAo La tho lat? faD befese tho ooaL wlates NAa %a. Sgsoe ylaeM 1al ~ Le tho fell? they agee...

  16. Effect of tebuthiuron on growth and forage quality of selected grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masters, Robert Andrew

    1981-01-01

    CD N c0 O c0 I/! I/I D al cd a! 0 O 0 '0 I I I al at Ch O N W I dl V C 0 ID ID O Cl CO CO 'Ct I O I Ch Ch I Ct D 0! '0 at CD cd Cl I Cl I O Ch I/I Cl 0' ca 0 Cl CO I tld ) 0 V tN a! C 0! Cl u 8 3 H C 0... Dd N cdO C Cd CD Cl 0! DD Z cdu '0 tD IJ ttl dl 00 Sw E~ I S S S vl DL 0 0 'tj p S C H S S 00 4 S P Vl C 4 g N 0 0?00 E S ta tfl S 0 p 00 dl 4 al 4 S t 4 0 0 W 00 'Q E td Vl I 0 3 00 4 S dl 3 P 4 0 Q tll C 0 S 4 00 dl...

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of using alfalfa and buffalo grass for remediation of trichloroethylene from groundwater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caravello, Victor

    1998-01-01

    Phytoremediation is receiving increasing attention due to the potential for vegetation to play a significant role in bioremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study to determine...

  18. INTERPRETATION OF GRAVITY SURVEYS IN GRASS AND BUENA VISTA VALLEYS, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    resistivity, and seismic interpretations along selectedboth gra- vity and seismic interpretations at several pointsvery well with the seismic interpretation obtained by means

  19. Preliminary Open File Report: Geological and Geophysical Studies in Grass Valley, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, H.

    2010-01-01

    component. The 3 shaded areas in Figure 51 correspond toValley area that is seismically active (Figure 51). The

  20. The grass is half-full : new biofuels from field to wheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Andrew (Andrew Garet)

    2008-01-01

    The current biofuels market in the United States is dominated by ethanol made from corn. But corn ethanol has limitations that will prevent it from displacing a large amount of fossil fuel use in the U.S. To achieve that ...

  1. Preliminary Open File Report: Geological and Geophysical Studies in Grass Valley, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, H.

    2010-01-01

    of August 1976. Seismic Data and Preliminary InterpretationMethods Seismic Data and Prel iminary Interpretation

  2. INTERPRETATION OF GRAVITY SURVEYS IN GRASS AND BUENA VISTA VALLEYS, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    resistivity, and seismic interpretations along selectedboth gra- vity and seismic interpretations at several pointsValley. Gravity and seismic interpretations also give The

  3. Estimates of Biomass Yield for Perennial Bioenergy Grasses in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    . S. Kheshgi ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ 08801, USA M. Khanna yields over the period 2001­2012 in the eastern USA. The validation with observed data from sites across

  4. From "Sea of Grass" to "Wire and Rail": Melville's Evolving Perspective on the Prairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    , commerce, and greed explicitly brought on by Euroamericans. While Melville’s metaphorical use of prairie images in his early writings may, in Buell’s terms, appear anthropocentric, in Moby-Dick as well as in his later work, Clarel and John Marr and Other... and the mystic of the prairie landscape. In Mardi, Melville recalls that the prairie may be as still as “an August noon” (M 567); in Moby-Dick, he refers to its “placidity” (MD 335), and later in John Marr and Other Poems, he writes that “Blank stillness would...

  5. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, G. M; Alexandre, A.; Southon, J. R; Treseder, K. K; Corbineau, R.; Reyerson, P. E

    2012-01-01

    M. K. : A simple method of extraction of opal phytolithsphytolith sample extraction methods (Boaretto, 2009; PriorUntil such efficient extraction methods are available, the

  6. The effect of gibberellic acid on root growth stoppage in several grasses following severe clipping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres Mas, Joaquin

    1958-01-01

    eg4 9+01 LSAS Sogg Se56 LgoRS Swig S 45 SA5 6, 04 S. R Jkdik ~ %AS 0 e4$ 4 Ssgs Sollasisg tresaseet kt thse of troeaeset got eliygof Mess Syos Les sess 5+SL 4~ 5+44 5+50 7 +40 4AS L4L 5o04 6 i%5 5el6 5e'N 5+4$ 5A5 6, 01 LQ %w...? Secgeea? k, W? L9$L ~ Ocseth ea4 7LaL4 st eertaia gceagaeee ae Iatlaeaesg h7 ce4aetkea eg 9hetee7athet5s tleese. gflgacgfa gi SSL SOL? g 0 West& g, k altseL m ee4 NasL7& 9 N L9$7 $CL4sase gsc "OIhhereLLCa?LLhs" seheteaeee Ores flsasrSag 9Laate? Pcee...

  7. Efficient use of irrigation water on turf-grasses is becoming more crucial in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of multiple turfgrass culti- vars in the stressful climate of the transi- tion zone. By shielding rainfall of turfgrasses were transplanted into clear polyethylene root tubes that were filled with fritted clay. Polyethylene tubes were then inserted into opaque PVC pipe (sleeves). Root growth is being monitored

  8. Grass control with DPX-79406 and cultivation in corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, James Mitchell

    1990-01-01

    treatments Late treatments Mode of DPX-79406 application rate Mode of DPX-79406 application rate POT (g/ha) 52. 5 POT POT 26. 25 26. 25 POT PD+C 26. 25 26. 25 POT 52. 5 NT BOT+C BOT+C BOT+C BOT+C 52. 5 26. 25 26. 25 52. 5 POT PD...+C NT 26. 25 26. 25 POT 52. 5 PD+C 52. 5 NT NT NT POT 52. 5 NT PD+C 52. 5 NT NT 13 Table 1. Continued 'POT=postemergence broadcast over-the-top; BOT+c=postemergence banded over-the-top plus cultivation; PD+C=postemergence directed plus...

  9. Grass Carp: A Fish for Biological Management of Hydrilla and Other Aquatic Weeds in Florida1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    serious problems in ponds, lakes, rivers, and irrigation and drainage throughout Florida. In some can seriously impact agricultural operations, shown here blocking the intake line of an irrigation pump. Credits: David L. Sutton #12;2 Herbicides are frequently used for hydrilla control

  10. The Use of Sudan Grass Pastures and Other Feeds for Beef Production. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, John H.

    1941-01-01

    weight ................... ......... . Average daily gain. basis farm weight ...... Average daily gain. basis market.weight ............. Shrinkage enroute to market. Ibs ......... Shrinkage enroute to market. percent Slaughter Data Carcass weight... daily gain basis farm weight ..................... ~v?ra;e daily gain: basis market weight ................... Shrinkage via truck to market. pounds .................... Shrinkage via truck to market. percent...

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evolutionary Insights on C4 Photosynthetic Subtypes in Grasses from Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    beneficial, es- pecially under high air temperature and low CO2 concen- trations (Ehleringer et al. 1997; Muhaidat et al. 2007). In the C4 pathway, atmospheric CO2 is fixed in the mesophyll cells into the bundle­sheath layer cells, where their decarboxylation releases CO2 for the Calvin­Benson cycle

  12. The Value of Different Phosphates for Various Texas Soils and Grasses, as Indicated by Pot Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1945-01-01

    as that in superphosphate (2, 30, 11, 39), but they cannot, at present, be recom- mended on calcareous soils. Ammonium phosphate is a soluble phosphate in which the phosphoric acid probably has a high availability. Basic slag, a by-product from the manufacture of steel..., has been used in many areas with variable results, but it contains only about 8 to 12 per cent of total phosphoric acid and is a low-grade fertilizer. Phosphoric acid in sonle basic slags may be nearly as available on some soils as that in super...

  13. Fine-Scale Spatial Genetic Structure in Perennial Grasses in Three Environments Steven E. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven E.

    relacio´n espacial gene´tica entre la poblacio´n de las plantas (la estructura gene´tica espacial) y estructura espacial gene´tica en tres especies de grami´neas en un medio ambiente semia´rido (Arizona, Me

  14. Use of tristimulus colorimetry to measure ornamental color in little bluestem grass (Schizachyrium scoparium [Michx.] Nash) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snowden, John Seward

    1990-01-01

    color within the light range perceived by the human eye (Francis and Clydesdale, 1975). The basic machinery uses a light source, three filters to imitate the responses of the human eye, and photocells. Several systems of quantification of color... using tristimulus colorimetry have been developed 11 (Francis and Clydesdale, 1975). The Hunterlab Labscan Spectro Colorimeter LS 5100 with videoscreen monitor has the capability of measuring color in four systems. Concentration here...

  15. EUROGRAPHICS 2002 / N.N. Short Presentations Real Time Animated Grass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidrich, Wolfgang

    in the wind, in real time. The technique employs vertex shaders to render displacement maps with Russian doll style transparent shells. Animation is achieved by translating the surface according to a local wind of the animation di- rection, in response to a simulated wind field, is maintained at the vertex level. At each

  16. Deleterious activity of cultivated grasses (Poaceae) and residues on soilborne fungal, nematode and weed pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J.; Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    on wheat seedlings. Crop Science, 35, 1652–1656. Burgos, N.system with cover crops. Weed Science, 44, 355–361. Cheema,

  17. Fertilizing Texas Lawns: 10-Point Checklist for Warm-Season Grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalmers, David; McAfee, James

    2007-01-31

    Use this checklist on fertilization to make your lawn healthy and attractive while minimizing the costs and damage to the environment....

  18. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Legumes, Grasses and Forage Crops in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeb, Charles W.; Thomas, John G.

    1982-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ALFALFA AND CLOVER PESTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Field Scouting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sucking Pests... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Clover Head Weevil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Alfalfa Caterpillar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Armyworms and Corn Earworms...

  19. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Legumes, Grasses and Forage Crops in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, C.T.; Hoelscher, Clifford E.

    1988-01-01

    4 .. ALFALFA AND CLOVER PESTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Resistant Cultivars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Field... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alfalfaweevil 9 Clover Head Weevil...

  20. Parasitism of Diatraea saccharalis (F.) infesting Johnson grass, by the braconid parasite Apanteles flavipes (Cameron) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Leerdam, Marinus Bartholomeus

    1981-01-01

    SUGARCANE Av. No. Larvae Left in Host Body Av. No. Host Av. No. Unviable Support Eggs Pupae per Efficiency Deposited Cocoon Mass per Larva Sex Ratio I II I I I IV V Vl Mean * 12. 4 34. 3 50. 1 72. 7 92. 5 109. 4 1. 79 6 13 17 16... II III IV V VI an * 13. 1 32. 1 51. 6 67. 2 88. 1 110. 6 6 12 15 11 15 6 13. 3 (1. 2) 5. 7 (0. 2) 79. 7 (13. 8) 10. 6 (1. 1) 6. 1 (0. 2) 56, 4 (7. 5) 10. 6 (0, 4) 5. 5 (0. 2} 57. 8 (8. 5) 11. 1 (0. 2) 5. 6 (0. 2) 59. 4 (9. 0) 11. 0...

  1. Effect of naphthalene and phenanthrene on the grass shrimp palaemonetes pugio (Holthuis) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Gene Paul

    1977-01-01

    in the Environment Contamination of coastal zones with oil remains one of the most serious consequences of the increased demand for petroleum products. Among the most common causes of this type of pollution are the discharge of ballast waters by tankers and other... OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES. . . INiTRODUCTION vii Osmoregulation in Palaemonetes ~u io. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sources of Petroleum in the Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . Char. cteristics and Toxicity of Oil to Marine...

  2. Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckler, Edward S; Casler, Michael D; Cherney, Jerome H

    2012-01-20

    This project had six objectives, four of which have been completed: 1) Association panels of diverse populations and linkage populations for switchgrass and reed canarygrass (~1,000 clones each) were assembled and planted in two sites (Ithaca, NY and Arlington, WI); 2) Key biofeedstock characteristics were evaluated in these panels for three field seasons; 3) High density SNP markers were developed in switchgrass; and 4) Switchgrass association panels and linkage populations were genotyped. The remaining two original objectives will be met in the next year, as the analyses are completed and papers published: 5) Switchgrass population structure and germplasm diversity will be evaluated; and 6) Association mapping will be established and marker based breeding values estimated in switchgrass. We also completed a study of the chromosome-number variation found in switchgrass.

  3. Hydrologic aspects of grass dominated and honey mesquite dominated areas on the Rolling Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Joe Dale

    1987-01-01

    bar e soi 1 areas conducive to runoff occurred in the herbaceous and mesquite areas during installation. The herbaceous areas quickly revegetated whereas the mesquite areas have yet to recover. Water yield through drainage was 19. 6, 11. 4 and -27... APPENDIX D APPENDIX E VITA Page . . 102 . . 105 . . 109 . . 112 . . 117 . . 121 128 . . 131 134 . . 144 150 156 LIST OF TABLES Table Mean peak standing crop of the weighable lysimeters by treatment on the Wagon Creek Spade Research area...

  4. Save Some Green--Grass AND Dollars--with These Lawn Care Tips | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13, 2015reports issuedExperienceEnergy|of

  5. Field Experiments at McKinney Sub-Station and Wichita Falls Sub-Station with Wheat, Corn, Cotton, Grasses and Manures. Field Experiments at College Station with Corn, Cotton, Grasses, Peas and Manures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connell, J. H.; Clayton, James

    1895-01-01

    Cracken . . ............................... Smooth . . . . . . . . 17 .18 ..... . 206 White Frack .................................. do ......... Hi.29 .... .. 207 Lebanon ................................... Bearded ........ 23.55 3.43. 208 Bodine E., 0. K. West .... . ................. Smooth...

  6. Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification performance of grasses and legumes from a mixed species prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    procedure. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden,in biomass. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden,

  7. Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool dynamics: Bromus tectorum invasion of perennial C3–C4 grass communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Adair, Elizabeth; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2010-01-01

    Proportion of variation explained by randomsee Results). proportion of the variation in soil C and N

  8. Unencumbered by History: Identity, Modernity, and the Holocaust in Günter Grass’s Die Blechtrommel and Christa Wolf's Kindheitsmuster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, David Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Literatur Geschichte der DDR. Expanded edition. Leipzig:und ihre Grenzen in der DDR. Ed. Martin Sabrow. Leipzig:in der Geschichte der DDR-Literatur." Weimarer Beiträge

  9. Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool dynamics: Bromus tectorum invasion of perennial C3–C4 grass communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Adair, Elizabeth; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2010-01-01

    differences between soil pools beneath B. tectorum adjusteddifferences between soil pools beneath Bonferroni and nativegrass values indicate that pools were estimate statement).

  10. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in a Tree - Grass Inter-Cropping System in the Humid Tropics of Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez-Daumas, Salvador

    in Oaxaca, Mexico, where increases in productivity are limited by shortage of capital and where the tree component would be used as green manure. It is difficult to investigate the effectiveness of such a system by only using conventional field trials. I...

  11. The effects of temperature and soil moisture on the germination and emergence of three perennial warm season grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlenbusch, Paul Dietrich

    1966-01-01

    selected IY!' speci?!s ??ere can&! blues tel!?(nndto pogon barbinodis Lag ), Sideoats grams (Sosteloaa eurti eachwla m. 7 soar. ), aalu gceen syraaqaetop (mpteen~ @usta QH. B. K Q Ness) The test sLaterial used was collected feed contrasting climatic... HAP TER X X REVXEW OF I XTERATVRE A seed, to germinates s&ust have (1) an adequate supply of water, (2) a suitable tes&perature, and (3) an ada&(uate supply of oxygen (F)eyer and Pol)akoff-Nayber, 1963) ~ Xn order for a plant to grow fros& a seed...

  12. Unencumbered by History: Identity, Modernity, and the Holocaust in Günter Grass’s Die Blechtrommel and Christa Wolf's Kindheitsmuster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, David Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    degraded worksites, with the reproach from her daughter thatGuernica as an ironic reproach against the brutalities ofsociety comes into play as reproach to the legacy of Nazi

  13. Strategic light manipulation as a restoration strategy to reduce alien grasses and encourage native regeneration in Hawaiian mesic forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostertag, Rebecca

    specific leaf area. Introduction Conversion of large tracts of forest to pasture for cattle production significant negative biotic and abiotic consequences, including altera- tion of nutrient cycling and loss of biodiversity (Janzen 1988; Silver et al. 2004). After abandonment some of these areas are able to recover

  14. Reticulate Evolutionary History of a Complex Group of Grasses: Phylogeny of Elymus StStHH Allotetraploids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason-Gamer, Roberta J.

    unlinked nuclear genes--phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, b-amylase, and granule-bound starch synthase I

  15. The effect of fertilizer treatments on several amino acids of Dallis grass grown in the Gulf Coast region of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, Wilfred Leo

    1956-01-01

    blook experiment with twelve treatments each replioated four times. It was set up as a pasture fertilizer test with sulfur, sources of phosphorus and lime used as fertilizer for the treatments. Table 1 gives the field randomiza- tion of the twelve... Super and 46 Sulfur Lime and Super 47 Hock Phos. and Sulfur Super Lime and Super and Sulfur Rock Pbos. 1954. The spr1ng and summer had been especially dry at the location of this test; therefore the forage d1d not have good growth...

  16. Evapotranspiration and Leachate Quality of Warm-season Turf and Native Grasses under Different Texas Landscape Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannkuk, Timothy Richard

    2012-02-14

    .) landscape crop coefficients (K[subscript L]) for landscapes comprised of different vegetation types, 2.) if regional climatic differences affect K[subscript L], and 3.) examine differences in leachate nutrient concentrations from the plant treatments. The K...

  17. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore »(prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  18. Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification performance of grasses and legumes from a mixed species prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Society of Agronomy/Crop Science Society of America/SoilSociety of Agronomy/ Crop Science Society of America/SoilSociety of Agronomy/Crop Science Society of America/Soil

  19. High-throughput system can analyze thousands of poplar, maize, and switch grass samples at a time to help determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to help determine which biomass feedstocks are best suited for biofuels. Researchers at the National

  20. TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkingburg, David R. Van

    2011-01-01

    grass cutti ngs 1. 55 kg, Eucalyptus duff 2.47 kg. 0,04 kg~grass cuttings. and Eucalyptus duff in a Mobil Korditeand grass along with Eucalyptus leaves burn first leaving

  1. The evaluation of certain species, varieties, and strains of winter annual grasses and small grains with and without Dixie crimson clover for forage production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soules, James Theodore

    1950-01-01

    Chairman at Caealttee Luguat~ 1950 The writer wishes to express bis gratitude to tbe following members of tbe staff of the kgricultural end Mechanical College of Texas vhose guidance and counsel have made this study possible& Dr. R. C. Patte, In Charge... of Forage Investigation, Department of kgroncsy, vho super- vised tbe study and helped vith tbe preparation of tbe manuscript~ Dr, L, C ~ Eapp& ksscciate Professor, Department of Lgronomy, vho made available faoilities for maldng the chemical analysesg...

  2. The effects of certain management practices and drought on native in south Texas with special emphasis on sandhill grass (Brachiaria ciliatissima (Bucki.) Chase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Euel L

    1952-01-01

    ?try? Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, fOr his patisnoo and timely suggestions during the oourso of this study? To Sr, 8, J, Klebsrg? Sr, of the King Ranch? and other members of his organisation? and ospooially No?sr?i Jim Me Bride ?nd Ni y, Noir...K of Ivanov {1QQQ) ~ tho ability of plant to, re'jfktt drought 1? directly proportional to, ite denegty end extent of tho root cyst~', ln 0 etude of the solstice 0'f"rests of hIIB ~tests to sr II1111 rosiotesoo Coot {XQ45), found the total axial root...

  3. Telluric and D.C. Resistivity Techniques Applied to the Geophysical Investigation of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems, Part III: The Analysis of Data From Grass Valley, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    a reasonable interpretation of gravity, seismic and d.c.interpretation of telluric and d.c. resistivity data, In conjunction with gravity, seismic, andseismic refraction/reflection. Only the data which are most pertinent to the interpretation

  4. Telluric and D.C. Resistivity Techniques Applied to the Geophysical Investigation of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems, Part III: The Analysis of Data From Grass Valley, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    a reasonable interpretation of gravity, seismic and d.c.interpretation of telluric and d.c. resistivity data, In conjunction with gravity, seismic,seismic refraction/reflection. Only the data which are most pertinent to the interpretation

  5. Creating a Multi-functional Library of Grass Transcription Factors for the Energy Crop Model System Brachypodium Distachyon (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coomey, Joshua [University of Massashusetts Amherst

    2014-03-20

    Joshua Coomey of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  6. Soil respiration in perennial grass and shrub ecosystems: Linking environmental controls with plant and microbial sources on seasonal and diel timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbone, Mariah S; Winston, Gregory C; Trumbore, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    R. Vargas (2008), Automated soil respiration measure- ments:and J. M. Wraith (2007), Diurnal hysteresis between soil CO2 and soil temperature is controlled by soil water content,

  7. Effects of soil treatments supplemented with two rates of magnesium sulfate on the availability of soil nutrients and on the yield and chemical composition of coastal Bermuda grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evatt, Nathan S

    1951-01-01

    'ZATZ ON THE AVAILABILITY OF SOIL NUTRIENTS AND ON TH YIELD AND CHENICAL COMPOSITICN GF CO. iSTAL BERNUDA GHASS INTRODUCTION It is known that magnesium is one of' the elements essential for plant growth; however much is to be learned concerning its specific functions... within the plant, Host Texas soils are not deficient, in magnesium (23). Magnesium is reported to be a carrier of the phos- phorus used by the plant. It is entirely possible that the failure to obtain crops of higher phosphorus content upon...

  8. The potential for tropical restoration legume and non-legume trees to suppress the invasive C4 grass Saccharum spontaneum in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Allelopathic effects of Eucalyptus citriodora on AmaryllisReview on alleopathy of Eucalyptus L'Herit. Boletin de la1997. Allelopathic effect of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. on

  9. The Vanishing Book of Life on Earth --Eric R. Pianka The great North American tall grass prairie --we just took it and turned it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    in all life on Earth could never be recorded in a single book, or even in an encyclopedia, but would precariously high. #12;2 Most people consider biology, particularly ecology, to be a luxury that they can do a biological major. Basic biology is not a luxury at all, but rather an absolute necessity. Despite our human

  10. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, these cycles are strongly...

  11. Buffalo Grass as a Means of Water Use Reduction on the UC Davis Campus Call, Siew, Wada, Ware ESM 121 Water Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    of the energy cost to pump irrigation water, just to keep their lawns green. The American fixation on the lawn sustainability. Ornamental lawn irrigation remains one of the largest water use inefficiencies in the United showed the potential for 46.6% reduction in annual irrigation water use, even the most favorable cost

  12. Carcass quality and composition, sensory characteristics, and shelf-life evaluation of five goat breed-types fed grain- or grassed-based diets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafley, Brian Scott

    2001-01-01

    Wether goats from five breed-types, Boer/Spanish, Spanish/Angora, Boer/Angora, Spanish, and Angora, assigned to grain-fed or pasture-fed, and grain-fed Boer/Spanish intact males were used to conduct this study. After slaughter, carcasses were...

  13. Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks play an important role in barrier island response to disturbance. Dune-building grasses like Ammophila breviligulata can restore areas of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    on Hog Island. In aggregate, our findings suggest that within barrier island systems like the #12;iii VCR#12;ii ABSTRACT Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks play an important role in barrier island response influence of the maintainer feedback on two morphologically distinct islands in the Virginia Coast Reserve

  14. The impact of shifting precipitation patterns on the establishment and biomass allocation patterns of shrub and grass seedlings in southwest Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Steven Richard

    2000-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions contribute to an annual 0.5% increase in atmospheric CO?. As global CO? levels increase, regional precipitation patterns in southern Texas will likely be altered, resulting in an increase in ...

  15. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    particular interest for biodiesel, and grasses (Gramineae)of particular interest for biodiesel production. Chemicalsparticular interest for biodiesel, and grasses (Gramineae),

  16. How is ferulic acid transported into the Golgi apparatus? Lignin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the cell wall polysaccharide composition -- for instance, in grasses, arabinose residues on arabinoxylans

  17. SPECIES ACCOUNTS FOR SELECT FOCAL SPECIES TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................................................O-1 MOUNTAIN BENT GRASS (Agrostis humilis ..............................................................................................................................................O-70 BLACK BEAR (Ursus americanus

  18. Exploiting Hierarchical Context on a Large Database of Object Categories -Supplemental Materials -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    With Context grass building person window window wallwall wall stand cupboard wallshelves oor mirror dishwasher

  19. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15

    treatments. Whole community estimates of herbaceous ANPP were obtained by summing individual functional group ANPP values. This approach was used to capture small, but important periods of productivity which might otherwise be masked by functional groups... stream_source_info HOLLISTER-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 280672 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name HOLLISTER-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 LAND...

  20. Gulf and Caribbean Research Vol 22, 71-75, 2010 Manuscript received October 30, 2009; accepted December 15, 2009 GrowtH PattErNS of SHoal GraSS hALodULE wRiGhTii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smee, Lee

    &M University ­ Corpus Christi, Department of Life Sciences, 6300 Ocean Dr. Unit 5800, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 clarity and increases light penetration, further increasing primary production (Zieman 1982, Gacia

  1. The role of topography in the emergence of African savannas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yeonjoo, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    The coexistence of trees and grasses in savannas are not well understood even though savannas occupy a wide area of West Africa. In this study, a hypothesis is proposed to investigate the question of how trees and grasses ...

  2. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ivy, and pampas grass. Eucalyptus and other non-native treenon-native trees such as eucalyptus, pine, fir, and others.cape ivy, and pampas grass. Eucalyptus and other tree stands

  3. The Aquatic Trophic Ecology of Suisun Marsh, San Francisco Estuary, California, During Autumn in a Wet Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeter, Robert E.; O'Rear, Teejay A.; Young, Matthew J.; Moyle, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Rosa californica), Eucalyptus sp. , perennial pepperweed (SD) Phytoplankton N/A N/A phytoplank N/A Eucalyptus globulusblue-gum eucalyptus euc alien Poaceae grass grass N/A

  4. Management of shallow impoundments to provide emergent and submergent vegetation for waterfowl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polasek, Len Gerard

    1994-01-01

    adjacent to water; and, grasses in upper, drier zones. Seed production of grasses, sedges, and forbs generally reflected vegetation present in each soil-moisture zone. Taxon richness of emergent plants was highest in dewatered zones. Drawdown timing did...

  5. Biogeochemistry of Woody Plant Invasion: Phosphorus Cycling and Microbial Community Composition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kantola, Ilsa Beth

    2012-07-16

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally-prevalent vegetation change phenomenon that has shifted grass-dominated ecosystems to mixed grass and woody plant matrices over the last century. In the Rio Grande Plains of Texas, the introduction of N...

  6. Suggestions for Weed Control in Pastures and Forages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Bade, David H.

    2004-04-06

    , pasture sod suppression and renovation, clover permanent grass pastures and established grass crops, sorghum-sudan hybrids, alfalfa and clover, winter pastures for grazing only, and grazing/hay restrictions. Sprayer calibration instructions are included....

  7. California: Cutting-Edge Biofuels Research and Entrepreneurship...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    viable processes for advanced biofuels and biochemical production from grasses, algae, wood, gases, and agriculturalindustrialmunicipal waste leading to efficient...

  8. The Night Sky During the month of April, all of the major planets of the solar system, except Saturn, are clustered near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    ), the Full Spouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Full Fish Moon (since some species of fish spawn

  9. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    switch­ grass genotype (Alamo AP-13) into the correctThe switchgrass (variety Alamo) and S. viridis (acces­ sion

  10. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    Chalk Bluffs north of the town of Bishop; 2) an intermediate, mixed grass-shrub community near the Owens River

  11. Common Southeast Wetland Plants Common name1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    No common rush Juncus effuses Seed rice cut grass Leersia oryzoides Seed common duckweed Lemna minor Aquatic

  12. alligatorweed Alternanthera philoxeroides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    grass Leersia oryzoides EM, NP common duckweed Lemna minor AB, FV #12;8/24/2011 9 sprangletop Leptochloa

  13. Pasture Improvement in the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison); Jones, John H.

    1939-01-01

    , carpet, and Angleton grasses, California bur clover (toothed bur clover), White Dutch clover, and common lespedez ?commended for permanent pastures in the region. Adequate drair wing to control weeds, and the seeding of desirable and nuapbcu pasture... grasses and clovers in a permanent pasture, and with- stands heavy grazing. This grass is recommended in any mixture for permanent pasture in the Gulf Coast Prairie. Bahia grass, Paspalum notaturn, is a native of the West Indies and South America...

  14. A Techno-Economic Assessment of Hydrogen Production by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 Resource Assessment of Biomass Feedstocks 1.1 Bagasse, Sw itch Grass, and Nut Shell Availability and Cost 1

  15. 2015 Winter and Spring Fire Potential Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015 Winter and Spring Fire Potential Assessment For the Grass Dominant Fuels on the Western Plains Factors · Fine Fuel Conditions · Drought · Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation #12;Grass Dominant Fuels Grass dominant fuels are generally found west of the red line shown on the map. During the dormant

  16. Pasture Development in the East Texas Timber Country. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouch, E. K.; Jones, John H.

    1945-01-01

    . The methods used included clearing, drainage, the application ' superphosphate and the seeding of suitable legumes and grasses. he application of approximately 200 pounds of phosphoric acid per :re permitted the establishment of adapted clovers and grasses... ........................ 8 ertain Plants Become Established .......................... 10 he Clovers ................................................... 11 The Grasses .................................... ! Fertilization Necessary ......................... . I -ontrol...

  17. Effects of three grazing systems on quail on the Northern Rio Grande Plain, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Linda

    1981-01-01

    through December 1980. Species composition of grasses, forbs and shrubs was de- termined for clay loam, sandy loam and shallow ridge range sites. Foliar cover of grasses abundance of forbs, and height and weight of both classes were determined... was highest on sandy loam sites. Di- versity generally increased with pasture deferment and with favorable growing conditions. The foliar cover, height and weight of grasses were significantly greater on clay loam sites than on sandy loam or shallow ridge...

  18. International Bibliography of Vegetation Maps 2nd Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

    1980-01-01

    . Parana-Uruguay c. Patagonia d. Mountain e. Marsh IV. Bushlands 8. a. Humid mountains b. Arid mountains c. Intermontanc valley d. Patagonia e. Inner coastal desert V. Deserts 9. a. Peruvian-Chilean b. Lomas c. Venezuelan sand-dunes d. Salt.... Bunch grasses, annual grasses and herbs, and shrubs 1. Tola heath puna 2. Paramo grassland: grasses 3. Tundra: low shrubs, mosses VI. Desert A. Coastal desert of Peru and Chile B. Fog vegetation of Peru Coast (lomas vegetation). Predominantly...

  19. Pasture, Hay and Silage Crops for East Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, E. C.; Johnson, P. R.; Buckingham, Mark; Hutson, H. C.; Crouch, J. K.; Wood, J. R.

    1958-01-01

    per acre, and have the advantage of reseeding themselves. Crimson clover, vetch and winter peas grown in combination with these annual grasses increase total production and the protein content of the forage. Perennial winter grasses, such as fescue... and increase total production. White clover is one of the best legumes for pastures because it will reseed under grazing, has a long growing season and has less smothering: effect on the permanent grass than many of the legumes. Narrowleaf vetch, a native...

  20. Chemokine-cleaving Streptococcus pyogenes protease SpyCEP is necessary and sufficient for bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    ., 2005) [genomic annotation prtS, also known as scpC (Ferretti et al., 2001; Hidalgo-Grass et al., 2006

  1. REVEGETATION OF THE ROCKY FLATS SITE, COLORADO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    growing on the topsoil, this could have been avoided by not using topsoil from that location. However, because no evaluation was done, a stand of undesirable nonnative grasses...

  2. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01

    and grasses (Gramineae) for bioethanol produc- tion. Theseof wide interest for bioethanol production. Editor’s note:Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol), bioenergy: Alternative

  3. Latino Autobiography, the Aesthetic, and Political Criticism: The Case of Hunger of Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durán, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    W. “The Making of Ethruc Autobiography in the U.S. "the Grass War Taller: Autobiography and the Experience ofin Contemporary Autobiography: Richard Rodriguez and Maxine

  4. Mechanical mastication thins Lake Tahoe forest with few adverse impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatchett, B.; Hogan, Michael P.; Grismer, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The treatments included woodchip- covered and bare-soilstands, or both. A woodchip plots. Mastication appears lessof the native grass or woodchip- covered plots, or from the

  5. NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    means a facility that creates energy, fuels, or chemicals directly from the wind, the sun, trees, grasses, biosolids,... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Local Government...

  7. Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purposes of renaissance zone designation, “renewable energy facility” means a facility that creates energy, fuels, or chemicals directly from the wind, the sun, trees, grasses, biosolids,...

  8. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these native prairies. The native grasses' deep roots help prevent erosion, trap rainwater and preserve the area's groundwater aquifers. Every year volunteers, users and...

  9. Development and characterization of renewable resource- structural composite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, Andrea Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Acetate Butyrate Bioplastic by Reactive Extrusion."Grass and Soy Based Bioplastic: Processing and PropertiesAcetate Butyrate Bioplastic by Reactive Extrusion."

  10. The Development of 70-Year-Old Wieslander Vegetation Type Maps and an Assessment of Landscape Change in the Central Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, James H; Kelsey, Rodd; Honig, Jacquelyn; Morgan, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Navarretia sp. Ribes sp. Salix sp. Tule Wild hay MonardellaTypes Annuals Grass Salix sp. Meadow Unidentified Code CAGResidence Water Ribes sp. Salix sp. Wild hay Unidentified

  11. NREL: Environment, Safety, Health and Quality - Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Photo of wild sunflowers in green grass. Credit: Bob Fiehweg NREL's Environmental Management System (EMS) supports the laboratory's commitment to its...

  12. Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the advanced biofuels industry comes from harvesting its raw material or feedstock - the wood, grass or agricultural waste it converts to fuel - and delivering it from the field...

  13. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    P Univ of Wisconsin Madison WI United States Dept of Botany APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES BIOMASS FUELS Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures...

  14. Image analysis of anatomical traits in stalk transections of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Botany 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures,...

  15. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Center (GLBRC), Madison, WI (United States)","USDOE","60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS",,"Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures,...

  16. Common Southeast Wetland Plants Common name1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    capensis No common rush Juncus effuses Seed rice cut grass Leersia oryzoides Seed common duckweed Lemna minor Aquatic Vegetation, Inverts sprangletop Leptochloa panacea Seed cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis

  17. BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ALEJANDRO E. CASTELLANOS V.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    , nitrogen), and + Physiological ecology of vines. - Desertification and Ecological Restoration + Land use exotic buffel - grass and desertification. In: B. Tellman, Ed. Weeds across borders. Proceedings

  18. Modeling the potential contribution of land cover changes to the late twentieth century Sahel drought using a regional climate model: impact of lateral boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G; Yu, M; Xue, Y

    2015-01-01

    cell (referred to as desertification in this section) inand grass co-exist, desertification is applied only whereof deforestation and desertification combined do not exceed

  19. Review and Status of Solid Waste Management Practices in Multan, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Mirza, Umar Karim; Sarwar, Muhammad Avais

    2006-01-01

    paper) 2.4 Rags Glass Food waste Animal waste Leaves, grass,bottle lids, food cans, computer waste, cosmetics residues,

  20. DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at scale, the operation of a dry fermentation system that uses pre- and post-consumer food wastes from supermarkets and restaurants, waste sawdust, grass, leaves, stumps and...

  1. 'To quarterback behind the scenes, third-party efforts': The tobacco industry and the Tea Party

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fallin, A; Grana, R; Glantz, SA

    2013-01-01

    grass roots: scenes from early Tea Party mobilization. In:precipitous rise of the tea party. Berkeley, CA: Universityprecipitous rise of the Tea Party. Berkeley, CA: University

  2. Keep Your Lawn Alive During Drought 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26

    This booklet addresses ways a homeowner can maintain a healthy lawn during drought. It discusses water rationing and care of specific grass species....

  3. Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

  4. PNNL-20162

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    be dominated by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). This winter annual grass is a successful invasive exotic competitor with native bunchgrasses and can increase after burning or...

  5. DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    boundary. It is more park-like with broader landscaped grass areas, parking lots, some buildings and trees. * Evaluated values using three guides - MACCS2 Training Module from...

  6. Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FAN, XIN

    2012-01-01

    DME, synthetic gasoline, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels. FirstDME - Perennial grasses - Gasification - Syngas - Animal manure - Direct liquefaction - Transportation fuels -

  7. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Composition in Agro-ecosystems Purdue University Task A. 2 Perennial grasses had lower sediment losses * Greater loss of soil following rain events from poplar, maize, and...

  8. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DiversityWilderness. Since the Lab's inception, Fermilab has maintained a strong dedication to the environment. Environmental specialists have been restoring native tall-grass...

  9. BOOLEAN THEORY boolean expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    expressions (the grass is green) (the sky is green) (there is life elsewhere in the universe) (intelligent and an antitheorem (no overclassified expressions) complete: every fully instantiated boolean expression is either, then it is an antitheorem. axiom: antiaxiom: axiom: (the grass is green) antiaxiom: (the sky is green) axiom: (intelligent

  10. The Use of a Geographic Information System for Second-Order Analysis of Spatial Point Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    The Use of a Geographic Information System for Second-Order Analysis of Spatial Point Patterns of geographical data can benefit from the availability of geographical information systems. Few such systems Support System (GRASS) version 3.1. GRASS is a fairly sophisticated geographical information system

  11. Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment of Poplar by Leading Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ; and (6) woody energy crops such as willow (Salix spp.), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.), as- pen, and hybrid additive (http://www1. eere.energy.gov/biomass). Currently, starch ethanol substi- tutes for over 5; (5) herba- ceous energy crops including miscanthus, alfalfa, switch- grass, and red canary grass

  12. Turfgrass: Maintenance Costs in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ethan C.; Allen, W. Wayne; Ferguson, Marvin H.

    1964-01-01

    LAW FOR VARIOUS M-AINTENANCE ITEMS BASED ON O\\!'\\'S. ERSHIP AND TYPE OF GRASS WITHIN EACH REGION Maintenance items TY PC Percent Lot size, Region of oz;r- of lawns square Com~osty Fertilizer Chemicals Water Average grass in region feet cost cost...

  13. This article was originally published in a journal published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse

    are consistent with C4 grass dominance by comparing leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence variables mesocosms and natural grassland sites. In the mesocosms, C4 grasses had higher photosynthetic rates, water. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: A:Ci curves; Chlorophyll fluorescence; C3; C4; Gas

  14. OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM 6th Grade 45-60 minutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (sun-grass-cow-people), introduce the term trophic level to students. 3. Explain how energy enters to the students that the grass gets its food by capturing energy from the sun and converting it to food (by photosynthesis). It has converted energy from the sun into 100 calories of food (represented by the 10 x 10 inch

  15. Energetics of maize C4 physiology under light limiting conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellasio, Chandra

    2014-07-01

    grasslands (Beerling and Osborne, 2006). Half of the C4 species are grasses, a fourth are sedges, and the other quarter are various eudicot species. Most tropical forage grasses and sedges are C4, and most of the new bioenergy crops under development...

  16. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  17. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03

    to seed in salted-out sites, is relished by jackrabbits. It is adapt- ed for vegetational areas 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 and is a perennial, warm, native grass that provides poor grazing for wildlife; fair grazing for livestock. 2. Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum.... This grass grows in vegetational areas 1 and 2 in sites with adequate moisture and is a perennial, warm, introduced forage and hay grass that provides fair grazing for livestock but poor grazing for wildlife. 3. Barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crusgalli var...

  18. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12

    ) and runoff. The LULC data showed that from 1980 to 1996 grass land and water body had decreased and forest land and crop land had increased. This change caused the evaporation from vegetation interception and vegetation transpiration to increase, whereas...

  19. Site selection of Henslow's sparrows wintering on the upper Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah, Flo

    2000-01-01

    The Henslow's sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii) selects wintering sites that consist of damp areas with tall grasses, standing dead weeds and scattered shrubs. The smallest study site, a grassy opening at W.G. Jones State Forest, was approximately .76...

  20. Influences of vegetation characteristics and invertebrate abundance of Rio Grande wild turkey populations, Edwards Plateau, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randel, Charles Jack

    2005-02-17

    , and cover scores of forbs, grass, litter, and bare ground at each nest site and surrounding area were sampled. This was done to determine if wild turkey hens selected nest sites with vegetative characteristics differing from surrounding habitat. Brood...

  1. Symposium Summary Drawn from Closing Remarks Natural Systems Are a Key Element of Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    . We talked about everything from the American Pika, to grass-fed beef, to high speed rail Report. He did not shy away from controversial topics and made the case that high speed rail

  2. Assessment of soil and water conservation methods applied to the cultivated steeplands of southern Honduras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James E

    1997-01-01

    Erosion associated with burning and cultivating steepland fields is a common problem throughout Central America. Quantifying the magnitude of effectiveness of soil and water conservation practices such as vetiver grass ...

  3. Continental-scale net radiation and evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    exchanges of carbon, water, and energy in young and old-properties alter water and energy ?uxes of an oak-grassEcosystem and understory water and energy exchange for a

  4. Post-fire vegetation dynamics of a sagebrush steppe community change significantly over time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Sara K; Fulgham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Perennial forbs 1981 (Pre-fire) Chandler site Annual forbsWright HA. 1985. Effects of fire on grasses and forbs inJ (eds. ). Rangeland Fire Effects. Idaho State Office,

  5. Tips for Living Green Conduct a home energy audit -hes.lbl.gov or fcgov.com/greenbuilding/home/existing_programs.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sure you recycle it. Every ton of recycled paper saves 380 gallons of oil. Compost yard waste: every year 24 million tons of leaves and grass are thrown away. Locally, yard waste can be composted

  6. The effects of shinnery oak removal on lesser prairie chicken survival, movement, and reproduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John Peter

    2009-05-15

    The lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus; LPC) has declined in numbers since the late 1800s. Reasons for this decline have been attributed to habitat degradation (decreased forb and grass cover and increased woody cover...

  7. Evaluating the Potential of Biochars and Composts as Organic Amendments to Remediate a Saline-Sodic Soil Leached with Reclaimed Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaganti, Vijayasatya Nagendra

    2014-01-01

    pyrolysis of papermill waste on agronomic performance and soilpyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil.pyrolysis of switch grass at 500 °C for 2 h, increased cumulative soil

  8. Comparative breeding ecology of Lesser Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis canadensis) and Siberian cranes (G. leucogeranus) in Eastern Siberia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2007-04-25

    in the Kytalyk Resource Reserve in July 2000. 22 of arctic polygonal tundra includes sedges (Carex spp.), cotton grasses (Eriophrum spp.), bluegrasses (Poa spp.), and dwarf willows (Salix spp.) (Uspenskii et al. 1962, Matveev 1989...

  9. Environmental Review Form f

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    water into either the bio- swales or other grass areas within the site. BWaste Management Construction or Demolition Waste e s X NO- During the construction of the facility,...

  10. Dispersion Modeling Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    via curves - Pasquill curves (which are prairie grass 3 cm based) + Time Dependent Wind Speed, x & Stability Class as a function of (y, z) Input MACCs Output Wind data...

  11. UDP-Xylose-Stimulated Glucuronyltransferase Activity in Wheat Microsomal Membranes: Characterization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faik, Ahmed

    oligosaccharides along with known arabinoxylan oligosaccharide standards suggests that a portion of the nascent GAX, glucurono(arabino) xylans (GAXs) in vegetative tissues of grasses, and neutral arabinoxylans (AXs) found

  12. Characterization of Stem Growth and Chemical Composition in Sorghum Bicolor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson Jr, Robert Taylor

    2014-03-31

    Sorghum bicolor is a subtropical grass grown throughout the world for human consumption, animal feed and for the growing biofuels industry. In this thesis I characterize sorghum stem growth and chemical composition, and ...

  13. DOI: 10.1126/science.1136237 , 513 (2007);315Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  14. to the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    to extreme environments (1). A plant-fungal symbiosis between a tropical panic grass from geothermal soils temperatures in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (2). Field and laboratory experiments have shown that when root

  15. Elucidation of Mechanisms of Salinity Tolerance in Zoysia matrella Cultivars: A Study of Structure and Function of Salt Glands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Sheetal

    2012-07-16

    Salt glands are important structural adaptations in some plant and animal species that are involved in the excretion of excess salts. Zoysia matrella is a highly salt tolerant turf grass that has salt glands. Two cultivars of Z. matrella, ‘Diamond...

  16. Ceres: Making Biofuels Bigger and Better | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    more biomass than other grasses-a promising indicator of success. Founded as a genomics technology firm in 1997, Ceres now applies the techniques used in the Human Genome...

  17. Behavioral ecology of striped skunk: factors influencing urban rabies management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffino, Denise Marie

    2009-05-15

    within urban areas by using short grass area baiting strategies during the fall season, using dip net capturing for faster surveillance collection, and by initiating a rabies education program targeted at Texas’ primary care physicians and their staff....

  18. The effects of juniper removal on rainfall partitioning in the Edwards Aquifer region: large-scale rainfall simulation experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taucer, Philip Isaiah

    2006-08-16

    site with Juniperus ashei (ashe juniper) cover both before and after brush removal, with three replications of a particular rainfall event for each vegetation condition. Similar simulations were carried out on a plot with a longstanding grass cover...

  19. Lawn Water Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  20. October 10, 2012 Postdoctoral Fellows funded by the BCSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    . Sales, James Rhodes Univ. FAIABD/Dryl. Biotechnologies Calcium metabolism in marine (2001) South Africa-herbivor (2001) Ecology, India Bertrand Boeken ratio between herbs and grasses productivity gradient. 16

  1. Investigations into the effects of environmental and physical variables on the growth of natural and transplanted populations of Ruppia maritima L. s.l. in the Galveston Bay System, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, William James

    2002-01-01

    System, Texas. Growth differences in natural populations among different basin morphologies and tidal regimes were examined. Sediment texture influenced the percent cover of widgeon grass the greatest of the variables studied. High silt content and low...

  2. MMOIRES ORIGINAUX 287 tude comparative de la composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Extrait sec Matières grasses Matières azotées Nitrites - Nitrates et urée * LT.E.B., 149, rue de Bercy: Mercure Plomb Fluor Arsenic Cadmium Chrome 1. MODALITES DE L'ENQUETE CONCLUSION Suite à la sene d

  3. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  4. A User Guide for Marsh Analysis and Planning Tool Incorporating Tides and Elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................... 18 3) Vertical Datum (VDatum) Transformation ....................... 20 c. Digital Elemation Models on a combination of a digital elevation model (DEM) derived from GPS observations, local tidal datums, and grass

  5. August 2002 17 angelands of western China have historically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Richard B.

    magnificent mountain glaciers towering above narrow and wide mountain valleys of grass and shrub vegetation, brown bears, snow leopards and eagles. Past, Present & Future: Rangelands in China Here we examine

  6. Baptism, Community, and Critique: A Cross-Cultural Study of Unorthodox Religion in Europe and England, 1100-1700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenagy, Eric Russell

    2015-01-01

    in the Grass, viz. On Water Baptism, Episcopacy. Primitive2005. Oates, Larry R. “The Water that Divides: Baptism and66 The celebrant sprinkles water on the child for the first

  7. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) response to clomazone as influenced by rate, soil type, and planting date 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Barr, John Houston

    2006-08-16

    Clomazone is an effective herbicide widely used for preemergence grass control in rice. However, use of clomazone on sandy textured soils of the western Texas rice belt may cause serious rice injury. When labeled for rice ...

  8. Thank you for taking the time out to participate in this meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Sewer New Wastewater Treatment Plant/Groundwater Discharge Land Converted to Turf/Grass New as the Primary Driver EPA Provided List of Tracking Requirements New Septic System Septic System Connected

  9. Ecosystem Engineering across Environmental Gradients: Implications for Conservation and Author(s): CAITLIN MULLAN CRAIN and MARK D. BERTNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertness, Mark D.

    , changes pH, and forms a physical barrier to seedling emergence.Marsh grass dampens wave energy, promoting of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity

  10. Revision of Ufens Girault, 1911 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    12.iii.2002, JMH, SW Eucalyptus (1 ); Ormiston Gorge, W ofel. , 2.iii.2002, JMH, open Eucalyptus forest (1 ). WesternJBM, AKO, SW grass/Eucalyptus forest (1 ). Western

  11. Women @ Energy: Kathy Hibbard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    so you're not overwhelmed. If you've ever looked up at the sky and wondered why it's blue, why the grass is green, then you are well on your way Learn what you are good at and...

  12. Migration and Father Absence: Shifting Family Structure in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobles, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    The grass widows of Mexico: Migration and union dissolutionthe auspices of female migration from Mexico to the UnitedA. (2012). Net migration from Mexico falls to zero—and

  13. International Migration and Educational Assortative Mating in Mexico and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Kate; Mare, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    2005. “The Grass of Mexico: Migration and Union DissolutionFamily, and U.S. Migration in Mexico. Presented in thecommunity level of migration in Mexico, the odds of marrying

  14. Planting Food or Fuel: Developing an Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding the Role of Culture in Farmers’ Decisions to Grow Second-Generation Biofuel Feedstock Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stacey Swearingen; Brown, J. Christopher; Gibson-Carpenter, Jane W.; Hanley, Eric; Earnhart, Dietrich H.

    2009-12-01

    Recent interest in biofuels as an alternative energy source has spurred considerable changes in agricultural practice worldwide. These changes will be more pronounced as second-generation biofuels, such as switch grass, gain prominence; this article...

  15. St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    St. Augustinegrass Warm-season turfgrass. Prefers full sun, but has a high tolerance for shade-season grass. It does best in full sun and high temperatures. Goes dormant and turns brown in winter. Very

  16. The Impact of Advanced Biofuels on Aviation Emissions and Operations in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winchester, N.

    We analyze the economic and emissions impacts on U.S. commercial aviation of the Federal Aviation Administration’s renewable jet fuel goal when met using advanced fermentation (AF) fuel from perennial grasses. These fuels ...

  17. Ensemble Perception: summarizing the scene and broadening the limits of visual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, David

    of a tree, the blades of grass, the tiles of the floor are redundant, giving rise to the percept of `tree-ness,' `lawn-ness,'and `floor-ness,' respectively. The individual components of those textures are lost

  18. EVALUATION OF UPFLOW FILTERS FOREVALUATION OF UPFLOW FILTERS FOR STORMWATER TREATMENT AT CRITICALSTORMWATER TREATMENT AT CRITICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    .brakes, etc. Infiltration Devices: Subsurface Infiltration Trenches,Infiltration Devices: Subsurface Infiltration Trenches, Surface Percolation Areas, Porous Pavement, Grass Filters,Surface Percolation Areas filters.downflow filters. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDYOBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY Primary:Primary: Optimize

  19. Small Grains Forage Management and Evaluation in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Aaron Michael

    2013-04-25

    nutrition disorders in cattle. Milk fever (hypocalcemia) and grass tetany (hypomagnesemia) are common ailments of lactating cattle, but can also afflict young stocker steers that generally graze small grains, with tetany being most prevalent (Horn, et al...

  20. Pacific AC Intertie (Oregon -Washington -Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GORGE ELK CREEK Black Butte Lake COVELO LAYTONVILLE FORT BRAGG BIG RIVER ELK WILLITS A POTTER VALLEY. A&B GREENLEAF 2 Nevada City BRUNSWICK GRASS VALLEY BANGOR DOBBINS COLGATE COLUMBIA HILL CAPE HORN

  1. Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

    2011-01-01

    in Three Perennial Grasses. Crop Science 2008; 48: 424-433.Society of Agronomy/ Crop Science Society of America/SoilCell Wall Degradability. Crop Science 2006; 46: 1801-1809.

  2. Effects of temperature and fertilization on nitrogen cycling and community composition of an urban lawn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIJOOR, NEETAS; CZIMCZIK, CLAUDIAI; PATAKI, DIANEE; BILLINGS, SHARONA

    2008-01-01

    in Kentucky bluegrass. Crop Science, 38, 157–162. Ehleringercool-season grasses. Crop Science, Johnson RC, Li YY (1999)isotope discrimination. Crop Science, 39, 1663–1670. Kamp T,

  3. Thatch Management for Home Lawns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene R.; Gray, Jason; Abernathy, Scott

    1998-12-16

    Thatch is the intermingled layer of living and dead grass stems, roots, rhizomes, and stolons that develops between the lawn's live green vegetation and the soil surface. A moderate thatch layer is beneficial, but excessive thatch creates problems...

  4. Forage Crops. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1901-01-01

    Reports of Cooperating Stockmen and Farmers from 71 Counties - Alfalfa - Japan Clover - Crimson Clover - White Clover - Velvet Bean - Beggar Weed - Cow Peas - Rescue Grass - Kaffir Corn - Field Corn - Chufas...

  5. The Production Coefficients of Feeds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1916-01-01

    chops ..................... ................... Brewers' grains Blood meal ...................... Burr clover hay .................. Corn Bran ....................... Cornmeal ....................... ............... Corn and cob meal Corn cob....': : : : : : : Cowpea meal .................... Cowpea hay ...................... Cowpea vines green .............. Crimson clovk. green: ............ Crimson clover hay ............... Ear corn chops ............ : ...... Guam grass hay .................. Hom...

  6. DOE-Funded Research on Bacterial Enzyme Could Lead to Cheaper...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in green plants) is an essential step in converting grasses and other forms of biomass into fuel. CelA is secreted by the bacterium Caldiscellulosiruptor bescii, which was...

  7. Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    with desert grasses and sage * TA-V is 5400 ft. above sea level * Annual total precipitation 8.5 inches - Heterogeneous terrain characterized by an alluvial fan with eroded...

  8. A microwear study of Clovis blades from the Gault site, Bell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minchak, Scott Alan

    2009-06-02

    from reaping grass after 1500 strokes; (c) NNWXP2, reaping grass polish after 1000 strokes. Scales: 100x = 200 um; 200x = 100 um; and 500x = 50 um................33 5 Experimental Blade: (a) NWXP3, polish from cleaning sinew; (b...) NWXP4, polish from cutting rawhide. Scales: 100x = 200 um; 200x = 100 um; and 500x = 50 um..................................36 6 Experimental Blades: (a) GRT 4-1, polish from scraping wood; (b) NNWXP1, polish from sawing wood. Scales...

  9. Physical properties of various soil mixtures used for golf green construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johns, Don

    1976-01-01

    that the Brady sand would provide a medium for growth and maintenance of turf- grass superior to either brick or concrete sand. No differences were found between peat moss and rice hulls in their effects on infiltration, water holding capacity, CEC, or root.... The mixtures were placed in 30 cm diameter containers. Green- house measurements were compared to measurements made in the USGA Physical Soil Test Laboratory. The mixtures were compacted, grass was established and the mixtures were recompacted. Infiltration...

  10. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01

    were more produc- tive than unburned areas based on evaluations for two growing seasons after the fires. Species diversity was increased by burning. Areas burned in the fall supported more diverse grass populations than either unburned areas... or areas burned in the spring. Forage, especially grasses, was apparently more available to grazing animals on burned than unburned areas. Forb production on uplands burned in the fall was five times that of unburned areas and twice that of areas burned...

  11. With drought and increasing water needs, are green lawns in the past?: Not so fast, experts say 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    summaries from ?? Texas weather stations. Home consumers can select a weather station in their area and use the information provided to calculate water application rates, White said. (See related story on pages ??-??.) ?e bo?om line, he said, is people... important. ?If the grasses are not managed correctly, then home consumers will not see the bene?ts of using the improved grasses,? he said. ?Managing existing lawns properly is probably one of the best ways to achieve substantial water savings...

  12. Long-Term Hydrologic Responses To Shrub Removal In A SW Texas Rangeland: Using Soil Chloride To Estimate Deep Drainage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barre, David Anthony

    2010-10-12

    of vegetation; yet root biomass unexpectedly increased due to successful grass establishment during the first five years after treatment. Soil properties did not vary between treatments, indicating that the majority of chloride differences seen were a... (b); grasses (c); forbs (d); saplings (e); and small cacti (f)??..??????????????...?????...24 Figure 1-4 Differences between fine roots (biomass for 5-Yr, 15-Yr and Control treatments in g/m2 to the depth of soil core...

  13. -A -._--Science Service Feature Dr. Charles F. Brooks,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surfaces, so that i n the morning we find dew. 5Uch water vapor i n the a i r , conditions favoring rain, w scusse-s: . DEV SIGNS Vhen the grass i s dry at morning light Look f o r rain before the night." 'When the dew is on the grass Rain w i l l never corn? t o pass." D r . J. Bwnphreys of the Weather Bureau has

  14. Summary of Soil and Water Conservation Research from the Blackland Experiment Station, Temple, Texas, 1942-53. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tippit, O. J. (Olin J.); Henderson, R. C.; Smith, Richard M.

    1954-01-01

    -season clovers on closely grazed or poor upland soils. Sweetclover with Johnson- ; also has wide usefulness. Mixed native tall grasses, managed for permanence of stand, give -- /man results. Sudangrass for hot summer grazing is outstanding among cultivated... and sweetclover, or grass with clover. Improved residue manage- ; ment may permit a higher percentage of row crops. - i , Class I1 land, with present farming methods, profits from the improvement of 1 year of small grain ~ith sweetclover, or equivalent...

  15. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1957-01-01

    Barley (grain) Cowpeas (grain) Rye (grain) Sugar beet Corn (field) Wheat Rape Castorbean (grain) Soybean Oats (grain) Rice FORAGE CROPS White clover8 TaIl fesque Wheat- Alkali sacaton Alsike clover Meadow grasses Bermudagrass Red clover fesque... Sudangrass Barley (hay) Ladino clover Orchard- Sweetclover Rhodesgrass Crimson grass Alfalfa Blue clover Millet Ryegrass Panicgrass Rose clover Sour clover Rye (hay) Burnet clover Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLE CROPS Lima bean...

  16. Rapid, Low-Cost Conversion from Rice to Improved Pastures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weihing, Ralph M. (Ralph Martin); Moncrief, James B.

    1950-01-01

    ] The following conclusions are based on a 3-year study by the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station at Beaumont of Broadcast seeding of clovers and grasses, without seedbed preparation, in standing rice at last draining about 10 days before harvest or in stubble... after harvest. Satisfactory stands of adapted grasses and legumes were obtained under either condition. Clovers should be seeded between October 15 and December 15. Seeding earlier than Octover 15 resulted in poor stands in 2 of the 3 years. Earlier...

  17. Selection and Use of Hay and Processed Roughage in Horse Feeding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Pete G.

    2005-04-15

    of harvest and other pertinent factors, such as fi eld inspections throughout the harvesting process. 2. Other Legumes Besides alfalfa, other legume hays used to feed horses include red clover, birdsfoot trefoil and lespedeza. 40 Blister beetles contain... clover hay is intermediate between grasses and alfalfa, and energy level is about the same as many grasses, while its levels and ratios of both calcium and phosphorus are similar to that of alfalfa. Red clover hay often appears stemmy, and it does...

  18. Effect of Picloram and Tebuthiuron on Broadleaf Weeds and Bermudagrass in East-Central Texas Pastures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bovey, R.W.; Meyer, R.E.; Baur, J.R.; Schulte, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    of Single Application on Weed and Grass Cover ??????????????????????? 6 Effect of Double Application on Weed and Grass Cover ??????????????????????? 8 Results of All Treatments on Weed Population ??????????????????????????????? 9 SUMMARY Pellet and spray... in January 1975 and retreated in July 1975 or treated in March 1975 and retreated in September 1976. Picloram pellets or sprays at 1.12 and 2.24 kg/ha applied in November 1974 and retreated in May 1975 also increased bermudagrass cover. Herbicide injury...

  19. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  20. Exploring the tug of war between positive and negative interactions among savanna trees: Competition, dispersal, and protection from fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacelar, Flora S; Hernández-García, Emílio

    2013-01-01

    Savannas are characterized by a discontinuous tree layer superimposed on a continuous layer of grass. Identifying the mechanisms that facilitate this tree-grass coexistence has remained a persistent challenge in ecology and is known as the "savanna problem". In this work, we propose a model that combines a previous savanna model (Calabrese et al., 2010), which includes competitive interactions among trees and dispersal, with the Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model, therefore representing fire in a spatially explicit manner. The model is used to explore how the pattern of fire-spread, coupled with an explicit, fire-vulnerable tree life stage, affects tree density and spatial pattern. Tree density depends strongly on both fire frequency and tree-tree competition although the fire frequency, which induces indirect interactions between trees and between trees and grass, appears to be the crucial factor controlling the tree-extinction transition in which the savanna becomes grassland. Depending on parameters, adult ...

  1. Systems Level Engineering of Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis to Improve Biofuel Feedstock Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Samuel

    2013-09-27

    Our new regulatory model of cell wall biosynthesis proposes original network architecture with several newly incorporated components. The mapped set of protein-DNA interactions will serve as a foundation for 1) understanding the regulation of a complex and integral plant component and 2) the manipulation of crop species for biofuel and biotechnology purposes. This study revealed interesting and novel aspects of grass growth and development and further enforce the importance of a grass model system. By functionally characterizing a suite of genes, we have begun to improve the sparse model for transcription regulation of biomass accumulation in grasses. In the process, we have advanced methodology and brachy molecular genetic tools that will serve as valuable community resource.

  2. Planning a Prescribed Burn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2009-04-01

    , the size of the burn, and its impact on wildlife habitat. If you burned using this plan, you would probably never burn rangeland again on purpose because of the risks taken and the potential for disappointing results. Effective planning well in advance...-leaved herbaceous plants other than grass, may look rank (vigorous) and dense enough to burn, but by midwinter they often have broken down. Woody debris and standing dead trees help little in spreading a fire. The grass fuel also needs to be ready at the right...

  3. Range Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scifres, C.J.; Kelly, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    centimeters deep for gravimetric determination of soil water content. Soil textures from the same depths were determined by the hy- drometer method (Bouyoucos, 1962), and pH on a 1:4 slurry (Mortensen, 1965). Post burn standing crop of herbaceous... bluestem tended to in- crease in impom during the second growing sea- f% following W burns. In April 1976, dune paspalum and Heller 'cum accounted or 64 percent of the green grass ding crop on unburned areas (Table 4). Ckdy 12 F ,&ent of green grass...

  4. Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Subhasis

    2008-10-10

    in either PO4-P or TP. Blanco-Canqui et al. (2004) compared the effectiveness among fescue filter strip (FS), barrier fescue FS, and barrier native FS in reducing runoff, sediment, nitrogen, and P loss in a Mexico silt loam soil. They used switchgrass... brome grass, timothy fescue Coland soil Simulated 66 37 34 Blanco- Canqui et al. (2004) Fertilizer switch, gama indian grass big bluestem gray-head cornflower Mexico silt loam Simulated 78 _ 37 McFarland and Hauck (2004) manure coastal...

  5. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30

    ,? ?Texas virgins-bower,? ?old man?s beard,? ?love in the mist,? ?goat beard,? ?bar- bas de chivato,? and other common names in different parts of Texas. Some native plants have dozens of com- mon names. When you use common names, be sure they are accurate...-rooted perennial grasses create a more stable environment than do short- rooted grasses. Without good litter cover on the soil, the soil surface is exposed to full sunlight, higher temperatures, and higher soil water evaporation rates. Fewer plants can com- pete...

  6. Resource Areas of Texas: Land. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

    1967-01-01

    's westernmost city The frost-free period ranges from about 180 days at the Panhandle's north end to 340 or more days at the State's southern tip. This range permits production of many kinds of winter and summer crops, as well as a variety of native grasses..., often covered with sea water in places. Elevation: Sea level to a few feet above sea level. Annual rainfall: 40 - 55 inches. Annual frost-free period: 270 - 300 days. Vegetation: Sedges, rushes, salt grasses. Coast Marsh 500,000 Acres Soils Dark...

  7. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  8. do you know your RANGE? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Garlyn O.

    1957-01-01

    need a good knowledge of range man- asemen2 b~f~re m~kjng CID?E CD~~B~~DDS DY range plots as is required in Part 111. An ex- ample of Part I11 is on page 12. The four range plots are placed just exactly like placing a class of livestock at a stock... good cover of native grass. Grass is a product which is harvested and marketed as meat, ~uool, mohair and wildlife. When you market animals you are paid for the number of poz~nds rather than the number of head you sell. By practicing good range m...

  9. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  10. PPPREVENTINGREVENTINGREVENTING LLLYMEYMEYME DDDISEASEISEASEISEASE Provided by IMA, Inc. for the exclusive use of our clients. www.imacorp.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Those individuals who work outdoors may be at risk of con- tracting Lyme disease. Ticks carrying the dis disorders. PREVENTING LYME DISEASE Here are some things you can do to reduce your risk of contracting and early summer months. · Remove leaves, tall grass and brush from work areas. · Apply a chemical poisonous

  11. JEPSON PRAIRIE Self Guided Nature Trail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    . Mounds emerge from the prairie like islands with their tops fringed with grasses that sway and rustle of October and March. The cool moist winter and spring are followed by summer heat and drought the plants to flower and ripen their seed before the heat and drought of summer. The animal residents also

  12. My Cart My Profile Log In Athens Log In Journal Home | OnlineOpen | Accepted Articles | Society | News | Reviews | Read Cover Story | Most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    or graphitized microstructure. Starting from one type of solid polymer sphere, a simple water washing treatment for the Hydroxycarbonylation of Aryl Halides in Water Sebastian Wittmann, Alexander Schätz, Robert N. Grass, Wendelin J. Stark are produced in moderate to good yields by direct borylation of readily available aryl amines (see scheme

  13. Experiments to examine transplant procedures on the seagrass Halodule beaudettei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land, Frederick Joseph

    2007-09-17

    and 95 days. A statistical difference was seen in the container type experiment, trays versus pots, at 48 days where shoal-grass had double the number of stems produced in trays; however no significant difference was found at 93 days. A significant...

  14. Scene Analysis Assisting for AWB Using Binary Decision Trees and Average Image Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    in digital cameras on the basis automatic classification of image fragments in pictures. Our approach grass/sky detection and classification engine, Section III contains experimental results, and Section IV demonstrates application of the technique to AWB setting. Section V concludes the paper. II. CLASSIFICATION

  15. ^ Danish Atomic Energy Commission ' Research Establishment Ris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Drinking Water 66 5. 9. Estimate of the Mean Contents of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in the Human Diet in Denmark in 1 of precipitation, soil, ground water, surface water, sea water, grass, dried milk, fresh milk, grain, bread, potatoes, vegetables, fruit, total diet, drinking water, and human bone. Furthermore Sr-90 was de- termined

  16. Ris Report No. 305 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water 60 90 1 37 5. 9. Estimate of the Mean Contents of Sr and Cs in the Human Diet in Denmark in 1 973 over the country of precipitation, soil, ground water, stream and lake water, sea water, grass, dried milk, fresh milk, grain, bread, potatoes, vegetables, fruit, total diet, drinking water, and human bone

  17. Fifty-five year changes in species composition on dry prairie remnants in south-central Wisconsin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Donald M.

    of habitat specialists has declined (from 27.4 to 21.7) contributing to declines in floristic quality and management since the arrival of European settlers in the early to mid 1800s decimated these grasslands. These included converting prairies into farm fields, fragmenting grass- lands by roads (Henderson 1981), and sup

  18. Published by ORNL's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (www.ornl.gov/Energy_Eff) No. 2 2000 In August 1999, President Bill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , fuels, and other industrial products. "Biomass" can be trees, agricultural crops or waste, forestry residue, municipal waste, animal waste, fibers, grasses--anything organic in nature and available barrels of oil each year--about 158 supertankers--and lower carbon emissions by 100 million metric tons

  19. Rpercussions agronomiques de l'pandage d'effluents et dchets de moulins huile d'olive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Agronomic effects of land disposal of waste from olive oil crushers. The agronomic effects of land disposal of waste from olive oil crushers were studied. Experimental crops of rye-grass were grown in pots to the waste from the olive oil crusher, within the conditions and amounts studied. So, the disappearance

  20. Longleaf Pine: Overview of Planting http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    planting. Site preparation herbicide sprays are also conducted before planting and will control most. Pastureland Site Preparation: Planted trees cannot com- pete with established grasses in open field settingsLongleaf Pine: Overview of Planting http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2 ter sites with more poorly

  1. Timber Management: Prescribed Burning for Woody Control http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with pines. · Prepares sites for future tree planting or natural regen- eration. · Increases sunlight to forest floor, producing more grass, flowering annuals plants and seeds for wildlife. · Reduces risks- vesting timber. · Most nutrients are returned to the soil in a more read- ily available form for plants

  2. Fire Information: Overview of Prescribed Burning http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Benefits: · Controls low quality hardwoods and shrubs that com- pete with pines. · Prepares sites for future tree planting or natural regen- eration. · Increases sunlight to forest floor, producing more grass, flowering annuals plants and seeds for wildlife. · Reduces risks of annosus root rot and brown

  3. Ecological Applications, 22(8), 2012, pp. 20352048 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    -TEIXEIRA,1,2,3 BENJAMIN D. DUVAL,1,2,3 STEPHEN P. LONG,1,2,3,4 AND EVAN H. DELUCIA 1,2,3,4,5 1 Energy production will also draw from cellulosic sources such as perennial grasses. In selecting optimal bioenergy are competing with uncultivated land, our model calculates land requirements to meet a given bioenergy demand

  4. Forage Quality Photo Guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Machen, Richard V.; Stuth, Jerry W.

    2000-08-18

    , there are three major daily grazing periods?long periods at dawn and late afternoon and a short one near midnight. Cattle graze to fill a need for quantity. Cattle grazing in the midday summer heat probably do not have enough grass to meet their needs. Evaluating...

  5. HMSC Sustainability Committee 9/7/06 Meeting Minutes (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    HMSC Sustainability Committee 9/7/06 Meeting Minutes (Draft) In attendance: Todd Bridgeman, Jim in sustainability in the local community -- several grass-roots initiatives have been launched to get local businesses and municipalities to learn about sustainability and incorporate it into planning and operations

  6. http://noaa.gov Discover Your World With NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    center of ocean commerce and naval power, the Elizabeth River is the most polluted waterway Creek in Sonoma County, California was once alive with salmon and steelhead trout; but after years in the Tampa Bay area grow marsh grasses and seagrasses, and assist with monitoring and plant- ing to restore

  7. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a, *, J the square of the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient and if the flow is laminar, which­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed waterways

  8. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a,*, J is laminar, which is the usual case, the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient. This last result: Darcy; Darcy­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed

  9. Reforestation: Herbaceous Weed Control After Planting http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and grasses. Water and nutrients within the sprayed areas that would have been utilized by the herbaceous veg spring rains, summer weather and the quality of the planting op- eration, it is significantly improved, application and disposal of chemicals and containers. It is a violation of Federal Law to use these products

  10. 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. University of Minnesota Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this material is available in alternative formats u

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of native grasses is not being adopted due to lack of knowledge and markets. Past studies were more focused potential ethanol yield was determined from chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin% cellulose, 28% hemicellulose, 20% lignin, and had the lowest ash content at 6.04% (Fig 1D). The high biomass

  11. HAWAII NATURAL ENERGY INSTITUTEwww.hnei.hawaii.edu Bioenergy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HAWAII NATURAL ENERGY INSTITUTEwww.hnei.hawaii.edu Bioenergy Research Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Briefing for Rear Admiral Matthew Klunder Chief of Naval Research Hawaii Natural Energy Institute University of Hawaii September 7, 2012 #12;Corn Sweet Sorghum Sugarcane Guinea Grass Banagrass Eucalyptus

  12. alf the worlds population of nearly six billion people prepare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the developing world. Carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases from cooking Þres may also foster global British economist E. F. Schumacher in his 1973 classic Small Is Beautiful. Schu- macher made a compelling and materials science to market research and grass-roots ed- ucational campaigns. Cookstoves in Kenya Acase

  13. Partitioning the effects of plant biomass and litter on Andropogon gerardi in old-field vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

    1997-10-01

    We examined the effects of living plant neighbors and litter on the performance of a native C4 grass, Andropogon gerardi, at five old-field sites that differ in community biomass and soil fertility. We used plant removal experiments in which both...

  14. Andreas Neumann & Barend Kbben SVG in GIS and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    Andreas Neumann & Barend Köbben SVG in GIS and Webmapping 1 #12;Andreas Neumann & Barend Köbben 2 Categories and examples · Spatial Databases Postgis, SpatiaLite · Desktop-GIS Quantum-GIS, GRASS, Autodesk Map3D, ESRI ArcGIS · Converters MapViewSVG, FME, gdal, · Commercial Webmap Services Google Maps · OS

  15. A genetic linkage map of buffelgrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessup, Russell William

    1999-01-01

    of buffelgrass to investigate the molecular basis of apospory and serve as a framework map for marker-facilitated breeding of perennial forage grasses. Buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link syn. Cenchrus ciliaris L.) (2n=4x=36), a highly polymorphic...

  16. binary expressions: represent anything that comes in two kinds represent statements about the world (natural or constructed, real or imaginary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    is green) (the sky is green) (there is life elsewhere in the universe) (intelligent messages are coming: no binary expression is both a theorem and an antitheorem (no overclassified expressions) complete: every: (the grass is green) antiaxiom: (the sky is green) axiom: (intelligent messages are coming from space

  17. Estimation of Fire Danger in Hawai`i Using Limited Weather Data and Simulation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Scott L.

    199 Estimation of Fire Danger in Hawai`i Using Limited Weather Data and Simulation1 David R. Weise: The presence of fire in Hawai`i has increased with introduction of nonnative grasses. Fire danger estimation using the National Fire Danger Rat- ing System (NFDRS) typically requires 5 to 10 yr of data

  18. Angora Goats for Conversion of Arizona Chaparral: Early Results1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angora Goats for Conversion of Arizona Chaparral: Early Results1 O. D. Knipe2 1 Presented located at the Station's Research Work Unit at Tempe, in cooperation with Arizona State Univer- sity quarter century has shown that conversion of Arizona chaparral to grass significantly increases water

  19. Experience-dependent modulation of C. elegans behavior by ambient oxygen.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolgemuth, Charles

    carried by the wind, water, or an animal. Foxtail grasses employ a spikelet or cluster of spikelets with a song title that we should cast our fates to the wind. As animals, though, we are typically not so trusting of the benevolence of Nature and, instead, decide where we want to go and expend energy to move

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Chon San (Kelvin) Kou, Clement Leung, Mia Xie, Noah Margo-Dermer, Permboon Priebjrivat, Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that includes five aspects of sustainability: food, waste, energy use, water use, and community engagement. Our the outdated hot water machine with a newer model that has an "Energy Save" mode, ensuring that "Energy Save associated with a lower environmental impact such as grass fed beef, game animals, OceanWise seafood

  1. Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dunes PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1, ERIC W. SEABLOOM,2 AND SALLY D. HACKER 1 1 Department of Zoology, Oregon may have knock-on effects on non-target native species and ecosystems. For example, coastal dunes arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata. These invasive grasses have converted open, low-lying sand dunes

  2. In This Issue... The FAMU Extension Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    will green back up. 3. The best time to water your grass is in the cool of the evening when you will get prune some of the top leaves as this will reduce transpiration and help the plant to get establish

  3. In 2006 hIstory buffs celebrated the 200th anniversary of the moment when explorer Zebulon Pike first saw the mountain that would later bear his name.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    first saw the mountain that would later bear his name. A great deal of effort was expended in historical of an area tucked between the Rocky Mountains and the vast interior Plains of North America. Here one escarpments, playa lakes, buttes, and views of mountains. This is not the sea-like, tall-grass prairie

  4. M I C R O S C A L E Z N S P E C I AT I O N I N A S M E LT E R -C O N TA M I N AT E D S O I L U S I N G MICRO-XAS AND XRE TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    area that has been severely impacted is the Blue Mountain operable unit. This area consists of 2,000 acres on the north slope of Blue Mountain. Revegetation efforts began in 1991 and currently half of the 2,000 acres is covered by grass. The other half of the mountain has limited vegetative growth so

  5. Research Article Rio Grande Wild Turkey Habitat Selection in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Research Article Rio Grande Wild Turkey Habitat Selection in the Southern Great Plains GALON I, USA ABSTRACT We recorded telemetry locations from 1,129 radiotagged turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo have the highest impact on nesting in riparian zones due to turkey use of grass as nesting cover

  6. The Way It Was Drake had been bent low over the sparse leaves, weeding. Plucking up the undesirables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    -grassed plain, the river wasn't the only unrecognizable part of this Brazilian landscape. A week ago he had there and everything he'd learned. They called that river out there "The Amazon." He could see it from where he squatted. It was wide and slow and brown ­ a sluggish snake winding a few hundred feet from the farm

  7. Spot-spraying Johnsongrass. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rea, H. E.

    1958-01-01

    -56, hack off the stems and treat 8-inch stubs of grass in the bloom stage. Use 3 gallons of HCA (90 percent hexachloroace- tone) in 100 gallons of kerosene or other suitable oils for combined contact and residual effectiveness in con- trolling...

  8. of dehydrated pelleted hay transit through the digestive tract. Nevertheless, this increase in calcium urinary and faecal excretion may be responsible for the bone deformation observed in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of dehydrated pelleted hay transit through the digestive tract. Nevertheless, this increase dehydrated pelleted hay during a long time. In lambs fed dchydrated pelleted rye-grass hay, the daily urinary was not observ- ed in lambs fed dehydrated pelleted lucerne hay. Thus, the calcium content of the hay seems

  9. Strategy for Sea Turtle Conservation in the WIO Region (J. A. Mortimer) --page 1 A Strategy to Conserve and Manage the Sea Turtle Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwich, Ken

    of hard-shelled sea turtles include sea grass, coral reef, sand and mud flat, and mangrove ecosystems), and all are currently listed either as "Critically Endangered" (i.e., the hawksbill, Eretmochelys imbricata, and the leatherback, Dermochelys imbricata), or "Endangered" (i.e., the green turtle, Chelonia

  10. NOAA | Valuing Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , wetlands, sea grasses, coral reefs, and mangroves. Despite localized successes, habitat trends continue% of coral reefs are already seriously damaged by local sources such as overfishing, destructive fishing and endangered species, human health and well-being. How valuable are healthy coastal and ocean ecosystems? Our

  11. Journal of Intelligent Information Systems, 14, 527, 2000. c 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberstein, Shlomo

    Journal of Intelligent Information Systems, 14, 5­27, 2000. c 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in The Netherlands. A Value-Driven System for Autonomous Information Gathering JOSHUA GRASS jgrass, MA 01003, USA Abstract. This paper presents a system for autonomous information gathering

  12. Altering hydrologic regime to revgetate crusted soils on semiarid rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wentz, Amy Leigh

    2004-11-15

    . Partial and full dehydration impact on germination of 4 warm-season grasses. Journal of Range Management 49:355-360. Fisser, H. G., M. H. Mackey, and J. T. Nichols. 1974. Contour-furrowing and seeding on nuttall saltbush rangeland of Wyoming. Journal...

  13. 275JOURNAL OF RANGE MANAGEMENT 57(3) May 2004 The effect of cattle grazing on the genetic structure of native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karoly, Keith

    275JOURNAL OF RANGE MANAGEMENT 57(3) May 2004 Abstract The effect of cattle grazing on the genetic structure of native grass populations has received little attention. We investigated the effect of cattle-old cattle exclosure in southeastern Oregon. We extracted DNA and used 2 ISSR primers to determine the geno

  14. Showdown on the PrairieShowdown on the Prairie: Use of bison and cattle to restore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Showdown on the PrairieShowdown on the Prairie: Use of bison and cattle to restore native ­ Current perspectives of grazing ­ Grazing effects Diff b t bi d ttl· Differences between bison and cattle and sedges Cattle Eat grasses and forbs and sedges Foraging differencesForaging differences Bison tend

  15. Food Stories Exhibition Trail Leader's Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    Food Stories Exhibition Trail Leader's Notes 1. Take a look at the stone fragment. Where do you a story about a celebration involving food? (No answer required) 3. This is a food hook from Papua New of grass, palm leaves and bamboo. The food hook would hang from the ceiling of the hut. Why do you think

  16. livestock grazing. In 2000, the reservation began its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    out of the fire. Evans said lush green grass would replace the blackened fields within a few weeks. "Depends on the rain and temperature, but in a week or so things will start turning green," said Evans . . . . . . . . 5 SNS sets new daily energy record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Final spring

  17. Northern Piedmont Center14471ResearchRd,Orange,Virginia22960540/672-2660www.cses.vt.edu/facilities/nparec.html Physical Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Associate Professor, CSES Herbaceous crops for biofuels/bioproducts industry Mike Goatley Professor, CSES) Legume and grass forage crops for Virginia Wade Thomason Associate Professor, CSES Corn grain and silage.D. candidate, Biosolids for biofuel production K. Pavuluri Thomason Ph.D. candidate, CSES; Barley

  18. Development of a formula to determine outdoor residential water consumption in College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelblech, Audrey Kristen

    1997-01-01

    but one of those variables in each group that were highly related, 6 variables remained, including non-baseload rainfall and evaporation, yard area, existence of a sprinkler system and/or pool, and the predominant variety of grass. Using these six...

  19. Altered Belowground Carbon Cycling Following Land-Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, SP, Brazil ABSTRACT Belowground carbon (C) dynamics of terrestrial to be thoroughly quantified through field measurements. Here, we show that belowground C cycling pathways grasses; establishment phase. INTRODUCTION Terrestrial ecosystems have a pervasive influence on the global

  20. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):313324, Fall 2013 Factors influencing survival and productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pronghorn in a semiarid grass-woodland in east-central New Mexico louiS C. BeNdeR, Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001, USA JoN C. BoReN, Associate Dean and Director, Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University

  1. 2012 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University VTTP-6NP Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    , livestock manure, compost, hay, and grass clippings used as mulch or a soil amendment can cause plant injury is particularly slow in manure and compost piles, due to lack of oxygen. These compounds may persist for as long as several years in certain situations. Not all herbicide products containing active ingredients

  2. Ecology, 93(6), 2012, pp. 14391450 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    feedback mediates effects of invasive grasses on coastal dune shape PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1,6 SALLY D. HACKER-specific ecological mechanisms influencing the geomorphology of U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal dunes. Over the last century, this system changed from open, shifting sand dunes with sparse vegetation (including native beach

  3. "Hot little prophets": reading, mysticism, and Walt Whitman's disciples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Steven Jay

    2004-11-15

    ??????????????????? 25 A Pr?cis of Chapters?????????????????????? 36 II ?A WOMAN WAITS FOR ME?: ANNE GILCHRIST AND LEAVES OF GRASS?????????????????????. 39 III ?SO SACRED?THE EXPLICATING NOTE?: DOCTOR RICHARD MAURICE BUCKE READING ?COSMIC... Illuminations????????????????????????? 128 Man?s Moral Nature?????????????????????? 140 Biography and Exegesis????????????????????.. 148 Comparative Readings and a Community of Believers????????.. 155 Cosmic Consciousness...

  4. Introduction Although the c. 10,000 species in the Poaceae places it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilu, Khidir

    . Development of our views of grass systematics followed major trends in advancement in the sciences and engineering. Major discoveries come in spurts and are usually followed by periods of relative stagnation and alkaloids; development of computers and various analytical software programs enhanced the capability

  5. A community of ants, fungi, and bacteria: A multilateral approach to studying symbiosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Cameron R.

    2001-01-01

    substrate Lower attines Myrmicocrypta Small Monomorphic Small to Insect corpses medium Mycocepurus Small Monomorphic Small Insect feces Apterostigma Small to Monomorphic Small Insect feces and medium woody matter Mycetarotes Small Monomorphic Small Unknown... Mycetosoritis Small Monomorphic Small Dead vegetative matter Cyphomyrmex Small Monomorphic Medium Insect feces, corpses Mycetophylax Small Monomorphic Small Dead grass Higher attines Sericomyrmex Medium Monomorphic Medium Dead vegetative matter Trachymyrmex...

  6. Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within the range 5 by grasses and herbs (Figure 1). The term `neutral', although indicative of soil pH, is more correctly descriptive of the species assemblage being neither markedly `calcifuge' (thriving in acid soils) nor

  7. Figure 1. Primary research site at Cornell with quadruplicate test strips (each ~1 acre) representing four crop treatments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for these soils. Unfortunately, the research base on perennial bioenergy grass production and impacts crop yields but also the potential for soil carbon accumulation (sequestration) to take place ­ nitrous oxide [N O] and 4 2methane [CH ] ­ which have a strong impact on the overall "emissions footprint

  8. April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction · AVHRR - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer · It is a sensor aboard NOAA - POES. · AVHRR Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Potential Evapo-Transpiration · Energy Balance Model Rn = E + H + G Where: Rn2/208 (Grass Reference), u2 = wind velocity(m.s-1), Ta = air temperature (ºC), Ts = land surface

  9. A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change highlighting the trend in biogas maize cultivation and the conversion of permanent grass- land to agricultural, environmental impacts, biogas maize, permanent grassland, Germany. 1. Introduction Agricultural land use

  10. 9 1993by The Humana PressInc. All rights of any nature whatsoeverreserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    , and carbon dioxide, into fuels, chemicals, and materials. Ethanol and other products are now derived from of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., wood, grasses, and agricultural and municipal wastes) into fuel ethanol of microalgae has been established to produce lipid oils for diesel fuel and other compounds from carbon dioxide

  11. ReseaRch aRticle 168 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE VOLUME 65, NUMBER 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    of biomass, roughly double the biomass yields of California rice or maize. The yield response to nitrogen virgatum) grows naturally in remnant prairies and na- tive grass pastures, and along roadsides throughout greenhouse-gas emissions (Adler et al. 2007). Cellulosic ethanol can also be produced from non- food crops

  12. Mark Walker Director of Public Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy saving efficiencies to qualified low income homeowners. At the time I saw a huge market on a grass roots basis, we are working to provide energy audits that direct ANY homeowner to a lower fuel bill, lower green house gas emissions and any investment that is aimed at reducing consumption so

  13. Technical reports and extension papers and presentations (last 10 years only) 162. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. GM crops: 12 years is long enough. Presented to the Kootenay Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    shapes our attitudes? Genetically Modified Language. A discourse of arguments for GM crops and food. 2008 (invited). Grass-based livestock and climate change. Presented to: Reclaiming Our Food System: A Call to Action. Sponsored by Food Secure Canada, Ottawa 7- 10 Nov 08. 157. Clark, E. Ann. 2008 (invited

  14. CREDIT CARD GIFT FORM Supplemental to UVM Foundation Gift and Pledge Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    to support the University of Vermont through a gift/pledge of $ to the University of Vermont Foundation (CVC2, CVV2, CID) Please note: The University of Vermont Foundation retains no Credit card information. Thank you for your support of the University of Vermont. Grasse Mount, 411 Main Street, Burlington, VT

  15. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Assctciation, 17(2):I42-l43,2OOl Copyright O 2001 by the American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the American Mosquito Control Association, Inc. USE OF AN INFUSION-BAITED GRAVID TRAP TO COLLECT ADULT and collection methods have been ineffective. Infusion-baited gravid traps, typically intended to attract Culex. Both grass and hay infusions were used as attractants. The infusions were made by placing ap

  16. Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass M. R. Schmer*, K. P. Vogel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    .S. to determine net energy and economic costs based on known farm inputs and harvested yields. In this report, we summarize the agricultural energy input costs, biomass yield, estimated ethanol output, greenhouse gas renewable than nonrenewable energy consumed. Switch- grass monocultures managed for high yield produced 93

  17. The effect of penning and chaining on circus elephant behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Theresa M

    1999-01-01

    on either grass or dirt. Focal animal point sampling of each elephant's behavior was made from the videotapes at a-min intervals. Ingestion and locomotion activities occurred more (P=.00O1) and social and stereotypic activities occurred less (P=.0001) when...

  18. Physiological and genetic control of water stress tolerance in zoysiagrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel Wade

    2006-04-12

    tolerant C4 grass (Beard, 1973; Inokuma et al., 1998; White et al., 2001). Zoysiagrass is an allotetraploid with a chromosome number of 2n = 40 (Yaneshita et al., 1999). Being an allotetraploid, it is surprising that zoysiagrass has a fairly small...

  19. Experimental nursery pond cultivation of the seagrass Halodule beaudettei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, David J.

    1998-01-01

    , and fertilizer on survival and growth of shoal-grass transplant units (TPUS) cultured in six-inch diameter plastic pots were examined. Additionally, the suitability of a natural bayou near Snake Island Cove in West Bay was evaluated as a nursery site using TPUS...

  20. Pacific AC Intertie (Oregon -Washington -Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willows WILLOWS A LOGAN CREEK & SCHULLER JACINTO PROVIDENT STONY GORGE ELK CREEK Black Butte Lake COVELO LAYTONVILLE FORT BRAGG BIG RIVER ELK WILLITS A POTTER VALLEY MENDOCINO CALPELLA Ukiah MASONITE UKIAH UPPER BRUNSWICK GRASS VALLEY BANGOR DOBBINS COLGATE COLUMBIA HILL CAPE HORN SHADY GLEN BEALE AFB 2 BEALE AFB 1

  1. Sound production, hearing and possible interception under ambient noise conditions in the topmouth minnow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladich, Friedrich

    but not during intraspecific interactions. Feeding sounds were short broadband pulses with main energies between and in the presence of natural ambient noise recorded in Lake Neusiedl in eastern Austria, best hearing sensitivities to other parts of Europe together with the herbivorous grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes

  2. PERSPECTIVE Setaria viridis: A Model for C4 Photosynthesis C W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David

    . viridis uses an NADP-malic enzyme subtype C4 photosynthetic system to fix carbon and therefore and nitrogen use efficiencies. Thus, engineering C4 traits into C3 crops is an attractive target for crop requirements, and rapid life cycle will greatly facilitate genetic studies of the C4 grasses. Importantly, S

  3. CHAPTER SIX Scientific Benchmarks for Guiding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    of Biochemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA Department of Biochemistry, University Institute, La Jolla, California, USA } GrassRoots Biotechnology, Durham, North Carolina, USA k Department

  4. Some Common Tomato Problems Are you having problems growing well-formed, blemish-free tomatoes? Many tomato problems,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , such as black plastic, straw, grass clippings (free of herbicides), or newspapers. Mulches can help moderate soil temperature and moisture, reduce pest problems, and keep the fruit clean. Black plastic mulch can as well as other problems. Improve soil moisture Maintain even soil moisture levels by applying a mulch

  5. www.growit.umd.edu Home and Garden Information Center 12005 Homewood Road Ellicott City, MD 21042 www.hgic.umd.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    to produce stronger, more prolific plants. Black plastic mulch is an excellent garden aid for speeding growth. Try black plastic mulch, newspaper, straw, dry grass clippings or dried leaves. · Watering: Uniform-10-10 or equivalent per 10 ft. of row after first fruits set. · Weeding: Weeds can be controlled by the use of mulch

  6. USDA-Ag In the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Losing Ground Grades 2-5: T-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    will be able to: 1. demonstrate that crop cover or mulch greatly reduces soil erosion by water and/or wind. 2. A copy of "The Dust Bowl" story for each student 2. Two plastic flower flats or any two boxes and pouring speeds. 5. 2 large wide-mouth jars 6. Mulch: grass clippings, straw, wood chips, or sawdust 7

  7. Preparing for Your Fall Vegetable Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    leaves, Grass clippings, Horse manure or cow manure Fine mulch Add complete fertilizer right and cans Buckets and baskets Styrofoam ice chests Plastic bags Barrels and drums Container Gardening Composting Mulching Animal manures Green manures Crop rotation Natural predators Resistant varieties

  8. Alternative Lawns *Note:Price estimates are for seeds only.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    lawn with black plastic bags or old newspapers (10-12 pages thick) using rocks to secure,remove plastic bags. The newspaper will decompose with the dead grass providing a nutrient rich top layer. 1.4 Mulch with straw which has been cleaned,chopped,and is weed-free (do not use hay).5 Use a fine

  9. Estimated Costs of Pasture and Hay Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Pasture and Hay Production This report summarizes estimated costs of improving pasture by five different systems. For each system, both the initial cost per acre and the annual maintenance cost per acre are presented. In addition, costs of establishing alfalfa or alfalfa-grass hay

  10. Evaluation of Basic Parameters for Packaging, Storage and Transportation of Biomass Material from Field to Biorefinery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paliwal, Richa

    2012-02-14

    the eco-friendly fuels more economically viable. Biomass is a promising feedstock for biofuels primarily because it is a renewable and sustainable resource. Among the most studied grassland crops, switchgrass is a perennial warm-season grass and has been...

  11. Assessing Maturity in Sweet Sorghum Hybrids and its Role in Daily Biomass Supply 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burks, Payne

    2012-07-16

    Sweet sorghum is a highly versatile C4 grass noted for its improved drought tolerance and water use efficiency relative to sugarcane. Sweet sorghum is well suited for ethanol production due to a rapid growth rate, high biomass production, and a...

  12. Catalogue of the Flora of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cory, V. L. (Vivian L.); Parks, Harris Bradley

    1937-01-01

    ................................................ 1-2-3-4 6 incertus M .. A. Curtis Coast Sandbur ...................... 1-2-34-5 myosuroides H.B.K ........................................ 3-4 pauciflorus Benth . Field Sandbur .......................... 1-2-3-4-! CHLORIS andropogonoides Fourn... giganteus (Walt . ) Muhl . (E . saccharoides M ichx.) Sugarcane Plume ...................................... 1 ........................................... strictus Baldwin 1-2 ERIOCHLOA . ....................... contracta H~tchc . Prairie Cup Grass 34...

  13. Video Input Driven Animation (VIDA) Meng Sun Allan D. Jepson Eugene Fiume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    of a synthetic actor placed in a meadow of swaying grass will move consistently with the wind that moved to harmonic oscillation, which we use to extract parameters of wind and of regular water waves. We observe the effect of wind on a tree in a video, estimate wind speed param- eters from its motion, and then use

  14. Approximation Algorithms for Lawn Mowing and Milling Esther M. Arkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Estie

    is constrained to stay within the region. The milling problem arises naturally in the area of automatic tool path the grass is cut. This lawn mowing problem arises in several practical applications. Motivations from to coat the entire surface of an object. · (Quality Control) Plan the movement of a sensor (camera

  15. OIMB GK12 CURRICULUM 4th Grade 60 minutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on energy from the sun. ! A food web illustrates energy transfer through feeding interactions. ! Organisms the sun (the grass); a consumer cannot make its own energy from the sun, but gets it from #12;OIMB GK12 a consumer, consuming the rabbit. The arrow and energy go from the rabbit to the fox. 3. Bring in the Sun

  16. Day in the Life of the Hudson River 10/16/14 Data (Salt Front RM 65.9)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    , pier, grassy, parking lot. Park used for fishing, small boat launch, another pier for small boat launching Surrounding Land Use: 30 % urban/residential; 30% forested; 40% park area with grass F 72 F 72 F 20 C 22 C 22 C Wind Speed 11:14 AM #3 Cloud Cover overcast >75% Water Calm Weather 11

  17. Original article High plant species diversity indirectly mitigates CO2-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Original article High plant species diversity indirectly mitigates CO2- and N-induced effects Non-structural carbohydrates a b s t r a c t We examined how elevated atmospheric [CO2] and higher subjected to either ambient or elevated levels of CO2 and N. Grass- hopper growth rate was higher on P

  18. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species increasing more in pathogen load. Elevated CO2 increased pathogen load of C3 grasses, perhaps by decreasing

  19. Sports Field Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31

    by the ryegrasses adds to the enjoyment of the players and fans. To prepare for overseeding, thin the bermudagrass turf with a flail mower or dethatching mower. Sweep or vacuum the field after mowing to remove grass clip- pings and thatch. Where common bermudagrass...

  20. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  1. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grass- land. Á Ecography 29: 755Á765. Understanding the interactive effects of multiple keystone

  2. CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont Biofuels Initiative: University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop and Perennial Grass ResearchCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1Date: 03/02/2011Location(s): Alburgh, VermontOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  3. Portland State University June 8, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    -Threatening Crisis Water is one of the most widely distributed substances on earth, and is a basic human need careless and water has for the most part gone untreated and unprotected. Worldwide, we are challengedJoe Parker Portland State University June 8, 2006 Forestalling Water Wars: Returning to Our (Grass

  4. InsideIllinoisFeb. 15, 2007 Vol. 26, No. 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    to the study and production of feedstock for biofuel production. Researchers will explore the potential Initiative will put Illinois at forefront of farm bioenergy production Bioenergy production Stephen P. Long. The researchers have found that this hardy perennial grass is more than twice as productive as switchgrass

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    ,5 and J.S. VanderGheynst1,3 1 Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA, USA 2 Earth Sciences Division renewable feedstock that is available for conversion to biofuels that will replace a substantial amount and sugarcane bagasse), woody biomass (poplar, pine) and dedicated energy crops (Miscanthus, switch- grass), has

  6. Collaborative Monitoring in Walnut Creek, California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    that they gained insight into priorities of Preserve users and knowledge of areas that might require new management regeneration and native grass populations in target management areas in the four Open Space Preserves and had to re-examine some of their own assumptions. The City of Walnut Creek managers stated

  7. PublishedbyEMUNI,January2010 Euro-Mediterranean University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köprülü, Kahraman Güçlü

    of unprivileged groups, management of diversity, human rights and trans-cultural competences, cultural sensitivity, care of multiculturalism and preservation of the plural society. Application Deadline: 19 February 2010, Egypt The seminar will examine how leadership can turn knowledge about cultural di- versity into grass

  8. Exp Astron (2009) 23:403434 DOI 10.1007/s10686-008-9133-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordé, Pascal J.

    2009-01-01

    Exp Astron (2009) 23:403­434 DOI 10.1007/s10686-008-9133-6 ORIGINAL ARTICLE PEGASE, an infrared Côte d'Azur, Grasse, France #12;404 Exp Astron (2009) 23:403­434 combiner working in the visible

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

    2007-06-06

    The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

  10. Brush Management/Water Yield Feasibility Study for Four Watersheds In Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bednarz, Steven T.; Dybala, Tim; Amonett, Carl; Muttiah, Ranjan S.; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeff G.

    2003-01-01

    storage. Brush removal was simulated by converting all heavy and moderate categories of brush (except oak) to open range (native grass). Simulated changes in water yield due to brush treatment varied by subbasin, with all subbasins showing increased... on water yield in watersheds above Lake Arrowhead, Lake Brownwood, Lake Fort Phantom Hill, and Lake Palo Pinto (Figure 1-1). The hydrologic 2 “feasibility” studies were conducted by a team from the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES), U...

  11. Modeling Dynamic Landscapes in Open Source GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    2013-11-20

    is free online • message board discussion, help • Google sites: post HW, get feedback • register to get credit Solar radiation modeling: monthly totals Applications in urban areas: solar panels, building design, thermal conditions,… Helena Mitasova, NCSU... topics: • Solar energy potential • Coastal hazards • Watershed analysis • Trail and greenway design • Lidar data processing Most students use ArcGIS but number of students who use GRASS for at least part of their project is increasing every semester...

  12. Suggestions for Weed Control in Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.; Coffman, Cloyce G.

    2001-05-04

    is under growth stress because of drought, cold weather, water-logged soils, etc. Consult the Peak ? label for further precautions and restrictions. Annual broadleaf weed control and some grasses (refer to label for specific weeds controlled) atrazine 4L... for specific weeds controlled) MCPA ? Several manufacturers 3.0 pts. Postemergence when crop is 6 to 12 inches tall but before boot stage. Apply before weeds are 5 inches tall. Avoid cultivation after treatment while sorghum is brittle. Hybrids vary...

  13. The effect of raft removal and dam construction on the lower Colorado River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartopo

    1991-01-01

    of these reservoirs were constructed for water conservation, flood control, municipal, industrial, irrigation, hydroelectric and recreational purposes (U. S. Army Corps of Fngineers, 1988). The development of water resources in the Colorado River Basin... and ranches in the Colorado River Basin. These ponds are used for farm and domestic water supplies, the proper management of grass lands, and also for the prevention of soil erosion. These minor reservoirs have total capacity of 203, 400 acre-ft (Board...

  14. Monitoring Energy Efficiency in Sophisticated Process Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    into the monitoring system particular to that plant. Rapid Pay Offs Are The Rule Figure 3 lists the sources of benefits that have been observed from the target program. Bene fits from the use of the grass-roots guidelines are generally longer range since... fitted to existing distillation towers, heat pumps to eliminate the condenser heat waste altogether, and the addition of intermediate reboilers to save an expensive utility at the cost of waste heat or a similarly inexpensive one. Projects including...

  15. Review: Walt Whitman's America: A cultural Biography by David S. Reynolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landsberg, Melvin

    1996-04-05

    -standing carpentry traditions. Sizemore's book is more than a discussion of common houses in Arkansas. It is also a primer of vernacular architecture that introduces many of the most important theories and findings in the discipline. For the beginner... with nature; American daguerreotypists; and Ameri-can painters, especially genre painters and luminists. At the beginning of the second half of his biography, Reynolds turns to a discussion of the first edition of Leaves of Grass (1855), calling it a "utopian...

  16. Environmental factors influencing the germination of Texas wintergrass (Stipa leucotricha Trin. & Rupr.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoonts, Byron Otis

    1986-01-01

    and content by: Christopher A. Call (Chair of Committee ) illy E. Conrad (Member) St phan L. Hatch (Member) Joseph L. Schuster (Head of Department) May 1986 ABSTRACT Env1ronmental Factors Influencing the Germination of Texas Wintergrass (~Sti a... leucotricha Trin. & Rupr. ). (May 1986) Byron Otis Spoonts, Jr. B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Christopher A. Call Texas wintergrass (~Sti a leucotricha Trin. and Rupr. ) is an important cool season forage grass 1n...

  17. Slaughter Calf Production. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Uel D.

    1955-01-01

    - uations also must be considered in view of mar- ket prices. Proper management of herd bulls directly affects the calf crop percentage, and handling of the herd at calving time needs spe- cial attention. Dehorning, castrating, brand- ing, disease... grasses and legumes is necessary for maximum grazing. This management may consist of fer- tilizing, mowing and deferred or rotation graz- ing. Under such systems cropland should sup- plement permanent pastures. Allowance should be made for feed...

  18. ON THE SPATIAL USES OF PREPOSITIONS Annette Herskovlts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the object. Consider the picture below. ,~, , ~, That patch of grass could be referred to alternately of symmetry (needed for across tan road and along tan ro~d), the "top surface" (on t&e label), the ~outllne). In under t/te aJater, the water stands for tAe upper free surface of tAn ruater; in in the water, i t .is

  19. Comparison of water use patterns by B?o?u?t?e?l?o?u?a? c?u?r?t?i?p?e?n?d?u?l?a? and H?i?l?a?r?i?a? b?e?l?a?n?g?e?r?i? in response to small rainfall events 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Arnold Jackson

    1991-01-01

    for a 10 native cool-season grass. The differences reflect better adaptations of native grasslands. A summary of transpiration ratio literature for C4 plants showed ratios range from 220-350 (Larcher 1983). Bailey (1939) found that several C3... near Sonora, Texas. The study monitored physiological responses of species to applications of 10 mm rainfall events. Soil water content, transpiration, stomatal conductance and xylem pressure potential were measured following each event. Production...

  20. Wintering Steer Calves at the Spur Station. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. H.; Fisher, C. E.; Marion, P. T.

    1956-01-01

    at the Spur Station SUMMARY Winter maintenance experiments were conducted with 1,034 steer calves at the Spur station dur. ing the 14-year period from the fall of 1941 to the spring of 1955. Results of these comparative trials, in most instances, were... made approximately the same gain during the winter as heavy calves averaging 466 pounds. Wheat pasture provided the lowest cost of winter maintenance for calves. Sorghum fields and na- tive grass supplemented with cottonseed cake were intermediate...

  1. Chromosome doubling method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  2. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

    2008-11-25

    percent to 35 percent; quail and lesser prairie chickens, up to 25 percent; and pronghorns virtually none. To satisfy the needs of more than one species compromise will be required. Although a single species of grass is common in many CRP fields.... Chemical brush man- agement can be accomplished with indi- vidual plant treatment or broadcast applica- tion. Consider a variable rate pattern using a criss-cross scheme, skipping every other swath and using half the usual recommended application rate...

  3. Seeding Rangeland. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Tommy G.; Haferkamp, Marshall R.

    1987-01-01

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This publication was supported by gifts from the following seed companies: Bamert Seed Co. Douglass W. King Co. Foster-Rambie Grass Seed G.E. Pogue Seed Co., Inc. Garrison Seed & Co., Inc. George Warner Seed Co., Inc. Harpool Field Seed... may be used as a cover crop. After establishing the cover crop, drill or broadcast seeds of desired species into the stubble or mulch. In some areas seedbeds have been successfully prepared by burning. For example, prescribed burning may ~educe...

  4. Effects of fluoride emissions on enzyme activity in metabolism of agricultural plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeri, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of fluoride on the activity of malatedehydrogenase (MDH) in rape seed and rye grass have been investigated. Fluoride, which has been absorbed from the air, seems to act differently from fluoride added to the soil. The action of airborne fluoride compounds resorbed by the plant on the activity of MDH significantly correlated with the distance from an aluminum plant, crop yield, and fluoride content. 5 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  5. A Statewide Pest Management Plan for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01

    comprehensive way, the future direc- tion for IPM programs within the state. The plan includes IPM systems for cotton, sorghum, corn, pea- nuts, rice, riceland mosquitoes, soybeans, citrus, pecans, timber, small grains, alfalfa, sunflowers and forage grass... Citrus Mutual, American Soybean Association-Texas Chap- ter, and the American Rice Growers Cooperative) have been extremely helpful in the development and review of this plan. The Texas Pest Management Association requested the writing of A...

  6. Growth performance, voluntary intake and nutrient digestibility in horses grazing Bermudagrass pastures and fed Bermudagrass hay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiken, Glen Eris

    1986-01-01

    of horses grazing Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L. ) Pers. ] pastures with no supplementation. Stocking rate treatments of 6. 7, 7. 9, 9. 5 and 12. 4 yearlings per hectare were imposed on two Bermuda- grass pastures. Average daily weight gain... Bermudagrass pastures at stocki ng rates of 6. 7, 7. 9, 9. 5 and 12. 4 yearlings per hectare. 2. Determine the relationship between growth of yearlings and the amount of forage available to them. 3. Determine the relationship between growth of yearlings...

  7. The effect of irrigated cropping systems on certain soil physical properties of Willacy fine sandy loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shiraj Hossain

    1958-01-01

    systems oa scil physical properties. Presently, there is e teadeacy 1a so11 research to wake e conceatrated effort toward obteiaing e better aadersteadiag of this perticnlsr problem. Experiments condncted ia some parts of the United States ead elsewhere... iadicete that it hes been possible to provide favorable soil physical coa- ditioas by usiag legemiaons end grass plants which, by virtae of their deep, exteasive, ead fibrons root-systems, impart e favorable porosity ead eir-weter beleace in e soil...

  8. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01

    root. Duckweed float freely and are moved by wind current. Often they can be removed mechanically by net or similar device when plants are crowded against the shore by a strong wind. Use Chemical Control No.8. FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS.... The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2...

  9. Method of pollination and heritability for seedling vigor in switchgrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez de Leon, Hector

    2005-08-29

    ................................................................................................ 45 5. Mean weight for six repetitions and overall mean weight for Frio buffelgrass, Alamo switchgrass, and the means of Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 under growth chamber conditions at College Station, TX, at 14 days after seedling emergence... cultivars include ?Blackwell?, ?Caddo?, and ?Cave-in-Rock? while ?Alamo? and ?Kanlow? are cultivars of the lowland ecotype (Alderson and Sharp, 1994). In addition to its importance as a forage grass, the U.S. Department of Energy has identified...

  10. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyerly, Paul J.; Longenecker, Donald E.

    1962-01-01

    these analyses as a basis for planning management prac- tices . TEST-DON'T GUESS . Apply water uniformly by using a properly de- signed irrigation system and by leveling where necessary . Apply enough water for the crop plus enough to keep salt leached to a... tolerant to your salt conditions . Plant good seed under optimum moisture and temperature conditions . Fertilize to replace nutrients lost by leaching and to maintain adequate fertility . Use soil-improving grasses or legumes to main- tain good soil...

  11. Natural succession impeded by smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium) in an abandoned agricultural field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J.K.

    1997-11-01

    In 1975, an abandoned agricultural field at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) that had been cultivated for more than 38 years, was seeded with smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium). Although these species are commonly planted in reclamation and roadside seed mixtures, few studies have documented their impact on the re-establishment of native plant communities. In 1994, species richness, cover, and biomass were sampled in the agricultural field and compared to the surrounding mixed-grass prairie at the Site. The agricultural field contained only 61 plant species (62% native), compared to 143 species (81% native) in the surrounding mixed-grass prairie. Community similarity based on species presence/absence was 0.47 (Sorensen coefficient of similarity). Basal vegetative cover was 11.2% in the agricultural field and 29.1% in the mixed-grass prairie. Smooth brome and intermediate wheatgrass accounted for 93% of the relative foliar cover and 96% of the biomass in the agricultural field. The aggressive nature of these two planted species has impeded the natural succession of the agricultural field to a more native prairie community. Studies of natural succession on abandoned fields and roads in northeastern Colorado have indicated that if left alone, fields would return to their native climax state in approximately 50 years and would be approaching their native state after 20--25 years. Based on the results of this study, this agricultural field may take more than 100 years to return to a native mixed-grass prairie state and it may never achieve a native state without human intervention.

  12. Pleistocene and Recent environments of the Central Great Plains. Edited by Wakefield Dort, Jr., and J. Knox Jones, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1970-01-01

    , these grass­ lands occupy a region stretching from southern Canada to northern Mexico and from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the west to beyond the Mississippi River in the east. The natural setting of this vast area long has interested natural... is an unusual record preserved in a lava cave on the Snake River Plain of Idaho (Butler, 1968; Dort, 1968). Here, exca­ vations by archaeologists revealed a se­ quence of laminated silts that had been periodically augmented by windblown sediment...

  13. The Home Lawn : Good Turf for Utility and Beauty. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crain, A. W.; Watson, J. R. (John R.)

    1952-01-01

    Texas Agricultural , Extension Service - THE HOME LAWN . . . Good Turf for Utility and Beauty TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. Lewis, Director, College Station, Texas 7a TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE L G. G. Gibson, Director..., College Station, Texas PREFACE A grass turf. for home lawns, parks, ceme- teries, playgrounds, highway rights-of -ways or around an industrial. plant ndds usefulness, value and beauty to the surroundings. Principles dis- cussed in this bulletin...

  14. White Grubs in Texas Turfgrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.; Biles, Stephen; Mott, Dale

    2004-06-24

    . Use of mulching mowers to recycle grass clippings should not cause thatch buildup in regularly mowed lawns. Environmental Considerations. Unnecessary insecticide applica- tions sometimes create more prob- lems than they solve. Pesticides can have... and other culti- vated plants. White grubs, sometimes referred to as grubworms, injure turf by feed- ing on roots and other under- ground plant parts. Damaged areas within lawns lose vigor and turn brown (Figure 1). Severely dam- aged turf can be lifted...

  15. Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer Management for Winter Wheat Production in the Blackland Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Tim C.; Hipp, Billy W.; Marshall, David S.; Sutton, Russelll L.

    1995-01-01

    include wheat, oats, grain sorghum, corn, cotton, forage sorghum, and legumes. About half of the region is rangeland with pasture crops consisting primarily of Coastal bermudagrass, clover, alfalfa, wheat, oats, and na tive grasses such as bluestem..., and Shickluna, 1983). Intelligent crop management demands a working knowledge of these relationships depicted in Figure 5. Soil?N gains and transforma tions include fertilizer or manure applications, fixa tion of atmospheric N2 by legumes (clover, alfalfa...

  16. Composition and Digestibility of the Chloroform Extract of Hays and Fodders. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

    1913-01-01

    of Chloroform Extract and of Ether Extract. Period. 3 12 9 6 17 16 4 10 15 11 5 1413 7 18 2 Description. Alfalfa hay ..................... Bermuda hay ................. Buffalo grass hay.......... Burr clover..................... Corn...-73? 4665 Excrement, rice straw..................................... 115.0 72-73? The acetyl numbers of the crystals are near to that of myricyl alco? hol, which is 116.4. This corresponds to the crystals separated from the ether extract of burr clover...

  17. Dallisgrass. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Ethan C.

    1956-01-01

    observations on adaptation, establishment, yield and forage quality, response to fertilization, utilization by livestock and seed production. Dallisgrass is a good quality forage plant that grows well in association with Bermuda- grass and white clover... by airplane in mid- October gave good results. Volunteer stands of Dallisgrass-clover have been observed in rotation with rice at the Rice- Pasture station (13). Areas which had been in pasture 2 to 3 years were planted to rice in 1950. In the spring...

  18. Rice… A Big Business on the Gulf Coast Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, R. J. Jr.

    1957-01-01

    of improved pasture usually is s~fficient to grow one rice crop. After 4 or 5 years of improved pasture, the residual phosphoric acid may be sufficient to grow two rice crops. Good clover growth in pasture before rice indicates that phosphorous... to convert from For several years 3 acres of this Persian and white clover pasture furnished almost continuow grazing for one cow from November to March. 14 rice to improved pasture by broadcasting grass and clover seed without seedbed preparation...

  19. Corn fodder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01

    Hay ................. Red Top Hay .............. Mixed Ilay and Clover ........ Clover Hay ................. Ensilage from Southern Corn. . ..... Ensilage from Sweet Corn ....... Pasture (Tame Grasses) e, we ase as Digestible Non- Digestible I'rotcinlnitrogenous Nu...- Nutritive Ratio. ---- 3.45 Green Rye .................... I ::: Sugar Beets.. ................ trients. 48.71 12.87 7.81 I 15.4 15.5 From the above it will be seen that pure leaf fodder has a very high value for feeding-second only to clover hay...

  20. Fertilizing Texas Patures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trew, E. M.; Bennett, W. F.

    1960-01-01

    soil acidity. Some pasture plants will not grow in strongly acid soils, and others do not grow as well on acid soils as on soils that contain moderate to large amounts of lime. For example, white- clover grows best when the soil acidity (ex.... Requirements are higher for Sudan- grass than for pearl millet; they are greater for crimson clover than for vetch; blue panic re- quires more fertility than lovegrass; Coastal Bermuda has higher requirements than K. R. bluestem ; whiteclover requires more...

  1. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  2. Fire Ants and Their Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamman, Philip J.; Drees, Bastiaan M.; Vinson, S. Bradleigh

    1986-01-01

    Agricultural Extension Service because these substances are dangerously flammable, kill grass and plants around the treated mounds and can seriously pollute the soil. Other home remedies include soap solutions, cleaning products or wood ashes soaked... ant workers feed on parts of plants or remove planted corn, peanut or soybean seeds and/or seedlings. Seed treat ments or insecticides applied before or at planting to control soil insects usually will prevent fire ant damage, although...

  3. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  4. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  5. Final technical report for Phenomic Analysis of Natural and Induced Variation in Brachypodium Distachyon DE-SC0001526

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, John P.

    2014-12-17

    The goal of this project was to apply high-throughput, non-destructive phenotyping (phenomics) to collections of natural variants and induced mutants of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon and characterize a small subset of that material in detail. B. distachyon is well suited to this phenomic approach because its small size and rapid generation time allow researchers to grow many plants under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, the simple diploid genetics, high quality genome sequence and existence of numerous experimental tools available for B. distachyon allow us to rapidly identify genes affecting specific phenotypes. Our phenomic analysis revealed great diversity in biofuel-relevant traits like growth rate, biomass and photosynthetic rate. This clearly demonstrated the feasibility of applying a phenomic approach to the model grass B. distachyon. We also demonstrated the utility of B. distachyon for studying mature root system, something that is virtually impossible to do with biomass crops. We showed tremendous natural variation in root architecture that can potentially be used to design crops with superior nutrient and water harvesting capability. Finally, we demonstrated the speed with which we can link specific genes to specific phenotypes by studying two mutants in detail. Importantly, in both cases, the specific biological lessons learned were grass-specific and could not have been learned from a dicot model system. Furthermore, one of the genes affects cell wall integrity and thus may be a useful target in the context of biomass crop improvement. Ultimately, all this information can be used to accelerate the creation of improved biomass crops.

  6. Former Soviet refineries face modernization, restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-29

    A massive modernization and restructuring program is under way in the refining sector of Russia and other former Soviet republics. Economic reforms and resulting economic dislocation following the collapse of the Soviet Union has left refineries in the region grappling with a steep decline and changes in product demand. At the same time, rising oil prices and an aging, dilapidated infrastructure promise a massive shakeout. Even as many refineries in the former Soviet Union (FSU) face possible closure because they are running at a fraction of capacity, a host of revamps, expansions, and grass roots refineries are planned or under way. The paper discusses plans.

  7. Effectiveness of a Bioretention Cell Treating Stormwater Runoff in Northeastern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaolu

    2010-05-12

    obtained and classified as sand and sandy loam. The mulch layer used in the study was from locally collected municipal leaves and grass clippings. In their research, some washout of media particles has been noted in field facilities, mostly from new... of the bioretention cell and surrounding area Runoff from Mize Boulevard is collected in curbside sewers behind the road and drained to the bioretention cells through a single concrete pipe. A mesh bag trap is installed in the entrance of the curbside sewer...

  8. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04

    c to facilitate mowing/shredding. Dash-dot line represents a levee with 10:1 side slopes. Figure is not to scale. and pipe to prevent washouts at this impor- tant location. Benefi ts of Levee Side Slopes and Spillways Gradually sloping sides... these plants can penetrate the interior of the embank- ment, creating macro-pores that often result in percolation and piping that can cause a washout. Woody plants can also shade out desirable sod-forming grasses, thus creat- ing potential spots...

  9. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Federation Glyphosate-resistant Johnsongrass in Argentina Glyphosate-resistant johnson- grass has been identified in northern Argentina. While not an immediate threat to U.S. cropping fields, the development once again points to the necessity... with our Monsanto reps down in Argentina quite a bit about this. I’ve been working with them as they begin their research.” “It’s an area that’s been in pro- duction agriculture. They began (growing) Roundup Ready soy- beans there probably about seven...

  10. The Texas Quail Index: Evaluating Predictors of Quail Abundance Using Citizen Science 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyna, Kelly Shane

    2009-05-15

    and Prairies region is referred to as the Osage Plain-Cross Timbers by the BBS and includes data from Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas. Figure 1.7. Bobwhite and scaled quail population trends in the South Texas Plains based on North... counties in the Rolling Plains, 13 in the Edwards Plateau, 11 in the Cross Timbers and Prairies, 10 in the South Texas Plains, and 2 in the Trans-Pecos ecoregion. The Rolling Plains landscape is flat to rolling, with natural vegetation of mixed- grass...

  11. Establishment of wetland vegetation on East Texas mine spoil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKnight, Steven Keith

    1991-01-01

    ). Spring drawdown was the only water regime to which all species responded. Barnyard grass produced the most (P & 0. 05) above-ground biomass, while Japanese millet produced the most (P& 0. 05) seed biomass in this water regime. Arrowhead grew under all... water regimes except fall drawdown. In the remaining 3 water regimes, total tuber biomass did not differ (P& 0. 05), while tuber number was greatest (P& 0. 05) in spring drawdown. Chufa produced no seed biomass and little above-ground biomass. Seed...

  12. Microalgae bioprospecting at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Prospecting for elusive fast-growing, oily microalgae is a soggy, muddy, rewarding job for NREL researcher Lee Elliott. Not only do algae grow in unlikely settings, but their ability to convert the light they receive into biomass has the potential to outperform that of land plants. Trees, grasses and shrubs typically are not very efficient in capturing and converting the sun's energy into biomass, but some algae are believed to be capable of much higher efficiencies, with some scientists thinking ideal strains may be able to approach the maximum theoretical photosynthetic efficiency under the right conditions.

  13. Engineered bamboo for structural applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Bhavna; Gatóo, Ana; Bock, Maximilian; Ramage, Michael

    2015-02-23

    is a giant grass consisting of a hollow culm having longitudinal fibres aligned within a lignin matrix, divided for sust full culm b ] to engi bamboo composites (e.g., [11–21]. Engineered bamboo co ites are of particular interest due to the standardisat... e Dendrocalamus giganteus, para utilização na engenharia. Rio de Janeiro: PUC-Rio, Publicação RMNC-1 Bambu 01/2001 (in Portuguese). [28] de Vos V. Bamboo for exterior joinery: a research in material properties and market perspectives. Thesis...

  14. Terracing in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, J. C.

    1916-01-01

    at right angles at which point dams will have to be built on the terrace untjl sediment fills the gullie . 5 with it much of the original covering. On gentle slopes with deep, porous and grass covered soils, the amount of water that runs off is very small... is devoid of humus or other water-hQlding material and the subsoil is baked harJ 0 that rno t of the rain- fall is lost as run-off, leaving the ground too dry for productivity. 6 underground is slow, and when the surface of the soil becomes saturn e ,the...

  15. Improving Rainfall Effectiveness on Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Thurow, Thomas L.; Taylor Jr., Charles A.

    2000-01-11

    little effective mois- ture for plant growth because it is rapidly lost through evaporation. Other factors affecting evap- oration from the soil surface include soil texture, L-5029 Improving Rainfall Effectiveness On Rangeland Allan McGinty, Thomas L..., an aggres- sive woody invader of moist pastures, rangelands and riparian habitats can use from 0.1 to 0.4 inch of water per day and from 48 to 156 inches of water per year (Davenport, et al., 1982). Perennial grasses are generally more efficient users...

  16. Turf in Texas: still sustainable, Researchers test management practices and tout landscapes' benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    . Augustine grass sod during a ??-day period, root growth increased four-fold when mowing was withheld and turf was allowed to grow freely for the ?rst few weeks a?er planting, he said. ??at plant is then going to be able to be?er withstand watering... in ???? and ????. ?e researchers tested turfgrass plots, all planted on native, nondisturbed soil, over ?? summer days with absolutely no rainfall or irrigation, Wherley said. All the tested warm-season turfgrass species recovered a?er irrigation resumed...

  17. Pushing the reset button on Texas Rangelands: Recovering from drought requires patience, knowledge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    program specialist in Texas A&M?s Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, said some burned areas that received rain a?er the ?res are recovering, but other burned areas that did not have rain are not improving. ?Landowners are concerned about... as long as it rains in the next growing season. But we had gone a whole year without rain. ?Previous studies have shown if it rains immedi- ately a?er burn, the response (of grasses) is quick,? she said. ?If it doesn?t rain, it could take up to three...

  18. Self-revegetation of disturbed ground in the deserts of Nevada and Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sauer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Plant cover established without purposeful soil preparation or seeding was measured on ground disturbed by plowing in Washington and by aboveground nuclear explosions in Nevada. After a time lapse of three decades in Washington and two decades in Nevada, fewer species were self-established on the disturbed ground than the nearby undisturbed ground. Alien annual plants were the dominants on the disturbed ground. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominated abandoned fields in Washington, and filaree (Erodium cicutarium) dominated disturbed ground in Nevada. Perennial grasses and shrubs appeared to be more successful as invaders in Nevada than in Washington. This distinction is attributed to the superior competitive ability of cheatgrass in Washington.

  19. Root interaction between Bromud tectorum and Poa pratensis: a three-dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bookman, P.A.; Mack, R.N.

    1982-06-01

    The spatial distribution of roots of two alien grasses, Bromus tectorum and Poa pratensis, grown singly and in a mixture, was examined using a double-labelling radioisotope technique. Interactions between the root systems of these plants led to a restricted B. tectorum rooting volume in P. pratensis neighborhoods greater than or equal to30-d-old. The roots of B. tectorum failed to develop laterally. The altered B. tectorum root systems may contribute to its inability to persist in established P. pratensis swards.

  20. Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Sally A. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG); Rickard, William H. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)

    2002-12-01

    How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.

  1. Quapaw Vocabulary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    (CS). dese baxe (7) drum (CS). to bite. go (cs ) • bdetta zn:ikhe I am going here (OM,AG). also droodedo dehudikki (?) de (7) fiddle, violin (OM) . probably bakitte to play an accordian...ifeather.~5~(JOD) ~siskaWhite Feather (CS). proper name ~Q5acoffee (OM,AG,CS). lit. black medicine ~Q5Q 5Q pill. IDQkkQzitte 5Q 5Q red pills (AG) lit. round medicine ~ttebow (CS). cf.~ arrow breast. eleven (BS). IDQhi grass (BS). also~i, ~ iron, gun (CS...

  2. Measurement and modeling of thermal properties of sorghum and soy flours 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Palacios, Lazaro

    1981-01-01

    transfer to or from the sample. Figure 2 (which will be explained in detail later) shows some typical Fusion trask HEAT slOW l RATE col/ sec 0 starling Transient lsotherma Grass Transition Crystal li sation Prrak Eras ne Transient Isothermal...H) required for this transition was measured by integrating the area under the peak with a planimeter and comparing it to the area obtained from a known transit1on of a standard. The standard used was indium which has a melting transition (see fusion peak...

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Triplett, Eric W. (Middleton, WI); Kaeppler, Shawn M. (Oregon, WI); Chelius, Marisa K. (Greeley, CO)

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  4. The influence of four iron oxide forms on the growth of grain sorghum seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Pat Albert

    1959-01-01

    . . ~ . . . . . . 38 I NT RO DUCT ION Chloresis of grain sorghuw aad other wewbers of the grass fawily has been a serious problea ia the Rio Qraade Plain area of Texas for waay years. One of the principal soils of this area oa which ohlorotic plants are frequeatly..., therefore, to deteraiae the role of foar iroa oxides, iaogaetite, heastite, syatbetio aagaetite, aad syathetie waghewite, os soaroes of iron oad the offsets of these iroa oxides oa the sheiaiool eoayositioa aad growth of grata sorghaia seedliags. agglgg...

  5. Microalgae bioprospecting at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Prospecting for elusive fast-growing, oily microalgae is a soggy, muddy, rewarding job for NREL researcher Lee Elliott. Not only do algae grow in unlikely settings, but their ability to convert the light they receive into biomass has the potential to outperform that of land plants. Trees, grasses and shrubs typically are not very efficient in capturing and converting the sun's energy into biomass, but some algae are believed to be capable of much higher efficiencies, with some scientists thinking ideal strains may be able to approach the maximum theoretical photosynthetic efficiency under the right conditions.

  6. Catfish Ponds for Recreation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

    1999-08-02

    through the natural food chain. The natural food chain starts with pond plants, particularly microscopic algae or phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are the start of the pond?s food chain, much as grasses are the start of many food chains on land. These algae... and their detritus (dead bodies) are eaten by microscopic animals (zooplank- ton) and by aquatic insects and worms, which are in turn eaten by fish such as catfish. Microscopic algae color the pond?s water some shade of green. This green water is often referred...

  7. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and once in ten year events, respectively, whereas corresponding values for runoff were 13% and 16%; these changes were accompanied by corresponding decreases in evapotranspiration, which accounted for 86% and only 78% of the precipitation occurring on the average and once in ten year even~ respectively.

  8. The Iceman as a Burial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frayer, David W.; Vanzetti, A.; Vidale, M.; Gallinaro, M.; Bondioli, Luca

    2010-09-01

    location. The cap (Figure 2: h), leather and pelt fragments followed the body, while a few of the lighter items such as grass (Acs et al. 2005), net and string fragments and the hollow quiver (Figure 2: g) floated farther afield. The northern limit... in the depression, but not on the platform. Recent analysis of plant macro-remains may also support this model. Heiss and Oeggl (2009: 23) recently presented the first spatial analysis of the distribution of selected plant remains. They arrived at a similar...

  9. The Objectivity of Poe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estey, Helen Sewall

    1913-01-01

    drum." Vol. Ill,P. 008, ", The Duo de LfOmelette. *?he apartment was superb. Its height was appalling. There was no ceiling,but a dense whirling mass of fiery colored clouds. Prom above hung a chain of an unknown -11- blood-red metal—its upper end... Babylon-like walls, Up shadowy long forgotten bowers Of sculptured ivy and stone flowers, et*." Vol.Xj.P.22. Silence. "One dwells in a lonely place Newly with grass o'er grown,— JTgmeless aif, ~<*That haunteth the lone regions where hath trod...

  10. Natural and experimental host range of the Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leisy, Ralph Herbert

    1968-01-01

    in. adjacent to, or in the vicinity of virus infected f'elds were collected for virus assay and for experimental susceptibility studies. Virus assays were (sade by mechanically inoculating suscep- tible host plants with the extracted sap of each... with MDMV, the grasses wh'ch were collected for determination of natural susceptibility and which proved to be free of the virus were grown in isolation and mechanically inocu- lated with the extracted sap of MDfliV (isolate Tx66-BBJg-I) infected AKS 614...

  11. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1986-03-01

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose.

  12. Texas Fever: Experiments Made by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, in Co-operation with the Missouri Experiment Station and the Missouri State Board of Agriculture, in Immunizing Northern Breeding Cattle Against Texas Fever. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaway, J. W.; Francis, M. (Mark)

    1899-01-01

    of maintaining a quarantined pasture, and the necessity of hand-feeding in the case of calves of non-immune cows; this method is not as desirable as that of blood i?zoculation. In the blood inoculation experiments 0ve.r -200 pure bred catt'le have been used... No. 4 died from accident, having been horned into the manger, probably by a Texas cow that was kept in the same pen. No. 2 and No. 3 improved during tlrc winter, and were put on the grass in the spring in fair condition. In July, 1898, both were...

  13. Spot-Oiling Johnsongrass. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Fred C.; Norris, M. J.; Rea, H. E.

    1955-01-01

    -treat Johnsongrass in cotton in 19 54. Power-driven sprayers normally used for in- tect control in row crops were modified for Yose. A spray pressure of 12 pounds re inch was used. Two systems of the grass were tried. In one system the crenr applying the oil... crown-oilings with naphtha, 83 percent in 7 tests by 3 oil- ings, 95 percent in 6 tests by 4 oilings and 98 percent in 4 tests by 5 to 7 oilings. The use of mixtures of 50 percent naphtha and 50 per- cent kerosene or diesel fuel oil reduced...

  14. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference will be held from November 19–20, 2014, at the Richland Community College in Decatur, Illinois. The event will focus on bioenergy and sustainable agriculture and explore topics ranging from logistics, energy conversion technologies, and markets for grass biomass. BETO Sustainability Program Technology Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking about the Energy Department’s perspective on sustainable bioenergy landscapes and will focus on BETO’s recent work with landscape design. The conference will be November 19–20 only. On November 18, participants may choose to participate in a pre-conference field tour.

  15. Dynamics of tritrophic interactions between solenopsis invicta, antonina graminis, and neodusmetia sangwani: do fire ants negatively impact the success of a biological control system? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantos, Jillian Marie

    2009-05-15

    (Vinson 1994; Wojcik et al. 2001). Worldwide there are 46 known species of mealybugs, in 16 genera known as legless mealybugs. They possess functional legs during the first instar only, the crawler phase, and adult females colonize grasses at the crown... at 28 o C for 7 days to allow crawlers to emerge. Rearing chambers were ranked according to crawler numbers as low (0-50), medium (51-100), or high (100+) density. One rearing chamber per pot (two per replicate) was randomly distributed...

  16. Biological Control of Rhodesgrass Scale in Texas by Neodusmetia sangwani (Rao): Effectiveness and Colonization Studies. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Michael F.; Boling, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    OF RNODESGRASS SCALE IN TEXAS B Y NEODUSMETIA SANG WANT (RAO): Effectiveness and Colonization Studies TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION H. 0. Kgnkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin....0 percent dur- ing the year. The two normal scale population peaks were reduced by 50 percent. The yearly mean para- sitism varied from 28.1 to 34.6 percent. Parasitized scales produced 93.7 percent fewer crawlers on rhdes- grass and 90.1 percent fewer...

  17. txH2O: Volume 3, Number 1 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2007-01-01

    that residents can implement around the home such as raising the height of lawn mower blades and using soaker hoses, as well as swimming pool tips and explanations on how to read water bills. EnviroMedia originally conducted statewide research in 2004 on behalf... evaporation and keep soil moist. ? Choose ?water wise? or native Texas plants such as lantana, salvia and Mexican sage. ? Raise your lawn mower blade and cut grass to a height of 3 inches?this shades the soil, which reduces evaporation and allows roots...

  18. Growing smarter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2007-01-01

    water use that residents can implement around the home such as raising the height of lawn mower blades and using soaker hoses, as well as swimming pool tips and explanations on how to read water bills. EnviroMedia originally conducted statewide research... to prevent evaporation and keep soil moist. ? Choose ?water wise? or native Texas plants such as lantana, salvia and Mexican sage. ? Raise your lawn mower blade and cut grass to a height of 3 inches?this shades the soil, which reduces evaporation...

  19. Money Crops in Place of Cotton. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle, E. J.; Morgan, J. Oscar; Burns, J. C.; Ridgway, J. W.; Proctor, W. F.; Youngblood, B.; Connor, A. B.; Conway, T. J.; Eliot, H. M.; Ousley, Clarence

    1914-01-01

    down and to absorb moisture. Plant February 20th to March 15th. Thin to approxi- mately one stalk per square yard. BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL MONEY CROPS IN PLACE OF COTTON. 9 Bur Clover, Bermuda and Rescue Pastures...: For pasture and waste lands. Plow the land, harrow and sow broadcast bur clover and rescue grass seed as early as possible and not later than November 15th, using ten pounds of seed of each per acre. Follow with a smoothing harrow to cover seed. In April...

  20. Weed Control in Texas Pastures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, John A.; Trew, E. M.

    1958-01-01

    that butyric forms of 2,4-D CP will give good control of curly dock in grass pastures with little damage to pasture I pmes when used at the rate of pound per acre. ipplications made when hop and white clover on the Trler Experiment Station were 2 to 3... inches high re- ' !lted in little injury to the clover. The control of dock cellent when the weeds were sprayed in the ; stage. Temperatures at the time of treatment $,,, ,,,out 50 degrees F. - I per , :~cnt, A1 1 :try smal I ) ti\\'es anc , TCA...

  1. Storing and Handling Silage In Horizontal Above-Ground Silos. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Weihing, R. M.; Person, N. K.; Allen, W. S.

    1964-01-01

    ......................................................... 9 - -. ' SUMMARY Research conducted at Beaumont ?I$ College 1957-63 resulted in the developing of practical me ing clovers and grasses during weather too wet a haying. The addition of zinc bacatracin to forage at ensiling reduced dry matter... was develoPd fa ically unloading horizontal-type silos. A capacity of 7. silage per hour was obtained with the machine in t sorghum and clover silages. A commercial unl " after the experimental machine, but with incr~, capacity, has been built and tested...

  2. A Dash of Salt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info A dash of salt.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9159 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name A dash of salt.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O | pg. 18 A... Texas A&M researcher is assessing the impact of using moderately saline water for irrigating urban landscapes in West Texas and southern New Mexico. A DASH OF SALT Researcher assesses salinity impacts on grasses, trees and shrubs A Dash of Salt...

  3. Some effects of soil differences and past grazing use on the amount and composition of vegetation on the Texas Range Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gerald W

    1951-01-01

    V. Species composition and, total density of vegetation in relation to soil series eo es creen ~ om os on Total a o grass e~ p ~ Soil Ve station Tobosa and Curly- oats Three- Other Sertee 1 Densit Ox'ass XXes uite Orama aen S oies Valera Oxona... data shoeing the average number of brush speoies per plot by soil series 0 Series Total Brush Ses uite trees Px iokl Pear ex rus 6 oies Valera Osona Tobosa Irion Bandall 6?90 10?07 10 ?19 2?51 2 ?27 5 ?57 4 ~ 13 3 ~ 15 2?ll 4 ?55 6...

  4. Changing Pattern of Forest Consumption: A Case Study from An Eastern Hill Village in Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokharel, Binod

    2003-01-01

    , HMGIN 1982 : 63). It is considered a very important contribution of forestry to hill farming in the use of plant bio-mass when mixed with animal excreta yields organic compost m'anure which forms the principal source of soil nutrients for hilly... an important role m sustamlng. the productivity of the land by using the organic manure of anllnal Binod Pokhorell Chonging Pal/ern ofFores/... 43 dung supported with bedding materials from the forest which provides grass, trees and fodder for animals (ADBIN...

  5. Backyard Production of Meat Rabbits in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukefahr, Steven D.; Paschal, Joseph C.; Ford, John E.

    1998-06-11

    . Feeds and Feeding Most rabbit producers feed commercial feeds, such as pel- lets, in their operations. The advantages of feeding pellets include convenience to the producer and increased con- sumption with minimum waste by the rabbits. In addi- tion... are actually fed. Simply feeding a good commercial pelleted diet takes out much of this guesswork. On the other hand, there is no problem in providing small amounts of fresh feeds (for example, a carrot, a few blades of grass, or a couple of cabbage leaves...

  6. AN EVALUATION OF PYROLYSIS OIL PROPERTIES AND CHEMISTRY AS RELATED TO PROCESS AND UPGRADE CONDITIONS WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION TO PIPELINE SHIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G; Boyd, Alison C

    2012-01-01

    One factor limiting the development of commercial biomass pyrolysis is challenges related to the transportation of the produced pyrolysis oil. The oil has different chemical and physical properties than crude oil, including more water and oxygen and has lower H/C ratio, higher specific gravity and density, higher acidity, and lower energy content. These differences could limit its ability to be transported by existing petroleum pipelines. Pyrolysis oil can also be treated, normally by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, and approaches crude oil and petroleum condensates at higher severity levels. This improvement also results in lower liquid yield and high hydrogen consumption. Biomass resources for pyrolysis are expected to become plentiful and widely distributed in the future, mainly through the use of crop residuals and growing of energy crops such as perennial grasses, annual grasses, and woody crops. Crude oil pipelines are less well distributed and, when evaluated on a county level, could access about 18% of the total biomass supply. States with high potential include Texas, Oklahoma, California, and Louisiana. In this study, published data on pyrolysis oil was compiled into a data set along with bio-source source material, pyrolysis reactor conditions, and upgrading conditions for comparison to typical crude oils. Data of this type is expected to be useful in understanding the properties and chemistry and shipment of pyrolysis oil to refineries, where it can be further processed to fuel or used as a source of process heat.

  7. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  8. Dust transport: Wind blown and mechanical resuspension, July 1983 to December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langer, G.

    1986-09-20

    This study defines the processes that resuspend plutonium (Pu) particles from Pu-contaminated soil at Rocky Flats. Such knowledge can predict the transport of Pu particles from the site and the population dose. A vertical dust flux tower profiled the plume of Pu particles from the site. The data show a 70% reduction between 1 and 10 m in the concentration of coarse and inhalable Pu particles. The respirable particle concentration remained steady at both heights, slightly above background levels. High winds visually resuspend large amounts of dust for short periods, but we suspected that present sampling devices do not function properly above 50 km/h. During a windstorm reaching 80 km/h, the size-selective sampler used seriously underestimated the dust(Pu) concentration. Wind tunnel studies measured resuspension versus wind speed from our prairie grass covered, arid soil. We failed to find a good correlation between resuspension and wind speed. This led to a search for alternative mechanisms of resuspension besides wind erosion. Resuspension of dust(Pu) from grass proved to be important, as well as resuspension from rain splash.

  9. Cooling the greenhouse effect: Options and costs for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from the American Electric Power Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helme, N.; Popovich, M.G.; Gille, J. [Center for Clean Air Policy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the earth is likely to face a doubling of preindustrial greenhouse gases in the next half century. This doubling could be expected to push average global temperatures. up from between 1.8 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Much of the potential for human impacts on the global climate is linked to fossil fuel consumption. Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption in the US totals about one-quarter of the world`s total emissions from energy consumption. Global warming is different from other environmental problems because CO{sub 2} emissions can be captured naturally by trees, grasses, soil, and other plants. In contrast, acid rain emissions reductions can only be accomplished through switching to lower-polluting fuels, conserving energy, or installing costly retrofit technologies. Terrestrial biota, such as trees, plants, grasses and soils, directly affect the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the atmosphere. A number of reports have concluded that forestry and land-use practices can increase CO{sub 2} sequestration and can help reduce or delay the threat of global warming.

  10. Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

  11. United States Department of Energy Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Air, water, soil, sediments, grass, and groundwater in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant were continuously or periodically sampled during 1984. Analyses for materials known to be in plant effluents were made to provide effluent control information and to determine compliance with applicable environmental standards. Low sulfur coal is burned in the steam plant to meet Kentucky emission limits for sulfur dioxide. Air analyses for radioactivity indicated concentrations at each off-site sampling station averaged less than 1% of the DOE Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG). Offsite analyses for fluorides in grass met the Kentucky Air Quality Requirements. All onsite and offsite airborne fluoride samples met the Kentucky one-week and one-month standards for gaseous HF. Soil samples were analyzed for uranium and showed no significant deviation from normal background concentrations. There was no detectable change in chemical, physical, or radioactive characteristics of the Ohio River attributable to Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant operations. The results of water sample analyses of the Ohio River show the chromium and fluoride concentrations to be in compliance with the requirements of the applicable Kentucky regulations. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. Analysis of Leaf and Root Transcriptome of Soil Grown Avena barbata Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swarbreck, Sté; phanie; Lindquist, Erika; Ackerly, David; Andersen, Gary

    2011-02-01

    Slender wild oat (Avena barbata) is an annual grass dominant in many grassland ecosystems in Mediterranean climate. This species has been the subject of ecological studies that aim at understanding the effect of global climate change on grassland ecosystems and the genetic basis for adaptation under varying environmental conditions. We present the sequencing and analysis of cDNA libraries constructed from leaf and root samples collected from A. barbata grown on natural soil and under varying rainfall patterns. More than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated using both GS 454-FLX pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing, and these tags were assembled into consensus sequences. We identified numerous candidate polymorphic markers in the dataset, providing possibilities for linking the genomic and the existing genetic information for A. barbata. Using the digital northern method, we showed that genes involved in photosynthesis were down regulated under high rainfall while stress- related genes were up regulated. We also identified a number of genes unique to the root library with unknown function. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm the root specificity of some of these transcripts such as two genes encoding O-methyl transferase. Also we showed differential expression under three water levels. Through a combination of Sanger and 454-based sequencing technologies, we were able to generate a large set of transcribed sequences for A. barbata. This dataset provides a platform for further studies of this important wild grass species

  13. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D.

    2011-03-01

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  14. Bamboo: An Overlooked Biomass Resource?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scurlock, J.M.O.

    2000-02-01

    Bamboo is the common term applied to a broad group (1250 species) of large woody grasses, ranging from 10 cm to 40 m in height. Already in everyday use by about 2.5 billion people, mostly for fiber and food within Asia, bamboo may have potential as a bioenergy or fiber crop for niche markets, although some reports of its high productivity seem to be exaggerated. Literature on bamboo productivity is scarce, with most reports coming from various parts of Asia. There is little evidence overall that bamboo is significantly more productive than many other candidate bioenergy crops, but it shares a number of desirable fuel characteristics with certain other bioenergy feedstocks, such as low ash content and alkali index. Its heating value is lower than many woody biomass feedstocks but higher than most agricultural residues, grasses and straws. Although non-fuel applications of bamboo biomass may be actually more profitable than energy recovery, there may also be potential for co-productio n of bioenergy together with other bamboo processing. A significant drawback is the difficulty of selective breeding, given the lack of knowledge of flowering physiology. Further research is also required on propagation techniques, establishment and stand management, and mechanized harvesting needs to be developed.

  15. The economics of biomass production in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.; Lichtenberg, E.; Roningen, V.O.; Shapouri, H.

    1995-12-31

    Biomass crops (e.g. poplar, willow, switchgrass) could become important feedstocks for power, liquid fuel, and chemical production. This paper presents estimates of the potential production of biomass in the US under a range of assumptions. Estimates of potential biomass crop yields and production costs from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) are combined with measures of land rents from USDA`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to estimate a competitive supply of biomass wood and grass crops. Estimates are made for one potential biomass use--electric power production--where future costs of electricity production from competing fossil fuels set the demand price. The paper outlines the methodology used and limitations of the analysis.

  16. Fungi from geothermal soils in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, R.S.; Litvintseva, A.; Sheehan, K.B.; Henson, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-12-01

    Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70 C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils the authors cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. They cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22 C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature.

  17. The effects of increased CO[sub 2] on the competitive ability of Lupinus arboreus, a dominant nitrogen-fixing shrub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, A.M. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brooks (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Plant responses to increased atmospheric CO[sub 2] have been shown to be both species-specific and dependent on other environmental factors, potentially changing competitive interactions and altering community structure. The competitive response of a dominant nitrogen-fixing shrub to an introduced annual (Bromus diandrus) and a native perennial grass (Bromus carinatus) was measured under ambient and high CO[sub 2] and two nitrogen levels. These species coexist in a generally nitrogen-limited coastal grassland reserve besieged with alien species. The relative competitive ability of the lupin increased with CO[sub 2] for all treatments, with the largest difference occurring at low nitrogen in competition with the introduced annual. This study provides a global change perspective for those interested in conserving native Californian grassland species, as well as the first data on the competitive response of nitrogen-fixers to high CO[sub 2].

  18. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  20. Wind resuspension of trace amounts of plutonium particles from soil in a semi-arid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langer, G.

    1984-01-01

    This study of resuspension of soil containing minute amounts of plutonium (Pu-239) has been in progress at the Rocky Flats (RF) Plant since 1978. It is one of several studies initiated after wind relocated small amounts of soil-borne Pu-239 during cleanup of an outdoor storage area. The Pu-239-settled field is now sparsely covered with prairie grass typical of the area. Past studies were limited to comparisons of bulk soil activity with total activity in the airborne dust. This work covers the physics of the particle resuspension process. This report covers the following: (1) Pu-239 resuspension rate versus wind speed, (2) mechanisms of soil particle resuspension, (3) vertical concentration profile of Pu-239 particles, (4) Pu-239 and host particle size distribution and activity concentration. 5 references, 1 table.

  1. Technical Support to SBIR Phase II Project: Improved Conversion of Cellulose Waste to Ethanol Using a Dual Bioreactor System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-310

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-04-01

    Over-dependence on fossil fuel has spurred research on alternative energy. Inedible plant materials such as grass and corn stover represent abundant renewable natural resources that can be transformed into biofuel. Problems in enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars include the use of incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and adsorption and loss of enzymes necessitating their use in large quantities. Technova Corporation will develop a defined consortium of natural microorganisms that will efficiently break down biomass to energy-rich soluble sugars, and convert them to cleaner-burning ethanol fuel. The project will also develop a novel biocatalytic hybrid reactor system dedicated to this bioprocess, which embodies recent advances in nanotechnology. NREL will participate to develop a continuous fermentation process.

  2. The start-up of the bi-provincial upgrader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, S. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The Bi-Provincial Upgrader is a $1.63 x 10{sup 9} Cdn grass-roots heavy oil upgrading facility located near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan. The facility, which started operation in August 1992, is designed to produce 7300 m{sup 3}/day of 34{degrees}API synthetic crude from 11-15{degrees}API heavy crude oils. The start-up and initial operation of the facility has been a technical success. The facility reached design capacity in a much shorter time than typically reported for the start-up of similar units and has operated reliably at better than design capacity. In this paper, the plant operating performance is reviewed in some detail. A review of the engineering and construction phases and a summary of regional benefits is also included.

  3. Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Justin Wayne

    1996-01-01

    letters within a row with the same letter are not significantly different (pc. 05). Tlm Dripline Dlm DBOm Junipenss ash(d - removed Liucr (kg ha') C4 bunchgrass (kg hs ') C3 bunchgrass (kg ha') Shortgrass (kg hac) Forbs (kg ha ') S0583a 127bc Oa... standing biomass Basal grass cover Total organic cover 69024a Ob Oa Oc Oa Oc Od 100a 31592s 394ab Ia Ob Oa 395ab 7b 89a 56936a 13lsb Ob Ob Oa 13 1b 3c looa 33622a Oc Oa Ob 46a 46c Ob 9 la 3$089a 14c Oa Ob Oa 14c Oc...

  4. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19

    in seedling dock AA tr ex N i ne-O ? 0.9 to 1.1 lbs. on winter fallo w ed lands. the spring. N o rmal w eed contr ol pr ograms will be (atrazine) necessar y at cr op planting time. (R efer to label for specific S yngenta and others w eeds contr olled.) N umer... factant or cr op oil concentrate at 1.0% v/v . S yngenta cr op oil concentrate N o te: G r amo x one E xtra or M a x ? may be combined with atrazine or B ladex ? for r esidual contr ol Annual br oadleaf and grass w e eds R oundup U ltra ? 0.5 to 1.5 qts...

  5. Fission gas induced fuel swelling in low and medium burnup fuel during high temperature transients. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of light water reactor fuel elements under postulated accident conditions is being studied by the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Thermal Fuels Behavior Program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As a part of this program, unirradiated and previously irradiated, pressurized-water-reactor type fuel rods were tested under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). During these integral in-reactor experiments, film boiling was produced on the fuel rods which created high fuel and cladding temperatures. Fuel rod diameters increased in the film boiling region to a greater extent for irradiated rods than for unirradiated rods. The purpose of the study was to investigate and assess the fuel swelling which caused the fuel rod diameter increases and to evaluate the ability of an analytical code, the Gas Release and Swelling Subroutine - Steady-State and Transient (GRASS-SST), to predict the results.

  6. Effects of hygromycin B feeding on the growing and laying performance of a commercial inbred cross laying stock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llorico, Bayani Francisco

    1961-01-01

    ?br (1949) ~d a aixturo of LihonochLasino and ntootin~entonLte in drf nc?h and found it to bo au offc?tive ond prc?tisal aothod of ronovir~ osoarids snd oooal camas fron nacura1ly infeoted ohiokons. Levtc? (1938) found tube?so dust at a gq 4& 6 aod 8... that wore on tho basal diet. Those birds that reosived the diet oontaining 12 grs?N of LLL?gr?s?cL?xin B pex ton of feed started prodnotion earliest? laging the first egg at 11$ d?cats of age (Ta@e g, Mrds reoeiving 8 grass of ?ygraegein LL bsid the first...

  7. Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

    2007-01-19

    .3?4.5 1.6?3.3 Turf grass Cool season Warm season 40 50 1.6?2.2 1.6?2.2 Sugarcane 65 4.0?6.5 Trees Apricots, peaches 50 3.3?6.6 Citrus 70% canopy 50% canopy 20% canopy 50 50 50 4.0?5.0 3.6?5.0 2.6?3.6 Conifer trees 70 3.3?4.5 Walnut orchard 50 5... the sensor leads for subsequent readings. Table 3. Recommended allowable soil moisture tensions for selected crops. Crop Tension centibars Alfalfa 80?150 Cabbage 60?70 Cantaloupe 35?40 Carrot 55?65 Cauliflower 60?70 Celery 20?30 Citrus 50?70 Corn (sweet...

  8. The effect of methyl silicone upon feedlot performance digestibility of nutrients and prevention of bloat in beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Landon Douglas

    1955-01-01

    WA~ ~~ e! as' WA ~ ~ a~~MS &! aM!!!IM 4M~% ~ MQ AAINN@ NINN Rig/ M3p ~ ~ W, ~ . W !!! . 4, :: . 88, alfalfa hay '. . . 7, Johnson, grass hay 2. '. =. , silage 1. 1. Feed costs per ton: cottonseed. meal 'j75. 00, milo grain 50 F 00, cottonseed...'i i j i e e 'o i i 'e y' j s i' i e em'i'w s iy e i si i' ii e w'i ?' i'. " 7l ~~~~~~ye~~yeys~~~~~~~p~+?aey~e~jr~e'@~eea~we, ?~eeyao~. F7 1' if+~44e~ iiaeei'eeeeeieeii eiiqwi equi je'e'i++%veiese~4i+e'iei+%4 ' 8 9i ~ ~ ~:~~:M. ~p. 383~4 i'i, iiji...

  9. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  10. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1985-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

  11. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  12. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  13. Plant Response and Environmental Data from the Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) project is a joint effort of ORNL and the University of Tennessee to investigate community and ecosystem response to global change, specifically looking at the interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, surface temperatures, and soil moisture. The plants studied for their response to warming temperatures, elevated carbon dioxide, and altered water availability include C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. These plants are typical of an old-field ecosystem that establishes itself on unused agricultural land. The results of the research focus on species abundance, production, phenology, and what is going on chemically below ground. Data are currently available from 2003 through July, 2008.

  14. Economic comparison of passively conditioned underground houses. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, H.L.

    1981-05-01

    The availability of cheap energy sources and the perfection of inexpensive, convenient heating and cooling systems has made the 'climate controlled' environment an integral and irreversible part of American life. However, the current shortage and high cost of fuel is threatening the quality and perhaps the availability of the climate-controlled environment. To prolong the life of the climate controlled environment, the national policy has been one of promoting conservation of the fuels that are available and promoting alternative energy systems that are often of high technology or of energy intensive materials. Fortunately, a grass roots response to the lack of energy has been an increase in the interest and construction of underground or earth-sheltered housing. The underground house, featuring a covering of earth on walls and roof, offers a high degree of energy conservation through low technology construction and the use of low energy intensive materials.

  15. Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, E.

    2014-09-01

    LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

  16. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  17. Nonlinear Decelerator for Payloads in Aerial Delivery Systems. I: Design and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lyons; M. Ginther; P. Mascarenas; E. Rickard; J. Robinson; J. Braeger; H. Liu; A. Ludu

    2014-08-19

    We study the dynamics and the optimization of the shock deceleration supported by a payload when its airborne carrier impacts the ground. We build a nonlinear elastic model for a container prototype and an elastic suspension system for the payload. We model the dynamics of this system and extract information on maximum deceleration, energy transfer between the container and payload, and energy resonant damping. We designed the system and perform lab experiments for various terminal velocities and types of grounds (cement, grass, sand water, etc.). The results are compared with the theoretical model and results are commented, including predictions for deceleration at different types of ground impact. The results can be used for aerial delivery systems, splash-down of capsules, recoveries, weather balloons, coastal surveying systems, or the new introduced goal-line technology in sport competitions.

  18. Biomass Feedstocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A feedstock is defined as any renewable, biological material that can be used directly as a fuel, or converted to another form of fuel or energy product. Biomass feedstocks are the plant and algal materials used to derive fuels like ethanol, butanol, biodiesel, and other hydrocarbon fuels. Examples of biomass feedstocks include corn starch, sugarcane juice, crop residues such as corn stover and sugarcane bagasse, purpose-grown grass crops, and woody plants. The Bioenergy Technologies Office works in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), national laboratories, universities, industry, and other key stakeholders to identify and develop economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable feedstocks for the production of energy, including transportation fuels, electrical power and heat, and other bioproducts. Efforts in this area will ultimately support the development of technologies that can provide a large and sustainable cellulosic biomass feedstock supply of acceptable quality and at a reasonable cost for use by the developing U.S. advanced biofuel industry.

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  20. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).