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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

watchlist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Common Name Scientific Name Date Found Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii * INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans * LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius * SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum * CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata * NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea **u PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata **u SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula **u Forbs ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus * WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa * YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata * BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta ** COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum ** CUP-PLANT Silphium perfoliatum **u NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae ** PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum ** RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium ** STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida **

2

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

3

Prairie Grasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grasses Grasses Prairie Resources - Exhibit Home "What is it about prairies? What fascinates us so about the grasslands that gird our continent? Other landscapes certainly offer more spectacular scenery such as the Rockies, the canyons, the deserts, the ocean coastlines. By contrast, the prairies seem, well, flat - flat and somewhat monotonous-undeniably vast but not as picturesque as a redwood forest or a mountain stream. "Yet the prairie holds a rightful place in American popular culture as one of our most distinctive and defining landscapes. Writers from Washington Irving to Willa Cather to Carl Sandburg have celebrated the prairie in prose and verse. Our national songs refer to the 'endless prairie' and 'the fruited plain.' Illinois, where only one-hundredth of 1 percent of its

4

Native Grass Restoration Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reader pdf format) on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Native Grass Restoration Projects Power Line Right-of-Way Roadside Re-Vegetation Riparian Restoration SNS Entrance Habitat...

5

Why is grass green?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is grass green? is grass green? Name: Bob Whitbeck Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What causes grass to be green? Replies: Bob, Grass and most other plants are green because they contain a pigment known as chlorophyll. The chlorophyll is used in the process of photosynthesis where a plant produces sugar in the presence of sunlight. In fact the word 'photosynthesis' means literally to synthesize or 'make' from light (photo). There are, of course some plants which do not contain chlorophyll, and these generally get their nutrition (food) by other means. Some examples are the fungi which decompose dead, and sometimes living, tissue, for their food. You will find that a green plant needs light to make food. If the source of light is cut off, the plant dies. Mushrooms, which are fungi, do not require light to make food (they decompose matter as I mentioned above) and you can find mushrooms growing in almost total darkness.

6

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the Montana Grass Conservation Commission to coordinate between the Department and Conservation Districts

7

Available Technologies: Improved Saccharification of Grasses by ...  

Researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have identified a technology to manipulate the xylan pathway and reduce xylan content in selected bioenergy grasses.

8

Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grass Valley Geothermal Area Grass Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Grass Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Grass Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.60333333,"lon":-117.645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology D.J. Gibson. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, and New-0198529187, and £34�95 / US $70 (paperback) ISBN 978-0198529194. The stated aim of this book is to provide a useful book for researchers and others with an interest in grassland. There can be few authors who have

Gibson, David

10

Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grass Valley Geothermal Area Grass Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Grass Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.60333333,"lon":-117.645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Rangeland Plant response to elevated CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Plots of a tallgrass prairie ecosystem were exposed to ambient and twice-ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations in open-top chambers and compared to unchambered ambient CO{sub 2} plots during the entire growing season from 1989 through 1993. Dominant species were Andropogon geradii, A. scoparius, and Sorghastrum nutans (C{sub 4}) and Poa pratensis (C{sub 3}). Aboveground biomass and leaf area were estimated by periodic sampling throughout the growing season in 1989 and 1990. In 1991, 1992, and 1993, peak biomass and leaf area were estimated by an early August harvest. Compared to ambient CO{sub 2} levels, elevated CO{sub 2} increased production of C{sub 4} grass species in 1989-1991, but in 1992 and 1993, wet years, there was no difference in C{sub 4} biomass production among treatments. Biomass production of C{sub 3} grass species did not differ among treatments any year. Root ingrowth biomass was greater in 1990 and 1991 on elevated CO{sub 2} plots compared to ambient or chambered-ambient plots. In 1992 and 1993, there was no difference in root ingrowth biomass among treatments.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Grass Valley Area (Morrison, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Grass Valley Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The attempt to carry out a detailed interpretation of a magnetotelluric survey has demonstrated some fundamental problems that must be addressed in future surveys and in future research. (see paper conclusions) References H. Frank Morrison, K i Ha Lee, Gary Oppliger, Abhi jit De (1979) Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Magnetotellurics_At_Grass_Valley_Area_(Morrison,_Et_Al.,_1979)&oldid=387832"

13

Green Grass, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Green Grass, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI...

14

Oak Ridge Reservation Native Grass Meeting - 1/26/10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Presentationname Oak Ridge Reservation Native Grass Meeting, January 26, 2010 Introduction - Mike Ryon Overview of...

15

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon The International Brachypodium Initiative* Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its

16

Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effects of Rye-grass and Red clover on Morphology and Biomass allocation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Rye-grass and Red clover on Morphology and Biomass allocation in Couch grass Yesudasan Production Ecology Uppsala 2013 #12;Effects of Rye-grass and Red clover on Morphology and Biomass allocation: 2013 Key words: competition, couch grass, weed control, rhizome, below ground biomass, morphological

18

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its potential as an important model system for developing new energy and food crops.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grass Energy Coop Corp Grass Energy Coop Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Place Kentucky Utility Id 1886 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Watt HPS- Acorn Fixture Lighting 100 Watt HPS- Cobra Head Lighting 100 Watt HPS- Colonial Fixture Lighting 100 Watt HPS- Open Bottom Lighting 100 Watt HPS- Ornamental Lighting 100 Watt HPS- Shoe Box Fixture Lighting 175 Watt MV Lighting 200 Watt HPS-Cobra Head Lighting 250 Watt HPS- Open Bottom Lighting 250 Watt HPS- Ornamental Lighting

20

MHK Technologies/eelGrass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eelGrass eelGrass < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage EelGrass.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization AeroVironment Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description AV has developed an innovative device for harnessing the ocean s energy Anchored to the sea floor and floating beneath the surface its turbine generates clean energy as the float moves horizontally through the water responding to pressure changes from passing waves Unobtrusive silent and reliable it is an attractive alternative to other ocean energy devices Mooring Configuration Proprietary Technology Dimensions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Why sequence Eukaryotic microbial metatranscriptome of blue grama grass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eukaryotic microbial metatranscriptome of blue grama grass eukaryotic microbial metatranscriptome of blue grama grass rhizosphere soils? About 50 miles south of Albuquerque, New Mexico is the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. The region is the intersection of several regional ecosystems, including grasslands, woodlands and riparian vegetation. The location is ideal for researchers to study how climate variability and climate change can act together to impact ecosystem dynamics and is known as the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. This project focuses on the blue grama grass rhizosphere of the LTER site. Aridland ecosystems such as the one found in the Sevilleta represent at least a third of terrestrial biomes and are known for their nutrient-poor

22

Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Magnetotelluric Studies In Grass Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A program of detail magnetotelluric soundings was initiated in 1974 in Green Valley, Nevada, as part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's major study of techniques for geothermal exploration in north central Nevada. The magnetotelluric program had three main goals; the determination of resistivity distribution at depths greater than that conveniently measured with other techniques; a comparison of the interpreted resistivity at shallow depth with the results of the other techniques ; and the evaluation of the SQUID or Josephson effect magnetometer i n practical

23

GWASS: GRASS web application software system based on the GeoBrain web service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GRASS is a well-known geographic information system developed more than 30 years ago. As one of the earliest GIS systems, GRASS has currently survived mainly as free, open-source desktop GIS software, with users primarily limited to the research community ... Keywords: GIS, GRASS, SOA, Web service

Fang Qiu; Feng Ni; Bryan Chastain; Haiting Huang; Peisheng Zhao; Weiguo Han; Liping Di

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Path rush J. tenuis Fac 0.4 0.45 Green bullrush Scirpus atrovireus Obligate 0.4 0.45 Wool grass S. cyperinus Obligate 0.4 0.45 Many leaved rush S. polyphyllus Obligate 0.4 0.45...

25

Thermal analysis and characterization of Elephant grass ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Here, ashes from incineration of elephant grass are characterized and its incorporation into clay to produce ... Moreover, thermal analysis was performed including gas emission ... Differential characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron sandstone deposit.

26

ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CLOVER-GRASS MIXTURES FOR ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hemicelluloses, they can be considered as substrates for bioethanol production. Clover-grass pastures can be harvested several times a year and the green biomass can be collected and processed to bioethanol conversion of the whole slurry was comparable with that of the washed solid material, indicating

27

Sweet Grass County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweet Grass County, Montana: Energy Resources Sweet Grass County, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7672796°, -109.8979907° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.7672796,"lon":-109.8979907,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Comparison of Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arabinoxylan Arabinoxylan Structure in Bioenergy and Model Grasses Ameya R. Kulkarni, 1 Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Michael G. Hahn, 1,2 William S. York, 1,3 and Malcolm A. O'Neill 1 1 Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and US Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, 2 Department of Plant Biology, and 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Abstract Heteroxylans were solubilized from the alcohol-insoluble residue of switchgrass, rice, Brachypodium, Miscanthus, foxtail millet, and poplar with 1 M KOH. A combination of enzymatic, chemical, nu- clear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopic, and immu- nological techniques indicated that grass arabinoxylans have comparable structures and contain no discernible amount of the reducing end sequence present in dicot glucuronoxylan. Our data suggest that rice, Brachypodium, and foxtail

29

Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Perennial grass production for biofuels: Soil conversion considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The increased use of renewable fuels for energy offers the United States a mechanism for significantly reducing national dependency on imported oil, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving regional agricultural economies. As mandated by law, a wide range of issues have been raised regarding the net environmental impacts of implementation of these new technologies. While uncertainties regarding both positive and negative environmental influences still exist in many areas of this new technology, it is now possible to address with substantial certainty the positive aspects of perennial herbaceous energy crops on several important soil conservation issues. Past experience with forage grasses and recent research with switchgrass. A warm season perennial forage grass selected as one of the model bioenergy species, indicates that important benefits will be gained in the area of soil conservation as grasses replace energy-intensive annual row crops. These include reduced erosion, improved conservation of water and nutrients, and increased productivity of soils by the deep and vigorous rooting systems of perennial warm-season gasses.

McLaughlin, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bransby, D.I. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Soils; Parrish, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy, economic and environmental implications of production of grasses as biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; McLaughlin, S.; Walsh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Perennial grasses for energy and conservation: Evaluating some ecological agricultural, and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; Walsh, M.; McLaughlin, S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Canopy growth and density of Wyoming big sagebrush sown with cool-season perennial grasses  

SciTech Connect

Post-mining revegetation efforts often require grass seeding and mulch applications to stabilize the soils at the same time as shrub seeding, creating intraspecific competition between seeded shrubs and grasses that is not well understood. In 1999, we initiated a study at the Belle Ayr Coal Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, to evaluate the influence of grass competition on establishment and growth of Wyoming big sagebrush. Combinations of three sagebrush seeding rates (1, 2, and 4 kg pls ha{sup -1}) and seven cool-season perennial grass mixture seeding rates (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14 kg pls ha{sup -1}) were seeded during winter 1998-1999. Shrub density and grass cover were assessed from 1999 to 2004. We monitored sagebrush canopy size in 2001, 2002, and 2004. All sagebrush seeding rates provided shrub densities (>=) 1 shrub m {sup -1} after six growing seasons. Grass production (>=) 75 g m{sup -2} was achieved by seeding grasses at 6 to 8 kg pls ha{sup -1}). Canopy growth of individual sagebrush plants was least in the heaviest grass seeding rate. Reduced grass seeding rates can aid in achieving Wyoming big sagebrush density standards and enhance shrub canopy growth.

Hild, A.L.; Schuman, G.E.; Vicklund, L.E.; Williams, M.I. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Sweet Grass Hills and Blackfeet Indians: Sacredness, Land, and Institutional Discrimination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Sweet Grass Hills of north-central Montana are part of the four Tribes of the Blackfoot Confederacys traditional territory and play a vital role in… (more)

Sheets, Cassie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Microseisms in geothermal exploration: studies in Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Frequency-wavenumber (f-k) spectra of seismic noise in the bands 1 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 10 Hz in frequency and parallel bar k parallel bar less than or equal to 35.7 cycles/km in wavenumber, measured at several places in Grass Valley, Nevada, exhibit numerous features which can be correlated with variations in surface geology and sources associated with hot spring activity. Exploration techniques for geothermal reservoirs, based upon the spatial distribution of the amplitude and frequency characteristics of short-period seismic noise, are applied and evaluated in a field program at a potential geothermal area in Grass Valley, Nevada. A detailed investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the noise field was made to guide subsequent data acquisition and processing. Contour maps of normalized noise-level derived from carefully sampled data are dominated by the hot spring noise source and the generally high noise levels outlining the regions of thick alluvium. Major faults are evident when they produce a shallow lateral contrast in rock properties. Conventional seismic noise mapping techniques cannot differentiate noise anomalies due to buried seismic sources from those due to shallow geological effects. The noise radiating from a deep reservoir ought to be evident as body waves of high phase velocity with time-invariant source azimuth. A small two-dimensional array was placed at 16 locations in the region to map propagation parameters. The f-k spectra reveal local shallow sources, but no evidence for a significant body wave component in the noise field was found. With proper data sampling, array processing provides a powerful method for mapping the horizontal component of the vector phase velocity of the noise field. In Grass Valley, and probably in most areas, the 2 to 10 Hz microseismic field is predominantly fundamental mode Rayleigh waves controlled by the very shallow structure.

Liaw, A.L.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Observing the Dynamics of Wildland Grass Fires: FireFlux—A Field Validation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grass fires, although not as intense as forest fires, present a major threat to life and property during periods of drought in the Great Plains of the United States. Recently, major wildland grass fires in Texas burned nearly 1.6 million acres ...

Craig B. Clements; Ryan Perna; Meongdo Jang; Daegyun Lee; Monica Patel; Susan Street; Shiyuan Zhong; Scott Goodrick; Ju Li; Brian E. Potter; Xindi Bian; Warren E. Heilman; Joseph J. Charney; Glenn Aumann

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DOE Joint Genome Institute: First Wild Grass Species and Model System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 10, 2010 February 10, 2010 First Wild Grass Species and Model System for Energy Crops Sequenced WALNUT CREEK, CA-As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works toward developing sustainable sources of clean renewable energy, perennial grasses have emerged as major candidates for the commercial production of cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks. However, little is known about the specific biological traits of the grasses that might contribute to their usefulness for energy production, in part because such grasses typically have long lifecycles and possess large, complex genomes, making them difficult to study. Representative genomes for two of the three major subfamilies of grasses-those that include rice, maize, sorghum and sugar cane-have already been sequenced. Now in the February 11 edition of the journal

38

Low frequency electromagnetic prospecting system. [Grass Valley, KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype portable electromagnetic sounding system was assembled and depth sounding survey was conducted in Grass Valley, Nevada, as a part of a program to evaluate geophysical techniques in geothermal exploration. A horizontal loop transmitter of radius 50 meters operating between .01 Hz and 100 Hz was used in conjunction with a SQUID magnetometer. A digital synchronous detector was used for on site processing of magnetometer output. This detector allowed useful data acquisition with transmitter-receiver separation of up to 2 km with power requirements of less than 72 watts. Conductive sediments (1 to 10 ohm-m) of thicknesses of up to 1.5 km were well resolved with this system, and the interpreted sections compared very well with dc resistivity measurements made with much heavier equipment and larger arrays in the same area.

Jain, B.K.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High-value renewable energy from prairie grasses  

SciTech Connect

Projected economic benefits of renewable energy derived from a native prairie grass, switchgrass, include nonmarket values that can reduce net fuel costs to near zero. At a farm gate price of $44.00/dry Mg, an agricultural sector model predicts higher profits for switchgrass than conventional crops on 16.9 million hectares (ha). Benefits would include an annual increase of $6 billion in net farm returns, a $1.86 billion reduction in government subsidies, and displacement of 44-159 Tg/year (1 Tg = 10{sup 12} g) of greenhouse gas emissions. Incorporating these values into the pricing structure for switchgrass bioenergy could accelerate commercialization and provide net benefits to the U.S. economy.

McLaughlin Jr, Samuel B [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, D. [University of Tennessee; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Sanderson, M. [USDA ARS; Tolbert, Virginia R [ORNL; Wolf, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Production of sugarcane and tropical grasses as renewable energy source. Third annual report, 1979-1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research continued on tropical grasses from Saccharum and related genera as sources of intensively-propagated fiber and fermentable solids. Candidate screening for short-rotation grasses was expanded to include six sorghum x Sudan grass hybrids developed by the Dekalb Company. Sugacane and napier grass yield trends in year 3 include: (1) Increased yields with delay of harvest frequency; (2) lack of response to close spacing; (3) a superiority of napier grass over sugarcane when harvested at intervals of six months or less; and (4) a general superiority of the sugarcane variety NCo 310 over varieties PR 980 and PR 64-1791. Delayed tasseling of a wild, early-flowering S. spontaneum hybrid enabled three crosses to be made in December using commercial hybrids as female parents. Approximately 1000 seedlings were produced. The first field-scale minimum tillage experiment was completed. Sordan 77 produced 2.23 OD tons/acre/10 weeks, with winter growing conditions and a total moisture input of 4.75 inches. Mechanization trials included successful planting of napier grass with a sugarcane planter, and the mowing, solar-drying, and round--baling of napier grass aged three to six months. Production-cost and energy-balance studies were initiated during year 3 using first-ratoon data for intensively propagated sugarcane. Preliminary cost estimates for energy cane (sugarcane managed for total biomass rather than sucrose) were in the order of $25.46/OD ton, or about $1.70/mm Btus.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Satellite and Radar Remote Sensing of Southern Plains Grass Fires: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many large grass fires occurred in north Texas and southern Oklahoma on 9 April 2009, destroying hundreds of homes and businesses and burning thousands of acres of grasslands, producing large smoke and debris plumes that were visible from various ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of Turbulent Surface Flux Parameterizations over Tall Grass in a Beijing Suburb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical weather and climate prediction systems necessitate accurate land surface–atmosphere fluxes, whose determination typically replies on a suite of parameterization schemes. The authors present a field investigation over tall grass in a ...

Linlin Wang; Zhiqiu Gao; Zaitao Pan; Xiaofeng Guo; Elie Bou-Zeid

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Remote sensing classification of grass seed cropping practices in western Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our primary objective was extending knowledge of major crop rotations and stand establishment conditions present in 4800 grass seed fields surveyed over three years in western Oregon to the entire Willamette Valley through classification of multiband ...

George W. Mueller-Warrant; Gerald W. Whittaker; Stephen M. Griffith; Gary M. Banowetz; Bruce D. Dugger; Tiffany S. Garcia; Guillermo Giannico; Kathryn L. Boyer; Brenda C. McComb

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Comparative Evaluation of an Eulerian CFD and Gaussian Plume Models Based on Prairie Grass Dispersion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical and statistical comparison of a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with two Gaussian plume models is proposed on the Prairie Grass data field experiment for neutral conditions, using both maximum arcwise ...

E. Demael; B. Carissimo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Temperature-gradient and heat flow data, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of 16 shallow and intermediate-depth temperature-gradient holes were drilled for Sunoco Energy Development Co. in Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada, on leases held by Aminoil USA, Inc., under the cost-sharing industry-linked program of the Department of Energy. Thirteen shallow (85-152 m) and 3 intermediate-depth (360-457 m) holes were completed and logged during the period June through September, 1979. The locations of these holes and of pre-existing temperature-gradient holes are shown on plate 1. This report constitutes a final data transmittal and disclosure of results. The drilling subcontractor was Southwest Drilling and Exploration, Inc. of Central, Utah. They provided a Gardner-Denver 15W rig, a 3-man crew, and supporting equipment. A l l holes were drilled with mud as the circulating medium. Drilling histories for each hole are summarized in table 1. GeothermEx, Inc. performed on-site geological descriptions of the cuttings; obtained several temperature profiles for each hole, including an equilibrium profile taken 23 days or more after cessation of drilling; selected samples for thermal conductivity measurements; integrated temperature, temperature-gradient, and heat-flow data obtained in this project with published values; and prepared this report.

Koenig, James B.; Gardner, Murray C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Save Some Green--Grass AND Dollars--with These Lawn Care Tips | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Save Some Green--Grass AND Dollars--with These Lawn Care Tips Save Some Green--Grass AND Dollars--with These Lawn Care Tips Save Some Green--Grass AND Dollars--with These Lawn Care Tips August 3, 2009 - 10:38am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Especially for home owners who have automatic sprinkler systems, it's easy to forget that regular summer watering uses a tremendous amount of water and can contribute to higher than necessary water bills. Consider these easy tips for saving money and water when caring for your lawn: Water only when your lawn needs it. The rule of thumb is that your lawn needs one inch of water per week. If you walk across your lawn and leave footprints, it's time to water. Or you can use a screwdriver as a probe to test soil moisture. If it goes in easily, don't water.

47

Influence of Pyrolysis Parameters and CaCl2 Catalyzer on Pyrolysis of Elephant Grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elephant grass is a fast growing and low nutrient demand plant with significant potential as a renewable energy source. In this work, the influence of heating temperatures, N2sweeping gas flow rates and CaCl2 catalyzer weights on the yields of products ... Keywords: biomass, pyrolysis, catalytic, elephant grass, calcium chloride

Li Bosong; Jiang Enchen; Xu Xiwei; Zhang Qiang; Liu Min; Wang Mingfeng

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nafus, A., Mcclaran, M. P., Archer, S. R. & Throop, H. L. (2009) Multi-species allometric models predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management (In Press) Abstract Multi-species allometric models to predict grass biomass may increase field study efficiency by eliminating the need-species regression models predicting current years' aboveground biomass for 8 common cespitose grass species. Simple

Archer, Steven R.

49

The Roughness Length for Heat and Other Vegetation Parameters for a Surface of Short Grass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations are presented that were made in the lower 2 m of the atmosphere and in the soil near the Cabauw mast in the Netherlands. The surroundings of the mast are horizontally homogeneous and the soil is covered with short grass. In the air, ...

Peter G. Duynkerke

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The groundwater modeling tool for GRASS (GMTG): Open source groundwater flow modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used to store, manipulate and visualize both spatial and non-spatial data. Because of their data manipulating capabilities, GIS have been linked to different simulation models in different research areas and are ... Keywords: GRASS, Geographic Information Systems, Groundwater modeling, MODFLOW

J. J. Carrera-Hernández; S. J. Gaskin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Systems study of fuels from grains and grasses. Quarterly progress report, July--October 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific objectives of the project are to determine on a geographic basis the current and potential USA production capability for grain and grass crops, to perform a preliminary screening of conversion processes, and to perform preliminary technical and economic feasibility analyses. The results obtained to date on biomass production, conversion processes, and data management are reported. (JSR)

Benson, W.; Allen, A.; Athey, R.; McElroy, A.

1976-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land–Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The ...

D. T. Mihailovic; K. Alapaty; B. Lalic; I. Arsenic; B. Rajkovic; S. Malinovic

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Production of sugarcane and tropical grasses as a renewable energy source. Second quarterly report; year 2, 1978-1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research centered on greenhouse screening of candidate grasses coupled with field-plot studies on varieties, optimal nitrogen and seeding rates, variable row spacing, and frequency of harvest. Candidate grasses were identified for short-rotation crops having potentially greater versatility than Sordan 70A (earlier maturatoon greater tolerance to moisture stress). Field-plot studies were performed on the optimization of N-fertilization and seeding rates for Sordan 70A. Field-plot data were recorded on sugarcane and napier grass responses to harvest frequency and row spacing. These results underscore a superiority of first-ratoon yields over plant-crop yields, of napier grass over sugarcane (up to 4 months), and delayed harvests over frequent harvests. Breeding tests were successful in producing F/sub 1/ seedlings from crosses between an unknown and early-tasseling wild S. spontaneum hybrid and late-tasseling commercial sugarcane hybrids.

Alexander, A.G.; Garcia, M.; Gonzalex-Molina, C.; Ortez-Velez, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Production of sugarcane and tropical grasses as a renewable energy source. First quarterly report, 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research continued on tropical grasses from Saccharum and related genera as sources of intensively-propagated fiber and fermentable solids. Final yield data for the second-ratoon crop of sugarcane and napier grass was compiled during the first quarter. The highest green matter yield for sugarcane was 92.0 tons/acre year (variety NCo 310). The highest dry matter yield, including trash, was 31.3 tons/acre year. For napier grass the highest green and dry matter yields were 88.9 and 22.4 tons/acre year, respectively. Sugar-cane quality was generally low but sugar yields were favorable when computed on a per acre basis. Sucrose content averaged 7.20% for all varieties and row spacings. Fiber content averaged 16.4%. The second ratoon crop averaged 6.18 tons sugar/acre (TSA) at standard row spacing and 5.71 TSA at narrow row spacing.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Hazen, Sam [University of Massachusetts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Electromagnetic (EM-60) survey in the Panther Canyon Area, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight frequency domain electromagnetic soundings were measured over the Panther Canyon thermal anomaly in Grass Valley, Nevada. The data were collected with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's large moment horizontal loop system (EM-60). At the transmitter site located near the center of the thermal anomaly, square wave currents of up to 70 A were impressed into a fourturn 50 m radius coil at frequencies from 0.033 to 500 Hz. At the eight receiver sites, 0.5 to 1.5 km from the loop, magnetic fields were detected with a three-component SQUID magnetometer and vertical and radial magnetic field spectra were calculated. Data were interpreted with a computer program which fit filled spectra and associated ellipse polarization data to one-dimensional resistivity models and results were compared to interpretations from earlier dipole-dipole resistivity measurements. Comparison of these interpretations indicates fairly close agreement between the two, with both models clearly indicating the presence and dimensions of the conductivity anomaly associated with the thermal zone. Although the dc data was better able to resolve the high resistivity bedrock, the EM-data were able to resolve all major features without distortion at shorter transmitter receiver separations and in about one-third of the field time.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.; Stark, M.; Haught, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Water Management Planning: A Case Study at Blue Grass Army Depot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Order 13123, Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management, mandates an aggressive policy for reducing potable water consumption at federal facilities. Implementation guid¬ance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set a requirement for each federal agency to “reduce potable water usage by implementing life cycle, cost-effective water efficiency programs that include a water management plan, and not less than four Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Best Manage¬ment Practices (BMPs).” The objective of this plan is to gain full compliance with Executive Order 13123 and associated DOE implementation guidance on behalf of Blue Grass Army Depot (BGAD), Richmond, Kentucky. In accordance with this plan, BGAD must: • Incorporate the plan as a component of the Installation energy conservation plan • Investigate the water savings potential and life-cycle cost effectiveness of the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and retrofit/replacement options associated with the ten FEMP BMPs • Put into practice all applicable O&M options • Identify retrofit/replacement options appropriate for implementation (based upon calculation of the simple payback periods) • Establish a schedule for implementation of applicable and cost-effective retrofit/replacement options.

Solana, Amy E.; McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable resources. The DOE is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water, and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soils conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row drops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different crops for wildlife species is also considered. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Application of heat-flow techniques to geothermal energy exploration, Leach Hot Springs area, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 82 holes ranging in depth from 18 to 400 meters were drilled for thermal and hydrologic studies in a 200 km/sup 2/ area of Grass Valley, Nevada, near Leach Hot Springs. Outside the immediate area of Leach Hot Springs, heat flow ranges from 1 to 6.5 hfu with a mean of 2.4 hfu (1 hfu = 10/sup -6/ cal cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ = 41.8 mWm/sup -2/). Within 2 km of the springs, conductive heat flow ranges between 1.6 and more than 70 hfu averaging 13.6 hfu. Besides the conspicuous thermal anomaly associated with the hot springs, two additional anomalies were identified. One is associated with faults bounding the western margin of the Tobin Range near Panther Canyon, and the other is near the middle of Grass Valley about 5 km SSW of Leach Hot Springs. The mid-valley anomaly appears to be caused by hydrothermal circulation in a bedrock horst beneath about 375 meters of impermeable valley sediments. If the convective and conductive heat discharge within 2 km of the Leach Hot Springs is averaged over the entire hydrologic system (including areas of recharge), the combined heat flux from this part of Grass Valley is about 3 hfu, consistent with the average regional conductive heat flow in the Battle Mountain High. The hydrothermal system can be interpreted as being in a stationary stable phase sustained by high regional heat flow, and no localized crustal heat sources (other than hydrothermal convection to depths of a few kilometers) need be invoked to explain the existence of Leach Hot Springs.

Sass, J.H.; Ziagos, J.P.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Munroe, R.J.; di Somma, D.E.; Lachenbruch, A.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Production of sugarcane and tropical grasses as a renewable energy source. Third quarterly report, December 1, 1980-February 28, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research continued on tropical grasses from Saccharum and related genera as sources of intensively-propagated fiber and fermentable solids. Greenhouse-level screening for short- and intermediate-rotation grasses included further trials with legume species as potential nitrogen sources for the tropical grasses. Yields from four indigenous legumes were appreciably higher when planted in spring (May) than when planted in autumn (November). Initial data were recorded from second generation energy cane studies established during 1980. Controlled variables include varieties, harvest interval, and nitrogen input. Yield data at 6 months indicate high but essentially equal growth rates among all varieties and N-variables. This is attributed to the use of a land rotavator during seedbed preparation - the first such application of this implement on Lajas Valley soils. Total green weights were in the order of 50 to 60 tons/acre, and millable stem weights ranged from 33 to 37 tons/acre, at the 6-months harvest. Dry matter yields ranged from 8 to 11 tons/acre. Juice quality values indicated a minimal sugar content at this stage of maturity. Fiber values ranged from 7 to 14%. Field-scale studies were continued at the Hatillo demonstration site on the humid north coast and in the semi-arid Lajas Valley. For the 6-months harvest at Hatillo, total green weights for all treatments averaged 38.4 tons/acre. Variety US 67-22-2 produced 50.2 tons/acre. Millable cane yields averaged 25.3 tons/acre for all treatments and 34.7 tons/acre for variety US 67-22.2.

Alexander, A.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Synthesis and Optical Properties of NuTaN2: Potential Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Layered CuTaN2 was synthesized by an ion exchange reaction of CuI and NaTaN2 as previously reported. Based on the results of EDX analysis, the Cu:Ta ratio of the CuTaN2 sample was 1:1 within the overall errors when examining powders of +/-10% and no Na was detected. The crystal structure and thermal stability of CuTaN2 was accurately determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray Diffraction profile and by TGA analysis, respectively. CuTaN2 crystallizes in a rhombohedral structure with space group R-3mH as shown in [figure 1]. CuTaN2 possesses a band gap of 1.53(x) eV, which is in reasonable agreement with density functional theory calculations of Cu containing nitrides. Similar materials may be even better suited for solar cell application.

Yang, M.; Zakutayev, A.; Zhang, X.; Ginley, D.; DiSalvo, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Description, field test and data analysis of a controlled-source EM system (EM-60). [Leach Hot Springs, Grass Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The three sections describe the transmitter, the receiver, and data interpretations and indicate the advances made toward the development of a large moment electromagnetic (EM) system employing a magnetic dipole source. A brief description is given of the EM-60 transmitter, its general design, and the consideration involved in the selection of a practical coil size and weight for routine field operations. A programmable, multichannel, multi-frequency, phase-sensitive receiver is described. A field test of the EM-60, the data analysis and interpretation procedures, and a comparison between the survey results and the results obtained using other electrical techniques are presented. The Leach Hot Springs area in Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada, was chosen for the first field site at which the entire system would be tested. The field tests showed the system capable of obtaining well-defined sounding curves (amplitude and phase of magnetic fields) from 1 kHz down to 0.1 Hz. (MHR)

Morrison, H.F.; Goldstein, N.E.; Hoversten, M.; Oppliger, G.; Riveros, C.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluation of coastal Bermuda grass protein extract as a substitute for fishmeal in practical diets for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to concerns over availability and cost of fishmeal for aquaculture feeds, a study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a protein extract from coastal Bermuda grass for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The coastal Bermuda grass was treated by soaking in liquid anhydrous ammonia under high pressure at 70 C, a process known as Ammonia Fiber Explosion (AFEX), followed by alkaline extraction, isoelectric precipitation and centrifugation. Amino acid analysis of the extracted protein indicated a generally balanced profile that was first limiting in methionine. A laboratory feeding trial was conducted in which four isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets containing incremental levels of the extract were evaluated. The control diet contained 10% menhaden fishmeal and experimental diets were formulated so that the extract replaced 33, 66 and 100% of the fishmeal on an equal-protein basis. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of channel catfish fingerlings initially weighing approximately 10 g/fish for 9 weeks. Apparent protein and organic matter digestibility of the extract also was determined utilizing chromic oxide as an inert marker. Results of the feeding trial indicated that substitution of the extract at all levels did not significantly (P>0.05) affect weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, net protein utilization, intraperitoneal fat or hepatosomatic index of channel catfish. Apparent protein and organic matter digestibility coefficients of the extract were 85 and 89%, respectively. These data indicate that the extract can replace fishmeal in channel catfish diets. Further research to evaluate substitution of other ingredients with the protein extract appear warranted.

Buentello, J. Alejandro

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Continuation of systems study of fuels from grasses and grains: Phase 2 and Phase 3. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an investigation of biomass-derived fuels from grasses and grains. A region-by-region analysis of biomass production, with both the present (near-term) and the future (mid-term) being considered is presented. The overall approach for analysis of the near-term involved least cost analysis of production, transportation, and energy conversion. The mid-term analyses were structured around the assumed implementation of modified crop production systems in which land was more extensively used in a given region, improved crop management practices were used, and the crop mixes were significantly altered from the present. The production systems in the several regions were combined with conversion plants ranging in size from 500 oven-dry (OD) tons/day to 3000 OD tons/day, or an energy imput of 75 x 10/sup 8/ Btus to 45 x 10/sup 9/ Btus using 7500 Btus/lb. The conversion processes consisted of anaerobic digestion, fermentation, direct combustion, and thermochemical conversion. The latter process was also considered in the context of production of ammonia and methanol.

McElroy, A.D.; Tinberg, C.; Davis, M.; Snyder, M.; Allen, A.D.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Determination of mechanisms of host plant resistance to the Banks grass mite Oligonychus pratensis (Banks) (Acari: Tetranychidae) in selected maize inbreds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maize lines selected for resistance to the Banks Grass Mite were tested to determine which mechanisms of resistance were being expressed: Antibiosis, Nonpreference, or Tolerance. Inbred 3 and, to a lesser degree Inbred 2, expressed antibiosis when compared with Mo17, the susceptible check. None of the resistant inbreds expressed nonpreference when compared with Mo17 and no conclusive evidence was determined about expression of tolerance. Useful estimates of r[] values, the intrinsic rate of increase, could be calculated from data collected over a shortened period of time. Differences in r[] values calculated with and without the Jackknife method were so small as to negate the usefulness of the Jackknife method. The Wyatt and White method for calculating r[] values did not provide good estimates of r[] values for mites on resistant plants, especially when juvenile mortality was high. Greenhouse grown plants did not provide a satisfactory substitute for held grown plants.

Krakowsky, Matthew David

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this investigation was to initiate the restoration process of a facsimile prairie. Specific objectives were to evaluate the effects of time, topography/soil, seeding rate, mulch treatments and soil compaction on-the establishment phase of the restoration in a split-split-split plot experimental design. Three 24mx3Om replicate plots were established on summit, backslope and footslope positions. Each plot was subdivided into four treatment subplots which were planted with locally collected seed at rates of .3, .6, and .9 kg/ha pure live seed (PLS) (based on Sorghastrum avenaceum PLS). The fourth subplot was a control. One-half of each subplot was mulched with mechanically shredded seed hay. Subplots were further split into areas of soil compaction created by the wheel traffic of planting equipment. Across time, native perennial grass densities decreased and cover increased, while native annual forb density increased as canopy dominance decreased. Native perennial grass establishment was best within the summit and poorest within the footslope positions. Higher levels of soil compaction were deleterious to establishment of native perennial species, especially within the first growing season. Sorghastrum avneaceum plants successfully established under mulch-only applications, while other native perennial grasses had greater cover on mulched than on unmulched plots. Annual forb densities were less on mulched plots. Further, interactions with topographic positions and soil compaction often modified or nullified other treatment effects. For example, S. avenaceum densities for mulch treatments on compacted soils were not different than unmulched plots, regardless of compaction.

Eidson, James Arthur

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Rangeland plant response to elevated CO{sub 2}. Annual report, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Effects of carbon dioxide enrichment on a tallgrass ecosystem were monitored during the 1990 growing season. The chambers, CO{sub 2} delivery system, and data acquisition and control system were in place and operational by 4 April 1990. CO{sub 2} fumigation and data acquisition began on that date. Nitrogen fertilizer as ammonium nitrate was applied at a rate of 45 kg ha {sup -1} on 1 April to the N-fertilized plots. The chambers were 4.5 m in diameter and 4 m in height to allow for destructive sampling for biomass accumulation, leaf area determination, and for grazing esophageally-fistulated sheep. The experimental site was located in pristine Tallgrass Prairie north of/and adjacent to the Kansas State University campus. Vegetation on the site was a mixture of C3 and C4 species and was dominated by big bluestem (Andropogon geradii vitman) and indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash). Subdominants included Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.), and tall dropseed (Sporobolus asper var. asper (Michx.) Kunth). Members of the sedge family made up 5-10% of the composition. Principal forbs included western ragweed (Ambrosia psilostachya DC.), Louisiana sagewort (Artemesia ludoviciana Nutt.), and mayflower scurfpea (Psoralea tenuiflora var. floribunda (Nutt.) Rydb.). Average peak biomass occurs in early August at 425 g m{sup -2} of which 35 g m{sup -2} is from forbs. The area was ideal for meeting the experimental objectives, in that the mixture of C3 and C4 plants would allow for assessment of competitive relationships among numerous species of both carbon fixation pathways.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the southern Great Plains, the encroachment of grassland ecosystems by mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), is widespread, and prescribed fire is commonly used in its control. Despite this, substantial quantitative information concerning their influences on the community composition, functional dynamics, and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage potential of grassland ecosystems is lacking. The objectives of this study were to: a) quantify the effects of seasonal prescribed fire treatments and mesquite encroachment on aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and herbaceous community composition; b) characterize SOC pool sizes, turnover, and storage potential relative to vegetation type and fire treatment; c) evaluate the structure and diversity of soil microbial communities relative to vegetation type; and d) characterize the functional diversity of these same microbes using the GeoChip functional gene microarray. Repeated winter and summer fires led to increased ANPP rates (average, 434 and 313 g m-2 y-1, respectively), relative to unburned controls (average, 238 g m-2 y-1), altered herbaceous community composition, and increased the storage of resistant forms of SOC, but did not affect overall SOC storage. Herbaceous ANPP rates did not differ significantly as a result of mesquite encroachment, but herbaceous community composition and SOC storage did. Mesquite soils contained significantly more total, slow-turnover, and resistant forms of SOC than those that occurred beneath C3 or C4 grasses. Similarity among the soil bacterial and fungal communities associated with the major vegetation types in this system was low to moderate. Significant differences were detected among soil fungi, with the mesquite-associated fungi harboring significant differences in community structure relative to the fungal communities associated with each of the other vegetation types examined. Despite this result, few significant differences were detected with respect to the functional diversity of these communities, suggesting either a high degree of functional redundancy, or that the functional differences harbored by these communities are beyond the scope of the GeoChip. The results of this study demonstrate that both fire and mesquite encroachment have the potential to alter ecosystem components and processes significantly, providing new insight regarding the effects of these widespread land use and land cover changes on ecosystem structure and function.

Hollister, Emily Brooke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Magnetotelluric studies in Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of detailed magnetotelluric soundings was initiated in 1974 in Green Valley, Nevada, as part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's major study of techniques for geothermal exploration in north central Nevada. The magnetotelluric program had three main goals; the determination of resistivity distribution at depths greater than that conveniently measured with other techniques; a comparison of the interpreted resistivity at shallow depth with the results of the other techniques; and the evaluation of the SQUID or Josephson effect magnetometer in practical field surveys. In addition, new numerical models were developed so that interpretation could be carried out in terms of fairly complex two-dimensional models.

Morrison, H.F.; Lee, K.H.; Oppliger, G.; Dey, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Turning Grass into Gas for Less  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stored in plant cellulose, then crops like this switchgrass could be turned into biofuels, rather than using corn or other food crops. Pull up to the pump these days and...

74

Grass Valley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.2190608°, -121.0610606° 9.2190608°, -121.0610606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2190608,"lon":-121.0610606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Grass Valley, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

601247°, -120.7856114° 601247°, -120.7856114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3601247,"lon":-120.7856114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Establishment of Native Warm Season Grass Communities on the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Establishment of NWSG Communities on the ORR - Where: Red ROW Blue Fields Yellow Other 12 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT...

77

Blue Grass Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

certify it with the EPA as an Energy Star home. The Energy Star label increases the value and efficiency of a home as well as the resale value. This program is available to...

78

e-governance at the grass roots: SAARC context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the age of the Internet and its evolutionary technologies, nations have taken keen interest in utilizing information and communication technologies to upgrade the livelihood of citizens. Governments have initiated multi-faceted programs and efforts ... Keywords: ICTs, SAARC, e-governance, e-government, e-readiness, local government

Hakikur Rahman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period seismic noise (T>30 sec) . . . 2.5 Geothermal ground226. Clacy, G.R.T. ? 1968, Geothermal ground noise amplitudestudies at the Cos0 geothermal area, China Lake, California:

Liaw, A.L.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Partners in ORR Native Grass Communities Restoration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for DOE's Oak Ridge Operations Office in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Y-12 -- The Y-12 National Security Complex is part of DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration. Top of Page ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

California native and exotic perennial grasses differ in their response to soil nitrogen, exotic annual grass density, and order of emergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early emergence of plant seedlings can offer strong competitive advantages over later-germinating neighbors through the preemption of limiting resources. This phenomenon may have contributed to the persistent dominance of ...

D'Antonio, Carla M.

82

Geology and thermal regime, geothermal test USA No. 11-36, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of drilling of an 8,565 foot geothermal test near Leach Hot Springs, Pershing County, Nevada, by Sunoco Energy Development Company. USA No.11-36 is located 500 feet south and 500 feet east of the northwest corner of Section 36, T. 32 N., R. 38 E (Mount Diablo Meridian), elevation 4,573 feet. It was drilled between May 15 and July 2, 1980. USA No.11-36 was deemed unsuccessful, having encountered no temperature higher than 270 F and no significant permeability, and was plugged and abandoned without testing prior to releasing the rig.

Wilde, Walter R.; Koenig, James B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Rangeland Ecol Manage 59:330333 | May 2006 Grass Repellency to the Red Imported Fire Ant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in homeostasis so that another organism, with disparate genetic interests, might also benefit? This question has of cellulolytic fungi, which reaches its pinnacle in the mound-building genera Macrotermes and Odontotermes soil at rates exceeding that of other mound- building termites in the environment (Table 5.3). The Nest

Perry, Gad

84

Combining ultrasonic sward height and spectral signatures to assess the biomass of legume-grass swards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In binary mixtures of either white clover (Trifolium repens L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) or lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) as well as in pure swards of each single species, biomass has been assessed ... Keywords: Grassland, Precision farming, Ultrasonic sensor, Vegetation index, Yield

Thomas Fricke, Michael Wachendorf

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Smooth Cord Grass (Spartina Alterniflora) Response to Simulated Oil Spills in Sediment-Water Microcosms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Simulated oil spills were created in S. alterniflora sediment-water microcosms to determine the effects of applied crude oil on S.alterniflora during two 90-day studies.… (more)

Beenk, Elliott E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The grass is half-full : new biofuels from field to wheel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current biofuels market in the United States is dominated by ethanol made from corn. But corn ethanol has limitations that will prevent it from displacing a large amount of fossil fuel use in the U.S. To achieve that ...

Moseman, Andrew (Andrew Garet)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project had six objectives, four of which have been completed: 1) Association panels of diverse populations and linkage populations for switchgrass and reed canarygrass (~1,000 clones each) were assembled and planted in two sites (Ithaca, NY and Arlington, WI); 2) Key biofeedstock characteristics were evaluated in these panels for three field seasons; 3) High density SNP markers were developed in switchgrass; and 4) Switchgrass association panels and linkage populations were genotyped. The remaining two original objectives will be met in the next year, as the analyses are completed and papers published: 5) Switchgrass population structure and germplasm diversity will be evaluated; and 6) Association mapping will be established and marker based breeding values estimated in switchgrass. We also completed a study of the chromosome-number variation found in switchgrass.

Buckler, Edward S; Casler, Michael D; Cherney, Jerome H

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

E-government readiness: from the design table to the grass roots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

e-Government generally refers to the government's use of information technologies (such as LANs, WANs, the Internet, Intranet, and mobile computing) to exchange information and services with citizens, businesses, general public and other arms of government. ... Keywords: ICT, digital divide, e-governance, e-government, e-government readiness, e-readiness

Hakikur Rahman

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Geological and geophysical studies in Grass Valley, Nevada. Preliminary open file report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geologic setting, geochemistry, and heat flow of the Leach Hot Springs area are discussed. Geophysical data is presented under the following section headings: survey lines; presentation of data; gravity survey; magnetic survey; self-potential; bipole-dipole apparent resistivity and apparent conductance; electric field ratio tellurics; dipole-dipole resistivity; magnetotellurics; seismological methods; seismic data and preliminary interpretation. (JGB)

Beyer, H.; Dey, A.; Liaw, A.; Majer, E.; McEvilly, T.V.; Morrison, H.F.; Wollenberg, H.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Representing Grass– and Shrub–Snow–Atmosphere Interactions in Climate System Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vegetation-protruding-above-snow parameterization for earth system models was developed to improve energy budget calculations of interactions among vegetation, snow, and the atmosphere in nonforested areas. These areas include shrublands, ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evolutionary ecology along invasion fronts of the annual grass Aegilops triuncialis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

edaphic gradient locations, one (McLaughlin) was at theUniversity of California McLaughlin Reserve (38°51 0 41 00gradients Foster Mclaughlin Snell Edaphic gradients Fig. 2

Rice, K J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

OAK RIDGE RESERVATION PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND NATURAL RESOURCES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atrovirens Black bulrush Draba ramosissima Branched whitlow grass Scirpus cyperinus Wool-grass Draba verna Whitlow grass Scirpus fluviatilis River bulrush Dryopteris intermedia...

93

GUIDELINES FOR THE CONVERSION OF URBAN FOUR-LANE UNDIVIDED ROADWAYS TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................18 Sioux Center Case Study...................................................................................................................................18 Blue Grass Case Study

Beresnev, Igor

94

The grass is half-full : new biofuels from field to wheel; New biofuels from field to wheel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current biofuels market in the United States is dominated by ethanol made from corn. But corn ethanol has limitations that will prevent it from… (more)

Moseman, Andrew (Andrew Garet)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Implementation of E-Commerce at the Grass Roots: Issues of Challenges in Terms of Human-Computer Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper looks into the concepts of electronic commerce e-commerce through the utilization of the Internet technologies. The study introduces the concept in finding a contextual diagram and talks further about the evolution of e-commerce. Thereafter, ... Keywords: Business Models, Developing Countries, E-Commerce, Human-Computer Interactions, Internet

Hakikur Rahman, Isabel Ramos

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Comparative Study of Gaussian Dispersion Formulas within the Polyphemus Platform: Evaluation with Prairie Grass and Kincaid Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details a number of existing formulations used in Gaussian models in a clear and usable way, and provides a comparison within a single framework—the Gaussian plume and puff models of the air quality modeling system Polyphemus. The ...

Irène Korsakissok; Vivien Mallet

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification performance of grasses and legumes from a mixed species prairie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J, Lehman C: Carbon-negative biofuels from low-input high-hydrolysis. Biotechnol for Biofuels 18. Anderson WF, Dienprairie. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011 4:52. Submit your

DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison of class 2 transposable elements at superfamily resolution reveals conserved and distinct features in cereal grass genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affrc.go.jp [21,31]. Sorghum genome (Sorbi1) and annota-T, Poliakov A, et al: The Sorghum bicolor genome and theOryza sativa (rice), Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays and

Han, Yujun; Qin, Shanshan; Wessler, Susan R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification performance of grasses and legumes from a mixed species prairie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and switchgrass. Biomass & Bioenergy 2006, 30:880-891. 11.to monoculture bioenergy crops [4]. For lignocellulosicof Science through the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC). We

DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

POTENTIAL OF ARID ZONE VEGETATION AS A SOURCE OF SUBSTRATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cane Napier grass Sudan grass (Sorghum) Corn (Zea mays) C-3Sugar cane Sudan grass (Sorghum) Corn (Zea mays) C-3 Plantscane, corn, crabgrass, sorghum, etc. have, in addition to

Bassham, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of Factors Affecting Water Transfer in a Cultivated Paleotropical Grass (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf) Field and a Neotropical Savanna during the Dry Season of the Orinoco Lowlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partitioning of available energy into sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat exchange was simultaneously measured in a closed Brachiaria field and an open neotropical savanna during the dry season of the Orinoco lowlands. These communities, differing ...

J. J. San José; N. Nikonova; R. Bracho

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Diuron in Surface Runoff and Tile Drainage from Two Grass-Seed Fields David E. Rupp,* R. Edward Peachey, Kristina L. Warren, and John S. Selker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it used a simpler, two-phase-flow single burner with three levels of refinement (4­, 8­, and 16­million (but are not limited to) aircraft landing gear, wind turbines, bridges, industrial heat exchangers combustor. This research is focused on Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of gas turbine engines with the inclusion

Selker, John

103

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woody and grass waste, cardboard, mixed paper and otherwastes Woody wastes Cardboard Mixed paper Digestibilitycontent, 44.9 (grass wastes) – 128.3 (mixed paper) gallon of

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Graminoid Survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tabernaemontani softstem bulrush Scirpus atrovirens green bulrush Scirpus cyperinus wool-grass Scleria oligantha littlehead nut-rush Sphenopholis intermedia slender wedge grass...

105

Biomass Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are...

106

JGI - CSP Sequencing Plans for 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

community tools for Setaria viridis-a model genetic system for C4 grasses Bucking, Heike South Dakota State University Exploring the transcriptome of perennial grasses in...

107

Improving Biomass Yields: High Biomass, Low Input Dedicated Energy Crops to Enable a Full Scale Bioenergy Industry  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ceres is developing bigger and better grasses for use in biofuels. The bigger the grass yield, the more biomass, and more biomass means more biofuel per acre. Using biotechnology, Ceres is developing grasses that will grow bigger with less fertilizer than current grass varieties. Hardier, higher-yielding grass also requires less land to grow and can be planted in areas where other crops can’t grow instead of in prime agricultural land. Ceres is conducting multi-year trials in Arizona, Texas, Tennessee, and Georgia which have already resulted in grass yields with as much as 50% more biomass than yields from current grass varieties.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Final Report, Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI03-97ER62461, Elevated CO2 and Limited Water Supply Effects on Carbon Processes and Sequestration in a C4 Grass (Sorghum) Ecosystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experiments were conducted at ample and limited levels of soil moisture on sorghum in 1998 and 1999 at the University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ. Numerous measurements were taken including biomass production, grain yield, soil carbon sequestration, N{sub 2}O production, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, canopy temperature, net radiation, and reflectance at many wavelengths. Accomplishments are listed and discussed.

Bruce A. Kimball

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

Offering Songs, Festive Songs, Processional Songs mGar-gLu, Khro-Glu, Phebsnga: Tashi Tsering's Music: Shar ri mukuh tang shing tu shi ru, 'The fields of grass'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Yak didn't come because he wanted the mother. He came because of the sweet white milk. The mother lamb - getting wool from body -- we'll put it inside the storage wall." ????? = square ground ??? = sheep ??? == storage last updated on Monday, 4...

Blumenthal, Katey

110

The Prairie - Our Heartland Sampler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was Illinois like 200 years ago? Illinois, called the "Prairie State," was once covered by 40,000 square miles of tall grass prairie. This ecosystem was home to grasses, forbs and...

111

Satellite Monitoring of Vegetation Phenology and Fire Fuel Conditions in Hawaiian Drylands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grass-fueled fires accelerate grassland expansion into dry Hawaiian woodlands by destroying native forests and by producing a disturbance regime that favors grass-dominated plant communities. Knowledge of grassland phenology is a key component of ...

Andrew J. Elmore; Gregory P. Asner; R. Flint Hughes

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Non-contact system for measuring tillage depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microprocessor-based non-contact ultrasonic sensor for tillage depth was evaluated. The sensor was tested on concrete, grass, wheat stubble, lightly disked wheat stubble (semi-stubble) and disked surfaces. The grass surface gave a higher variation ...

M. Yasin; R. D. Grisso; G. M. Lackas

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

For the birds | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a protected zone - the native grass plot." The 3-acre native grass area reduces fuel usage and greenhouse gas emissions while saving money; it is only mowed (bush-hogged) once...

114

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 Net Energy Balance of Corn-Ethanol, U. S. Department ofg/mi) Ethanol (E90 (corn)) Ethanol (E90 (grass)) Methanol (Ethanol (E100 (corn)) Ethanol (E100 (grass)) Methanol (

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The role of topography in the emergence of African savannas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coexistence of trees and grasses in savannas are not well understood even though savannas occupy a wide area of West Africa. In this study, a hypothesis is proposed to investigate the question of how trees and grasses ...

Kim, Yeonjoo, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARM - Field Campaign - Surface spectral albedo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15. Mostly clear-sky. Measurement were made at the following locations a) Milo (grain sorghum) field. b) Bare soil. c) Tall grass. d) Short grass. e) Bare soil. f) Young green...

117

Efficacy of Vegetated Buffer Strips for Retaining Cryptosporidium parvum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cryptosporidium parvum in sandy porous media (soils andwith grass, filled with a sandy loam soil, spiked with 200 gwith grass, filled with a sandy loam soil, spiked with 200 g

Tate, Kenneth W; Das Gracas C Pereira, Maria; Atwill, Edward R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood, grass, or corn. It considers fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCVs) as well as internal- combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood, grass, or corn. It considers fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCVs) as well as internal- combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulosic biomass, such as switch grass or wood, the fermentable sugars must be extracted from the feedstock (

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

(wizard) and (analyst) logged ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Increased "nutrients" caused an overproduction of phytoplankton, which block the light reaching the sea grasses and algae. ...

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

NIST Demos Industrial-Grade Nanowire Device Fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... local Nano Depot, manufacturers will need ... is to grow nanowires like blades of grass ... used conventional semiconductor manufacturing techniques to ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

Overview of the April 9th North Central Texas Wildfire Outbreak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the outbreak area showed that grasses were cured in Clay, Montague, Archer, Wichita and Shackelford Counties

124

Multiple Objective Stormwater Management For the Coliseum Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

asphalt landscaping lawns and grass; sandy soil, slope sandy soil, slope sandy soil, slope <2% Cover Factor*

Jones, Jesse; Kraai, Rachel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANT CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torpedo Grass CogonGrass Chinese Tallow Japanese Climbing Fern #12;Wide Range of Habitats /Dispersal Mechanisms Barrier Island Sand Dune Flatwood Swamp CHINESE TALLOW CHINESE TALLOW #12;Application Equipment treatments Urban Interface Plantation Cut Stump #12;More Treatments COGON GRASS TALLOW TREES CLIMBING FERN

Watson, Craig A.

126

Illinois a La Liette  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

boat. Afterwards you find virgin forests on both sides, consisting of tender walnuts, ash, whitewood (linden), cottonwood, a few maples, and grass, taller in places than a man....

127

DOE/EIS-0380  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

LANL continued work in FY 2012 on the landscape management plan to reduce maintenance costs and potable water consumption by removing non-native water intensive grass....

128

NPP Grassland: Klong Hoi Khong, Thailand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Grass Ecosystems of the Tropics" and has continued under subsequent UNEP and Thai-Austrian research projects. The study site of several hectares is situated within a...

129

Control of Invasive Plants on the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy November 2006 (10) Japanese stilt grass spreads through the ORR (ORNL photo) Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy November 2006 (11)...

130

TMS 2009 Annual Meeting and Exhibition: Turning Green  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS is a member of the Convene Green Alliance, a grass-roots organization of ... TMS is making strides to eliminate waste, recycle and conserve energy in all ...

131

GHG - P5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production of corn, soybeans, trees, and grasses. In this section, I revise my estimates of the energy and chemical inputs to the production of energy ...

132

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and grasses (Gramineae) for bioethanol produc- tion. Theseof wide interest for bioethanol production. Editor’s note:Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol), bioenergy: Alternative

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grass-to-ethanol plants Bioethanol plants can be designed toimpact on LCGE for bioethanol. WORKING PAPER DRAFT FORelectricity generated by bioethanol plants; and the mix of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

INCORPORATING THE EFFECT OF PRICE CHANGES ON CO2- EQUIVALENT EMSSIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE-FUEL LIFECYCLES: SCOPING THE ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grass-to-ethanol plants Bioethanol plants can be designed toimpact on LCGE for bioethanol. WORKING PAPER DRAFT FORelectricity generated by bioethanol plants; and the mix of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SMALL MAMMAL POPULATIONS IN SWITCHGRASS STANDS MANAGED FOR BIOMASS PRODUCTION COMPARED TO HAY AND CORN FIELDS IN KENTUCKY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), a native warm-season grass, has been investigated as a renewable energy crop that may provide viable wildlife habitat. This study investigated small… (more)

Schwer, Laura Mary Jane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Department of Energy to Make Available up to $33.8 Million to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

effort focuses on production from non-food materials and agricultural waste - such as corn stover, switchgrass, and prairie grass. This FOA focuses specifically on systems to...

137

Environmental Performance Report 2011: Annual Site Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBRF has pilot scale operations that take cellulosic materials such as switch grass or corn stover and convert the cellulose to fermentable sugars that lead to ethanol...

138

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biomass Technology Analysis Models and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of more than 150 (as of 1001) samples of potential biofuels feedstocks including corn stover, wheat straw, bagasse, switchgrass and other grasses, and poplars and other...

139

NREL: Biomass Research - Data and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data on more than 150 analyzed samples of potential biofuels feedstocks, including corn stover, wheat straw, bagasse, switchgrass and other grasses, and poplars and other...

140

Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on Simple Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... than 40 years ago suggested that simple plants – grasses, beans, and corn- exhibited varying effects in simulated geomagnetic fields and in electric fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Biological and Health Effects of EM and Acoustic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009... ago suggested that simple plants – grasses, beans, and corn-exhibited varying effects in simulated geomagnetic fields and in electric fields.

142

One- and Two-Phase Conversion of Biomass to Furfural  

Exploiting the energy potential of biomass high in cellulose and lignin—including grasses, shrubs, husks, bark, yard and mill offal not readily ...

143

South Dakota | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resilience, and Biodiversity of Perennial Grass Mixtures and Monocultures as Biofuel Feedstocks across Environmentally Heterogeneous Landscapes CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B5.1...

144

Native Meadow Restoration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mono-culture switchgrass Additional areas added for switchgrass with acceptance into Biofuel Initiative Program Roundup application to remove existing non-native grasses and...

145

Why sequence inbred Brachypodium lines?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

journal Nature to help researchers develop grasses tailored to serve as feedstocks for biofuel production. Led by John Vogel of the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural...

146

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system efficiency. Capstone Turbine Corporation is designing a combined 65 kilowatt CHP system and biomass gasifier that can use stalks, grass and other material to generate...

148

Pollutants Could Pose Health Risks for Five Sea Turtle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Their preferred diets range up the food chain from the green's sea grasses and algae to the crabs favored by the Kemp's ridley. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

2002_10_18-11_45_56,analyst,Continuation,"Need info on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rivers caused an overproduction of tiny phytoplankton which in turn blocked the light reaching the sea grasses and algae, essential components of ...

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Oak Ridge Reservation Vascular Flora  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

americanus threesquare bulrush Scirpus atrovirens black bulrush Scirpus cyperinus wool-grass Scirpus fluviatilis river bulrush Scirpus pendulus bulrush Scirpus polyphyllus...

151

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Video Blog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

features. WBranham Says: September 20, 2011 at 10:17 pm Georgia's grass roots Regional Solar Market Transformation Initiative is positioned to lead the nation in the development...

152

Bioenergy at DOE JGI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Alternative Energy Sources Soybeans: Translational Genomics for Clean Energy Corn: The Leading U.S. Fuel Ethanol Crop Switchgrass: Power Grass Brachypodium: Growing...

153

NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Microsoft Word - saturnis.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conversion of switchgrass and other related grasses to produce synthetic crude for refineries. Previous methods for converting biomass to fuel cannot efficiently convert lignin...

155

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Biofuel Production in the United States.second-generation biofuel production, including grasses andthat reduce biofuel crop production will reduce fuel

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell wall in grasses. Keywords Biofuels Á Digestibility Áa broader adaptation of biofuels. One of the limitations foryield and composition for biofuels. Crop Sci 47:2211–2227

Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evaluation of emergent macrophytes as a source forbiogas production after mechanical, alkaline and fungalpretreatments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Two species of emergent macrophytes, Typha latifolia (common cattail) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) were evaluated as substrates for biogas production. The specific… (more)

Alvinge, Simon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

following major components: - Soil organic carbon pool - Forest biomass carbon pool - Crop biomass carbon pool - Grass biomass carbon pool * The potentials of terrestrial carbon...

159

The Australians in Greece and Crete : a study of an intimate wartime relationship.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Historians have largely ignored the importance of relationships in war, particularly at a grass roots level. Examining the past from a relational point of view… (more)

Hill, Maria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

BESC - A novel monolignol that reduces recalcitrance of plant cell ...  

synthesis of cell walls of switchgrass and other bioenergy grasses and crops, including woody perennial species, for more facile deconstruction in energy, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The role of habitat in avian community composition: physiognomy or floristics?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were available. Pawnee and Pantex sites each contain twoalpestris Pawnee - HS and Pawnee U heavy summer Pantex - Hand Pantex U Bison heavy Bridget N Colorado short-grass

Rotenberry, John T

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following wildfire in a sagebrush­grass community. Soil Sci Soc Amer J 1994;58:564­70. Bodí MB, Mataix-Solera

Florida, University of

163

Bestimmung der Biomasse durch Fernerkundung Kurt P. Gnther, Marion Schroedter-Homscheidt, Markus Tum, Markus Niklaus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bestimmung der Biomasse durch Fernerkundung Kurt P. Günther, Marion Schroedter-Homscheidt, Markus.4 wavelength [m] reflectance[%] green grass dry grass decidous trees brown soil red soil Signal = f(Biomasse) #12;3 Deutsches Fernerkundungsdatenzentrum Wie gut sind Bodenmessungen der Biomasse? Messung des DBH

Heinemann, Detlev

164

Investigations into the effects of environmental and physical variables on the growth of natural and transplanted populations of Ruppia maritima L. s.l. in the Galveston Bay System, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of sixteen environmental and physical variables on the growth of six natural populations and on the establishment and growth of transplanted populations of widgeon grass, Ruppia maritima L. s.l., were evaluated in the Galveston Bay System, Texas. Growth differences in natural populations among different basin morphologies and tidal regimes were examined. Sediment texture influenced the percent cover of widgeon grass the greatest of the variables studied. High silt content and low sand content in the sediments resulted in greater percent cover of widgeon grass than sediments with low silt and high sand content. Water temperature significantly influenced the stem lengths of widgeon grass; warm temperatures stimulated longer plant lengths, while cold water temperatures resulted in reduced stem lengths. Marshes and tidal habitats exhibited perennial growth patterns of widgeon grass as compared to annual growth patterns found in ponds, lakes, and semitidal habitats. Ponds, lakes, and semitidal habitats generally had significantly higher percent cover and stem lengths than marshes and tidal habitats; except in periods of drought. The effects of sixteen environmental and physical variables on the growth and establishment of transplanted widgeon grass, Ruppia maritima L. s.l., in the Galveston Bay System, were analyzed. Growth differences between different transplant spacings (1 meter, 0.5 meters and 0.25 meters) also were studied. Various fetch distances had the greatest significant influence on the establishment and growth of transplanted widgeon grass. Greater fetch distances resulted in reduced growth of transplants due to increased wave action that the transplants were subjected to. There was no significant difference in widgeon grass growth among the transplant spacings. In conclusion, I found that widgeon grass can be successfully transplanted onto submerged bare sediments in areas of low fetch distances. Transplanting widgeon grass into internal open water areas designed with low fetch distances in saltmarsh restoration projects can increase habitat diversity and function. Efforts should concentrate on designing suitable habitat into restoration plans rather than transplanting large quantities of plant material.

Schubert, William James

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Manufacturing and Co-firing Switchgrass and Coastal Bermudagrass Cubes for Generating Renewable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-firing grasses in existing coal-fired units is a potential low-cost option for generating renewable energy. The most basic approach to co-firing involves mixing biomass with coal and introducing the mix into the plant's coal handling system. Loose grass with coal will not flow reliably, so a study was created to determine if local grasses could be cost-effectively compressed into dense cubes that could then be successfully mixed with coal and fired in existing coal-fired boilers. Success with cubing t...

2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 16270 of 26,764 results. 61 - 16270 of 26,764 results. Rebate Grass Conservation Act (Montana) The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the... http://energy.gov/savings/grass-conservation-act-montana Rebate Jackson EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Georgia) Jackson Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is an electric cooperative that serves 194,000 customers in 10 counties in northeast Georgia. To encourage its residential customers to adopt energy... http://energy.gov/savings/jackson-emc-residential-energy-efficiency-rebate-program-georgia Rebate Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural

167

JGI - Why Sequence Sorghum?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorghum? Sorghum? One of the world's leading grain crops, sorghum is also an important model for tropical grasses of worldwide importance with a collective minimum economic impact of $69 billion U.S. per year. As a model for the tropical grasses, sorghum is a logical complement to Oryza (rice), the first monocot plant to be sequenced. Sorghum is representative of the tropical grasses in that it has "C4" photosynthesis, using a complex combination of biochemical and morphological specializations resulting in more efficient carbon assimilation at high temperatures. By contrast, rice is more representative of temperate grasses, using "C3" photosynthesis. In addition to its intrinsic value, the sorghum sequence will be a valuable reference for assembling and analyzing the fourfold larger genome of maize

168

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 16180 of 28,905 results. 71 - 16180 of 28,905 results. Rebate Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) The Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (GUFPA) was established to protect the underground utility infrastructure of Georgia. GUFPA mandates that, before starting any mechanized digging or... http://energy.gov/savings/georgia-utility-facility-protection-act-georgia Rebate Grass Conservation Act (Montana) The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the... http://energy.gov/savings/grass-conservation-act-montana Rebate Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground

169

Did U Know? : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Did U Know? Did U Know? Common U.S. agricultural products specifically grown for biofuel production include switchgrass and soybeans. Can you really drive a car off grass instead of gas? Yes! Switch grass is a common, warm-season grass that can be an environmentally friendly biofuel and alternative to traditional gasoline. How cool is that! Humans have used biomass fuels for heating and cooking since the discovery of fire. Biofuel is any liquid fuel derived from biological material such as trees, agricultural wastes, crops, or even grass. Biofuel can be produced from any carbon source that can be replenished rapidly, such as plants. Biomass refers to living and recently dead biological matter that can be used as fuel or for industrial production. Biofuel is considered a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions

170

Comparisons of Interception Loss from Tropical and Temperate Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilayer crop model is used to investigate interception loss from oak, pine, wheat and grass canopies. It is shown that the evaporative properties of the full oak canopy are similar to those of the evergreen tropical rain forest. Evaporation ...

J. G. Lockwood; P. J. Sellers

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

grading, all areas were contoured to promote drainage away from the disposal cell. A mix of grasses and sagebrush was used to revegetate all disturbed areas of the disposal...

172

Reducing Dew and Frost on the Dames of Net Pyrradiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of net radiation (Rn) measurements under conditions conducive to dew or frost deposition. Two nonventilated net pyrradiometers were mounted over grass during November and December 1986. A ...

S. M. McGinn; K. M. King; G. W. Thurtell

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling the Thermal Effects of Artificial Turf on the Urban Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of artificial turf (AT) on the urban canopy layer energy balance, air and surface temperatures, and building cooling loads are compared to those of other common ground surface materials (asphalt, concrete, and grass) through heat ...

Neda Yaghoobian; Jan Kleissl; E. Scott Krayenhoff

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Durango.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

soil matrix layer on the top and rock (riprap) on the side slopes to protect against wind and water erosion. The top of the disposal cell is planted with native grasses. Riprap...

175

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear accidents such as those at Windscale (1957) and Chernobyl (1986). An important route by which and cesium via the grass-cow-milk pathway after the Chernobyl accident. Health Physics 66:653-665 6. Müller H

Crout, Neil

176

DOE/EIS-0380  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A review of CD2 and CD3 is complete. A landscape management plan to reduce maintenance costs and potable water consumption by removing non-native water intensive grass continued...

177

Birds' Nests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are pressed into place and reinforced with blades of dead grass. With the exception of eagles and certain hawks it is one of the few birds that uses the same nest more than one...

178

MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine-sassafras-dollarleaf . Slash pine-black cherry-water oak Longleaf pine-turkey oak-wire grass Longleaf pine-turkey oak- bracken fern . Longleaf pine-moneywort . Longleaf...

179

A Simple Scheme for Daytime Estimates of the Surface Fluxes from Routine Weather Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a simple empirical scheme is presented, which gives hourly estimates of the surface fluxes of heat and momentum from routine weather data during daytime. The scheme is designed for grass surfaces, but it contains parameters which ...

A. A. M. Holtslag; A. P. Van Ulden

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Switchgrass for Bioenergy held at the University of NebraskaLincoln  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion types on which switchgrass and other perennial grasses have economic potential as bio- energy crops - 72

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environmental Performance Report 2012: Annual Site Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBRF has pilot-scale opera- tions that take cellulosic materials such as switch grass or corn stover and convert the cellulose to fermentable sugars that lead to ethanol produc-...

182

Bias of Purine Stretches in Sequenced Chromosomes David Ussery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, K. Kaija, R. Brzozowski, and C. Majewski. 2009. Assessing Pasture Grasses, Legumes and PastureD) Wildlife migrations; Ali Farzad (2010 PhD) Cover cropping; Dave Timmins (2010 PhD, Res. Econ) Bio- energy

Ussery, David W.

183

Potatoes in the Home Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after being turned under. A compost made of a grass/legumeand phos- phorous. The compost mix should be applied at and15” of soil). While the compost needs to be stable, potatoes

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Activity Center 4 : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Center 4 - Thick cell walls of plants must be broken down to release the sugar that is wrapped in lignin and cellulose. Set-up: There will be specimens of blades of grass and...

185

Pests Affecting the Ecosystems on the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nest preda- tion on forest species such as the wood thrush increase. The nonnative fish on the ORR with the greatest negative ecosystem impacts are grass and common carp and...

186

The Shrikes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of small twigs, weed stems and grasses, thickly lined with plant down, feathers or wool and located from 2 to 2 0 feet up in the center of thorny trees, hedges or thickets....

187

orrvflr1998_4_30_04.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US, DU,ORRHv c - - - n f - - OBL - monocot P gr - E N Cyperaceae Scirpus cyperinus - - wool-grass el ORRH,ORRHv c - - - n o - - OBL - monocot P gr - E N Cyperaceae Scirpus...

188

EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Summary | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

great diversity of vegetation (from trees to brush to grasses), which can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, or...

189

Forage Crops.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of Cooperating Stockmen and Farmers from 71 Counties - Alfalfa - Japan Clover - Crimson Clover - White Clover - Velvet Bean - Beggar Weed - Cow Peas - Rescue Grass - Kaffir Corn - Field Corn - Chufas

Unknown author

1901-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Safety at SLAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety at SLAC PHOTO: Landscape of oak tree and green grass SLAC is committed to protecting the health and safety of our staff, the community and the environment as we carry out...

191

Interactive Crop Management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal Influences on Land–Atmosphere Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1) is evaluated with two coupled atmosphere–land simulations. The CTRL (control) simulation represents crops as unmanaged grasses, while CROP represents a crop managed simulation that includes ...

Samuel Levis; Gordon B. Bonan; Erik Kluzek; Peter E. Thornton; Andrew Jones; William J. Sacks; Christopher J. Kucharik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy grasses and algae could increase biofuel yields whileH2 Producing Algae Figure 3-4: Biofuel production pathwaysalgae for lipids and carbohydrates increases the overall US biofuel

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy grasses and algae could increase biofuel yields whileH2 Producing Algae Figure 3-4: Biofuel production pathwaysalgae for lipids and carbohydrates increases the overall US biofuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Determining Bottom Reflectance and Water Optical Properties Using Unmanned Underwater Vehicles under Clear or Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with hyperspectral optical sensors that measure downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance was deployed over sandy bottoms, sea grass patches, and coral reefs near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, during the ...

David C. English; Kendall L. Carder

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SPECIAL—Savanna Patterns of Energy and Carbon Integrated across the Landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannas are highly significant global ecosystems that consist of a mix of trees and grasses and that are highly spatially varied in their physical structure, species composition, and physiological function (i.e., leaf area and function, stem density, ...

Jason Beringer; Jorg Hacker; Lindsay B. Hutley; Ray Leuning; Stefan K. Arndt; Reza Amiri; Lutz Bannehr; Lucas A. Cernusak; Samantha Grover; Carol Hensley; Darren Hocking; Peter Isaac; Hizbullah Jamali; Kasturi Kanniah; Stephen Livesley; Bruno Neininger; Kyaw Tha Paw U; William Sea; Dennis Straten; Nigel Tapper; Richard Weinmann; Stephen Wood; Steve Zegelin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequent tomato, ?lettuce and broccoli transplants through allelopathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article t Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequentJ. Stapleton Grass cover crops can be harvested for biomassmay affect subsequent crops. We stud- ied the effects of

Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.; Stapleton, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nutrient use efficiency in bioenergy cropping systems: Critical research questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and one panic grass grown as biofuel. Aspects Appl. Biol.giganteus grown as a biofuel for 14 successive harvests.2 O release from agro- biofuel production negates the global

Brouder, Sylvie; Volenec, Jeffrey J; Turco, Ronald; Smith, Douglas R; Ejeta, Gebisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Vegetation–Climate Feedbacks in the Conversion of Tropical Savanna to Grassland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical savannas have been heavily impacted by human activity, with large expanses transformed from a mixture of trees and grasses to open grassland and agriculture. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) CCM3 general circulation ...

William A. Hoffmann; Robert B. Jackson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Broadband and Spectral Emissivities (2–18 ?m) of Some Natural Soils and Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadband and spectral emissivities of several soil types, grass and tree leaves are reported for wavelengths between 2 and 18 ?m. Broadband measurements were made in situ with an 8–14 ?m bandpass radiometer, and spectral measurements were made ...

Robert A. Sutherland

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Stormwater Management for UMore Park Molly McClung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research in sustainability7 . These principles include: Zero Carbon, Zero Waste, Sustainable Transport drainage network. The primary vegetation was Bur Oak Savanna with areas of prairie grass and maple

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The “Inactive” Eddy Motion and the Large-Scale Turbulent Pressure Fluctuations in the Dynamic Sublayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical structure of the turbulent pressure fluctuations was measured in the dynamic sublayer of a large grass-covered forest clearing by a free air static pressure probe and modeled using Townsend's hypothesis. Townsend's hypothesis ...

Gabriel G. Katul; John D. Albertson; Marc B. Parlange; Cheng-I. Hsieh; Paul S. Conklin; John T. Sigmon; Ken R. Knoerr

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 The Ohio State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

window with louvers is on one side. A deck extends from the other side. In front are small stands of landscaped grasses. Behind is a sports stadium. Ohio State's...

203

148 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION.' the digestive liquids produced in different ways did not in the slightest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to sugar and thus rendered soluble. It is, therdore, evident that of tho weds of some grasses growing quantity of albumen, fat, and sugar contained in them. 50.-I'OlSONOUS PIBIB.` B y Dr.OSCAR TYBRING

204

main_title.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Nests Buffalo Canada Geese Deer Fungi Grass Insects Lichens Math Patterns in Nature Poison Ivy Prairie Insects in Winter Red-tailed Hawk West Nile Virus Woodchuck Prairie...

205

The impact of Summer Rainfall on the Temperature Gradient along the United States-Mexico Border  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international border running through the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona and northern Sonora is marked by a sharp discontinuity in albedo and grass cover. The observed differences in surface properties are a result of long-term, severe ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Decapod Crustacea of the Californian and Oregonian Zoogeographic Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat and depth. --Mud or sandy mud, intertidal-50 m.or tan. Habitat and depth. —Sandy subtidal areas, rarely lowbeaches, eel grass beds, sandy coasts; intertidal to 174 m.

Wicksten, Mary K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Costs of Urban Stormwater Control Practices Arvind Narayanan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The life-cycle project costs include the initial construction costs, in addition to long- term maintenance)......................................................................................................................76 Table 64. Estimated Capital Cost of a 1.5-foot Deep, 10-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC)......................................................................................................................78 Table 65. Estimated Capital Cost of a 3.0-feet Deep, 21-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC

Pitt, Robert E.

209

Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Fire Nature Bulletin No. 51 Febraury 1, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE Most people firmly believe the ancient notion that the prairies and vacant lots should be burnt off "to make better grass." Many are doing so now. Boys who have seen their parents and neighbors kindling fires on vacant property frequently do likewise on the prairies. Recently there have been four fires in the forest preserves which spread from adjoining land. Burning does more harm than good. True, it gets rid of the old weed stalks and dried grass of last year, so that new grass shows green more quickly. But repeated burnings kill the good, nutritious grasses such as bluegrass, timothy and clover. The wildflowers disappear. All food and nesting cover for birds, rabbits and other wildlife is destroyed, just when they need it most. Thistles thrive. Only tough grasses of little value for pasture or hay, such as crabgrass and quackgrass, and the weeds survive.

211

Environmental studies conducted at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock geothermal development site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental investigation of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal development was conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, during 1976-1979. Activities at the Fenton Hill Site included an evaluation of baseline data for biotic and abiotic ecosystem components. Identification of contaminants produced by HDR processes that had the potential for reaching the surrounding environment is also discussed. Three dominant vegetative communities were identified in the vicinity of the site. These included grass-forb, aspen, and mixed conifer communities. The grass-forb area was identified as having the highest number of species encountered, with Phleum pratense and Dactylis glomerata being the dominant grass species. Frequency of occurrence and mean coverage values are also given for other species in the three main vegetative complexes. Live trapping of small mammals was conducted to determine species composition, densities, population, and diversity estimates for this component of the ecosystem. The data indicate that Peromyscus maniculatus was the dominant species across all trapping sites during the study. Comparisons of relative density of small mammals among the various trapping sites show the grass-forb vegetative community to have had the highest overall density. Comparisons of small mammal diversity for the three main vegetative complexes indicate that the aspen habitat had the highest diversity and the grass-forb habitat had the lowest. Analyses of waste waters from the closed circulation loop indicate that several trace contaminants (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, fluoride, boron, and lithium) were present at concentrations greater than those reported for surface waters of the region.

Miera, F.R. Jr.; Langhorst, G.; McEllin, S.; Montoya, C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

214

Why sequence Marinomonas?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marine bacterial genus Marinomonas? marine bacterial genus Marinomonas? In the Mediterranean Sea, the perennial Neptune grass (Posidonia oceanica) forms meadows that cover about 15,000 square miles of rocks and sand and is a key part of the marine ecosystem. About 30 percent of the bacteria found in Neptune grass is composed of Marinomonas strains, which include M. posidonica, considered to be the most abundant Marinomonas species, and M. mediterranea, the only species in the genus that has melanins. Marinomonas P. oceanica meadows such as this one off Formentera Island, Spain play host to Marinomonas bacteria. Photo by Manu Sanfelix M. mediterranea has enzymes that can break down compounds in industrial and oil refinery emissions. The bacterial enzymes might also be useful in breaking down lignocellulosic material in sea grass, and thus might have

215

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

216

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

217

Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection At the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites - 8354 J. Powell, F. Johnston, J. Homer Fernald Preserve 10995 Hamilton-Cleves Hwy. Harrison, Ohio 45030 Y. Deyo Weldon Spring 7295 Highway 94 South St. Charles, Missouri 63304 ABSTRACT At both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Preserve and the Weldon Spring Site, the development of ecological restoration goals and objectives was used to complement and even enhance achievement of selected remedies. Warm-season native grasses and forbs were used for revegetation of remediated areas. The hardiness and ability to establish in low-nutrient conditions make native grasses ideal candidates for reestablishment of vegetation in excavated areas. At the Fernald Preserve, native grasses

218

The Xylan Delignification Process for biomass conversion to ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extrusion process melded with alkaline peroxide chemical pretreatements allows the lignin and hemicellulose in biomass to be solublibzed, and the cellulose component to be made available for enzymatic breakdown. This process is called the Xylan Delignification Process (XDP). In this paper, some results of the XDP on promoting enzymatic breakdown and SSF of corn stalks switch grass and straw are reported. It was found that the XDP process allowed quick (6 hour) and reasonably complete (85--88%) hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction of cornstalks, but was less effective in allowing utilization of the switch grass with 76% yeild noted in 24 hours. Solubilization of the lignin and hemicellulose were not acheived on a first set of corn stalk, switch grass, and straw samples, but was noted on a second straw sample.

Dale, M.C.; Zhao, C.; Lei, S. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States); Tyson, G. [Xylan Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOI-BLM-NV-B020-????-???-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B020-????-???-EA B020-????-???-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-B020-????-???-EA EA at Grass Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Grass Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Battle Mountain Managing Field Office BLM Mount Lewis Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager none provided Mineral Manager none provided Selected Dates Relevant Numbers Lead Agency

220

Plant community dynamics governed by red harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) activities and their role as drought refugia in a semi-arid savanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examined modifications made by Pogonomyrmex barbatus, by their processes of granivory and nest construction, to forb and grass dynamics under large-scale disturbances of fire, recent drought and long-term, large-mammalian herbivory using comparative studies, field experimental manipulations, and a simulation model on the Edwards Plateau, Texas. Ant nests are refugia for grass survival during extreme droughts as demonstrated during the drought of 1998 to 2002. Significantly greater cover of grasses and lower abundance and cover of forbs was found beside nests compared with surrounding habitat throughout the drought and recovery. Grasses near nests may be the seed source for surrounding habitats during recovery. Seeds were differentially collected among most forbs and grasses despite seed abundance. Harvest was significantly reduced in the fall relative to spring. During preference experiments, harvest differences were found between grazing treatments for two of four species, but only during the spring. High lipid content seeds were unpreferred in fall compared to high protein and carbohydrate content seeds. Granivory influences on seedling establishment were studied by comparing seedling recruitment among sown and naturally occurring seeds excluded and open to foragers. Exclosures were placed in three nest densities and two burn treatments. Seeds in exclosures produced significantly more seedlings than open arenas only during the first year of drought recovery. Densities of grasses and annual forbs were higher in open arenas the second year due to indirect effects of granivory. By reducing seeds ants release seedlings from competition. Sown seedling abundance was unaffected by colony density and fire. Colony density and distribution were influenced by topography, soil types, soil depth and woody cover, but not by historical grazing treatments. Cleared vegetation on nest disks impacted less than 1% of total surface area and losses were compensated by greater basal cover of grasses next to disks compared to surrounding habitats. Foraging areas influenced 17.3-73.6% of surface area and could diminish seed populations for potential seedlings. Model results agree with experimental observations that communities may be modified by P. barbatus presence due to differential responses of grass species to interaction between nests or granivory and rainfall amounts.

Nicolai, Nancy Carol

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Resolving permutation ambiguity in correlation-based blind image separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of permutation ambiguity in blind separation of multiple mixtures of multiple images (resulting, for instance, from multiple reflections through a thick grass plate or through two overlapping glass plates) with unknown mixing coefficients. ... Keywords: Blind image separation, Generalized multiple correlation, Permutation ambiguity, Pruning scheme, Separation of reflection

Kenji Hara; Kohei Inoue; Kiichi Urahama

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sustainable bioethanol production combining biorefinery principles and intercropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intercropping is that the intercrop components composition can be designed to produce a medium (for microbial. Nitrogen fertilization is responsible for more than 85 % of the greenhouse gas emissions from wheat grain unheated clover-grass juice can be co-converted into ethanol by natural enzymes and yeast increasing

223

Interactive responses of old-field plant growth and composition to warming and precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and temperature (1) are not linear, and (2) interact. In this article, we examined responses of herbaceous biomass by C3 species (mean contribution to aboveground biomass production in plots = 99%, range = 85 pratense and Poa spp., the annual C4 grasses Setaria glauca and S. viridis, the intermittently flowering

Dukes, Jeffrey

224

Consequences of wildfire on ecosystem CO2 and water vapour fluxes in the Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because biomass and plant density of invasive annual grass species may respond more strongly to elevated stocks from sagebrush eco- systems during incineration (up to 980 g biomass mÃ?2 during prescribed fires, 1991), little baseline data on NEE and ET are available (e.g. Angell & Svejcar, 1999; Angell et al

DeLucia, Evan H.

225

This is an Accepted Article that has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication in the Global Change Biology, but has yet to undergo copy-editing and proof correction. Please cite this article as an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examined responses of herbaceous biomass production and species composition in the first two full years contribution to aboveground biomass production in plots = 99%, range = 85% - 100%) and perennials (mean = 80 spp., the annual C4 grasses Setaria glauca and S. viridis, the intermittently flowering perennial

Dukes, Jeffrey

226

Copyright 2010, Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understory plant biomass, sometimes in a patchy pattern. Although the structural changes caused by any one to 20 years after stand-replacing fire, biomass is concentrated on the forest floor, as grasses of deciduous species was 5 feet (1.5 m). Browse biomass was eliminated on severely burned areas for 2 years

Thorp, James H.

227

Columbia Computer Science Technical Report (2005) Time-Varying Textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the reflectance and texture of surfaces is a static phe- nomenon. Yet, there is an abundance of materials in nature whose appearance varies dramatically with time, such as cracking paint, growing grass, or ripening such as stress fracture, accu- mulation of particles, and state changes such as oxidation. We then synthesize

228

Columbia Computer Science Technical Report (2005) TimeVarying Textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the reflectance and texture of surfaces is a static phe­ nomenon. Yet, there is an abundance of materials in nature whose appearance varies dramatically with time, such as cracking paint, growing grass, or ripening such as stress fracture, accu­ mulation of particles, and state changes such as oxidation. We then synthesize

229

SERS internship Spring 1995 abstracts and research papers  

SciTech Connect

Presented topics varied over many fields in science and engineering. Botany on grasses in California, real time face recognition technology, thermogravimetric studies on corrosion and finite element modeling of the human pelvis are examples of discussed subjects. Further fields of study are carcinogenics, waste management, radar imaging, automobile accessories, document searching on the internet, and shooting stars. Individual papers are indexed separately on EDB.

Davis, B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nest Record Card Scheme 1 Welcome to the Nest Record Card Scheme, NERCS for short. The project aims to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of November. In arid areas, such as the Karoo, many small birds breed erratically at any time of the year than 2 m high, including much of the fynbos, Karoo and Kalahari biomes) DESERT (natural plant growth) fynbos,Karoo,Kalahari, riparian,largely alien trees, other (specify) gravel, sand, rock, grass, scrub

de Villiers, Marienne

231

Executive Summary v Chapter 1 1-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mounds emerge from the prairie like islands with their tops fringed with grasses that sway and rustle and swales during the summer and must evacuate to higher ground of the mounds in winter. While awaiting of Jepson Prairie. Called "mima-mounds" (pronounced my-ma), this type of landform occurs elsewhere

Love, Milton

232

PUBLICATION 460-144 More than a million acres in the Appalachian region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLICATION 460-144 More than a million acres in the Appalachian region were surface mined for coal: Soil physical properties on unused coal mine sites are often poorly suited for planting trees on older coal mine sites applied P fertilizers at levels that were adequate for establishing grasses

Liskiewicz, Maciej

233

Bioethanol - the Climate-Cool Fuel: Biofuels For the Global Environment Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bioethanol is alcohol fuel made from cellulosic biomass-renewable resources such as trees, grasses, much of the material in municipal solid waste, and forestry and agricultural residues. Compared to the fossil fuels it will displace, bioethanol contributes little or no net CO2 to the earth's atmosphere.

NONE

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Comparison of Continuous Soil Moisture Simulations Using Different Soil Hydraulic Parameterizations for a Site in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous time series of soil water content over a period of more than 9 months for a midlatitude sandy loam soil covered by grass are calculated with the Campbell and the van Genuchten soil hydraulic functions and the Clapp–Hornberger, Cosby et ...

Gerd Schädler

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties, management practices and watering techniques.

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

2011 ANNUAL REPORT IREE'S MISSION: TO PROMOTE STATEWIDE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; SUSTAINABLE, HEALTHY AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, certain kinds of grass, trees, corn, and even algae. This project will focus on wood chips (coming from, is the gasification type. The boiler turns the wood chips into a gas and catches the ash produced. Some boilers, like Middlebury's claim a 99.7% efficiency rate particulate collection during the gasification process. The claim

Minnesota, University of

237

Bioenergy Initiative Directory 2008 Areas of Research Expertise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, sewage and other waste-water · Dedicated energy crops (purpose-grown) ­ Grasses, trees, algae, other Conversion ­ Combustion ­ Gasification ­ Pyrolysis · Bioconversion ­ Anaerobic/Fermentation ­ Aerobic-oils Biodiesel Plasma Gasification Air/Steam Gasification Pyrolysis DME Fermentation Anaerobic Digestion

Kraft, Markus

238

!"#$%&'(#)*+#,'(#-#*$./'!01#$+2-#' 3#./*"2.*)'!"%2"##$2"%'4#1*$+5#"+'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including drought- and disease-tolerant grasses, trees that grow on marginal soils, and fast-growing algae. · Geothermal energy (enhanced geothermal systems) provides at least 10 percent of electric power needs. · Algae, next-generation integrated gasification combined cycle and oxyfuel power plants, gas plants, biofuel

Hochberg, Michael

239

Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ketchum. #12;OSU canola study informs policy makers amid debate among seed growers ODA asks OSU to see if canola can grow in Willamette Valley without pollinating other crops Adispute is brewing in the Willamette Valley. Grass-seed farm ers want to grow canola, a rotation crop that can be turned into food

Tullos, Desiree

240

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Copyedited and fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Genomic and small RNA sequencing of Miscanthus x giganteus shows the utility of sorghum as a reference genome sequence for Andropogoneae grasses

Kankshita Swaminathan; Magdy Alabady; Kranthi Varala; Isaac Ho; Dan S Rokhsar; Aru K Arumuganathan; Ray Ming; Pamela J Green; Blake C Meyers; Stephen P Moose; Kankshita Swaminathan; Magdy Alabady; Kranthi Varala; Emanuele De Paoli; Isaac Ho; Dan Rokhsar; Aru K Arumuganathan; Ray Ming; Pamela J Green; Blake C Meyers; Stephen P Moose; Matthew E Hudson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

242

Conceptual Combination Stimuli (Swinney et al, 2007 Psych Science)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it difficult to conceal themselves in the dry1 grass2 along the river. Compound property ­ brown Noun property The only trace of the lost hunting party was a knife found in the burnt1 meadow2 across the river. Compound ­ crystal No

243

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG EDITION 136 TEXAS A&MU N I V E R S I T Y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and rain erosion are greatly reduced because of the grass roots' ability to stabilize the soil. The surface: 13-wave coulters in front of seeder, double disk openers for starter fertilizer, and heavy disk for Plasticulture, Penn State University: http://plasticulture.cas.psu.edu Penn State High Tunnel Production Guide

Behmer, Spencer T.

244

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warhead or a terrorist's "dirty bomb", nuclear "fallout" is produced. This fallout is the melted into the atmosphere and later falls back to earth. Fission products, the radioactive residue of fallout, are minerals mainly on the food eaten by the animal. Grazing animals that eat grass or forage contaminated by fallout

Navara, Kristen

245

A Soil Moisture Climatology of Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this ...

Steven E. Hollinger; Scott A. Isard

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Climate implications of algae-based bioenergy systems Andres Clarens, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as grass, wood chips, corn stalks and algae. New methods of making biofuel are also available that use Argonne, LLC. Did you know... Biofuels can be made from a wide variety of biological feedstocks. OPPORTUNITY Argonne biofuels researchers have teamed up with the lab's mechanical engineers as part

Walter, M.Todd

247

Salvo and Geiger Page 1 Fuel Mix and Air Quality during the 2009-2011 Natural Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable sources. This will include bioethanol from wheat and sugar beet, biodiesel from oil seed rape scarcer even though suitable habitat is available elsewhere. Conversely, mobile and general- ist species and novel crops such as monocultures of high- sugar grass species or biomass crops such as Miscanthus

Schweik, Charles M.

248

Ris-R-Report Emerging product carbon footprint standards and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the development of biobased products Corn Soy- beans Sugar- cane, sugar beets Cellulosic material (perennial grass the greatest eutrophication impact of the bioproducts surveyed. Conversely, switchgrass-based ethanol offers for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass Bioenergy 2005, 29, 426­439. (4) Landis, A. E.; Miller

249

Effect of xylanase supplementation of cellulase on digestion of corn stover solids prepared by leading pretreatment technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the development of biobased products Corn Soy- beans Sugar- cane, sugar beets Cellulosic material (perennial grass the greatest eutrophication impact of the bioproducts surveyed. Conversely, switchgrass-based ethanol offers for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass Bioenergy 2005, 29, 426­439. (4) Landis, A. E.; Miller

California at Riverside, University of

250

Bioethanol - the Climate-Cool Fuel: Biofuels For the Global Environment Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Bioethanol is alcohol fuel made from cellulosic biomass-renewable resources such as trees, grasses, much of the material in municipal solid waste, and forestry and agricultural residues. Compared to the fossil fuels it will displace, bioethanol contributes little or no net CO2 to the earth's atmosphere.

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

251

Past, Present, and Future Capabilities of Remote Sensing for AssessingPast, Present, and Future Capabilities of Remote Sensing for Assessing , , p g g, , p g g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dominance GLO Survey grass 8% shrub 92% Ground survey assisted by aerial photography aerial vehicles (UAVs, Las Cruces, NM 88003 Aerial photo sequence What Products Can Result From UAVs?Introduction Historic developed technologies are currently in use. One should not overlook historic land and vegetation surveys

252

John Harte's Publications: 2000-2011 J. Harte, Maximum Entropy and Ecology: A Theory of Abundance, Distribution, and Energetics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and J. Harte, "Invasion of non-native grasses causes a drop in soil carbon storage in California. Harte, "Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation: heterogeneity over space. Torn, and J. Harte, "Linking soil organic matter dynamics and erosion- induced terrestrial carbon

Kammen, Daniel M.

253

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have shown that manure and effluent applied from animal feeding operations to waste application fields (WAFs) have contributed to excess P in segments of the North Bosque River in east central Texas. There is a growing need for environmentally sound, economically viable, and easy to establish best management practices to control such pollution. Vegetative buffer strips offer a potential solution for reducing runoff P from WAFs by extracting it from soil and by reducing sediment P delivery (due to reduced runoff and soil erosion) to streams. In a field study, ten plots (5m x 5m) were assigned to five replicated treatments, namely control (bare, without having any plant cover), cool season grass, warm season forb, warm season grass, and warm season legume to assess their efficacy of runoff sediment control and P sequestration potential from soil. These plots were established on a coastal Bermuda grass WAF that received dairy lagoon effluent. A runoff collection system, a 1m x 1m sub-plot with a runoff conveyance and collection apparatus, was installed on the upstream and downstream margins of each plot. Natural rainfall runoff samples were collected and analyzed subsequently for total P, soluble P, and total suspended solids in the laboratory. Additionally, the total mass of runoff collected from each sub-plot was calculated. Results suggested that the warm season forb and warm season grass were the most effective vegetative covers for the reduction of runoff P, followed by coastal Bermuda and cool season grass, respectively. The lesser amount of runoff total P in these two treatments was due to lesser runoff mass and lesser sediments in the runoff due to initial interception of rain and less raindrop impact on soil because of denser vegetative cover in both treatments compared to all other treatments.

Giri, Subhasis

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils (RMS). Experimental sites characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil were identified. These sites are owned by Americal Electrical Power and are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. The sites chosen were: (1) reclaimed without topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover), (2) reclaimed with topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover) and (3) unmined sites (one under forest and another grass cover). Soil samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm and 15 to 30 cm depths from each of the experimental site under continuous grass and SOC and, total nitrogen (TN) concentration, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were determined. The results of the study for the quarter (30 September to 31 December, 2003) showed that soil pH was > 5.5 and EC reclaimed in 2003 (newly reclaimed and at baseline) to 11.64 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 1987 (a 5-fold increase) to 20.41 g kg{sup -1} for sites reclaimed in 1978 (a 10- fold increase). However, for sites reclaimed without topsoil application, soil pH, EC, SOC and TN concentrations were similar for both depths. The SOC concentrations in reclaimed sites with topsoil application in 0 to 15 cm depth increased from a base value of 0.7 g kg{sup -1} at the rate of 0.76 g kg{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The high SOC concentration for 0-15 cm layer for site reclaimed in 1978 showed the high carbon sequestration potential upon reclamation and establishment of the grass cover on minesoils.

M. K. Shukla; R. Lal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO  

SciTech Connect

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils (RMS). Experimental sites characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil were identified. These sites are owned by Americal Electrical Power and are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. The sites chosen were: (1) reclaimed without topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover), (2) reclaimed with topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover) and (3) unmined sites (one under forest and another grass cover). Soil samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm and 15 to 30 cm depths from each of the experimental site under continuous grass and SOC and, total nitrogen (TN) concentration, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were determined. The results of the study for the quarter (30 September to 31 December, 2003) showed that soil pH was > 5.5 and EC < 4 dS m{sup -1} for all sites and depths and therefore favorable for grass growth. Among the three reclamation treatments, SOC concentration increased from 1.9 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 2003 (newly reclaimed and at baseline) to 11.64 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 1987 (a 5-fold increase) to 20.41 g kg{sup -1} for sites reclaimed in 1978 (a 10- fold increase). However, for sites reclaimed without topsoil application, soil pH, EC, SOC and TN concentrations were similar for both depths. The SOC concentrations in reclaimed sites with topsoil application in 0 to 15 cm depth increased from a base value of 0.7 g kg{sup -1} at the rate of 0.76 g kg{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The high SOC concentration for 0-15 cm layer for site reclaimed in 1978 showed the high carbon sequestration potential upon reclamation and establishment of the grass cover on minesoils.

M. K. Shukla; R. Lal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessment of soil and water conservation methods applied to the cultivated steeplands of southern Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erosion associated with burning and cultivating steepland fields is a common problem throughout Central America. Quantifying the magnitude of effectiveness of soil and water conservation practices such as vetiver grass hedgerows and mulching and the impact associated with the traditional practice of burning fields prior to planting were evaluated using a paired runoff catchment study design. Runoff, soil, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loss observations from three steepland field catchments were measured for storm event(s) over a three-year period (1993-1995). The 0.2 ha field catchments with 60% slopes were monitored in the community of Los Espabeles near Choluteca, Honduras. During the calibration period (1993), all three catchments were managed the same with mulch only. During the treatment period (1994-1995), one catchment combined mulch management with contour vetiver grass hedgerows, one catchment was burned prior to planting, and one catchment served as the control with mulch only. Combining vetiver grass hedgerows with mulching significantly (pgrass hedgerows reduced soil loss more than mulching alone. Not only did vetiver grass form a barrier to runoff and soil loss, it helped protect the integrity of the steepland field against major sloughing events which occurred on the other two fields without vetiver grass. The slash & bum practice significantly (p

Smith, James E

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Data:75dda582-c47b-4744-b0c2-96529aab6608 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dda582-c47b-4744-b0c2-96529aab6608 dda582-c47b-4744-b0c2-96529aab6608 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt HPS- Ornamental Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

260

Data:757f290a-df95-4317-8f36-c47803dda820 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-df95-4317-8f36-c47803dda820 a-df95-4317-8f36-c47803dda820 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Shoe Box Fixture Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Why Sequence Foxtail Millet?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foxtail Millet? Foxtail Millet? Maturing head of foxtail millet. Photo courtesy Andrew Doust, Univ. of Florida Foxtail millet (Setaria italica) is a diploid grass with a relatively small genome (~515 Mb). It is an important grain crop in temperate, subtropical, and tropical Asia and in parts of southern Europe, and is grown for forage in North America, South America, Australia, and North Africa. The genetic map of foxtail millet is highly colinear with that of rice, despite the fact that these lineages last shared a common ancestor more than 50 million years ago. Hence, comparison of the rice and foxtail millet genomes will facilitate reconstruction of the ancestral grass genome. Most important, foxtail millet is a close relative of an important biofuel crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). It is also closely related to pearl millet

262

Data:24af1ad3-35ec-4244-bdf8-c4aa3f85fb13 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5ec-4244-bdf8-c4aa3f85fb13 5ec-4244-bdf8-c4aa3f85fb13 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Acorn Fixture Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

263

DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2011-0001-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10-2011-0001-EA 10-2011-0001-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2011-0001-EA EA at Grass Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Leach Hot Springs Geothermal Exploration Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Consultant JBR Environmental Consultants, Inc. Geothermal Area Grass Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Development Drilling, Exploration Drilling, Well Testing Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 345 NEPA Process Time 274 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

264

Data:F79b3f39-3416-4616-bd86-eca914d50e57 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f39-3416-4616-bd86-eca914d50e57 f39-3416-4616-bd86-eca914d50e57 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 200 Watt HPS-Cobra Head Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

265

Data:5aa9448b-cb1e-4e3b-8856-ddbfd7786864 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

448b-cb1e-4e3b-8856-ddbfd7786864 448b-cb1e-4e3b-8856-ddbfd7786864 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Less than 100 kW - Not dispatched by East Kentucky Power Cooperative Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

266

Microsoft Word - 2005 Smooth Brome 032206 FINAL.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2005 Smooth Brome Monitoring Introduction Smooth brome (Bromus inermis) is an exotic graminoid species that has been used for over a century across much of North America as a revegetation grass. Research has shown the species is an aggressive invader of native plant communities under certain conditions. It often invades native grassland communities, replacing the native plant species, reducing biodiversity, and lowering the wildlife habitat value of an area. The grass has been used in the past at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) for numerous revegetation projects. For the past several years it has been prohibited for use in seed mixtures at the Site. However, numerous locations on the grassland have been invaded by the species and smooth brome circles are

267

Environmental Capital Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group LLC Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Capital Group LLC Place Grass Valley, California Zip 95945 Product String representation "Environmental C ... tartup forward." is too long. References Environmental Capital Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Environmental Capital Group LLC is a company located in Grass Valley, California . References ↑ "Environmental Capital Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Environmental_Capital_Group_LLC&oldid=345025" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

268

CX-002746: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2746: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2746: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002746: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Biomass Production on Marginal Lands Using a Novel Legume/Grass Mixture CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of Illinois proposes to use federal funds to develop a system to produce biomass with little or no nitrogen fertilizer application. They will do this by planting nitrogen fixing legumes along side of the perennial grasses. This project will include field plot establishment and biomass production, botanical composition and chemical characterization of biomass, and project management and reporting. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

269

Data:19d06049-dd1b-4b49-8bed-232300791a06 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

049-dd1b-4b49-8bed-232300791a06 049-dd1b-4b49-8bed-232300791a06 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Less than 100kW - Not dispatched by East Kentucky Power Cooperative - Non-time differentiated rates Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent:

270

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Williams Abstract Williams Abstract Direct and indirect effects of warming, elevated CO2 and non-native plant invasion on carbon and water cycling in semiarid grassland Principle Investigator: David G. Williams, University of Wyoming Co-Investigators: Elise Pendall, University of Wyoming Abstract:: Our proposed work builds on the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment underway in semiarid grassland of Wyoming. We will evaluate relative sensitivities of carbon and water cycles to elevated CO2 and temperature, and non-native plant invasion, separately and in combination, and distinguish direct from indirect effects of these factors on ecosystem physiology. Location: The PHACE experiment is being conducted at the USDA-ARS High Plains Grasslands Research Station, located near Cheyenne, WY. The ecosystem is a northern mixed-grass prairie consisting of C3 and C4 grasses, C3 forbs and C3 sub-shrubs. Laboratory analyses will be conducted at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

271

Bluegrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bluegrass Bluegrass Nature Bulletin No. 298-A March 16, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BLUEGRASS It is a remarkable fact that, of all our cultivated food plants and all our domesticated animals, only the dog was found in both the eastern and western hemispheres before Europeans reached the Americas. From the Old World, too, we have obtained all of the grasses and legumes most important as plants for pasture, forage crops, erosion control and turf-- turf for lawns around our homes and public buildings, or in parks, golf courses, airports and cemeteries. The most commonly known and widely-used of all such grasses, especially in the north-central and northeastern states, is Kentucky Bluegrass.

272

ARM - Blog Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] 1, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] "...and BBOP was chosen for this one." Bookmark and Share The Biomass Burning Observation Project, or BBOP, is a field campaign that is being carried out with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF) of the U.S. Department of Energy this summer to measure the evolution of properties of aerosols produced by biomass burns. Biomass refers to any vegetation-trees, grass, etc.-and thus biomass burns refer to forest fires, grass fires, etc., whether they be natural, such as forest fires started by lightning strikes, or anthropogenic (i.e., man-made), such as crops being burned by farmers. This first newsletter will give an introduction to BBOP, and subsequent newsletters, to be distributed every few weeks, will provide information on the status of the

273

Data:5afd4777-9c31-4ed0-b1de-03159a241ebb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afd4777-9c31-4ed0-b1de-03159a241ebb afd4777-9c31-4ed0-b1de-03159a241ebb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: GS 1- Residential & Farm Sector: Residential Description: AVAl LABILITY Available to all residential and farm consumers. The capacity on individual motors served under this schedule may not exceed ten (1 0) horsepower. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

274

The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu Duration 1:46 Topic Biofuels Bioenergy Credit Energy Department Video SECRETARY STEVEN CHU: This is a photograph of a perennial grass called miscanthus. It was grown without irrigation, without fertilizer. And in the autumn, you just shave it off. You use that to convert it to ethanol. The amount of ethanol in this particular plot of land outside the University of Illinois produces 15 times more ethanol than a similar plot of land if you grew corn, and the energy inputs are far less. So we need to develop methods in order to use these grassy, woody substances and also agricultural waste - wheat straw, rice straw, corn

275

CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

447: Categorical Exclusion Determination 447: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop and Perennial Grass Research CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Alburgh, Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The recipient is proposing to continue work in the same field plot locations as reviewed previously. The recipient is proposing to introduce new grasses to the project that would be cultivated in a similar fashion as the previous National Environmental Policy Act review. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005447.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006589: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006597: Categorical Exclusion Determination

276

Chiggers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chiggers Chiggers Nature Bulletin No. 24 July 21, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation CHIGGERS You see a lot of people scratching themselves every Monday morning these days. It's nothing to be ashamed of; it' s not even funny. Those people happen to be susceptible to "chiggers" which crawl on them as they lie on the grass, or work in the garden, or walk through tall grass and weeds. Chiggers are really harvest-ites, so small they scarcely can be seen by the naked eye, immature six-egged forms of various mites that attach themselves like ticks to the skin and gorge themselves with blood. "Chigger" is probably a corruption of "chigoe" and "jigger", two names for a small flea found in the West Indies and tropical America, which burrows beneath the toenails and skin of the feet to cause painful, sometimes serious ulcers.

277

Data:D18a06b0-6980-42a7-b86f-263405086547 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6b0-6980-42a7-b86f-263405086547 6b0-6980-42a7-b86f-263405086547 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Open Bottom Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

278

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois May 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 10, 2013. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, was in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Erosion on top of the grass covered mound at Plot M continues to be a concern. Bike traffic produces ruts which if left unfixed grow and threaten the protectiveness of the soil cover on top of the mound. In 2010 ANL personnel repaired two areas at Plot M by filling in the ruts with clean top soil and re-seeding. In 2012, additional repairs were made by ANL personnel. Three-

279

Data:Cf75e482-1b6e-48ee-9c83-b4ecd6413ea3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-1b6e-48ee-9c83-b4ecd6413ea3 -1b6e-48ee-9c83-b4ecd6413ea3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Over 100 kW - East Kentucky Power Cooperative Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

280

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 12630 of 29,416 results. 21 - 12630 of 29,416 results. Rebate Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968 (Georgia) This law regulates all surface mining in Georgia, including the coastal zone. It includes provisions to "advance the protection of fish and wildlife and the protection and restoration of land,... http://energy.gov/savings/georgia-surface-mining-act-1968-georgia Rebate Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) The Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (GUFPA) was established to protect the underground utility infrastructure of Georgia. GUFPA mandates that, before starting any mechanized digging or... http://energy.gov/savings/georgia-utility-facility-protection-act-georgia Rebate Grass Conservation Act (Montana) The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Data:7b55475f-65f3-4dbc-a238-2494850b7cf4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

65f3-4dbc-a238-2494850b7cf4 65f3-4dbc-a238-2494850b7cf4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B-2 ( Large Industrial Rate) Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to contracts with demands of 4,000 KW and greater with a monthly energy usage equal to or greater than 425 hours per KW of contract demand. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

282

Moisture Metrics Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.

Schuchmann, Mark

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

EFFICIENCY OF SCAVENGING DEVICES IN DETERMINING FALLOUG. Progress Report No. 6 March 15 to July 31, 1957  

SciTech Connect

A fall-out sample collector was designed and tested for use in collecting samples at the soil surface. The sampler consists of artificial grass and a stainless steel pot. Results are included from preliminary studies on the scavenging properties of artificial grass. The effects of relative humidity, rain, and wind velocity on the efficiency of scavenging devices were investigated. A comparison was made of Sr/sup 90/ fall-out data from samples collected on gummed film and surface soil samples from various locations. Preliminary experiments were performed for the evaluation of devices used in determining air concentration of radioactive fall-out or other particulate matter. (For preceding period see AECU-3435.) (C.H.)

Rosinski, J.

1957-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

prairie restoration index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose Purpose This is the first section of a "How to" guide designed for those individuals interested in restoring an area of land back to native prairie. To better facilitate your search for specific information, select one or all of the main topics associated with prairie parcel restoration listed below. Index History/Introduction of Prairie Restoration Selecting a Site Starting/Planning Seedbed Preparation. Seed (Amount, Acquiring and Preparation) Planting Watering General Identification (Grasses, Forbs, Flowers, Keeping Track) Burning - Enriching Reference Materials, Burning Permit and Seed Sources Information Identification Keys - Grasses and Forbs Illustrated Guide to Native Prairie Species Watch List for Native Prairie Plants This report was written by Lawrence Cwik as part of his participation in

286

POST OAK SAVANNA IN TRANSITION: JUNIPER ENCROACHMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE ALTER GRASSLAND SOIL RESPIRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of carbon flux from soils on a global scale is estimated at over 75 x 1015 g C yr-1. Climate change is projected to affect regional environmental conditions, raising temperatures and altering precipitation patterns. The semi-arid environment of the post oak savannah is an ecotone in transition. As juniper encroachment replaces native grasses, changes in species composition may affect carbon cycling. Given that water is limiting in this warm-temperate climate, changing precipitation patterns coupled with higher temperatures may alter function in addition to the structure of savanna ecosystems. The Texas Warming and Rainfall Manipulation (Texas WaRM) experiment is designed to test global climate change factors and the responses of the dominant tree, eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and grass species, little blue stem (Schizachyrium scoparium). We compared respiratory carbon losses of soils between eastern red cedar and little blue stem plots subjected to warming (1.5 °C) and summer drought treatments to determine the effects of climate change on integrated below-ground CO2 efflux. During the June to August months, soil CO2 efflux rates were determined and compared among treatments in relation to soil temperature and moisture. Overall, juniper and grass plots had relatively equal CO2 respiratory flux, although it generally has more associated roots and microbial biomass. Soil respiration in grass plots appeared more responsive to changes in soil moisture, while juniper maintained more consistent respiration under increasing heat and declining moisture conditions during summer drought. With equivalent soil CO2 efflux and reduced responsiveness to warming or drought, coupled with increased woody biomass, juniper encroachment might have positive effects on the carbon cycle of this transitional biome through increased carbon sequestration. Determining these transitional characteristics of a changing carbon budget will aid in projecting climate change impacts on carbon cycling and provide management options for native and managed vegetation.

Thompson, Bennie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Program on Technology Innovation: Gasification Testing of Various Biomasses in Untreated and Pretreated (Leached) Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove/eliminate troublesome constituents, such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus, presents the opportunity to solve many of the problems found when firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomasses, grasses, and waste materials for energy or production of biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has fostered projects for the development and testing of this potential game-changing biomass pretreatment technology since 2010. As part ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards. (HLW)

Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of an Ecolotree TM CAP for Closure of Coal Ash Disposal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once they are filled or become inactive, coal ash disposal ponds at power plant sites must meet state and federal regulations for permanent closure. In-place closure of ash ponds typically requires an impermeable cover to protect groundwater from leachate generated by stormwater infiltration through the ash. This report documents the construction, maintenance, and performance of the EcolotreeTM Cap (Tree Cap) -- an ash pond closure alternative consisting of poplar trees, grasses, and surface soil amendme...

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Phased Construction of IGCC Plants for CO2 Capture - Effect of Pre-Investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, conceptual plant designs for integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) have taken two approaches regarding the capture of CO2. Baseline plants have placed emphasis on producing power with a minimum cost and maximum efficiency without CO2 capture. The primary rationale for designing these plants without CO2 capture is that there have yet to be regulations promulgated that require the capture and sequestration of CO2. Conversely, grass roots IGCC designs with provisions for CO2 capture and c...

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

postkwonTable2.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: 2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327 http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/postkwon2000/postkwon2000.html Years since Soil sample Rate of change (g m -2 y -1 ) Reference agriculture depth (cm) MAX AVG Cool temperate steppe Cultivated to perennial grass 12 300 110.00 Gebhart et al. (1994) cultivated to abandoned field 50 10 3.10 Burke et al. (1995) cultivated to seeded grass 6 5 0.00 Robles & Burke (1998) cultivated to improved pasture White et al. (1976) russian wildrye 8 7 6.86 crested wheatgrass 8 7 18.87 B-I-ALF (full) 8 7 14.01 B-I-ALF (short) 8 7 34.15 Mine tailing to grass-forb meadow 5 - 80 10 60.00 4.01 Titlyanova et al. (1988) Coal mine spoil to dry grassland 28 - 40

293

Rice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rice Rice Nature Bulletin No. 364-A January 10, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RICE The Biblical saying, "All flesh is grass", is food for thought. Civilization depends on agriculture; and agriculture, fundamentally, depends upon the seeds of grasses that were originally wild: principally wheat, rice and corn; to a lesser extent upon barley, rye, oats and millet, These are the cereal grains that feed us. The seeds, stems and leaves of these and other grasses also sustain the animals upon which we depend for meat. Millet and, later, barley were apparently the first grains to be cultivated but civilization really arrived, probably 10, 000 years ago, when man learned how to grow wheat. He learned how to make bread, the staff of life. About the same time, in southeastern Asia, he learned how to cultivate rice and boil it for food. To lessen his labor, he invented the plow, the wheel and the cart. Here in the western hemisphere he domesticated maize, which we call corn. Until those times the land would not support relatively dense populations nor the central cities that advanced the progress of civilization.

294

Fires - 1946  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fires - 1946 Fires - 1946 Nature Bulletin No. 85 September 28, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRES - 1946 It happens every fall. Thousands of acres of vacant land are being burned-off: some of them because of matches, cigarettes or pipe dottle carelessly tossed aside along the highways and along the trails; some of them set afire by thoughtless boys; most of them deliberately burned by people who believe they will improve the crop of grass next year. That is stupid. And if you start a fire which burns over another person's property you are liable to arrest and heavy penalty, under the Illinois law, unless you have given that person proper notice of your intention. Fires harm -- they never help. The tough seeds and roots of the worthless grasses and weeds survive a fire but the good nutritious grasses and most wildflowers are killed. Further, all the winter food and cover for birds and other wildlife are destroyed.

295

Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

Doust, Andrew, N.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

Tissue-culture investigations into mechanisms of biomass enhancement. Annual report, June 1984-July 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cost effectiveness of biogas production can be considerably improved by producing cultivars of sorghum and Napier grass with increased biomass and tolerance to common soil stresses such as salinity and drought. In addition, increased fertilizer efficiency of plants used for biomass is also desired. Tissue-culture methodologies provide a means for generating improved sorghum and Napier grass cultivars and for selecting cells and plants with tolerance to salinity, drought, and low levels of applied nitrogen fertilizer. To this end, tissue cultures of sorghum and Napier grass were established. Media were devised to enhance high-frequency, long-term plant production from these cultures. Existing methods were considerably improved and the first plant regeneration techniques from callus cultures of sweet sorghum were devised. Over 1000 plants were regenerated from callus cultures during the first year. These are being used in biomass production assays. Tissue culture selection for salt tolerance has been initiated using high levels of NaCl or hydroxyproline in the medium. Sodium chloride stress represents direct selection; hydroxyproline stress selects cells with increased levels of proline, an amino acid known to be associated with salt tolerance. Selection for cell variants efficient in reducing nitrate are planned; cells will be grown in the presence of chlorate, a nitrate analogue. Selections are carried out on either solid or liquid media. Cell suspension systems, allowing more efficient selection, are being developed for all cultivars under study.

Nabors, M.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. Among the three sites chosen for this study one was reclaimed in 1978 (Cumberland), one in 1987 (Switch Grass) and one site was reclaimed in 1994 (Tilton's Run). All three sites were reclaimed with topsoil application and were under continuous grass cover. Eighteen experimental plots were developed on each site. Five fertilization treatments were applied in triplicate on each experimental site. During this quarter, water infiltration tests were performed on the soil surface in the experimental plots. Soil samples were analyzed for soil moisture characteristics. This report presents the data on infiltration rates, volume of transport and storage pores, and available water capacity (AWC) of soil. The infiltration rates after 5 min (i{sub 5}) showed high statistical variability (CV > 0.62) among the three sites. Both steady state infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration showed moderate to high variability (CV > 0.35). The mean values for the infiltration rate after 5 min, steady state infiltration rate, and cumulative infiltration were higher for Switch Grass (2.93 {+-} 2.05 cm min{sup -1}; 0.63 {+-} 0.34 cm min{sup -1}; 113.07 {+-} 39.37 cm) than for Tilton's Run (1.76 {+-} 1.42 cm min{sup -1}; 0.40 {+-} 0.18 cm min{sup -1}; 73.68 {+-} 25.94 cm), and lowest for Cumberland (0.63 {+-} 0.34 cm min{sup -1}; 0.27 {+-} 0.19 cm min{sup -1}; 57.89 {+-} 31.00 cm). The AWC for 0-15 cm soil was highest at Tilton's Run (4.21 {+-} 1.75 cm) followed by Cumberland (3.83 {+-} 0.77 cm) and Switch Grass (3.31 {+-} 0.10 cm). In 15-30 cm depth Switch Grass had higher AWC (3.15 {+-} 0.70 cm) than Tilton's Run (3.00 {+-} 0.43 cm) and Cumberland (2.78 {+-} 0.34 cm). In 30-50 cm depth Tilton's Run had higher AWC (4.31 {+-} 1.25 cm) than Switch Grass (3.18 {+-} 0.70 cm) and Cumberland (2.95 {+-} 1.07 cm). The volumes of transport and storage pores were fairly similar among sites up to 30 cm depth, but were variable for 30-50 cm depth. These preliminary results along with those reported earlier for the third quarter suggest that the management effects are important and indicative of these sources of variability.

M.K. Shukla; K. Lorenz; R. Lal

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effects of Vegetation Structure and Elevation on Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri, LKMR), 1 of 3 subspecies of Sylvilagus palustris, is endemic to the Lower Florida Keys. The LKMR is listed as an endangered species due to predation by feral and free roaming domestic cats (Felis catus) and raccoons (Procyon lotor), road mortality, effects of storm surges, sea level rise, the small declining metapopulation size, and possible habitat loss from hardwood encroachment. The purpose of this study was to determine the current LKMR density on lands managed by the United States Navy, Naval Air Station Key West and evaluate how vegetation structure and patch elevation effect LKMR population density. I conducted fecal pellet counts to determine LKMR density, collected vegetation data using percent composition of ground cover, Robel range pole, and point-centered quarter methods, and obtained data on patch area and elevation. I used simple linear regression to assess the relationship between LKMR density and 9 measured vegetation characteristics, patch area, and patch elevation to determine which variables have an influence on LKMR density and the relationship between them. In my examination of the simple regression models, 6 out of the 11 variables appeared to influence LKMR population density. The average per patch percent composition of nonliving material and grasses, maximum height of vegetation at the range pole, distance to nearest woody vegetation, patch elevation, and visual obstruction readings (VOR) individually accounted for 26.4%, 30.4% , 18.1%, 8.5%, 6.8%, and 1.4% of the variability in LKMR density, respectively. According to the regression models, LKMR density increased in patches with greater amounts of grasses and with greater distance to woody vegetation. Habitat management is vital to the recovery of the LKMR and needs to focus on providing greater amounts of grasses and reducing the amount of woody vegetation encroachment to enhance LKMR population density.

Dedrickson, Angela

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.

M.K. Shukla; K. Lorenz; R. Lal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

McLaughlin, S.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights gained from Brachypodium will inform translational research studies, with applications for the improvement of cereal crops and bioenergy grasses.

Tyler, Ludmila [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Bragg, Jennifer [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Wu, Jiajie [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Vogel, John [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Screening Study for Utilizing Feedstocks Grown on CRP Lands in a Biomass to Ethanol Production Facility: Final Subcontract Report; July 1998  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility study for a cellulosic ethanol plant using grasses grown on Conservation Reserve Program lands in three counties of South Dakota, with several subcomponent appendices. In 1994, there were over 1.8 million acres of CRP lands in South Dakota. This represented approximately 5 percent of the total U.S. cropland enrolled in the CRP. Nearly 200,000 acres of CRP lands were concentrated in three northeastern South Dakota counties: Brown, Marshall and Day. Most of the acreage was planted in Brohm Grass and Western Switchgrass. Technology under development at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and at other institutions, is directed towards the economical production of fuel-grade ethanol from these grasses. The objective of this study is to identify and evaluate a site in northeastern South Dakota which would have the greatest potential for long-term operation of a financially attractive biomass-to-ethanol production facility. The effort shall focus on ethanol marketing issues which would provide for long-term viability of the facility, feedstock production and delivery systems (and possible alternatives), and preliminary engineering considerations for the facility, as well as developing financial pro-formas for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol production facility in northeastern South Dakota. This Final Report summarizes what was learned in the tasks of this project, pulling out the most important aspects of each of the tasks done as part of this study. For greater detail on each area it is advised that the reader refer to the entire reports which are included as appendixes.

American Coalition for Ethanol; Wu, L.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

308

fulltext.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Plant Genetics for Study of the Roles of Root Exudates and Microbes in the Soil Aparna Deshpande, Ana Clara Pontaroli, Srinivasa R. Chaluvadi, Fang Lu, and Jeffrey L. Bennetzen Contents 4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 4.2 Natural Variation and Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis to Identify Alterations in Root Exudate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 4.3 Plant Genetic Determination of Natural Variation in Rhizosphere and Root-Associated Microbes in the Grasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 4.4 Implications and Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 A. Deshpande Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University,

309

Cookstoves for the developing world  

SciTech Connect

Traditional wood, charcoal and coal stoves are used in hundreds of millions of homes. Their design can have a dramatic effcect on energy usage, the environment and community health. Over the past decade government programs, development assistance groups and community-based organizers have undertaken a thorough review of the requirements for successful dissemination of cookstove technology. A new generation of stove programs is now implementing these hard-won lessons. This effort encompasses everything from an examination of stove thermodynamics and materials science to market research and grass-roots educational campaigns. This paper looks at cookstoves in Kenya and programms in China and India. 3 refs.

Kammen, D.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

Triplett, Eric W. (Middleton, WI); Kaeppler, Shawn M. (Oregon, WI); Chelius, Marisa K. (Greeley, CO)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

Skinner, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Great plains coal gasification plant: Technical lessons learned report  

SciTech Connect

In a first of a kind, grass roots plant of the complexity of the Great Plains Gasification Plant the lessons learned are numerous and encompass a wide range of items. This report documents the lessons learned from all phases of the project from preliminary design through the most recent operation of the plant. Based on these lessons learned, suggestions are made for changes and/or process improvements to future synfuel plants. In addition, recommendations are made for research and development in selected areas. 46 refs., 31 figs., 33 tabs.

Delaney, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Former Soviet refineries face modernization, restructuring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A massive modernization and restructuring program is under way in the refining sector of Russia and other former Soviet republics. Economic reforms and resulting economic dislocation following the collapse of the Soviet Union has left refineries in the region grappling with a steep decline and changes in product demand. At the same time, rising oil prices and an aging, dilapidated infrastructure promise a massive shakeout. Even as many refineries in the former Soviet Union (FSU) face possible closure because they are running at a fraction of capacity, a host of revamps, expansions, and grass roots refineries are planned or under way. The paper discusses plans.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sr$sup 90$ MONITORING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Radioassays of milk, soil, grass, and other material located near the Savannah River Plant showed no detectable Sr/sup 90/ due to plant wastes. These assays indicated that the Sr/sup 90/ found in this geographical area (25-mile radius of SRP) was nuclear weapons debris. Sr/sup 90/ was separated from milk by absorption on cation exchange resin. An extraction technique was used in assaying Sr/sup 90/ in all types of samples. Cs/sup 137//Sr/sup 90/ ratios were found to be constant in soil samples. (auth)

Butler, F.E.

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOM in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 2003 (R03-G), in 1973 (R73-F), in 1969 (R69-G), in 1962 (R62-G and R62-F) and in 1957 (R57-F). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three landscape positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The samples were air dried and using wet sieving technique were fractionated into macro (> 2mm), meso (2-0.25 mm) and microaggregate (0.25-0.053 mm). These fractions were weighted separately and water stable aggregation (WSA) and geometric mean (GMD) and mean weight (MWD) diameters of aggregates were obtained. The soil C and N concentrations were also determined on these aggregate fractions. Analysis of mean values showed that in general, WSA and MWD of aggregates increased with increasing duration since reclamation or age of reclaimed soil for all three landscape positions and two depths in sites under continuous grass. The forest sites were relatively older than grass sites and therefore WSA or MWD of aggregates did not show any increases with age since reclamation. The lower WSA in R57-F site than R73-F clearly showed the effect of soil erosion on aggregate stability. Higher aggregation and aggregate diameters in R73-F than R62-F and R57-F also showed the importance of reclamation with topsoil application on improving soil structure. Soil C and N concentrations were lowest for the site reclaimed in year 2003 in each aggregate fraction for both depths. The higher C and N concentrations each aggregate size fraction in older sites than the newly reclaimed site demonstrated the sequestration potential of younger sites.

M.K. Shukla; R. Lal

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Passive solar rondavel in the mountains of Lesotho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction and performance of a passie solar rondavel in Lesotho, a country in Southern Africa is described. A rondavel is a round building with stone walls and thatching grass for the roof. The one door is usually the major source of natural light and non-combusted heat energy in these houses which average about four meters in diameter. This new design is one possible response to addressing the problem of heating, without relying on the open fire combustion of dung and wood, two widely used fuels which are in short supply.

Klein, G.; Wyatt, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Stigmergy Approach for Open Source Software Developer Community Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The stigmergy collaboration approach provides a hypothesized explanation about how online groups work together. In this research, we presented a stigmergy approach for building an agent based open source software (OSS) developer community collaboration simulation. We used group of actors who collaborate on OSS projects as our frame of reference and investigated how the choices actors make in contribution their work on the projects determinate the global status of the whole OSS projects. In our simulation, the forum posts and project codes served as the digital pheromone and the modified Pierre-Paul Grasse pheromone model is used for computing developer agent behaviors selection probability.

Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Ohio Sites 1 (Mixed Hay) and 2 (Corn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work conducted during 2008–2010 were to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) in eastern Ohio and to assess the potential for environmental effects of the use of FGDG. Two field experiments were conducted at the eastern Ohio research site, one involving a mixed-grass hay field and the other a corn (Zea mays L.) field. FGDG and mined gypsum product were applied one time at rates of 0.2, 2.0, and 20 megagrams ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluating possible cap and trade legislation on cellulosic feedstock availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated, socioeconomic biogeophysical model is used to analyze the interactions of cap-and-trade legislation and the Renewable Fuels Standard. Five alternative policy scenarios were considered with the purpose of identifying policies that act in a synergistic manner to reduce carbon emissions, increase economic returns to agriculture, and adequately meet ethanol mandates.We conclude that climate and energy policies can best be implemented together by offering carbon offset payments to conservation tillage, herbaceous grasses for biomass, and by constraining crop residue removal for ethanol feedstocks to carbon neutral level.

Hellwinckel, C.M.; West, Tristram O.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Perlack, Robert D.

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Presented at: BioEnergy ‘98- The Eighth Biennial National Bioenergy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The new power plants are also expected to economically utilize annual plant growth materials (such as rice hulls, cotton gin trash, nut shells, and various straws, grasses, and animal manures) that are not normally considered as fuel for power plants. This paper summarizes the new power generation concept with emphasis on the engineering challenges presented by the gas turbine component.

A Small; Scale Biomass; Fueled Gas; Turbine Power Plant; C. R. Purvis; J. D. Craig

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Microsoft Word - TR05-24.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hallam, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska May 2011 Page 1 2011 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) was inspected on April 27, 2011. The IHX building, the grass cover on the foundation of the former reactor building, and DOE groundwater monitoring wells, were all in good shape. Groundwater was sampled in June 2010. Gross alpha and beta were the only parameters that were detected at statistically significant concentrations. The gross alpha and beta activity concentrations observed were consistent with values previously observed and are attributed to naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium and uranium decay chain products) in the groundwater.

325

Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) was initiated by a coalition of regional Planning Authorities. These Planning Authorities are entities listed on the NERC compliance registry as Planning Authorities and represent the entire Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC was founded to be a broad-based, transparent collaborative process among all interested stakeholders: State and Federal policy makers Consumer and environmental interests Transmission Planning Authorities Market participants generating, transmitting or consuming electricity within the Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC will provide a grass-roots approach which builds upon the regional

326

Data:D8adc67e-a534-4b23-aec0-6dd04b55c226 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

adc67e-a534-4b23-aec0-6dd04b55c226 adc67e-a534-4b23-aec0-6dd04b55c226 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Over 100 kW - Not dispatched by East Kentucky Power Cooperative Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

327

Data:Cac705fe-c35e-4787-bd53-5c55de0631b4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cac705fe-c35e-4787-bd53-5c55de0631b4 Cac705fe-c35e-4787-bd53-5c55de0631b4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt HPS Directional Flood Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

328

Data:F34100c1-288d-4666-97bf-505188f5ac04 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c1-288d-4666-97bf-505188f5ac04 c1-288d-4666-97bf-505188f5ac04 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt HPS- Open Bottom Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

329

The Bur Oak  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bur Oak Bur Oak Nature Bulletin No. 708 March 9, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon. President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE BUR OAK The state tree of Illinois is the "native oak". It should be the Bur Oak. As Aldo Leopold discerned: "When school children vote on a state bird, flower, or tree, they are not making a decision; they are merely ratifying history". Ergo, when the first settlers gazed westward across the vast prairies of Illinois, bur oaks were the burly trees on knolls and ridges which stood like ships in a sea of grass. Those oak openings, as they are called, were remarkable features of the tall grass prairies in Indiana, Illinois, and the prairie peninsulas that extended northward into Michigan and Wisconsin. Many early travelers wrote lyrical descriptions of those park-like openings "without a twig of underbrush". . . "where deer grazed leisurely like sheep"...."so open that a cabriolet could have been driven through them for miles".

330

Data:Bba2489c-2c8a-4ccf-8829-fd386a00cff0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bba2489c-2c8a-4ccf-8829-fd386a00cff0 Bba2489c-2c8a-4ccf-8829-fd386a00cff0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: GS-3 (Residential and Farm Time-of-Day Rate) Sector: Residential Description: Available to all consumers eligible for the Tariff GS-1, Residential and Farm. The capacity on individual motors served under this schedule may not exceed ten (IO) horsepower. Consumers must remain on this rate schedule for one (I) year. This rate is not available for the direct load control credits Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

331

Data:Ce2d8931-65c2-402a-ad6f-e2457290a745 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

31-65c2-402a-ad6f-e2457290a745 31-65c2-402a-ad6f-e2457290a745 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: 175 Watt MV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

332

Data:6954b465-9e26-4da5-a196-2b4027106c55 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

65-9e26-4da5-a196-2b4027106c55 65-9e26-4da5-a196-2b4027106c55 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt MV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

333

Data:196a4534-b274-4fe7-8ac0-7c76cd538f67 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

34-b274-4fe7-8ac0-7c76cd538f67 34-b274-4fe7-8ac0-7c76cd538f67 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt MH Directional Flood Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

334

Data:Fe4b848d-7e6c-48f7-a6fb-1829e55b4817 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b848d-7e6c-48f7-a6fb-1829e55b4817 b848d-7e6c-48f7-a6fb-1829e55b4817 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Cobra Head Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

335

Data:588842fb-8872-4812-b6cc-93c1d04a2f6f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8872-4812-b6cc-93c1d04a2f6f 8872-4812-b6cc-93c1d04a2f6f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule G1- Large industrial Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to contracts with demand of 15,000 kW and greater with a monthly energy usage .equal to or greater than 438 k'wln per kW of contract demand. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

336

Data:08632a5a-e008-45a5-a0db-f68ad1115427 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-e008-45a5-a0db-f68ad1115427 a-e008-45a5-a0db-f68ad1115427 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: LP-1 Large Power (101 KW to 500 KW) Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

337

Data:0421edea-f61a-4940-890d-d35885ae6b35 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

edea-f61a-4940-890d-d35885ae6b35 edea-f61a-4940-890d-d35885ae6b35 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Ornamental Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

338

Data:883a3779-6ddd-4acb-b35d-5553b0f67be2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

79-6ddd-4acb-b35d-5553b0f67be2 79-6ddd-4acb-b35d-5553b0f67be2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Less than 100 kW Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

339

Data:9906920a-d627-4cf0-a1db-edd31ea895f1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-d627-4cf0-a1db-edd31ea895f1 a-d627-4cf0-a1db-edd31ea895f1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: LP-2 Large Power (over 500 KW) Sector: Industrial Description: Available to all commercial and industrial consumers whose contracted kilowatt demand shall exceed 500 kW for all usage subject to the established rules and regulations. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

340

Data:8bff045b-1afd-4e8a-a16f-5b213a8708e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b-1afd-4e8a-a16f-5b213a8708e4 b-1afd-4e8a-a16f-5b213a8708e4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt HPS- Colonial Fixture Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Data:4bb1c92c-b6a7-4fc0-be39-89ee6f7d520d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-b6a7-4fc0-be39-89ee6f7d520d c-b6a7-4fc0-be39-89ee6f7d520d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B-1 ( Large Industrial Rate) Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

342

Data:38e7a926-6345-4991-88c1-8a6dd193a5f5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6345-4991-88c1-8a6dd193a5f5 6345-4991-88c1-8a6dd193a5f5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 Watt HPS- Ornamental Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

343

Data:Ead2cbdb-2126-45fe-a85d-ac94ce28685d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ead2cbdb-2126-45fe-a85d-ac94ce28685d Ead2cbdb-2126-45fe-a85d-ac94ce28685d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt HPS- Cobra Head (Aluminum Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

344

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS OF 90SR AND 137CS CONCENTRATIONS IN AN ECOSYSTEM OF THE 'RED FOREST' AREA IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the most highly contaminated region of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone: the 'Red Forest' site, the accumulation of the major dose-affecting radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs) within the components of an ecological system encompassing 3,000 m{sup 2} were characterized. The sampled components included soils (top 0-10 cm depth), Molina caerulea (blue moor grass), Camponotus vagus (carpenter ants) and Pelobates fuscus (spade-footed toad). In a comparison among the components of this ecosystem, the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs concentrations measured in 40 separate grids exhibited significant differences, while the frequency distribution of the values were close to a logarithmically normal leptokurtic distribution with a significant right-side skew. While it is important to identify localized areas of high contamination or 'hot spots,' including these values in the arithmetic mean may overestimate the exposure risk. In component sample sets that exhibited logarithmically normal distribution, the geometrical mean more accurately characterizes a site. Ideally, risk assessment is most confidently achieved when the arithmetic and geometrical means are most similar, meaning the distribution approaches normal. Through bioaccumulation, the highest concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were measured in the blue moor grass and spade-footed toad. These components also possessed distribution parameters that shifted toward a normal distribution.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Caldwell, E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

AN EVALUATION OF PYROLYSIS OIL PROPERTIES AND CHEMISTRY AS RELATED TO PROCESS AND UPGRADE CONDITIONS WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION TO PIPELINE SHIPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One factor limiting the development of commercial biomass pyrolysis is challenges related to the transportation of the produced pyrolysis oil. The oil has different chemical and physical properties than crude oil, including more water and oxygen and has lower H/C ratio, higher specific gravity and density, higher acidity, and lower energy content. These differences could limit its ability to be transported by existing petroleum pipelines. Pyrolysis oil can also be treated, normally by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, and approaches crude oil and petroleum condensates at higher severity levels. This improvement also results in lower liquid yield and high hydrogen consumption. Biomass resources for pyrolysis are expected to become plentiful and widely distributed in the future, mainly through the use of crop residuals and growing of energy crops such as perennial grasses, annual grasses, and woody crops. Crude oil pipelines are less well distributed and, when evaluated on a county level, could access about 18% of the total biomass supply. States with high potential include Texas, Oklahoma, California, and Louisiana. In this study, published data on pyrolysis oil was compiled into a data set along with bio-source source material, pyrolysis reactor conditions, and upgrading conditions for comparison to typical crude oils. Data of this type is expected to be useful in understanding the properties and chemistry and shipment of pyrolysis oil to refineries, where it can be further processed to fuel or used as a source of process heat.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Boyd, Alison C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Using ISC & GIS to predict sulfur deposition from coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research project was to determine if atmospheric sources have the potential of contributing significantly to the sulfur content of grazed forage. Sulfur deposition resulting from sulfur dioxide emissions from coal- fired power plants was predicted utilizing the Industrial Source Complex Long-Term (ISCLT2) Model for the areas ofa interest in East Texas. GRASS, a geographical information system (GIS), was used to pull together all predicted values from ISCLT2 and present them in the form of predicted sulfur deposition maps with different ranges of deposition. Two field trips to NE Texas were taken to obtain data on soil and forage sulfur content. GRASS was used extensively in the planning process before each trip and the global positioning system was also used extensively during the trip to locate sampling sites and to obtain the geographical location of each site. The methodology developed predicts that 11 to 21 kg sulfur/ha per year can be deposited as far as 100 to 160 km from the source. Data from both field trips do not show a statistical significant relation between predicted sulfur deposition and either soil or forage sulfur content. However, the data do show that there is a trend of increasing soil and forage sulfur content as predicted sulfur deposition increases.

Lopez, Jose Ignacio

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Forage uptake of uranium series radionuclides in the vicinity of the anaconda uranium mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemical analysis was performed on samples of soil and eight species of common vegetation growing on the Anaconda uranium mill site, located in New Mexico. The concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210 in these forage plants were determined. The sampling procedures and analytical laboratory methods used are described. The highest radionuclide concentration found in a forage species was 130 pCi of Ra-226 per gram dry weight for grass growing on the main tailings pile at Anaconda, where the surface soil activity of Ra-226 was 236 pCi/g. A comparison of shoots activity with that of roots and soil was used to determine a distribution index and uptake coefficient for each species. The distribution index, the ratio of root activity to shoot activity, ranged from 0.30 (Th-230) in galleta grass (Hilaria jamesii) to 38.0 (Ra-226) in Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides). In nearly all instances, the roots contained higher radionuclide concentrations. The uptake coefficient, the ratio of vegetation activity to soil activity, ranged from 0.69 (U-238) in Indian ricegrass roots to 0.01 (U-238) in four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescans) shoots. The range of radionuclide concentrations in plants growing on the Anaconda mill site is compared to that in vegetation from a control site 20 km away.

Rayno, D.R.; Momeni, M.H.; Sabau, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria for Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eolian dispersion of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments is an emerging global issue for which economical remediation alternatives are needed. Phytostabilization, the revegetation of these sites with native plants, is one such alternative. Revegetation often requires the addition of bulky amendments such as compost which greatly increases cost. We report the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) to enhance the revegetation of mine tailings and minimize the need for compost amendment. Twenty promising PGPB isolates were used as seed inoculants in a series of greenhouse studies to examine revegetation of an extremely acidic, high metal content tailings sample previously shown to require 15% compost amendment for normal plant growth. Several isolates significantly enhanced growth of two native species, quailbush and buffalo grass, in tailings. In this study, PGPB/compost outcomes were plant specific; for quailbush, PGPB were most effective in combination with 10% compost addition while for buffalo grass, PGPB enhanced growth in the complete absence of compost. Results indicate that selected PGPB can improve plant establishment and reduce the need for compost amendment. Further, PGPB activities necessary for aiding plant growth in mine tailings likely include tolerance to acidic pH and metals.

Grandlic, C.J.; Mendez, M.O.; Chorover, J.; Machado, B.; Maier, R.M.

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental GIS database for the White Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The European Commission INCO Copernicus project was promoted in autumn 2000 as "Sustainable management of the marine ecosystem and living resources of the White Sea". One of the scientific and technical objectives is t o create dedicated environmental, ecological and socio-economic databases integrated in a Geographical Information System (GIS) for the White Sea region. To ensure the access to the database development also in the future, the open source gis approach as GRASS5.0 was chosen [1]. Into the White Sea GRASS-GIS database the bathymetry data with resolution 1 by 0.5 minutes was used to model the bottom surface of the White Sea. Russian coordinate system of Pulkova 42 was used. DCW vector data were used for the shoreline and the White Sea was divided to 7 traditional geographic areas. Raster layer of the bathymetry was divided with vector polygons to appropriate geographic areas and the area and volume were calculated. The hydrological and chemical parameters as

Seppo Kaitala; Anatoly Shavykin; Vladimir A. Volkov

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Bamboo: An Overlooked Biomass Resource?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bamboo is the common term applied to a broad group (1250 species) of large woody grasses, ranging from 10 cm to 40 m in height. Already in everyday use by about 2.5 billion people, mostly for fiber and food within Asia, bamboo may have potential as a bioenergy or fiber crop for niche markets, although some reports of its high productivity seem to be exaggerated. Literature on bamboo productivity is scarce, with most reports coming from various parts of Asia. There is little evidence overall that bamboo is significantly more productive than many other candidate bioenergy crops, but it shares a number of desirable fuel characteristics with certain other bioenergy feedstocks, such as low ash content and alkali index. Its heating value is lower than many woody biomass feedstocks but higher than most agricultural residues, grasses and straws. Although non-fuel applications of bamboo biomass may be actually more profitable than energy recovery, there may also be potential for co-productio n of bioenergy together with other bamboo processing. A significant drawback is the difficulty of selective breeding, given the lack of knowledge of flowering physiology. Further research is also required on propagation techniques, establishment and stand management, and mechanized harvesting needs to be developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

An assessment of management practices of wood and wood-related wastes in the urban environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that yard waste{sup 1} accounts for approximately 16% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream (US EPA, 1994). Until recently, specific data and related information on this component of the (MSW) stream has been limited. The purposes of this study, phase two of the three-phase assessment of urban wood waste issues, are to assess and describe current alternatives to landfills for urban wood waste management; provide guidance on the management of urban wood waste to organizations that produce or manage wood waste; and clarify state regulatory and policy positions affecting these organizations. For this study, urban wood waste is defined as solid waste generated by tree and landscape maintenance services (public and private). Urban wood waste includes the following materials: unchipped mixed wood, unchipped logs, and unchipped tops and brush; clearing and grubbing waste; fall leaves and grass clippings; and chips and whole stumps. Construction and demolition debris and consumer-generated yard waste are not included in this study. Generators of urban wood waste include various organizations; municipal, county, and commercial tree care divisions; nurseries, orchards, and golf courses; municipal park and recreation departments; and electric and telephone utility power line maintenance, excavator and land clearance, and landscape organizations. (1) US EPA defines yard waste as ''yard trimmings'' which includes ''grass, leaves and tree brush trimmings from residential, institutional, and commercial sources.''

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (United States). Center for Tropical Research & Education

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Switchgrass biomass energy storage project. Final report, September 23, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the Chariton Valley RC&D Inc., a USDA-sponsored rural development organization, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Energy Bureau (IDNR-EB), and IES Utilities, a major Iowa energy company, is directed at the development of markets for energy crops in southern Iowa. This effort is part of a statewide coalition of public and private interests cooperating to merge Iowa`s agricultural potential and its long-term energy requirements to develop locally sustainable sources of biomass fuel. The four-county Chariton Valley RC&D area (Lucas, Wayne, Appanoose and Monroe counties) is the site of one of eleven NREL/EPRI feasibility studies directed at the potential of biomass power. The focus of renewable energy development in the region has centered around the use of swithgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.). This native Iowa grass is one of the most promising sustainable biomass fuel crops. According to investigations by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), switchgrass has the most potential of all the perennial grasses and legumes evaluated for biomass production.

Miller, G.A.; Teel, A.; Brown, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Metal Interactions at the Biochar-Water Interface: Energetics and Structure-Sorption Relationships Elucidated by Flow Adsorption Microcalorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in biochars and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of metals have increased in recent years. However, a systematic understanding of the mechanisms involved in biochar-metal interactions and conditions under which a given mechanism is predominant is still needed. We used flow adsorption micro-calorimetry to study structure-sorption relationships between twelve plant-derived biochars and two metals of different ionization potential (Ip). Biochar structure influenced the amount of K+ (Ip = 419 kJ mol-1) or Cd(II) (Ip = 868 kJ mol-17 ) sorption but had no effect on the mechanism of sorption. Irrespective of the biochar, K+ sorption was exothermic, surface-controlled and occurred via an ion-exchange mechanism on negatively- charged sites with molar heats of adsorption (_Hads) of -4 kJ mol-1 on wood versus -8 kJ mol-1 on grass biochars. In contrast, Cd(II) sorption was endothermic and favored surface complexation on uncharged biochar surfaces with _Hads of around +17 kJ mol-1. Cadmium sorption transitioned from surface- to diffusion-controlled on biochars formed at ? 350 oC and _Hads for Cd(II) sorption was the same on grass and wood biochars. We concluded that, in general, metals with lower Ip favor electrostatic interactions with biochars, while metals of higher Ip favor more covalent-like interactions.

Harvey, Omar R.; Herbert, Bruce; Rhue, Roy D.; Kuo, Li-Jung

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Weed Seeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weed Seeds Weed Seeds Nature Bulletin No. 469-A November 4, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WEED SEEDS The study of weed seeds can be fascinating, educational, and an inspiration for artistic designs -- especially if you use a good magnifying glass or hand lens. People wonder why weeds are so aggressive; why they succeed where desirable plants fail; why they thrive in spite of droughts, grass fires, mowing and cultivation. One answer, in the case of most weeds, can be found in the seeds that they produce. Some weed seeds have such a hard durable outer coat that they are unharmed by an ordinary grass fire. If eaten by a bird or a grazing animal, they are not digested in its stomach and are widely distributed. Some kinds have such vitality that they have been known to sprout and grow when brought to the surface after being buried deeply for many years. Many weed seeds have interesting appendages which cause them to be carried long distances by winds or which enable them to cling to passing animals.

358

Data:B6e48264-6b3c-43db-9436-fedeb9a8ab8d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e48264-6b3c-43db-9436-fedeb9a8ab8d e48264-6b3c-43db-9436-fedeb9a8ab8d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 Watt HP (Colonial) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

359

Data:9c4226db-e4b9-4370-b67b-1dec57de29cb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26db-e4b9-4370-b67b-1dec57de29cb 26db-e4b9-4370-b67b-1dec57de29cb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 5- Renewable Resource Power Service Sector: Description: This schedule shall be made available to any consumer in the following listed block amounts: 100 kwh Block (Minimum size) or Greater And where the consumer will contract with the Cooperative to purchase these blocks under this Retail Rider. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf

360

Data:7bc41f5d-3b7c-4f83-930b-246412ad4b4b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1f5d-3b7c-4f83-930b-246412ad4b4b 1f5d-3b7c-4f83-930b-246412ad4b4b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Co generation & Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule Less than 100 kW - East Kentucky Power Cooperative - Non-Time Differentiated Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/125/1%20COOP,%20KY,%20Blue%20Grass%20Energy%20Tariff-2.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO  

SciTech Connect

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. During this quarter, bulk and core soil samples were collected from all 13 experimental sites for 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, and 30-50 cm depths. In addition, 54 experimental plots (4 x 4 m) were established at three separate locations on reclaimed minesites to assess the influence of compost application on SOC during project period 2. This report presents the results from two sites reclaimed during 1978. The first site is under grass and the other under forest cover. The soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were determined for these two sites on a 20 x 20 m grid. The preliminary analysis showed that the {rho}{sub b} ranged from 0.88 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.16 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 0.91 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.32 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.93 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths in Cumberland tree site, and it's statistical variability was low. The variability in {rho}{sub b} was also low in Wilds grass site and ranged from 0.82 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} for 0-15 cm, 1.04 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.37 Mg m{sup -3} for 15-30 cm, and 1.18 Mg m{sup -3} to 1.83 Mg m{sup -3} for 30-50 cm depths. The {rho}{sub b} showed strong spatial dependence for 0-15 cm depth only in the Cumberland tree site. The SOC concentrations and stocks were highly variable with CV > 0.36 from all depths in both Wilds grass site and Cumberland tree site. The SOC stocks showed strong spatial dependence for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths and moderate to strong for 20-50 cm depth in the Cumberland tree site. In contrast, in Wilds grass site, {rho}{sub b} was weakly and SOC stocks moderately spatially dependent for all depths. These preliminary results suggest that the management effects are important and indicative of these sources of variability.

M.K. Shukla; R. Lal

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Marker-Assisted Verification of Hybrids in Pearl Millet-Napiergrass (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br. x Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marker-Assisted Verification of Hybrids in Pearl Millet-Napiergrass (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br. x Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.). (December 2011) Charlie D. Dowling, III, B.S., College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Russell W. Jessup A high-biomass perennial grass that is directly seeded using existing farm equipment can reduce both planting and overall input costs. Three cytoplasmic male-sterile cms A-lines and four fertile genotypes of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br.) and one novel pearl millet selection from the Perennial Grass Breeding Program at Texas A&M University were selected to cross with napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.). The pearl millet parents were chosen based on characteristics such as basal tillering, plant height, and days to anthesis. Three napiergrass accessions from the Perennial Grass Breeding Program and the cultivar Merkeron were used as pollinators for these crosses. The cms and fertile pearl millet accessions produced full heads of seed when pollinated with napiergrass. There were a large range of seed sizes and weights for each hybrid family, and the seed were separated into four size classes. The weight differences from the largest to smallest class of seed varied by more than 30%. All of the seed classes germinated, and seed size, in this case, was completely unrelated to the ability to germinate. 100% germination was observed in five seed size classes for both PMN iv hybrids, and 90% germination was observed in three of the eight classes. Essentially all of the hybrid seed recovered from the original pearl millet x napiergrass crosses germinated, but all of the F 1 hybrids were sterile in that none of them produced viable seed. Flow cytometry could not be used to identify the hybrids because the DNA content of pearl millet and napiergrass were essentially the same even though distinct 2C and 4C peaks were seen from the diploid pearl millet. From the 58 EST-SSRs surveyed in the bulked segregate analysis, several were heterozygous dominant and many were homozygous dominant and hemizygous at its particular loci. Seven hemizygous EST-SSRs were identified for Merkeron, seven for PEPU09FL01, eight for PEPU09FL02, and six for PEPU09FL03. These markers are extremely valuable to any pearl millet x napiergrass hybridization program because they provide a means whereby the hybrids can be easily identified. Identification of hemizygous pearl millet markers will also assist in future DNA sequencing and also in a marker-assisted breeding program.

Dowling, Charlie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 12 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. nature biotechnology advance online publication  A r t i c l e s Grasses of the genus Setaria occur in natural and agricultural eco- systems worldwide, from the tropical forage S. sphacelata (golden timothygrass) to the invasive S. viridis (green foxtail) and S. verticil- lata (hooked bristlegrass) populations that can be found in the farthest northern reaches of Canada. Five Setaria species, S. faberii (giant fox- tail), S. viridis, S. pumila (yellow foxtail), S. geniculata (knotroot foxtail) and S. verticillata, are problematic weeds 1 . S. viridis is among the most widespread plant species on the planet, and is problematic for crop production due to its repeated evolution of herbicide resistance 2 . In Northern China, around 6,000 BC, foxtail millet was domesticated

365

Why Sequence Switchgrass?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Switchgrass? Switchgrass? A long-standing mission of the DOE has been to develop alternative sources of energy from biomass, and with good reason President George W. Bush specifically mentioned switchgrass as a promising energy crop in his 2006 State of the Union Address. This native grass has many traits that make it well suited for use as an energy feedstock. Yields of switchgrass are high, averaging 7 tons per acre in unirrigated field trials with some lines yielding up to 10 tons per acre. Production costs are low because of the plant's low nutrient use, minimal pesticide requirements, propagation by seed, and perennial growth habit. Switchgrass can be harvested with conventional haying equipment, and its wide adaptability allows it to be grown productively across a large geographic area, including marginal

366

CX-001239: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vegetation Test Plots; National Wind Technology Center - SunEdison 1-Megawatt Photovoltaic Array; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking Number 10-013 CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.3 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office In 2002, a National Environmental Policy Act determination was signed for the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) DOE/EA-1378. This EA included the installation of an eight acre photovoltaic (PV) array located at the western edge of the NWTC, previously occupied by native grasses. The EA also identified reclaiming the areas not

367

CX-007662: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Categorical Exclusion Determination 62: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007662: Categorical Exclusion Determination Parking Lot Construction North of 706-1F CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 11/21/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Mixed Oxide Services proposes the construction of 28 gravel parking spaces on a 0.17-acre site located approximately 100 feet north of 706-1F. No excavation will be required. The grass will be cut, filter fabric will be placed on the ground, and crushed stone will be placed on top of the fabric to an approximate depth of two inches. Parking blocks will be used to separate the parking stalls and to serve as stops at the north end of each stall. Parking blocks will be secured using two-foot-long anchor pins. Ground-penetrating radar will be used to survey the area prior to anchor

368

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 20210 of 26,764 results. 01 - 20210 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: City of Saint Paul Solar District Heating CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): St. Paul, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005374-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop and Perennial Grass Research CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Alburgh, Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005447-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005308: Categorical Exclusion Determination

369

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purpose, Need and Issues Purpose, Need and Issues S-1 Summary In this summary: ΠPurpose, Need, and Issues ΠMethods and Their Impacts ΠPlanning Steps ΠProgram Alternatives and Their Impacts Purpose, Need and Issues Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 15,000 miles of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure S-1.) Those states offer a great diversity of vegetation (from trees to brush to grasses), which can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, or interfere with our ability to maintain our system. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control

370

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs.

371

amchitka.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of of Amchitka, Alaska, Site Site Description and History Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and

372

2004 Annual Inspection for the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for the for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 16, 2008, to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. Results of the inspection conclude that the site is in excellent condition. Vegetation control activities (mow and spray) have been effective in reducing the populations of weed species present at the site. An area of poison hemlock re-growth and an area of poison ivy were identified during the inspection. Although the site is currently mowed twice a year, the grass was rather high at the time of the inspection. It is recommended that the frequency of

373

2009 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hallam, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska May 2013 Page 1 2013 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) was inspected on May 1, 2013. The IHX building and the grass cover on the foundation of the former reactor building, were in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. There are 19 groundwater monitoring wells at the Hallam site. Four of the 19 wells are flush mount in design and are locked using a special tool. The other 15 wells require a pad lock. It was reported in June 2012, as the wells were being sampled, that the pad locks were hard to work and needed to be replaced. All of the 15 wells requiring pad locks received a new lock during the

374

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic diversity and structure of natural and agronomic switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) populations Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao * C. Neal Stewart Jr. * Charles Kwit Received: 17 March 2012 / Accepted: 16 August 2012 Ó Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012 Abstract Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) is an obligate outcrossing C 4 perennial prairie grass cur- rently being pursued for the production of lignocellu- losic ethanol. Commercial production of switchgrass for bioenergy has increased substantially in the United States. Understanding the degree of native genetic diversity within and among switchgrass populations will facilitate effective germplasm improvement, conservation, and management programs. In this study, the genetic diversity and differentiation among natural and agronomic switchgrass populations were analyzed at the molecular level by

375

Grasshopper Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grasshopper Biology Grasshopper Biology Name: s. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My son found a grasshopper and put it in a fish bowl with cover, and we need to know what to feed it? we have it some lettuce and apple and a bit of water. Replies: Sounds ok so far, most any kind of green plant should be ok, doubt it will pay too much attention to the water. Don't expect it to live very long though. J. Elliott Hello, Grasshoppers eat green vegetation of various kinds. They especially love tall grass. The greener the better. Clip a variety of plants from a nearby unmowed ditch or vacant lot and place them in a short container of water and place the container of water and plants in your fish bowl. The grasshopper will "eat it up". Wayne Vanderploeg River Trail Nature Center

376

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mine Soils of Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 Heino.Beckert@netl.doe.gov Rattan Lal Principal Investigator Ohio State University School of Natural Resources 2021 Coffey Road Columbus, OH 43210 614-292-9069 lal1@osu.edu Carbon SequeStration in reClaimed mine SoilS of ohio Background Prior to 1972, surface coal mining in Ohio was performed by removing the soil and rock above the coal deposit (known as overburden) during mining operations. Because specific reclamation guidelines did not exist at the time, the overburden was not replaced and the mined site was simply planted to grass or trees, without performing grading or reclamation. After 1972, the Ohio Mineland Reclamation Act mandated that mined sites be graded to restore their original topography and

377

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Project Information Project Title: Restoration of 73 SX 1 OH DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring this location 73 SX 10H. What are the environmental Date: 3/3/2010 Contractor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. We 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marker. 3. What is the duration of the project? Flush flowline and remove it.Then we will till the location and plant with native grasses. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig, 3-4 days etc.)? The equipment to be used will be a backhoe, tiller, dumptruck, and welder.

378

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

379

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

283 283 Project Information Project Title: Restoration of61 -36-SX-10 DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Ove rview We will be restoring this location 61 -36-SX-10. What are the environmental Da te: 2-9-2010 Cont rac tor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. We 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marlgrasses. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (worl< over rig, drilling rig, 3-4 days etc.)? The equipment to be used will be a backhoe, tiller, dumptruck. and welder.

380

Molar Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molar Growth Molar Growth Name: Daniel Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What animals have molars that grow continuously ? Replies: No mammals that I or my colleagues are aware of, only some few whose incisors grow continuously. J. Elliott Most vertebrates are "polyphyodonts" meaning that they replace teeth continuously through out their lives. All the teeth aren't replaced at once, but in waves so that the animals always have functional teeth around those that are lost. Most mammals are "diphyodonts", which means that they have only 2 sets of teeth: baby teeth and adult teeth. The teeth of herbivore mammals, those which eat grasses, seem to grow throughout their lives. But really, the teeth are very long and extend far down into the jaws. They gradually move up in the jaw toward the surface over time, with the area beneath them filling in with bone.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Kentucky/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Kentucky/Incentives < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Financial Incentive Programs for Kentucky 2 Rules, Regulations and Policies for Kentucky Download All Financial Incentives and Policies for Kentucky CSV (rows 1 - 125) Financial Incentive Programs for Kentucky Download Financial Incentives for Kentucky CSV (rows 1 - 70) Incentive Incentive Type Active Atmos Energy - Natural Gas and Weatherization Efficiency Program (Kentucky) Utility Rebate Program Yes Biomass Energy Grants (Kentucky) State Grant Program No Blue Grass Energy - Heating System Tune-Up Discount (Kentucky) Utility Rebate Program No

382

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 23640 of 28,905 results. 31 - 23640 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop and Perennial Grass Research CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Alburgh, Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005447-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Parking Lot South of Building 16-35 CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 02/02/2011 Location(s): Amarillo, Texas Office(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Pantex Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005278-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

383

portfolioJan2006_final_v2.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baseline Baseline ecological information is needed to assist in management decisions. There is an abundance of data collection and monitoring to be conducted. Approach Interns, through the Office of Educational Programs, spend 10 weeks using radio telemetry, GPS, GIS, and conducting field research. Benefits Students obtain hands on experience learning field techniques and using GIS and GPS systems. BNL gains a wealth of information that the current staff would not be able to obtain without assistance. POC: Jennifer Higbie, higbie@bnl.gov Brookhaven National Laboratory Training the Next Generation Locating GPS coordinates to take sediment samples A student used GPS and GIS to map vegetation from a remediation project Geospatial Science Program Cheat Grass Phenology

384

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Laydown Yard Northeast of MOX Services Concrete Batch Plant Establish Laydown Yard Northeast of MOX Services Concrete Batch Plant Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina MOX Services proposes to establish a laydown yard approximately 150 feet east of 902-3F. The 0.26-acre site is sparsely covered with grasses and herbaceous vegetation and also is partially covered with gravel. No grading is required, but the area will be covered with crushed stone and barricaded to provide a laydown surface for stored materials. The laydown yard will be used to stage rebar, piping, and other construction material. B1.15 - Support buildings Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2012.05.29 14:58:52 -04'00'

385

Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection Collection and Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags Derived from Laser Capture Microdissected Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. Alamo) Vascular Tissues Avinash C. Srivastava & Karuppaiah Palanichelvam & Junying Ma & Jarrod Steele & Elison B. Blancaflor & Yuhong Tang # Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Switchgrass is a perennial C4 grass that thrives in a wide range of North American habitats and is an emerging crop for the production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Lignin is an integral component of secondary plant cell walls that provides structural rigidity to the cell wall but it interferes with the conversion of cellulose to fermentable sugars by prevent- ing chemical access to cellulose. Thus, one strategy for improving production of cellulosic ethanol is the down- regulation of lignin in plants. To achieve this goal, it is important

386

Land Validation Holdings, PROVE, June 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROVE Data and Images Released PROVE Data and Images Released Data and images are now available from the Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE), a field campaign conducted in May 1997 at the Jornada Experimental Range near Las Cruces, New Mexico. The Jornada Experimental Range is an expansive plateau on the Chihuahuan Desert and hosts a complex mosaic of grasses and shrubs that were characterized during PROVE. PROVE researchers collected land and atmospheric measurements for use in validating data from Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. Measurements included surface reflectance, surface temperature, albedo, and leaf area index, among other parameters. We anticipate that additional data associated with papers published in a recent special issue of Remote Sensing of the Environment (October 2000) will be registered in the ORNL

387

NPP Grassland: Rio Mayo, Argentina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rio Mayo, Argentina, 1983-1989 Rio Mayo, Argentina, 1983-1989 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Sala, O. E. 2001. NPP Grassland: Rio Mayo, Argentina, 1983-1989. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of the Patagonian steppe in Argentina was determined at Rio Mayo, beginning in 1983. Biomass dynamics of grasses were monitored quarterly for one year, and above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) was estimated for other years based upon peak biomass. The Rio Mayo study site (45.68 S 70.27 W) is situated in south-western Chubut, typical of the temperate dry steppe of South America, with extremely low rainfall. Patagonia is a large region of 500,000 km2, and few

388

CX-001239: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vegetation Test Plots; National Wind Technology Center - SunEdison 1-Megawatt Photovoltaic Array; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking Number 10-013 CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.3 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office In 2002, a National Environmental Policy Act determination was signed for the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) DOE/EA-1378. This EA included the installation of an eight acre photovoltaic (PV) array located at the western edge of the NWTC, previously occupied by native grasses. The EA also identified reclaiming the areas not

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dakota Incentives and Laws Dakota Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Biofuels Production Protection Archived: 04/01/2013 The South Dakota Legislature urges the U.S. Congress and federal agencies to resist implementing indirect land use change provisions that may unfairly impact biofuels production in the United States. (Reference House Concurrent Resolution 1016, 2010) Biofuels Economic Development Plan Archived: 03/31/2012 The South Dakota Legislature resolved to develop a biofuels economy in the state by investing in the development of perennial biomass crops, including switchgrass and other native grasses by supporting long-term research and

390

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 23560 of 31,917 results. 51 - 23560 of 31,917 results. Download VSC's.xls http://energy.gov/downloads/vscsxls Download CX-006845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Production, Resilience, and Biodiversity of Perennial Grass Mixtures and Monocultures as Biofuel Feedstocks across Environmentally Heterogeneous Landscapes CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Colman, South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006845-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006850: Categorical Exclusion Determination University of Cincinnati CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/11/2011 Location(s): Cincinnati, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006850-categorical-exclusion-determination

391

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/13/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4/13/01 4/13/01 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management of annual weeds on seven acres of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owned pastureland at the Walla Walla Substation. Location: The pastureland is adjacent to the Walla Walla Substation and is located east and north of the fenced substation, all within the BPA property boundary. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also

392

Joint DOE/EPA Interim Policy Statement on Leasing Under the "Hall Amendment"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Protection Agency June 23, 1998 Washington, D.C. JUN 30 1998 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Joint DOE/EPA Interim Policy Statement on Leasing Under the "Hall Amendment" FROM: Timothy Fields, Jr. Assistant Administrator, Office of Solid Waste and Energy Response (Acting) United States Environmental Protection Agency James M. Owendoff Assistant Secretary Environmental Management (Acting) United States Department of Energy Robert W. DeGrasse, Jr. Director, Office of Worker and Community United States Department of Energy G. Thomas Todd Director, Office of Field Management United States Department _______________________________________________________________ Attached is a joint statement between the United States Environmental Protection Agency. (U.S., EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) providing interim policy on processing

393

CX-008641: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Categorical Exclusion Determination 41: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008641: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Laydown Yard Northeast of MOX Services Concrete Batch Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office MOX Services proposes to establish a laydown yard approximately 150 feet east of 902-3F. The 0.26-acre site is sparsely covered with grasses and herbaceous vegetation and also is partially covered with gravel. No grading is required, but the area will be covered with crushed stone and barricaded to provide a laydown surface for stored materials. The laydown yard will be used to stage rebar, piping, and other construction material. CX-008641.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008640: Categorical Exclusion Determination

394

CX-003623: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23: Categorical Exclusion Determination 23: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003623: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Grounds and Maintenance Activities CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.11, B1.15 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office This proposed action covers general grounds maintenance type work. These actions include: 1) grading and re-grading of selected areas and storm water conveyances, 2) erosion control and stabilization activities including rip-rap, erosion matting, filter fabric, and silt fencing, 3) landscaping maintenance and horticultural activities around buildings, park areas, and foot trails, 4) tree removal, pruning and planting and grass/lawn maintenance, 5) fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, 6) installation, maintenance and repair of wood and metal

395

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project Information Project Title: Restoration ofT -6-3 Date: 11/10/2009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Proje ct Le ad: Jeff Jones Project Overview The environmental impact will be minimal. The location is T -6-3. The duration of this project is approx. two 1. What are the environmental impacts? weeks. We will be removing the treater and building. Taking the building to 25X14. Taking the treater to the scrap yard to cut up for scrap.Aiso we will remove the manifold building and take that to 25X14 also. The 2. What is the legal location? piping that goes along with this will be flushed and capped.Then we will blade and level location till and 3. What is the duration of the project? seed with native species of plants and grasses. The equipment used in this project will be as follows:

396

Microsoft Word - PearlSubExpansion_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Johny Luiz - TEP-CSB-2 Proposed Action: Pearl Substation 500-kilovolt (kV) #6 Bay Addition Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The proposed project includes modification of existing substation equipment, the addition of a new 500-kV Bay 6, and a one-half acre yard expansion in the southwest corner of the substation. The yard expansion area is within BPA property, consists of mowed grass, and is to facilitate a 40 square foot addition to the Pearl Control House

397

NPP Grassland: Towoomba, South Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towoomba, South Africa, 1949-1990 Towoomba, South Africa, 1949-1990 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: General view of study site at Towoomba (click on the photo to view a larger image from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Scholes, R. J. 1998. NPP Grassland: Towoomba, South Africa, 1949-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of an artificially-established grass savanna was monitored at the Towoomba study site, under a long-term experiment to test the long-term effect of fertilizer application. Peak above-ground biomass was monitored for each treatment, from 1950 to the present. The Towoomba agricultural research station (24.90 S 28.35 E) is situated

398

Wheat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wheat Wheat Nature Bulletin No. 746 march 7, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor WHEAT "Give us this day our daily bread. " That simple plea is included in the Lord' s Prayer because bread, made from wheat, was the "staff of life" in Palestine -- as it is for us today. Wheat bread is a source of energy that contains the food elements essential for the growth, health and upkeep of a human body. It is a staple food that is not only inexpensive but, uniquely, one which we never become tired of. The three most important grains used by mankind for food are wheat, rice, and Indian corn or maize. Next in importance are barley, rye, oats, and millet. The white races of people prize wheat far above any of the others. All seven -- known as cereal grains -- are the seeds of grasses descended from wild plants.

399

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-92): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 1999-060-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Copping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use. Location: Various locations in the Asotin Creek Watershed, WA. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a no-till/direct seed farming

400

Protoplast isolation and transient gene expression in switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biotechnology Biotechnology Journal DOI 10.1002/biot.200700189 Biotechnol. J. 2008, 3, 354-359 354 © 2008 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 Introduction Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-sea- son perennial grass that is a major component of the prairies of North America. It is grown in mono- culture for hay, grazing, and erosion control [1]. Also, switchgrass has a high biomass production potential as a feedstock for biofuel production [2, 3]. Genetic manipulation of the growth and devel- opment of switchgrass is needed for better cellu- losic ethanol production, especially to improve cel- lulose-to-lignin ratios. The latest genomic and biotechnology tools can be used for the production of designer plants for this purpose, which is immi- nently feasible. Several genes can make significant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Native Sparrows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sparrows Sparrows Nature Bulletin No. 525 April 12, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NATIVE SPARROWS The commonest bird of our cities and towns, or about buildings in rural regions, is the English Sparrow. This much cussed and discussed immigrant was brought from Europe to America. about a century ago and quickly followed man across the continent. It builds large trashy nests of grass and straw, lined with feathers, under the eaves or roofs of garages, barns, sheds and porches, as well as in birdhouses. It is quarrelsome and they sang together to drive out songbirds. Sometimes it is called the House Sparrow but, strictly speaking, it is one of the Weaver Finches which build nests with a side entrance. It is not a sparrow.

402

The Entire Botany Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Botany Archives Botany Archives Botany Archives, Since May 2000 Table of Contents: Ginseng Caterpillars and Pin Oaks Seaweed and Nutrition Blue Leaves Walnut Problems Italian Trees Purple Plants Poplar Up-date European Tree Design Planting Magnolia Trees Schoolyard Plants Poplar Droppings Fungi Spores Woodland Adaptations Growing Lichen Apple Tree Maturity Horse Poison Plants Honeysuckle Poison Old Trees Leaking Popular Cottonwood Infestation Tulip Tree Seeds Bald Cypress Ecology Maple Recovery Leaf Minors Catalpa Problem Berm Enhancement Organic Gardening Ailing Burr Oak Damaged Cypress Tree Reed Ridding Berm Enhancement Tulip Tree Flowering Lichens Weed Seeds Plants at Night Kombu Seaweed Plants at Night Crab Grass Phloem Physiology Elm Disease Bark Thickness Poison Sumac Growing Fields Killing Pine Trees

403

Sykue Bioenergya | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sykue Bioenergya Sykue Bioenergya Jump to: navigation, search Name Sykue Bioenergya Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 04536-001 Sector Biomass Product Sykue Bionergya is a company that invests in Biomass Generation using elephant grass/napier as feedstock. They plan to build 10 plants, producing 300MW by 2011. References Sykue Bioenergya[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sykue Bioenergya is a company located in Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil . References ↑ "Sykue Bioenergya" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sykue_Bioenergya&oldid=351969" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

404

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

405

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

406

NPP Grassland: Konza Prairie, U.S.A. [Kansas]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990 Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Knapp, A. K., and D. Ojima. 1996. NPP Grassland: Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a humid temperate tall-grass prairie was determined at the Konza Prairie Natural Research Area from 1975 to the present. Monthly dynamics of above-ground plant biomass have been monitored since 1984, and estimates of above-ground plant production have been made since 1975. The Konza Prairie was the site of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE), an intensive

407

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 results: 3 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Z. Liu [Clear All Filters] 2011 Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li. "Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application." Electrochemical Solid-State Letters 14, no. 5 (2011): A61-A63 . 2010 Braun, Artur, Bongjin S. Mun, Yun Sun, Z. Liu, Oliver Gröning, R. Mäder, Selma Erat, Xueyuan Zhang, Samuel S. Mao, Ekaterina Pomjakushina et al. "Correlation of conductivity and angle integrated valence band photoemission characteristics in single crystal iron perovskites for 300 K < T < 800 K: Comparison of surface and bulk sensitive methods." Journal of

408

DOE Joint Genome Institute: How Now, Inside the Cow: Nearly 30,000 Novel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 27, 2011 January 27, 2011 How Now, Inside the Cow: Nearly 30,000 Novel Enzymes for Biofuel Production Improvements To download Cow Rumen data, go to: http://portal.nersc.gov/project/jgimg/CowRumenRawData/submission/ WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Cows eat grass-this has been observed for eons. From this fibrous diet consisting mainly of the tough to degrade plant cell wall materials cellulose and hemicellulose, substances of no nutritional value to most animals, ruminants manage to extract all they need to nourish themselves, their progeny and their keepers. And now, the cow, or rather the network of organisms working unseen in the cow's forestomach or rumen, is providing researchers with vital information that may someday accelerate the large-scale deployment of biofuels. This will offer a

409

CX-006668: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6668: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6668: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006668: Categorical Exclusion Determination Restoration of T-6-3 CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.22, B1.28, B5.2, B5.4, B6.1 Date: 11/16/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC We will be removing the treater and building. Taking the building to 25X14. Taking the treater to the scrap yard to cut up for scrap. Will remove the manifold building and take that to 25X14 also. The piping that goes along with this will be flushed and capped. Then we will blade and level location, till and seed with native species of plants and grasses. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006668.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006675: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006693: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006647

410

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Beauty and Charm at Fermilab  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beauty and Charm at Beauty and Charm at Fermilab Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Beauty and Charm at Fermilab July 15, 2013 3:30PM EDT to July 19, 2013 5:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

411

Rapid Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Lignin Content and Structure in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Grown Under Different Environmental Conditions David G. J. Mann & Nicole Labbé & Robert W. Sykes & Kristen Gracom & Lindsey Kline & Isabella M. Swamidoss & Jason N. Burris & Mark Davis & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 13 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a candi- date feedstock in bioenergy, and plant breeding and molecular genetic strategies are being used to improve germplasm. In order to assess these subsequent modifica- tions, baseline biomass compositional data are needed in a relevant variety of environments. In this study, switch- grass cv. Alamo was grown in the field, greenhouse, and growth chamber and harvested into individual leaf and stem tissue components. These components

412

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REVIEW: REVIEW: PART OF HIGHLIGHT ON BREEDING STRATEGIES FOR FORAGE AND GRASS IMPROVEMENT Is genetic engineering ever going to take off in forage, turf and bioenergy crop breeding? Zeng-Yu Wang* and E. Charles Brummer Forage Improvement Division, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA * For correspondence. Email: zywang@noble.org Received: 1 December 2011 Returned for revision: 22 December 2011 Accepted: 5 January 2012 † Background Genetic engineering offers the opportunity to generate unique genetic variation that is either absent in the sexually compatible gene pool or has very low heritability. The generation of transgenic plants, coupled with breeding, has led to the production of widely used transgenic cultivars in several major cash crops, such as maize, soybean, cotton and canola. The process for regulatory approval of genetically engineered crops

413

Michele Yager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivered by Ingenta to: Delivered by Ingenta to: Michele Yager IP : 130.207.37.34 Wed, 18 Jan 2012 15:37:50 RESEARCH ARTICLE Copyright © 2011 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America Journal of Biobased Materials and Bioenergy Vol. 5, 514-519, 2011 Characterization of Fermentation Residues from the Production of Bio-Ethanol from Lignocellulosic Feedstocks Poulomi Sannigrahi and Arthur J. Ragauskas ∗ BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Solid residues from the conversion of four lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, Miscanthus, Switch- grass, hybrid poplar and red maple, to bioethanol in a pilot plant have been characterized for their lignin and carbohydrate content, heating value, ash content and inorganic elements profile. These residues have

414

NREL: News - NREL Teams with Navy, Private Industry to Make Jet Fuel from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

313 313 NREL Teams with Navy, Private Industry to Make Jet Fuel from Switchgrass Project could spur jobs in rural America, lead to less reliance of foreign oil June 6, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is partnering with Cobalt Technologies, U.S. Navy, and Show Me Energy Cooperative to demonstrate that jet fuel can be made economically and in large quantities from a renewable biomass feedstock such as switch grass. "This can be an important step in the efforts to continue to displace petroleum by using biomass resources," NREL Manager for Bioprocess Integration R&D Dan Schell said. "We're converting biomass into sugars for subsequent conversion to butanol and then to JP5 jet fuel." It's one of four biorefinery projects funded recently by the Energy

415

NREL: Learning - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video (Text Version) Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video (Text Version) This is the text version for the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems video. The video opens with an image of a dark red flower, trembling in the breeze. It pulls out to a shot of grass-covered hills. Finally, it turns to an image of a truck driving down a highway. (Voiceover) It is one of our greatest challenges: to steer the future of transportation in a more secure, sustainable direction. The video follows a presentation given outside the NREL campus. Several people are sitting outside in rows of chairs, listening to NREL's Director speak from behind a podium. Dan Arvizu, NREL Director: "Today we launch the NREL vehicle test fleet." The video fades in to an image of researchers walking through a parking lot

416

Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table of Contents Table of Contents Lesson 1 - Energy Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 3 - Atoms and Isotopes Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 5 - Fission, Chain Reactions Lesson 6 - Atom to Electricity Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 8 - Concerns Lesson 9 - Energy and You 1 Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. But what does that really mean? You might think of work as cleaning your room, cutting the grass, or studying for a test. And all these require energy. To a scientist, "work" means something more exact. Work is causing a change. It can be a change in position, like standing up or moving clothes from the floor to the laundry basket. It can be a change in temperature, like heating water for a cup

417

NPP Grassland: Nylsvley, South Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nylsvley, South Africa, 1974-1989 Nylsvley, South Africa, 1974-1989 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Fine-leaved savanna at Nylsvley (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Scholes, R. J. 1997. NPP Grassland: Nylsvley, South Africa, 1974-1989. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a broad-leaved savanna, which includes a substantial grass component (i.e. 60-70% of cover), was monitored from 1974 to the present at the Nylsvley study site, under the South African Savanna Biome Programme. The Nylsvley study site (24.65 S 28.70 E) is situated 200 km north of Johannesburg, near the town of Nylstroom. The 800 hectare savanna research

418

TPG11-10-0026.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PL PL ANT GENOME NOVEMBER 2011 VOL. 4, NO. 3 273 SPECIAL SUBMISSIONS The Switchgrass Genome: Tools and Strategies Michael D. Casler, Christian M. Tobias, Shawn M. Kaeppler, C. Robin Buell, Zeng-Yu Wang, Peijian Cao, Jeremy Schmutz, and Pamela Ronald* Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial grass species receiving signifi cant focus as a potential bioenergy crop. In the last 5 yr the switchgrass research community has produced a genetic linkage map, an expressed sequence tag (EST) database, a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that are distributed across the 18 linkage groups, 4x sampling of the P. virgatum AP13 genome in 400-bp reads, and bacterial artifi cial chromosome (BAC) libraries containing over 200,000 clones. These studies

419

Minutes Ops mtg 120706  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2012 6, 2012 10:30 - 11:30 AM Minutes Attendees: Ken Barat, Thomas Schenkel, Peter Seidl, Pat Thomas, Herb Toor, Csaba Toth, Linnea Wahl, Weyland Wong 1. ES&H News and Lessons Learned: News: * Chemical and gas cylinder clean-outs - EHS is organizing some chemical and gas cylinder clean-out efforts this summer. If you have old "orphaned" gas cylinders from a previous vendor or damaged cylinders that you have been having difficulties getting picked up, please contact Pat Thomas so they can be included in the clean-out. EHS is planning to bring in a contractor that can pick up the unwanted cylinders. * Goats have arrived - The herd of goats has been seen grazing on dry grass and brush around the Lab to reduce fire risk. When the goats are

420

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels (Redirected from - Biofuels) Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 14890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 14890 of 28,905 results. Download Financial and Activity Report- September 24, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-september-24-2010 Article Women @ Energy: Karin Rodland "Remember when you were a child, and could ask all those really fundamental questions: Why is the sky blue? Where do clouds come from? Why does grass turn green in the spring? Being a scientist is like being a child for life. I get to ask fundamental questions every day, and I get to prod and probe and play in the lab until I get the answers." Read more from Karin on her profile here. http://energy.gov/diversity/articles/women-energy-karin-rodland Download Departmental Information Systems Engineering (Volume 1) http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/departmental-information-systems-engineering-volume-1

422

The Tumblebug & Scarab Beetle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tumblebug & Scarab Beetle Tumblebug & Scarab Beetle Nature Bulletin No. 605-A May 22, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE TUMBLEBUG & SCARAB BEETLE The mention of Tumblebugs calls up childhood memories. After school let out in spring, one of the chores of a farm youngster was herding the family cows while they ate grass on the roadsides. He had nothing to do except turn the cattle around before they strayed too far and see that they did not break through fences. However, he had to stay on the job, alone, because our fathers went on the principle, "One boy is a boy, two boys -- half a boy, and three boys -- no boy at all. " Passing wagons, buggies and, rarely, a chugging automobile added momentary interest. With such limited sources of amusement, it is not surprising that many of us became tumblebug watchers.

423

Microsoft Word - TR05-27.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hallam, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska June 2010 Page 1 2010 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) was inspected on April 28, 2010. The Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) building, the grass-covered mound, and the monitoring wells were all in good shape. The roof of the IHX building was replaced in 2007 and the building was painted in 2008. Dirt and gravel were placed around the base of the IHX building in 2009 to raise the ground surface and eliminate the potential for water to pool near the base of the building. In 2009, inspectors noted that strong winds had moved roof rock from the corners of the upper roof exposing the underlying roofing fabric. In 2009 paver stones were placed in the corners of both the upper and

424

Microsoft Word - TR06-03.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois June 2009 Page 1 2009 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 28, 2009. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, is in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) plugged and abandoned 28 monitor wells since the 2008 inspection and labeled the outer protective casing of the remaining wells with their unique identification number. With the exception of one well (Well 11A) all of the monitoring wells visited during the inspection were locked and secured. A couple of holes in the ground surface of Site A were identified during the inspection. It is

425

Microsoft Word - TR06-06.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois June 2008 Page 1 2008 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 25, 2008. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, is in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. The historic monument at Plot M has been vandalized, as noted during previous inspections, but remains functional. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is in the process of decommissioning several monitor wells, and will provide a list and decommissioning documentation of the decommissioned monitor wells to DOE-LM. The need to label the outer surface of the protective casing of monitor wells with a well number

426

Feature - Argonne involved with proposed Green Fuels Depot in Naperville  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

involved in Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot involved in Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot The proposed Green Fuels Depot would produce renewable fuels for Naperville's vehicle fleet. Using grass clippings to power next-generation vehicles - now that's green transportation. This is one of the ideas being considered at Naperville's newly proposed Green Fuels Depot. The project, which will require $4 million in funding to get started, would bring together Argonne National Laboratory, the city of Naperville, Packer Engineering and the College of DuPage for an innovative plan to produce renewable energy. "It's a golden opportunity for Argonne to be associated with one of our neighboring communities in promoting new technologies that we have pioneered here at the laboratory," said Glenn Keller, manager of vehicle

427

Complexed Adsorbed HP1 HP1 L2 L7 L7 L7 L2 H3 H3 National Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexed Complexed Adsorbed HP1 HP1 L2 L7 L7 L7 L2 H3 H3 National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2011 Annual Report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8148 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2011 Annual Report The Year in Perspective Research News New Mathematical Method Reveals Where Genes Switch On or Off Small Particles Have Big Impact Detailed Model Changes View of Ancient Climate Change A Better Way to Find Extreme Weather Events in Climate Modeling Data Turning Grass into Gas for Less Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium-Air Batteries

428

The outlook for crops (and biofuels and policy and...)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jarrett Whistance Jarrett Whistance EIA Biofuels Workshop 20 March 2013  Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at the University of Missouri (FAPRI-MU)  Objective policy analysis  Focus on how policies affect decisions, then estimate market impacts  Recently released annual baseline  10-year projection of agricultural and biofuel markets  Stochastic process to account for different assumptions in oil price, weather patterns, etc.  Cellulosic model basics  Key assumptions in the biofuel model  Focus on cellulosic waiver options  Implications of cellulosic waiver options  A look at the 2013 Baseline results  Cellulosic biofuel production based on supply of five feedstocks:  Warm-season grasses; Wheat straw; Corn stover;

429

CX-006845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6845: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Production, Resilience, and Biodiversity of Perennial Grass Mixtures and Monocultures as Biofuel Feedstocks across Environmentally Heterogeneous Landscapes CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Colman, South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy proposes to fund South Dakota State University (SDSU) to conduct biofuel feedstock productivity research using switchgrass to establish whether monoculture is more productive than polyculture in varying edaphic conditions. This research would be conducted on the 650 acre, SDSU-leased Prairie Farm located at 46786 232nd Street, Colman, South

430

u.s. DI!PARThlJ!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThlJ!NT OF ENERGY PARThlJ!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DI!TFIU.nNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:South Dakota State Unversity STATE: SD PROJECf TITLE: Improving production, resilience, and biodiversity of perennial grass mixtures and monocultures as biofuel feedstocks across environmentally heterogeneous landscapes Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number COP G088073 GFO-G088073-031 0 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the propos~ action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autboroA'd under DOE Order 451.1A). I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not

431

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

432

CX-006605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006605: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackenberry Raw Water Intake Structure Clear Zone CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/29/2011 Location(s): Lake Charles, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, equipment, transportation, and supervision required to cut trees, brush and grass to make a "clear zone" approximately 110 feet around the perimeter of the West Hackenberry Raw Water Intake Structure. Tasks include machine clearing standing vegetation performed with cutting/grinding equipment that minimizes disturbance of the surface of the soil or root system. Trees and brush shall be removed down to approximately ground/water level. Trees and bush

433

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

434

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2011 3, 2011 CX-005304: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Simi Valley CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Simi Valley, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 2, 2011 CX-005447: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop and Perennial Grass Research CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Alburgh, Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 2, 2011 CX-005416: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

435

Why Sequence Zostera marina (seagrass)?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zostera marina (seagrass)? Zostera marina (seagrass)? Seagrasses cover nearly 80,000 square miles of shallow and subtidal coastlines such as bays and estuaries around the world. They help prevent erosion by cushioning the force of the waves and currents hitting the shoreline. They also act as carbon sinks for as much as 15 percent of the total surplus carbon fixed in the oceans. Zostera marina Photo: Thorsten Reusch Eelgrass (Zostera marina) is the dominant seagrass in the northern hemisphere, though it's not actually a true grass but rather a flowering plant that lives underwater. A monocot like tulips and orchids, eelgrass serves as a nursery for several species of fish and invertebrates such as marine worms and sea anemones. In addition, it also provides food for several species of fish, birds and shellfish. Eelgrass absorbs nutrients

436

maybellwest.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title II disposal site at Maybell West, Colorado. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Maybell West Disposal Site Regional Location of the Maybell West Disposal Site Site Description and History The Maybell West Disposal Site is in Moffat County in northwest Colorado. The site is located in a historical uranium-mining district characterized by rolling terrain and small, dry washes that flow only during periods of intense rainfall. The washes drain to the Yampa River, about 2 miles southwest of the site. Vegetation is generally sparse and consists primarily of sagebrush, saltbush, and short grasses. The Miocene Browns Park Formation directly underlies the site and is the host rock for the uranium ore in the area. This formation is composed of white to light gray and tan

437

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Sustainability trees for bioenergy Growing trees for bioenergy Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research on the sustainability of bioenergy crops in two major areas. First, we are assessing the life cycle impacts and water footprint of conventionally grown bioenergy crops under various scenarios with the goal of identifying the most economically viable and sustainable options. Argonne is also proactively developing sustainable methods to produce new economically viable advanced biofuels from crops such as willows, poplars, switchgrass and prairie grasses. The goal is to exploit the ability of deep-rooted bioenergy crops to grow on underproductive land, to serve as buffer zones on the edges of fields, for example. As a result, the deep-rooted crops can scavenge nitrogen from the subsurface, removing it

438

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parking Lot Construction North of Pad 717-14F Parking Lot Construction North of Pad 717-14F Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina MOX Services proposes the construction of 52 parking spaces on a 0.225-acre site north of and adjacent to Pad 717-14F. No excavation will be required. The grass on the site will be cut, filter fabrix will be placed on the ground, and crushed stone will be placed on top of the fabric to an approximate depth of two inches. Parking blocks will be used to separate the parking stalls and to serve as stops at the north end of each stall. Parking blocks will be secured using one-foot-long anchor pins. Ground-penetrating radar will be used to survey the area prior to anchor pin installation to avoid pin contact with subterranean infrastructure. B1.15 - Support buildings

439

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~ ~ ' Project Information Project Title: Restoration of 51-63-SX-1 0 Date: 12/28/2009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview 1. What are the environmental impacts? The Location of this project is 51-63-SX-1 0. The duration is going to be approx. 3-days. Before we do 2. What is the legal location? any digging and welding we will be flushing the flowline . We will be digging down approx. 5ft. cutting the wellhead off and welding a legal plate to it. We will then do the same with the flowline. Once this is done 3. What is the duration of the project? we will be tilling and seeding location with native grasses. The machinery to be used is as follows: 4. What major equipment will be used if backhoe, Blade, Welder, Ford tractor, Seeder.

440

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to June 19, 2013 5:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grass sorghastrum nutans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Particles and Prairies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particles and Particles and Prairies Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Particles and Prairies July 22, 2013 3:30PM EDT to July 26, 2013 4:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

442

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Insects at Work in Our World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insects at Work in Insects at Work in Our World Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Insects at Work in Our World June 20, 2013 3:30PM EDT to June 21, 2013 5:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

443

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemistry Institutes Chemistry Institutes Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to June 21, 2013 5:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

444

Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Modeling of Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production. Organisms like green algae, grasses, and trees use photosynthesis to transform light energy and carbon dioxide into chemicals-chemicals that can be turned back into energy when used as biofuels or feedstocks for biofuel production. Researchers at NREL have set out to make photo- synthesis more efficient, so that more energy can be captured as biofuels. To improve the efficiency

445

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

446

Biofacts : BioEnergy Science Center  

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BioFacts BioFacts What causes global warming? Carbon dioxide and other air pollution trap in the sun's heat in the atmosphere. Coal-burning power plants and automobiles are the largest U.S. sources of carbon dioxide pollution. What are alternative fuels? Alternative fuels, such as biofuels, are substitutes for conventional fossil fuels, such as petroleum (oil), coal, propane and natural gas. Common U.S. agricultural products specifically grown for biofuel production include switchgrass and soybeans. What is switchgrass anyway? Switchgrass is a common, warm-season grass that can be used to make an environmentally friendly biofuel and alternative to traditional gasoline. By 2050, biofuels could reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 1.7 billion tons per year - equivalent to more than 80% of current

447

NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics  

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Site Wind Resource Characteristics Site Wind Resource Characteristics A graphic showing the location of National Wind Technology Center and its wind power class 2. Click on the image to view a larger version. Enlarge image This graphic shows the wind power class at the National Wind Technology Center. You can download a printable copy. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is on the Great Plains just miles from the Rocky Mountains. The site is flat and covered with short grasses. The terrain and lack of obstructions make the site highly suitable for testing wind turbines. Take a tour of the NWTC and its facilities to better understand its location and layout. Another prime feature of the NWTC is the strong directionality of the wind - most of the strong winds come within a few degrees of 285°. West of

448

NPP Grassland: Lamto, Ivory Coast  

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Lamto, Ivory Coast, 1965-1987 Lamto, Ivory Coast, 1965-1987 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: A storm during the rainy season at Lamto (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Menaut, J.-C. 1996. NPP Grassland: Lamto, Ivory Coast, 1965-1987. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a humid grass savanna was determined at the Lamto study site operated in collaboration with CNRS (Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique) - É Normale Supé Paris, France. Measurement of monthly dynamics of above-ground plant matter (i.e., live biomass and dead matter for some years, total biomass in other years), and total roots (live +

449

Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest  

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Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Nature Bulletin No. 10 April 14, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE IS THE ENEMY OF FIELD AND FOREST There have been 112 fires in the forest preserves since January 1, burning over 612 acres, including 150 acres of fine woodland and young forest plantings. There need not have been ONE if people only understood the damage done by forest and grass fires. Every spring and every fall, thousands of acres of prairie and vacant subdivisions are burnt off. Some of these fires jump over into forest preserves. Many fires start inside the preserves, or along their highway borders, from matches, cigarettes or pipe bottle thrown aside by careless people. Some start from picnic fires. A few are kindled by boys who have seen their parents or neighbors do the same thing at home.

450

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

East of 281-3F East of 281-3F Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Construction activities at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) require additional laydown space for construction materials. A 1.55- acre area east of 281-3F and west of Road E-0.1 is proposed for use as an additional laydown area. The subject site is currently vacant and sparsely vegetated with grasses and herbaceous vegetation and also is partially covered with gravel. No grading is required, but the existing vegetation will be cut close to ground level, then covered with filter fabric. A four-inch layer of crushed stone will be placed on top of the filter fabric to provide a laydown surface for stored materials. An unnamed road traversing the area will remain open to traffic, but areas for laydown

451

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

;l,[p~ ;l,[p~ Project Information Project Title: Restoration of 54-TPX-1 0 Date: DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview 1. What are the environmental We will be restoring 54-TPX-10. The work to be done will be to dig 5ft below surface cut casing and impacts? install a marker. We will do the same with the flowline. Any contaminated soil will be replaced with clean fill dirt. The contaminated soil will be transferrred to the lanclfarm. The base will be moved to section 14. 2. What is the legal location? We will then blade, till and reseed with native grasses. The equipment to be used will be as follows: 3. What is the duration of the project? Backhoe, Blade, Shovels, Torch, Welder, And Tiller. This project will also require a hotwork permit for the

452

CX-001609: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1609: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1609: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Homestead Road Bicycle/Pedestrian Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/07/2010 Location(s): Lee County, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The County of Lee proposes to use Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding for construction of an approximate 2.0 mile bike path in an existing road right of way (ROW). The project activity includes construction of a 5' to 8' wide asphalt bike path along the east side of Homestead Rd. within the existing roadway ROW. The existing grass shoulder and roadside swale will be re-graded and a culvert pipe will be installed where necessary to construct the bike path and maintain existing drainage

453

CX-008639: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39: Categorical Exclusion Determination 39: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008639: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Laydown Yard East of 281-3F CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Construction activities at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) require additional laydown space for construction materials. A 1.55-acre area east of 281-3F and west of Road E-0.1 is proposed for use as an additional laydown area. The subject site is currently vacant and sparsely vegetated with grasses and herbaceous vegetation and also is partially covered with gravel. No grading is required, but the existing vegetation will be cut close to ground level, then covered with filter fabric. A four-inch layer of crushed stone will be placed on top of the filter fabric

454

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

706-1F 706-1F Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina MOX Services proposes the construction of 28 gravel parking spaces on a 0.17-acre site located approximately 100 feet north of 706-1F. No excavation will be required. The grass will be cut, filter fabric will be placed on the ground, and crushed stone will be placed on top of the fabric to an approximate depth of two inches. Parking blocks will be used to separate the parking stalls and to serve as stops at the north end of each stall. Parking blocks will be secured using two-foot-long anchor pins. Ground-penetrating radar will be used to survey the area prior to anchor pin installation to avoid pin contact with subterranean infrastructure. B1.15 - Support buildings Andrew R. Grainger

455

The Froghopper or Spittlebug  

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Froghopper or Spittlebug Froghopper or Spittlebug Nature Bulletin No. 348-A June 7, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George w. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FROGHOPPER OR SPITTLEBUG With the coming of summer, mysterious blobs of snow-white froth begin to appear on weeds, grasses, garden crops and other vegetation. Later, hundreds of these foam blossoms dot the meadows and hillsides. Each resembles a dab of soap suds or beaten egg white and feel slippery between one's fingers. ' Examined closely, a small flat greenish seed-like creature, with six slender legs and a broad head having a pointed beak beneath, is found inside. Named Froghopper because of his squatty froggy appearance, he is also called the Spittlebug because his home looks like a fleck of saliva. In folklore these little masses of froth are described as "frog spit", "snake spit", "cuckoo spit", or the birthplace of horseflies.

456

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 62-42 SX 10 DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring this location 62-42 SX-1 0. What are the environmental Date: 2/25/2010 Contractor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. W e 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marker. 3. What is the duration of the project? Flush flowline and remove it. Then we will till the location and plant with native grasses. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig , 3-4 days etc.)? The equipment to be used will be a backhoe, tiller, dumptruck, and welder.

457

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-03): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/16/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) 3) Dorothy Welch, KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Couse/Tenmile Creeks Six-Year Direct Seed Program Project No: 2002-050-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 3.2 Conservation Cropping Sequence, 3.3 Conservation Tillage, 3.8 Delayed Seed Bed Preparation, 3.9 Grasses and Legumes in Rotation, 3.26 Evaluate Field Limitations, 3.27 Equipment Calibration and Use Location: Various properties in Anatone, Asotin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a six-year direct seed program

458

CX-005886: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86: Categorical Exclusion Determination 86: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005886: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Monitoring, Maintenance, General Site Actions, and Non-Routine Actions at the Edgemont, South Dakota Disposal Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.11, B1.24 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Edgemont, South Dakota Office(s): Legacy Management Routine actions related to monitoring include annual site inspection of gates, signs, boundary monuments, site marker, fence. Transects include, grass-covered disposal cell top, riprap-covered containment dam and diversion channels, region between disposal cell and site perimeter, and the outlying area, and annual vegetation monitoring. Routine maintenance includes repairs to gates, fences, perimeter signs, and annual weed control. Non-routine activities concern the on-site grazing license and

459

NREL: Energy Sciences - Larry Taylor  

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Larry Taylor Larry Taylor Research Scientist Phone: (303) 384-7784 Email: larry.taylor@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2007 Larry Taylor received his Ph.D. in Environmental Molecular Biology and Biotechnology from the Marine and Estuarine Environmental Sciences department at the University of Maryland, College Park. His dissertation work focused on the functional genomics of the plant cell wall degrading enzyme systems of the marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, which was isolated from decaying salt marsh grass the Chesapeake Bay watershed in 1988. Preliminary genomic analyses revealed that the S. degradans encodes more than 180 predicted carbohydrases. Under the direction of Prof. Ronald M. Weiner, and in collaboration with Dr. Bernard Henrisaat, Dr. Taylor identified the predicted cellulase system of S. degradans through sequence

460

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs. DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis

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461

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2011 17, 2011 CX-006848: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Olson-Ashbrook-Schanno-Uhalde-Zoller Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 17, 2011 CX-006845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Production, Resilience, and Biodiversity of Perennial Grass Mixtures and Monocultures as Biofuel Feedstocks across Environmentally Heterogeneous Landscapes CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Colman, South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 17, 2011 CX-006874: Categorical Exclusion Determination

462

Easter Bunnies  

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Easter Bunnies Easter Bunnies Nature Bulletin No. 61 April 13, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation EASTER BUNNIES Rabbits do have eggs. But they are only 1/300 of an inch in diameter and develop into young which are born and nursed like other mammals. Molly Cottontail has already had the first of the three or four litters she produces per year in this climate. Each litter numbers from 4 to 6 little rabbits born in a nest which is a shallow hole dug in the ground by the mother, usually in an open field, padded with grass and with fur which she plucks from herself. Their ears are small at first, their eyes are closed, and they have only a coat of fuzz. After about a month they leave the nest and soon are shifting for themselves.

463

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

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Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

464

U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Media Contact: For Immediate Release News Media Contact: For Immediate Release Joe Culver 304/285-4822 September 28, 2009 The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected Brian W. Dressel as a physical scientist in its Sequestration Division. He previously worked as an environmental consultant for a variety of consulting firms for nearly 20 years. Dressel earned a B.S. in geology from Michigan State University and an M.S. in geology and Hydrogeology from The Ohio University. Originally from Grass Lake, Mich., Dressel resides in Canonsburg, Pa., with his wife, LeNore, and daughters Brenda, 13, and Heather, 7. NETL is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's national laboratories. NETL - "the ENERGY lab" - focuses on America's economic prosperity, which requires secure, reliable energy supplies at sustainable

465

switchgrass_lite_final[2]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA CONTACTS: Ron Walli DRAFT MEDIA CONTACTS: Ron Walli DRAFT Oak Ridge National Laboratory Communications & External Relations (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov J. Adam Calaway The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Office of Public Relations (580) 224-6209; jacalaway@noble.org New lignin 'lite' switchgrass boosts biofuel yield by more than one-third OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 14, 2011 - Bioethanol from new lines of native perennial prairie grass could become less costly because of plant engineering by The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and fermentation research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe their transgenic version of switchgrass as one that produces about one-third

466

JGI - CSP Sequencing Plans for 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 For status information, see the Genome Projects section. Proposer Affiliation Project Description Algae Kerfeld, Cheryl DOE JGI Genome and Transcriptome Analyses of Two Extremely Acidophilic and One Neutrophilic Eukaryotic Algal Species with Diverse Mechanism for CO2 Acquisition Lovejoy, Connie Laval University, Canada Small planktonic single celled eukaryotes from the Arctic Ocean Plants Muehlbauer, Gary University of Minnesota Whole genome shotgun sequencing of the barley genome Vogel, John USDA-ARS Surveying natural diversity of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon Fungi de Vries, Ronald CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Comparative analysis of Aspergilli to facilitate novel strategies in fungal biotechnology Goodwin, Stephen Purdue University Sequencing of pathogens and extremophiles in the Dothideomycetes

467

CX-004652: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004652: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Yield Tropical Feedstocks and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy Production and Economic Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8, B5.1 Date: 12/09/2010 Location(s): Hawaii Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to the University of Hawaii to continue assessing the use of C-4 tropical grasses for conversion to biofuels and the development of methodology for conducting net energy analyses for biomass crops grown in Hawaii. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004652.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination

468

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

469

Microsoft Word - FCT 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Falls City, Texas Falls City, Texas Page 5-1 5.0 Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site 5.1 Compliance Summary The Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site, was inspected on January 15, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in excellent condition and functioning as designed. Control of deep-rooted woody vegetation on the top and side slopes of the disposal cell continues. Grass continues to be cut and baled on site, including on the disposal cell cover. Minor fence repair were performed and one missing perimeter sign was replaced. Groundwater monitoring was performed; generally, historical trends continue, although the uranium concentration in well MW-0880 decreased significantly. NRC concurrence in the revised LTSP

470

lms3046FER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

June 6 and 12, 2013 Inspector SM Stoller, Ohio EPA, ODH June 6 and 12, 2013 Inspector SM Stoller, Ohio EPA, ODH Area Paddys Run East, SWU, SWRB, South Field Sub-Area Type of Finding Follow Up No. Location (Use Map Whenever Possible) GPS? Unauthorized Use Disturbance Vegetation Other Description Photo? (File No.) Corrected Maintenance Req'd Cont. Observation 1 South pines deer fence X Hole in fence X 2 South pines deer fence X Hole in fence X 3 South pines/PRE X Reed canary grass X 4 South field - west X Deer fence gate missing X 5 Well 22108 well pad X Exposed wires 1-130612 X 6 Well 33253 X Miscellaneous debris on pad 2-130612 X 7 South field deer fence - west X Fence down X 8 South field deer fence - east X Fence overgrown - remove X

471

Microsoft Word - TR11-18.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Parkersburg, WV Parkersburg, WV November 2009 Page 1 2009 Annual Inspection for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 22, 2009, to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. Results of the inspection conclude that the site is in excellent condition. The grass covered disposal cell is in excellent condition. No evidence of erosion or slope instability on the disposal cell was noted during the inspection. Vegetation control activities (mow and spray) have been effective in reducing the populations of weed species present at the site. Areas of poison hemlock were identified during the inspection.

472

U.S. Department of Energy 2012 Annual Inspection - Hallam, Nebraska  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hallam, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska May 2012 Page 1 2012 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) was inspected on April 24, 2012. The IHX building and the grass cover on the foundation of the former reactor building, were in good condition. The IHX building is in excellent condition, however, a minor surface water stain was observed on the east wall of the building where the lower roof meets the wall of the two story portion of the building. The water staining appears to be the result of a heavy rain from the preceding months. No corrective action is recommended at this time. The area will be inspected and re-assessed during the inspection next year.

473

newbrunswick.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

New New Brunswick, New Jersey, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The New Brunswick, New Jersey, Site (formerly the New Brunswick Laboratory Site) is located at 990 Jersey Avenue, approximately 1.6 miles from downtown New Brunswick, New Jersey. The 5.6-acre site is situated in an industrial area and consists of a vacant and fenced grass-covered lot. The property is bordered by Jersey Avenue on the north, a main rail line and vacant property on the south, and industrial property on the east and west. From 1948 to 1977, the site was used by the U.S. government as a chemistry laboratory for nuclear reactor and weapons programs. The site included a main laboratory building, a plutonium laboratory complex, and nine other support buildings. Thorium and uranium ores, plutonium, americium, and enriched uranium

474

Microsoft Word - S08266_App_A-2.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 2011 Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity Results This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Report Appendix A-2, 2011 Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity Results Doc. No. S08266 May 2012 Page A-2-1 Table A-2-1. BAPW2 Wetland Vegetation Monitoring Data Summary Total Species 34 Native Species 30 Non-Native (Adventive) Species 4 Average CC b 2.78 Species Common Name Type CC b Nativity Wetland Indicator c Relative Cover Alisma subcordatum SOUTHERN WATER- PLANTAIN forb 2 native OBL 0.296% Ambrosia artemisiifolia COMMON RAGWEED forb 0 native FACU 0.075% Ammannia robusta SESSILE TOOTH-CUP forb 7 native OBL 0.296% Andropogon gerardii BIG BLUESTEM grass 5 native FAC 1.035% Asclepias incarnata SWAMP MILKWEED forb 4 native OBL 0.739%

475

fulltext.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Gene Flow in Genetically Engineered Perennial Grasses: Lessons for Modification of Dedicated Bioenergy Crops Albert P. Kausch, Joel Hague, Melvin Oliver, Lidia S. Watrud, Carol Mallory-Smith, Virgil Meier, and C. Neal Stewart Jr 10.1 Introduction The potential ecological consequences of the commercialization of genetically engineered (GE) crops have been the subject of intense debate, particularly when the GE crops are perennial and capable of outcrossing to compatible relatives (Aldhous 2003; Colwell et al. 1985; Eastham and Sweet 2002; Giles 2003; Marvier A.P. Kausch and J. Hague University of Rhode Island, 530 Liberty Lane, West Kingston, RI 02892, USA e-mail: akausch@etal.uri.edu; joel.hague@gmail.com M. Oliver USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Unit, University of Missouri, Columbia. 204 Curtis Hall, Columbia, MO 65211, USA e-mail: moliver@lbk.ars.usda.gov L.S. Watrud

476

Why sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? These common marine microorganisms with the tongue-twisting name behave like fungi in the ocean ecosystem but are actually protists. Their abundance in the ocean varies with the changing seasons. They feed on non-living organic matter such as decaying algae, plants such as mangrove leaves and salt marsh grass or even animal tissues. Species that belong to the Labyrinthulomycete category all fall under a larger category of protists that also includes diatoms and brown algae. Labyrinthulomycetes help break down organic matter in the waters, and some species can also break down crude oil and tarballs. Researchers believe they also "upgrade" the quality of the debris that feed other marine organisms by adding nutrients. Long chain fatty acids produced by

477

the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Volume 8 Issue 2 1 Volume 8 Issue 2 Among the images associated with farm life is that of the cow contemplatively chewing on grass. Shown the same image, biofuels researchers have wondered how microbial communities in the cow's forestomach or rumen help break down the cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell walls to extract nutrients, and how they can harness that information to work toward commer- cial-scale biofuel production. In the January 28, 2011 issue of Science, a team of DOE JGI researchers and members of the Energy Biosciences Institute answered the latter question, reporting the discovery of nearly 30,000 novel enzymes in the microbial community of a cow rumen that can break down complex sugars such as cellulose into small sugars. The project

478

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Project Title: Routine monitoring, maintenance, general site actions, and non-routine actions at the Edgemont, SD Disposal Site Location: South Dakota Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: D Routine actions related to monitoring include annual site inspection of gates, signs, boundary monuments, site marker, fence. Transects include, grass-covered disposal cell top, riprap-covered containment dam and diversion channels, region between disposal cell and site perimeter, and the outlying area, and annual vegetation monitoring. Routine maintenance includes repairs to gates, fences, perimeter signs, and annual weed control. Non-routine activities concern the on-site grazing license and include installing a semi-permanent 1,200 gallon water tank, placing approximately 4

479

Communicating Bad News  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Robert McCullough Robert McCullough Energy Information Administration April 7, 2009 Why did the chicken cross the road? ï‚ž Curiously, this is often offered as an example of an imponderable question ï‚ž As everyone knows, chickens cross roads for many reasons: ï‚— Random walk: All chickens cross all roads if enough time has lapsed ï‚— Nutrition: The grass is always greener on the other side of the road ï‚— Competition: There are fewer chickens over there ï‚— Reproduction: The chickens across the road are potential domestic partners In 2008, WTI crude prices rose 45% and then fell by 80% Media pundits had many answers: ï‚ž India and China ï‚ž Hubbert's Peak ï‚ž Exchange rates ï‚ž Excessive speculation ï‚ž Market manipulation Fundamentals explain very little Actually, fundamentals go the

480

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 CX-006848: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Olson-Ashbrook-Schanno-Uhalde-Zoller Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 17, 2011 CX-006845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Production, Resilience, and Biodiversity of Perennial Grass Mixtures and Monocultures as Biofuel Feedstocks across Environmentally Heterogeneous Landscapes CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B5.1 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): Colman, South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office October 17, 2011 CX-006874: Categorical Exclusion Determination

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481

u.s. DEPARTl\,IENT OF ENERGY I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,IENT OF ENERGY ,IENT OF ENERGY I : .0 *. O~ I EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENfER NEPA DETERl\UNATION RECIPIENT: Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund STATE: VT PROJECT Vermont 8iofuels Initiative: University of Vermont & State Agricultural College, Oilseed Crop & Perennial TITLE: Grass Research Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number FY2009 COP DE-FG36-08G088182 GFO-G088182-022 G088182 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 63.1 Onsite and offsite site characterization and environmental monitoring, including siting, construction (or modification).

482

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

58 58 Affected Environment 4.9.1 PLANT COMMUNITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS INEEL lies within a cool desert ecosystem dom- inated by shrub-steppe vegetation. The area is relatively undisturbed, providing important habi- tat for species native to the region. Vegetation and habitat on INEEL can be grouped into six types: shrub-steppe, juniper woodlands, native grasslands, modified ephemeral playas, lava, and wetland-like areas. Figure 4-16 shows these areas. More than 90 percent of INEEL falls within the shrub-steppe vegetation type. The shrub-steppe vegetation type is dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), saltbush (Atriplex spp.), and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus spp.). Grasses found on INEEL include cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.), and

483

Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charles Charles E. Wyman 1,2 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA Welcome to "Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals." This book provides insights into thermochemical preparation of cellulosic biomass such as wood, grass, and agricultural and forestry residues for aqueous conversion to fuels and chemicals as well as economic and analysis information that is broadly applicable to a wide range of aqueous biomass opera- tions. Historically, acid catalyzed hydrolysis of biomass goes back to the early nineteenth century [1], when the emphasis was on aqueous-processing of biomass in concentrated acid or dilute acid at higher tempera- ture to break down cellulose

484

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

485

Why sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? Amanita thiersii is a white, sticky mushroom that obtains its carbon by decomposing grasses, playing a role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The fungus is commonly found in grasslands throughout the central United States and grows in grassy areas away from trees, often seen on lawns after the rain. By sequencing A. thiersii's genome, researchers hope increase the list of fungi that might provide enzymes that can be used to commercialize the production of cellulosic biofuel, which falls in with the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to develop clean energy, by potentially offering a more cost-effective method of breaking down lignocellulose in plant cell walls. Because the fungus is found in regions where the biomass is high in

486

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

SciTech Connect

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Your World Magazine - Biofuels: Energy for Your Future  

SciTech Connect

Policymakers have been talking for years about measures to cut back how much petroleum we use. Interest has spiked recently, with government and private companies coming together to push forward scientific research and development of alternative fuel products such as ethanol. Biotechnology is helping make alternative energy sources easier - and more affordable - to produce. Most of the world's energy needs are met with oil and natural gas, which come from fossil fuel. No one knows how long the supply can last. Biobased fuels come from natural sources that can be replaced quickly. Along with corn, there are many other grains, grasses, trees, and even agricultural wastes being investigated for their usefulness and environmental friendliness as alternative fuel sources. Careers in this emerging new field emphasize chemistry and engineering. Look into it for a potential career - it's definitely a job full of energy.

Biotechnology Institute

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

SALINITY AND SODICITY INTERACTIONS OF WEATHERED MINESOILS IN NORTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO AND NORTH EASTERN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect

Weathering characteristics of minesoils and rooting patterns of key shrub and grass species were evaluated at sites reclaimed for 6 to 14 years from three surface coal mine operations in northwestern New Mexico and northeastern Arizona. Non-weathered minesoils were grouped into 11 classifications based on electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Comparisons of saturated paste extracts, from non-weathered and weathered minesoils show significant (p < 0.05) reductions in SAR levels and increased EC. Weathering increased the apparent stability of saline and sodic minesoils thereby reducing concerns of aggregate slaking and clay particle dispersion. Root density of four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canascens), alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides), and Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys junceus) were nominally affected by increasing EC and SAR levels in minesoil. Results suggest that saline and sodic minesoils can be successfully reclaimed when covered with topsoil and seeded with salt tolerant plant species.